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Athletes

Sports Spine Specialist Chiropractic Team: Athletes strive to achieve their body’s maximum performance by participating in numerous training regimens consisting of strenuous exercises and physical activity and ensuring they meet all of their body’s nutritional requirements. Through proper fitness and nutrition, many individuals can condition themselves to excel in their specific sport. Our training programs are designed for athletes that look to gain a competitive edge in their sport.

We provide sport-specific services to help increase an athlete’s performance through mobility, strength, and endurance. Occasionally, however, the excess workouts can lead many to suffer injuries or develop underlying conditions. Dr. Alex Jimenez’s chronicle of articles for athletes displays in detail the many forms of complications affecting these professionals while focusing on the possible solutions and treatments to follow to achieve overall well-being.


Sticking To A Fitness Regimen: Back Clinic

Sticking To A Fitness Regimen: Back Clinic

Everybody understands that exercise is necessary for optimal physical and mental health. Beginning a workout routine can be simple, but sticking with it long-term is the challenge. Knowing how to stay motivated can be overwhelming when facing various fitness options. Understanding the benefits of exercise and identifying the most significant motivating factors will help stick to the fitness plan.

Sticking To A Fitness Regimen

Benefits of Exercise

The first step is identifying why you want to start exercising and the principal motivator/s. For most individuals exercising regularly helps:

  • Contribute to weight loss
  • Decrease risk of disease
  • Increase lifespan
  • Improve the quality of life
  • Improve mental health

Sticking to a plan tends to dissolve after a few months without serious motivation. It is recommended to focus on making the why as specific and personal as possible. The more specific the why, the less likely the individual will stray from the plan. For example, a middle-aged father wants to get and stay in shape because he wants to keep up with his kids and set a healthy example.

Starting Out

A small amount of regular exercise positively affects the body’s health. This is a common cause of burnout and is not necessary. Those who have never exercised or worked out regularly are often tempted to start with intense hours-long exercise routines.

That means that 30 minutes a day of moderate exercise/activity or 15 minutes a day of vigorous exercise/activity is the recommended amount to see and feel health benefits like improved metabolism and mental health.

  • Getting the body physically fit is a long-distance marathon, not a quick sprint.
  • Consistency is the objective.
  • Increasing the frequency and/or duration of workouts is fine, but doing it in a way where the exercise is still enjoyable and not a chore is recommended.
  • Individuals who work out too hard and need to rest for a few days risk losing motivation.

Daily Activities

Becoming more active throughout the day outside of the workout regimen is recommended to increase physical activity levels and build and reinforce healthy habits. If exercising is too strenuous for the individual, start with increasing physical daily activities. This is an effective way to ease into regular exercise. Examples of physical activities include:

Develop Healthy Habits

Developing healthy habits, physical and nutritional are the goals, which is why it is essential to find an exercise approach that doesn’t lose its appeal and continues to develop. One study found that working out with friends or joining group sports can generate greater enjoyment. There are a variety of activities that can include:

  • Structured workouts
  • HIIT
  • Yoga
  • Pilates
  • Strength training
  • Cycling
  • Running
  • Biking
  • Hiking
  • Organized sports leagues:
  • Soccer
  • Basketball
  • Softball
  • Volleyball
  • Tennis
  • Golf
  • Low-impact options:
  • Walking
  • Stretching
  • Water aerobics

What is essential is to find something that you will want to continue to do.


Personalized Training and Rehabilitation


References

Barranco-Ruiz, Yaira et al. “Dance Fitness Classes Improve the Health-Related Quality of Life in Sedentary Women.” International journal of environmental research and public health vol. 17,11 3771. 26 May. 2020, doi:10.3390/ijerph17113771

Dalle Grave, Riccardo. “Nutrition and Fitness: Mental Health.” Nutrients vol. 12,6 1804. 17 Jun. 2020, doi:10.3390/nu12061804

Higgins, John P. “Smartphone Applications for Patients’ Health and Fitness.” The American journal of medicine vol. 129,1 (2016): 11-9. doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2015.05.038

Yang, Yun Jun. “An Overview of Current Physical Activity Recommendations in Primary Care.” Korean journal of family medicine vol. 40,3 (2019): 135-142. doi:10.4082/kjfm.19.0038

Knee Discomfort and Pain Chiropractic Clinic

Knee Discomfort and Pain Chiropractic Clinic

Many live with chronic discomfort and pain regularly in one or both knees. This could be from past injuries, being overweight, lack of physical conditioning, degeneration, or arthritis. Many take prescription or over-the-counter pain medication to deal with the discomfort. Pain medications only dull and mask the pain and discomfort associated with the symptoms. As a result, living with masked knee pain can worsen the condition, and the surrounding bones, joints, and tissues can begin to deteriorate. Chiropractic combined with massage, decompression, and traction therapy can significantly reduce or eliminate knee pain.

Knee Discomfort and Pain Chiropractor

Knee Discomfort and Pain

The knee’s joint and ligaments need to be strong and healthy to support activities. The most common issues that individuals develop include:

Acute Injuries

  • Knee injuries can be caused by auto accidents, physical strain, playing sports, work accidents, workplace ergonomics, and walking up and down stairs.
  • The most common acute knee injuries include:
  • Knee contusions.
  • Ligament sprain.
  • Muscle strains.
  • Puncture injuries.

Chronic Injuries

  • Chronic or inflammatory medical conditions can wear down the cartilage cushion between the upper and lower leg bones.
  • Most common include gout, septic arthritis, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Unhealthy postures and obesity can also contribute to the chronic degradation of the knee joint.

Knee discomfort and pain can present in various ways. Some might hear an acute popping in the knee followed by swelling. Others might notice the gradual development of stiffness and weakness over time. When injured or compromised, localized pain is one of the first indicators. Chronic knee and joint pain can lead to weakness, nerve damage, or create new injuries/problems. Not all knee pain is caused by injury; in many cases, a triggering incident, like an awkward step or misstep, a stretch that went too far, or a walk, can create an injury. Even a sedentary lifestyle can contribute to knee degeneration as the surrounding muscles can lose strength, placing unnecessary strain on the joints when movement is necessary.

Chiropractic

A chiropractor will examine the knee through a series of analyses, including x-rays, digital imaging, and a physical exam. The chiropractor will develop a personalized treatment plan to treat, rehabilitate, and strengthen the knee. The treatment can include:

  • Physical therapy
  • Trigger point therapy
  • Myofascial release
  • Massage therapy
  • Hip manipulation
  • Knee manipulation
  • Posture correction to distribute body weight evenly, lessening the stress on an affected knee.
  • Targeted exercises and nutritional recommendations will ensure long-term healing.

Q Angle of the Knee


References

Cimino, Francesca, et al. “Anterior cruciate ligament injury: diagnosis, management, and prevention.” American family physician vol. 82,8 (2010): 917-22.

Donnell-Fink, Laurel A et al. “Effectiveness of Knee Injury and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear Prevention Programs: A Meta-Analysis.” PloS one vol. 10,12 e0144063. 4 Dec. 2015, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0144063

Hoskins, Wayne, et al. “Chiropractic treatment of lower extremity conditions: a literature review.” Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics vol. 29,8 (2006): 658-71. doi:10.1016/j.jmpt.2006.08.004

Neogi, Tuhina, et al. “Sensitivity and sensitization in relation to pain severity in knee osteoarthritis: trait or state?.” Annals of the rheumatic diseases vol. 74,4 (2015): 682-8. doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-204191

A Look Into Pilates For Back Pain

A Look Into Pilates For Back Pain

Introduction

Many people worldwide know that exercising has impressive benefits that help improve the body’s overall wellness. The body has different muscle groups that have a casual relationship with the vital organs inside the body. Organs like the heart, lungs, gut, and bladder correlate with the different muscles through the nerve roots that connect them. When the body suffers from various factors that affect it, it causes referred pain to the body where one pain is at one location but radiates from the other side. Exercising can help the body recover through physical rehabilitation by reducing inflammation and scarring on the muscle tissues. One of the many exercises that helps strengthen the muscles, increase flexibility, and even improve posture is Pilates. Today’s article looks at Pilates, its benefits, and how it can help alleviate back pain. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to help many individuals with low back pain issues affecting their bodies. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

Axiom-JapanStudy

What Is Pilates?

 

Have you been feeling sluggish or having low energy throughout the entire day? What about experiencing pain in your lower back? Have you experienced muscle stiffness in certain areas around your body? Many of these symptoms are associated with musculoskeletal issues that correlate with different factors that affect the body; why not try an exercise regime like Pilates? Pilates is a system of exercises that uses a particular machine or body to improve a person’s physical strength and posture while increasing the body’s flexibility and enhancing mental awareness. Joseph Pilates developed Pilates in the early 20th century as an exercise program to help World War I soldiers improve their physical fitness levels. Pilates was used as rehabilitation therapy for injured individuals by incorporating resistance, stretching, and target muscle strengthening. Pilates is now utilized for all individuals with different bodies and fitness levels and can provide tremendous benefits. 

 

What Are The Benefits?

Pilates, like any other form of exercise, has many beneficial properties that help improve a person’s health and wellness. Studies reveal that Pilates helps many individuals, including older adults, by improving their posture by decreasing thoracic flexion while increasing lumbar extension for pain relief. Some of the beneficial properties that Pilates offer to the body include:

  • Increasing core strength: The deep muscles in the abdomen, back, and pelvic regions become stronger and help stabilize the body more.
  • Strengthen muscle groups: Pilates helps make the muscles not only strong but also helps stretch them so that they can look long and lean. This makes the individual look toned.
  • It’s a whole body workout: As many exercises work on specific body parts, Pilates focuses on each muscle part of the body and helps muscle development.
  • Posture Improvement: Pilates help keep the spine aligned while strengthening the body and core. Over time a person’s posture will improve naturally, making them stand taller, stronger, and even more graceful.
  • Increases energy: Like all exercises, Pilates will give a person the energy boost they need. This is due to the focused breathing and increased blood circulation that stimulates the muscles and the spine.

 


Pilates Exercises For Back Pain-Video

Are you looking for a new exercise to tone your muscles? Have you been dealing with pain in your lower back? Do you have muscle weakness in some regions of your body? If you have been experiencing pain-related issues, why not try Pilates? The video above goes through a 10-minute Pilates workout for back pain. Studies reveal that non-specific low back pain is a highly prevalent condition many individuals associate with disability and work absence worldwide. Many environmental factors affect many individuals, causing them to suffer back issues. Pilates can help encourage many individuals to regain their health and wellness by incorporating core strength and stability while improving their posture.


Pilates Alleviate Back Pain

 

Many people don’t realize that some low back pain symptoms are related to poor posture. Poor posture can lead to associated symptoms of headaches, back pain, improper balance, and pelvic issues. What Pilates does is that it creates body awareness and helps improve the lower back muscles by strengthening them and relaxing the stiff muscles. Studies reveal that incorporating Pilates as physical therapy for individuals suffering from low back pain can help address the mental and physical pain aspects with core strengthening, flexibility, and relaxing the tense muscles. Many individuals should never put off exercising when it comes to back pain. Incorporating an exercise routine can benefit the body and prevent future injuries.

 

Conclusion

An exercise regime can provide many beneficial results for those looking for ways to be healthy, those suffering from injuries, or those who want to add something else to their workout routine. Pilates is one of those exercises that incorporates resistance, stretching, and muscle targeting as it is a full-body workout. Pilates is used in rehabilitation therapy for injured individuals and can provide tremendous benefits. Pilates can help many individuals with back issues associated with environmental factors like poor posture. Many individuals that utilize Pilates as part of their exercise regime will begin to feel stronger and healthier as their backs will thank them.

 

References

Baker, Sara. “Pilates Exercise for a Healthy Spine – Spineuniverse.” Spineuniverse, 28 Dec. 2019, www.spineuniverse.com/wellness/exercise/pilates-exercise-healthy-spine.

Kuo, Yi-Liang, et al. “Sagittal Spinal Posture after Pilates-Based Exercise in Healthy Older Adults.” Spine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 May 2009, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19404180/.

Sorosky, Susan, et al. “Yoga and Pilates in the Management of Low Back Pain.” Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine, Humana Press Inc, Mar. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2684152/.

Yamato, Tiê P, et al. “Pilates for Low Back Pain.” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2 July 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8078578/.

Disclaimer

The Beneficial Properties Of Yoga For The Body

The Beneficial Properties Of Yoga For The Body

Introduction

When many individuals look for ways to relax after a stressful event in their daily lives, many people have an exercise regime that allows them to take their minds off of their hectic lives. When finding the proper exercise, it is best to consider that everybody is different and has different fitness levels. Many individuals could be dealing with chronic issues that affect them drastically and with so much pain in their bodies. When these chronic issues overlap with muscle and joint pain, it can make the body dysfunctional while potentially being involved in environmental factors. Yoga is a low-impact exercise that helps tone muscles, relax tension in the body, and focus on deep breathing. Today’s article looks at the benefits of yoga for the body, how chiropractic care works together with yoga, and different yoga poses can help manage various chronic issues. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to help many individuals with musculoskeletal problems affecting their bodies. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

SpineMed

The Benefits of Yoga For The Body

Have you been dealing with chronic stress affecting your quality of life? Have you been dealing with bladder or gut issues constantly? What about feeling muscle stiffness in your back, neck, shoulders, or pelvic regions? Some of these symptoms are signs that you could risk developing musculoskeletal problems associated with pain. Dealing with musculoskeletal issues related to pain can make a person feel miserable and have stress affecting their bodies. Yoga is a low-impact exercise that doesn’t put pressure on the joints and will provide a full-body workout through strengthening and stretching weak muscles. Yoga has many benefits for many individuals that are dealing with the following:

  • Muscle weakness
  • Back pain
  • Neck pain
  • Pelvic Pain
  • Arthritic symptoms
  • Cardiovascular issues
  • Chronic stress

Studies reveal that environmental factors are involved in non-specified chronic pain in the spine, overlapping musculoskeletal disorders causing many individuals to try to find relief. Many individuals incorporate yoga because it is a safe and effective way to alleviate various forms of back, neck, or pelvic pain causing issues to the body. Yoga utilizes gentle stretching and strengthening of weak, injured muscles while increasing blood circulation to promote healing in the body. 

 

Chiropractic Care & Yoga

When people are dealing with health conditions or injuries that have affected their bodies, it can make them feel frustrated and think their injuries are taking forever to heal. Many individuals don’t realize that incorporating yoga practices provides impressive health benefits while mirroring the similar foundations of chiropractic care. Both chiropractic care and yoga provide many beneficial results to an aching body that needs a good stretch and ready the body to heal itself naturally. Chiropractic care includes spinal manipulation to the spinal joints while reducing inflammation and strengthening weak muscles. Yoga allows the body to increase its flexibility and stamina, reduces stress and blood pressure, and provides a better sense of breathing and balance.


Yoga For Chronic Pain-Video

Have you felt muscle stiffness in your neck, back, or body? Have you felt sluggish or overly stressed from your day-to-day lives? Do you want to improve your balance? If you have been experiencing these issues affecting your quality of life, why not incorporate yoga as part of your exercise regime? The video above shows that yoga poses for chronic pain affect the body, including the neck, back, and pelvic regions. Studies reveal that yoga can help relieve intense neck pain while improving pain-related function disability. Yoga allows the muscles to not only relax but strengthen them as well. Yoga can also help improve the body’s range of motion through deep breathing and give more awareness of how the body holds tension in places a person hasn’t realized they were holding onto.


Yoga Poses For Different Issues

When a person does yoga, they will go through various poses and repeat them constantly as their body begins to get used to the movements. This allows the body to challenge itself and helps the individual focus more on deep breathing. A good example would be an individual taking a yoga class due to experiencing pelvic pain. By going through each yoga pose, many individuals suffering from pelvic pain will reduce the pain intensity while improving their quality of life. Below are some yoga poses that anyone can do to reduce pain associated with their back, neck, or pelvis.

Bridge Pose

  • Lie on your back
  • Bend both knees while placing the feet on the floor at hip-width apart
  • Arm on the sides with palms facing down
  • Press feet to the floor and lift the hips as you inhale
  • Engage the legs and buttock 
  • Hold 4-8 breaths and exhale to lower the hips back to the ground slowly

 

Cobra Pose

  • Lie on your stomach with hands near the chest just under the shoulders and fingers facing forward
  • Keep elbows close to sides
  • Press hands on the floor and slowly lift your head, chest, and shoulders while slightly bending the elbows by inhaling
  • Exhale to go back down slow and rest your head

 

Cat-Cow

  • Be on all fours, hands under the shoulders and knees under hips (Think like a table)
  • Inhale to lower your core to the floor as your head looks up to the sky
  • Exhale slowly to lower your chin to the chest as you round your back
  • Continue fluid motion for a minute

 

Forward Bend

  • Be in a standing position, and feet are at a hip distance apart
  • Lengthen the body as you lean forward while keeping the knees slightly bended
  • Place hands on either legs, yoga block, or the floor (Whichever makes you comfortable)
  • Tuck the chin into the chest, letting the neck and head relax
  • Gently rock your head side to side to relieve tension in the neck and shoulders
  • Slowly roll up to a standing position allowing the arms and head to be the last to rise

 

Supine Spinal Twist

  • Lie on your back while your knees bent and feet flat on the floor
  • Extend arms out of the side and place palms down on the floor
  • As you inhale, breathe into the gut and lower limbs
  • Exhale to lower knees on the left side (Look at the opposite way to slowly stretch the neck and shoulder muscles)
  • Pay attention to the stretches for 5 breathes as well as the lengthening sensations on the ribs
  • Return the knees to the middle and repeat on the right side

 

Child’s Pose

  • Sit back on the heels with the knees together (For added support, you can use a rolled-up blanket under your knees)
  • Bend forward and walk hands in front of you
  • Gently rest your forehead on the floor
  • Keep arms extended in the front while focusing on relieving tension in the back as the upper body falls to the knees
  • Stay in that pose for 5 minutes

 

Conclusion

Incorporating yoga as part of an exercise regime allows the individual to focus on deep breathing while calming the mind. Yoga is a low-impact exercise that helps strengthen weak muscles associated with pain and inflammation. Yoga provides a full-body workout that benefits many people dealing with chronic pain. Utilizing yoga as part of a daily practice might help individuals learn to be calm and practice mindfulness.

 

References

Busch, Fred. “Healing Benefits of Yoga.” Spine, Spine-Health, 27 Jan. 2004, www.spine-health.com/wellness/yoga-pilates-tai-chi/healing-benefits-yoga.

Crow, Edith Meszaros, et al. “Effectiveness of Iyengar Yoga in Treating Spinal (Back and Neck) Pain: A Systematic Review.” International Journal of Yoga, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, Jan. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4278133/.

Li, Yunxia, et al. “Effects of Yoga on Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Prisma Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” Medicine, Wolters Kluwer Health, Feb. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407933/.

Saxena, Rahul, et al. “Effects of Yogic Intervention on Pain Scores and Quality of Life in Females with Chronic Pelvic Pain.” International Journal of Yoga, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5225749/.

Disclaimer

Children’s Postural Health Back Clinic

Children’s Postural Health Back Clinic

Practicing improper/unhealthy postures throughout the day can severely fatigue the mind and body. Children’s postural health is vital to their overall health and energy levels to perform tasks, school work, and play. An unhealthy posture causes the body to lose its ability to dissipate forces evenly and correctly. Symptoms like soreness, pain, tightness, and irritability can begin to present, which is the body’s way of letting the individual know something is off. When the body is in proper alignment, the spine disperses body weight correctly and efficiently. Chiropractic adjustments can effectively counter the unhealthy posture effects, and simple postural exercises can strengthen the body, increasing healthy posture habits.

Children's Postural Health Chiropractor

Children’s Posture Health

Healthy posture is more than simply sitting and standing up straight. It is how the body is positioned, meaning the head, spine, and shoulders, and how it moves unconsciously like a walking gait. An uneven gait or awkward body position can indicate a problem and cause long-term consequences to a child’s health.

Challenges

Kids and children are constantly hunched, slumped, and slouched over device screens. This constant awkward positioning adds weight to the spine, increasing the pressure, which can cause issues ranging from headaches, mild neck pain, low back pain, and sciatica. Severe health effects from poor posture include:

  • Shoulder problems.
  • Chronic pain.
  • Nerve damage.
  • Difficulty breathing from prolonged hunching-over.
  • Spinal joint degeneration.
  • Vertebral compression fractures.

Poor alignment of the muscles begins to restrict postural muscles from relaxing correctly, making the muscles stay stretched or slightly flexed, causing strain and pain. As a child’s body grows, practicing unhealthy postures can drive continued awkward positioning, abnormal spine growth, and an increased risk for arthritis later in life.

Chiropractic Adjustments

A chiropractor will check for any imbalances, like a hunched back, one shoulder higher than the other, or a pelvic tilt/shift. Through a series of adjustments, chiropractic releases the muscles, relieves pressure on ligaments, allows the postural muscles to relax and realign to their proper position, prevents further muscle overuse, strain, abnormal joint wear, and helps reduce fatigue by conserving/utilizing energy as the muscles are functioning correctly and efficiently.

Exercises

Simple postural exercises can help maintain children’s postural health.

Triangle Stretch

  • Standing, spread the legs into an A shape shoulder-width apart.
  • Bend and stretch to one side.
  • Raise the opposite arm of the side, bending straight above the head, so the bicep touches the ear.

Arm Circles

  • Raise the arms above the head.
  • Elbows bent at 90 degrees.
  • Make small circles forward and backward ten times.

Cobra Pose

  • Lay flat on the floor.
  • Place hands next to the chest so that they are underneath the shoulders.
  • Gently press the chest upward.
  • Keeping the legs on the ground.
  • Look straight ahead.

They only take a few minutes, but the objective is consistency. Doing the poses for one week won’t immediately change unhealthy posture habits. It is developing consistent healthy postural habits that generate improvement. They should be done at least three times weekly to build strength and endurance.


Kids and Chiropractic


References

Achar, Suraj, and Jarrod Yamanaka. “Back Pain in Children and Adolescents.” American family physician vol. 102,1 (2020): 19-28.

Baroni, Marina Pegoraro, et al. “Factors associated with scoliosis in schoolchildren: a cross-sectional population-based study.” Journal of epidemiology vol. 25,3 (2015): 212-20. doi:10.2188/jea.JE20140061

da Rosa, Bruna Nichele et al. “Back Pain and Body Posture Evaluation Instrument for Children and Adolescents (BackPEI-CA): Expansion, Content Validation, and Reliability.” International journal of environmental research and public health vol. 19,3 1398. 27 Jan. 2022, doi:10.3390/ijerph19031398

King, H A. “Back pain in children.” Pediatric clinics of North America vol. 31,5 (1984): 1083-95. doi:10.1016/s0031-3955(16)34685-5

Wrestling Injuries Chiropractic Team

Wrestling Injuries Chiropractic Team

Wrestling is a sport that requires speed, strength, and endurance that involves intense physical contact, pushing and pulling the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints to their limits. Wrestlers’ are constantly contorting their bodies. Pushing the body to its limits increases the risk of developing wrestling injuries that include:

Wrestling Injuries Chiropractor

Wrestling Injuries

The most common injuries usually occur from forceful contact or twisting forces. And if a wrestler has been injured, there is an increase for re-injury. Wrestling tournaments typically take place over days, often with back-to-back matches, which significantly fatigues the body and increases injury risk. The most common wrestling injuries include:

  • Muscle strains of the lower extremities and/or the back.
  • Chronic problems can result from hours in the forward stance posture and repetitive motions.
  • Trigger points.
  • Neck injuries.
  • Ligament knee injuries – Meniscus and MCL tears.
  • Pre-patellar bursitis/Osgood Schlatter’s syndrome from consistently hitting the mat.
  • Ankle injuries.
  • Hand and finger dislocations and fractures.
  • Dislocations and sprains of the elbow or shoulder from take-downs.
  • Cauliflower ear – is a condition that can cause ear deformity and develops from friction or blunt trauma to the ears.
  • Skin infections occur from constant contact, sweating, bleeding, and rolling on the mats. Infections include herpes gladitorium, impetigo, folliculitis, abscesses, and tinea/ringworm.
  • Concussions are usually caused by hard falls/slams or violent collisions with the other wrestler.

Injuries can cause wrestlers to alter/change their technique, exacerbating the existing damage and potentially creating new injuries.

Chiropractic Rehabilitation and Strengthening

There can be a variety of pain generators/causes when it comes to wrestling injuries. Joints and muscles can get overstretched, muscles can spasm, and nerves can become compressed and/or irritated. For example, a neck muscle spasm could be caused by nerve irritation from a shifted vertebrae. To determine the specific cause or causes of the injury/pain, a detailed chiropractic examination will be performed that includes:

  • Range of motion testing
  • Ligament tests
  • Muscle palpation
  • Gait testing

Injuries often relate to the proper weight, neuromuscular control, core strength, proper technique, hygiene, and hydration management. Successful treatment depends on identifying the root cause of the wrestling injury. Chiropractic restores proper alignment through massage, specific manual adjustments, decompression, and traction therapies. Adjustments can include the back, neck, shoulder, hips, elbows, knees, and feet. Once correct body alignment is achieved, rehabilitative exercises and stretches are implemented to correct and strengthen muscle function. We work with a network of regional medical doctors specializing in referral situations and strive to return the athlete to their sport as soon as possible.


Wrestling Match


References

Boden, Barry P, and Christopher G Jarvis. “Spinal injuries in sports.” Neurologic clinics vol. 26,1 (2008): 63-78; viii. doi:10.1016/j.ncl.2007.12.005

Halloran, Laurel. “Wrestling injuries.” Orthopedic nursing vol. 27,3 (2008): 189-92; quiz 193-4. doi:10.1097/01.NOR.0000320548.20611.16

Hewett, Timothy E et al. “Wrestling injuries.” Medicine and sport science vol. 48 (2005): 152-178. doi:10.1159/000084288

Mentes, Janet C, and Phyllis M Gaspar. “Hydration Management.” Journal of gerontological nursing vol. 46,2 (2020): 19-30. doi:10.3928/00989134-20200108-03

Wilson, Eugene K et al. “Cutaneous infections in wrestlers.” Sports health vol. 5,5 (2013): 423-37. doi:10.1177/1941738113481179

Cheerleading Conditioning Chiropractic Clinic

Cheerleading Conditioning Chiropractic Clinic

Cheerleading and the physically intensive gymnastics and acrobatics put participants’ body’s/musculoskeletal systems at an increased risk of injury. A wrong move or falling at the wrong angle can cause permanent damage. Cheerleaders must follow a balanced diet and maintain physical fitness, strength, endurance, and flexibility to be successful cheerleaders. Cheerleading conditioning builds the musculature and spinal strength to decrease the risk and prevent injury.

Cheerleading Conditioning Chiropractor

Cheerleading Conditioning

Cheerleaders must have a solid musculoskeletal system to ensure their safety and the safety of their squads. Workouts include cardio, strength training, and flexibility exercises.

Warming Up

  • Before any workout, the muscles need to be warmed up.
  • Spend five minutes jumping rope, running in place, jogging on a treadmill, or doing any mild activity to raise the heart rate.
  • After the muscles are warmed up, stretch all major muscle groups.

Cardio

Strength Training

Performing partner lifts, pyramids, and basket tosses calls for strong muscles.

  • Focus on the shoulders, arms, back, core, and legs.
  • Strength training workouts can be done with exercise equipment or body weight.
  • Bodyweight workouts include pushups, situps, partner leg lifts, squats, and lunges.
  • Perform 10 to 12 repetitions each, working up to 75 – 100 reps.

Flexibility

  • Cheerleading conditioning focuses on the hamstrings, quads, glutes, abdominals, chest, shoulders, back, and pectorals.
  • Yoga, Pilates, or regular stretching at home will increase flexibility.
  • Incorporate stretches that focus on the major muscle groups.
  • Stretch at the end of the workout.

Balance Training

Balance is essential.

  • This is where yoga can improve balance.
  • Try tree pose by standing on the right foot, and the left leg bent on the right knee.
  • The left thigh should be parallel to the ground.
  • Raise arms overhead and make a V motion keeping the abdominal muscles pulled in tight.
  • Balance for up to one minute.
  • Switch to the other foot.
  • Once balance is mastered on the ground, try balancing on a cushion to add instability.
  • Repeat three to five times on each foot.

Common Injuries

Common injuries include:

  • Hand and finger injuries.
  • Ligament sprains in the knees and ankles.
  • Muscle strains in the hip, low back, and legs.

Overuse injuries

  • Cheerleading is becoming a year-round sport.
  • Starting with tryouts during spring.
  • Teams may hold or go to organized summer cheerleading camps to learn new skills, improve skill sets, and create routines for competition.
  • Continuous training and competitions increase the chance of overuse injuries.
  • The wrists, elbows, knees, and ankles can be injured by repetitive stress.

More severe injuries are:

  • The repetitive tumbling places significant pressure on the spine and can cause stress fractures.
  • Dislocation of the shoulder or elbow.

Injury Causes

  • Lack of arm and shoulder, foot, and ankle strength.
  • Little to no core and abdominal strength.
  • Flexibility problems.
  • Improper conditioning.
  • Unhealthy diet.
  • Performing skills that are advanced for the cheerleader’s current level.

Chiropractic Enhancement

Chiropractic care can treat injuries and strengthen the body’s musculoskeletal system to prevent injuries. Chiropractic’s goal is optimal body performance by redistributing blood circulation, nerve energy flow, correct muscle positioning, and skeletal alignment. Many cheerleading teams are incorporating chiropractic. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic also specializes in sports medicine rehabilitation, strength training, nutrition, and health coaching.


Cheerleading Strength Training Workout


References

Boden, Barry P, and Christopher G Jarvis. “Spinal injuries in sports.” Neurologic clinics vol. 26,1 (2008): 63-78; viii. doi:10.1016/j.ncl.2007.12.005

Miners, Andrew L. “Chiropractic treatment and the enhancement of sport performance: a narrative literature review.” The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association vol. 54,4 (2010): 210-21.

Mueller, Frederick O. “Cheerleading injuries and safety.” Journal of athletic training vol. 44,6 (2009): 565-6. doi:10.4085/1062-6050-44.6.565

Pang, Yanbin, et al. “Premature exhaustion of mesenchymal stromal cells from myelodysplastic syndrome patients.” American journal of translational research vol. 9,7 3462-3468. 15 Jul. 2017

Wan, Jing-Jing, et al. “Muscle fatigue: general understanding and treatment.” Experimental & molecular medicine vol. 49,10 e384. 6 Oct. 2017, doi:10.1038/emm.2017.194

Dancing For Your Health & Wellness

Dancing For Your Health & Wellness

Introduction

Everyone is trying to find what exercise works for them as they start looking for ways to improve their health and wellness. Many individuals who begin to work out would go with finding a personal trainer or a gym that helps incorporate muscle strength training and cardio training to improve their heart and lung capacity to make the body feel good while strengthening their muscles. One of the unique forms of exercise that involve both the heart and muscles is dancing. Dancing is a great way to not only improve musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health but can help reduce overlapping conditions that a person is dealing with in their bodies. Today’s article looks at how dancing helps with musculoskeletal health, affects the heart and brain, and how chiropractic care goes hand in hand with dancing. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal and cardiovascular therapies to help those with heart and muscle issues. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

03 Minich Nutrition in CVD

 

Dancing For Musculoskeletal Health

 

Have you ever noticed people take a cardio class with music playing in the background and see them happy afterward? How do athletes incorporate cardio into their exercise regime to improve their mobility and flexibility? Or how do particular video games make you get up and move around? All these scenarios imply that cardio exercises like dancing may help improve musculoskeletal function. Dancing is one of the many aerobic exercises that can help improve a person’s social skills and is something that can be taken up early while providing many beneficial qualities like:

  • Increase strength
  • Improve gait and balance
  • Reduce functional loss
  • Reducing the risk of falls
  • Rehabilitating musculoskeletal injuries
  • Stabilize core muscles

For the musculoskeletal system, dance would be considered an isometric exercise involving different muscle groups like the hips, shoulders, back, and abdominals without using the joints. When a person is dancing, each of the various movements is related to strengthening the core muscles by working thoroughly with the abdominals. Dance can even help improve posture by maintaining strength and enhancing stability in the body. Studies reveal that dance’s impact on individuals with chronic issues like Parkinson’s disease associated with motor and non-motor symptoms can increase their quality of life. So what does that mean? It means that dancing, even for just one song, can help with movement and foster balance, flexibility, and muscle endurance through repeated tasks while associating with accessible, social, and attractive aspects of a person’s physical abilities.

 

How Does Dancing Affect The Heart and Brain?

Dancing not only helps with musculoskeletal issues, but it can help improve brain and heart function in the body. Studies reveal that moderate-intensity dancing was inversely associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease mortality. What dancing does to the heart is that it makes the body intake more oxygen to the lungs, which relates to the heart beating faster and circulating the blood to be transported throughout the entire body. But how does dancing correlate to brain health? Let’s look at dance fitness classes, like Zumba, and use it as an example. Studies show that dance fitness classes provide several health benefits that could reduce mood disorders like depression and anxiety while improving cognitive skills. This means that dance fitness classes like Zumba do repetitive movements to the beat of the music that engages the individual to repeat the steps while having fun. When the muscles begin to do repetitive movements, this motor function sends the signal to the brain, making the person remember the movements later, known as muscle memory. When an individual suffers from neurological disorders like dementia or Alzheimers, dancing could potentially be involved with music therapy, allowing the individual to reduce the risk of developing neurological disorders from progressing further.


How Does The Body React To Dancing?-Video

Have you felt terrific after listening to a good song? How about feeling like you just had a workout? Or have you noticed certain areas in your body like your abdominals, legs, and back looked more toned? All these are beneficial signs that you should add dancing to your regime. The video explains what happens to the body when people are dancing. Dancing could potentially be a mediator for many athletes that play sports.

 

 

An example would be football and ballet. How do football and ballet relate to each other? Football utilizes efficient and precise movements that benefit every position on the field, while ballet requires speed to make them flawless on stage. Combining the two, many football players will increase their speed and agility associated with ballet to avoid tackles, jump higher, catch passes and avoid injuries on the field. Dancing is an excellent way to get some cardio exercises in, and combined with other treatments can make a difference in a person.


Chiropractic Care & Dancing

 

Like all athletic individuals, professional dancers utilize various treatments to recover and improve their performance. Treatments like chiropractic care are safe, effective, and widely used by young and professional athletes that want to prevent injuries from progressing. Chiropractic care for professional athletes and the general population can help prevent and treat injuries like back and neck pain or aggravating conditions like sciatica through spinal manipulation. Chiropractic care also helps restore an individual’s original well-being while increasing their strength, flexibility, and mobility. By working with an experienced chiropractor, an individual can regain their stamina by adopting new ways to prevent injuries caused by spinal complications from reoccurring in the body.

 

Conclusion

Dancing for 30 minutes to an hour can be used as part of an exercise regime and could potentially reduce chronic issues that affect the body’s brain, heart, and muscles. Dancing could also enhance a sports athlete’s performance by increasing their agility, endurance, and performance. Combined with chiropractic care, individuals will begin to see improvements in their range of motion, flexibility, and even an increase in their brain function to dance longer and improve their health and wellness. So whether you are a professional or not, dancing is for everyone.

 

Reference

Barranco-Ruiz, Yaira, et al. “Dance Fitness Classes Improve the Health-Related Quality of Life in Sedentary Women.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, MDPI, 26 May 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7312518/.

Ferchak, Dawn. “Belly Dance Your Back Pain Away – Spineuniverse.” Spine Universe, 14 Oct. 2020, www.spineuniverse.com/wellness/exercise/belly-dance-back-pain.

Gyrling, Therese, et al. “The Impact of Dance Activities on the Health of Persons with Parkinson’s Disease in Sweden.” International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being, Taylor & Francis, Dec. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8547839/.

Merom, Dafna, et al. “Dancing Participation and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: A Pooled Analysis of 11 Population-Based British Cohorts.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2016, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26944521/.

Disclaimer

Swimming Might Improve Your Musculoskeletal System

Swimming Might Improve Your Musculoskeletal System

Introduction

When the weather becomes hot, and everyone begins to plan fun activities to enjoy, one of the many activities that come to mind is hanging out in the pool. Swimming is an excellent way to combat the summer heat, but it can provide much more for the body. For athletes, it provides another form of cardio exercise to improve their quality performance when they are competing. While for individuals looking for an affordable exercise regime or just some fun activity to do, swimming can become a form of therapy and be beneficial for them if they were previously injured. Today’s article looks at how swimming causes an impact on the musculoskeletal system, its beneficial properties to the heart, and how aqua therapy combined with chiropractic care helps optimize full-body health. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments and hydrotherapy to help those with musculoskeletal disorders. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

09 Sinatra CHF & Metabolic Cardiology

Swimming & Its Impact On The Musculoskeletal System

Water exercises or swimming can benefit those looking for different cardio exercises to build muscle endurance or have a clear sense of mind. Swimming is fantastic for all body sizes, and when it is done correctly, it can be highly recognized as a form of rehabilitation and injury recovery known as aquatic therapyResearch studies reveal that aquatic treatments and exercises can significantly reduce pain in individuals that suffer from low back pain while increasing physical function. Some of the impacts that swimming/aquatic therapy provides on the musculoskeletal system include:

  • Builds muscle strength
  • Improves endurance
  • Stabilizes joints
  • Improves poor posture

Swimming/ hydrotherapy is an excellent low-impact exercise that is easy on the back and spine, especially for individuals suffering from low back pain or spinal misalignments. Studies reveal that the efficacy of aquatic activities helps strengthen the abdominals and legs and stretch the back while managing musculoskeletal issues. 

 

When individuals suffer from back pain associated with chronic issues can become concerning for the vital organs that have a causal relationship with the muscle as they are affected as well. When spinal joints and muscles begin to suffer from abnormal weight increases, the muscles and ligaments become misaligned. Misalignment or subluxation is defined as spinal vertebrates that are out of place and cause pressure on the surrounding nerves exiting the spinal cord. These spinal issues then become a risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders in the body. Unlike many aerobic exercises like running or cycling that may be hard on the spine, swimming has little to no impact on the spinal structures. So when individuals begin to take up swimming, they realize that the water buoyancy helps support their body weight while relieving stress on all joints and decompressing the spine. This gives the individual a greater range of motion, while the water gives off a sense of purification as it helps the body relax. Hence, hydrotherapy helps relax people who suffer from obesity or muscle injuries associated with muscle and joint pain as the water provides gentle resistance while relaxing the muscles to promote longer exercise sessions.

 

The Benefits Of Swimming For The Heart

 

Swimming or any form of water aerobics is not only beneficial to the musculoskeletal system but can help improve cardiac function in the heart and even the lungs. Studies reveal that swimming is an effective option for maintaining and enhancing cardiovascular fitness. Some of the benefits swimming provides for the cardiovascular system include:

  • Lowers blood pressure
  • Improve circulation
  • Reduces heart rate

But how does swimming improve cardiovascular function in the body? Individuals submerge themselves underwater; they hold their breath until the air is needed. Being submerged underwater may help lung capacity while gaining control of how a person breathes. Breathing exercises associated with aqua therapy help promote stronger lungs and heart while increasing their capacity for blood and airflow to the heart and lungs. Say, for example, a person is having trouble breathing due to restrictive blood and air flow associated with cardiopulmonary issues, which potentially be involved in experiencing an asthma attack associated with obesity.


The Benefits Of Swimming-Video

Have you wanted to try a different form of cardio exercise? Have you been experiencing a limited range of motion in your arms, shoulders, back, and neck? Do you feel tightness across your chest? The video above gives an overview explanation of the health benefits of swimming. Swimming or aquatic therapy allows the individual experiencing chronic pain issues to do cardio activities without increasing or worsening pain, which is very therapeutic for the body. Many people are either training for an athletic event or finding a leisure activity that will benefit them in the long run. Swimming is considered an important factor in a person’s quality of life as it helps them become motivated to make small changes to better their health. Additionally, regular cardiovascular exercises/activities like swimming benefit pain reduction in a therapeutic sense. When individuals are trying to figure out and determine the proper training or therapy that can help alleviate their specific ailments, their goal is to see how those exercises should be done in a certain amount of time without causing fatigue or increased pain as the primary objective.


Aqua Therapy & Chiropractic Care

When looking for the proper exercise regime or treatment for pain issues, it can be challenging to see what works and doesn’t. For those with musculoskeletal disorders related to chronic issues, aqua therapy and chiropractic care go hand in hand in alleviating pain. Aqua therapy exercises can range from simple routines in shallow waters to high-tech equipment like underwater treadmills for muscle conditioning. Active water therapy exercises that are diverse in relieving musculoskeletal pain should be tailored to the person and the specific conditions that are ailing them.

 

But how does chiropractic care work hand in hand with aqua therapy? Well, chiropractic care and exercise have a casual relationship when it comes to treating musculoskeletal disorders. Many individuals do suffer from spinal misalignment, which becomes a risk of developing musculoskeletal issues that cause discomfort. Since many individuals associate chiropractic care with back issues, the reality shows that chiropractic care not only helps with back issues but various issues that affect the muscles, joints, and organs related to each other. An example would be an individual with low back problems who cannot do any activities for long periods while triggering gut issues. This is defined as somato-visceral pain where affected muscles associated with internal organs trigger pain. So for a chiropractor to adjust an individual dealing with back pain associated with gut or heart issues can slowly restore the person’s natural alignment by reducing the irritated nerve roots between the vertebrae and strengthening the surrounding muscles and tissues. Afterward, a chiropractor may recommend exercises like aquatic therapy to speed up the rehabilitation process, as studies reveal that physical activities are perceived to have a positive impact on health while being associated with perceived symptom reductions in musculoskeletal and injuries, as well as cardiovascular and blood conditions. Once a chiropractic regimen and exercise routine are in place, injury prevention kicks in, keeping the individual moving pain-free.

 

Conclusion

Whether it is having fun in the sun or finding a new exercise, swimming is not only for just playing but can be therapeutic for individuals dealing with chronic issues. Any aquatic exercise provides little to no impact on the body as it helps strengthen the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems with gentle force. Combined with chiropractic care, many individuals that are dealing with musculoskeletal issues associated with chronic organ issues will begin to become motivated to better themselves in the long run.

 

References

Ariyoshi, Mamoru, et al. “Efficacy of Aquatic Exercises for Patients with Low-Back Pain.” The Kurume Medical Journal, Kurume University School of Medicine, 11 Aug. 2009, www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/kurumemedj1954/46/2/46_2_91/_article.

Lazar, Jason M, et al. “Swimming and the Heart.” International Journal of Cardiology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 18 Apr. 2013, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23602872/.

Massey, Heather, et al. “Perceived Impact of Outdoor Swimming on Health: Web-Based Survey.” Interactive Journal of Medical Research, JMIR Publications, 4 Jan. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8767464/.

Shi, Zhongju, et al. “Aquatic Exercises in the Treatment of Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review of the Literature and Meta-Analysis of Eight Studies.” American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2018, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28759476/.

Disclaimer

Sports Performance Competitive Anxiety Chiropractic Clinic

Sports Performance Competitive Anxiety Chiropractic Clinic

Athletes train and practice constantly to prepare their mind and bodies for the big games, matches, etc. When the game is on, it is normal/natural to feel anxious and nervous, especially at the beginning, but then the athlete settles in and relaxes, letting their training take over. However, for some athletes, the anxiousness and nervousness doesn’t go away but intensifies, the heart starts racing, and the individual can’t stop thinking about choking, failing, and losing. This is known as sports performance anxiety, or competitive anxiety, and is common.

Sports Performance Competitive Anxiety: Chiropractic Tension Release

Competitive Anxiety

Research shows that 30 to 60 percent of athletes experience the disorder. Doctors divide the signs and symptoms into mental and physical categories.

Physical Symptoms

Rapid Heartbeat

  • The stress can cause overproduction of adrenaline and cortisol, making the heart beat rapidly.

Muscle Tension

  • The muscles can tighten up, become painful, and cause tension and pain in the head.

Trembling

  • The hands could shake while holding the ball, bat, racket, or foot twitching could present.

Hyperventilation

  • Individuals report a sensation of choking or being unable to catch their breath.

Digestion Issues

  • The stress can cause foods to be quickly digested, causing cramping and/or the sudden urge to use the bathroom.

Mental Symptoms

Fear of Failing

  • The athlete imagines themselves losing all the time.
  • Worrying about letting the coach and team down or the audience or other athletes criticizing and laughing at your performance.

Unable to Focus

  • The athlete may have concentration issues and become absorbed in how others react to their performance.

Overthinking

  • The athlete can temporarily forget how to perform specific actions that are typically automatic.

Self-confidence issues

  • The athlete can start doubting their abilities.

Stress and Anxiety

The Yerkes-Dodson law explains how stress, anxiety, and arousal levels affect performance and how stress levels must be maintained within a range to perform well.

Low Arousal

  • It could be the athlete is not as into the sport as when they began, so they do not put forth the total effort.

High Arousal

  • This means the sport could be causing so much stress that the athlete panics or freezes up.
  • Competitive anxiety sets in.

Optimal Arousal

  • This means the athlete is fully engaged in pushing themselves to the fullest.
  • This can be applied to any performing task like play rehearsals to a tennis match.
  • Individuals have different optimal levels of stress.

Recommended Steps

Some recommended steps can be taken to handle and prevent sports competitive anxiety when trying to overcome those overwhelming feelings of nervousness and tension.

Positive self-talk

  • Self-talk is having a positive conversation with yourself.

Athletes who practiced positive self-talk reported:

  • Improved self-confidence
  • Reduced physical anxiety symptoms
  • Improved sports performance

Listen to Music

  • When anxious before a meet, game, match, etc., consider listening to some favorite or relaxing music.

Meditation

  • Meditation has been found to reduce all types of anxiety, including sports.

Chiropractic

Chiropractic treatment specializes in the musculoskeletal system and can realign the body and release any muscle tension and restriction through hands-on manipulation techniques and mechanical decompression. Treatment involves manipulating the muscles, ligaments, tendons, fascia, and soft tissues to relieve pain through therapeutic muscle therapies that include:

One or a combination of therapies can alleviate symptoms related to muscle spasms, delayed onset muscle soreness, fascia restrictions, soft tissue injuries, and pain and dysfunction throughout the body, restoring function, movement, and strength.


Using The DRX9000 For Spinal Decompression


References

Elliott, Dave, et al. “The effects of relaxing music for anxiety control on competitive sport anxiety.” European journal of sports science vol. 14 Suppl 1 (2014): S296-301. doi:10.1080/17461391.2012.693952

Ford, Jessica L et al. “Sport-related anxiety: current insights.” Open access journal of sports medicine vol. 8 205-212. 27 Oct. 2017, doi:10.2147/OAJSM.S125845

Rice, Simon M et al. “Determinants of anxiety in elite athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.” British journal of sports medicine vol. 53,11 (2019): 722-730. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2019-100620

Rowland, David L, and Jacques J D M van Lankveld. “Anxiety and Performance in Sex, Sport, and Stage: Identifying Common Ground.” Frontiers in psychology vol. 10 1615. 16 Jul. 2019, doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01615

Walter N, et al. (2019). Effects of self-talk training on competitive anxiety, self-efficacy, volitional skills, and performance: An intervention study with junior sub-elite athletes. mdpi.com/2075-4663/7/6/148

Gardening Tips and Stretches: Back Pain Prevention

Gardening Tips and Stretches: Back Pain Prevention

Gardening is healthy for the body and does count as exercise, which works the major muscle groups that include the neck, shoulders, arms, abdomen, back, glutes, and legs. However, gardening can cause stress to the body with unhealthy posture/positioning, not using proper lifting techniques, using the wrong tools, and not taking breaks to stretch out the body, move around, and rehydrate. This can lead to body soreness, pain, and injuries. Here are some recommended gardening tips and stretches for pain prevention.

Gardening Tips and Stretches For Pain Prevention

Gardening Tips and Stretches

A sore back and body can stem from staying in a single posture for too long and repetitive motions/movements. Here are a few tips to help maintain musculoskeletal health while gardening:

Tools

  • Choosing the right garden tools can spare a lot of pain and money.
  • Focus on the fundamental tools and purchase the best quality tools that the budget will allow.
  • Size weight, task level, material, grips, handle length, and attachments are things to consider
  • Maintaining quality tools will go a long way.

Digging

  • Digging requires the right tools to get the job done safely and efficiently.
  • Make sure the shovel is sharp enough to reduce using extra force to break up the dirt.
  • The shovel handle should be long enough to avoid excessive bending.
  • Utilize proper digging posture while using a shovel.
  • If using too much pressure, soak the soil to loosen it up.
  • Try not to twist when shoveling the dirt/soil; instead, move the whole body to where the dirt needs to be.

Lifting

  • Prolonged lifting of bags, plants, pots, and equipment can take a toll on the spine and spinal muscles.
  • Bend the knees and use the hips to lift, as the hip muscles are stronger than the low back muscles.
  • Do not bend the waist to come back; use the hips.
  • Investing in an elevated garden or gardening seat/stool is recommended to avoid bending.

Weeding

  • Weeding can require prolonged sitting or bending, depending on the number of weeds.
  • To avoid excessive sitting and bending, a gardening seat/stool can help, as well as a standing weeding tool will reduce the pressure on the back.
  • This is also helpful for knee and/or hip pain.

Mowing

Take Breaks

  • Do not push through; take a break even if the body feels great.
  • Every half hour, the body needs to rest.
  • Try to work in 30-minute increments then break to move around, stretch, relax, and rehydrate.
  • Squatting, bending, digging, lifting bags, and pushing wheelbarrows is a form of strength training that helps achieve stronger muscles, healthier bones, and joints.
  • But if there are no breaks, the chances for pain and injuries increase.

Stretches

Simple stretches can reduce the strain and pain of gardening. Stretching before, during, and after the gardening session is recommended.

Cat Stretch

  • This is a simple yoga pose that helps with back soreness.
  • On your hands and knees, keep the hands at shoulder distance and the knees at hip distance.
  • Pull the navel up to the spine and arch/round the back.
  • Slowly straighten the back.

Cow Stretch

  • The cow stretch is the opposite of the cat pose.
  • Start in the same position.
  • Drop the stomach to the floor and lift the head up and back.
  • The spine will arch and gently stretch the back.

Head Rolls

  • Head rolls will help with shoulder and neck pain.
  • Drop the chin down toward the chest.
  • Gently roll the head to one side going around back to the center.
  • Repeat in the opposite direction.

Supine Twists

  • Supine twists can help the lower back.
  • Lay down with the legs at a 45-degree angle and the arms out to the sides.
  • Twist the legs to one side and look in the opposite direction.
  • Hold the pose until the stretch is felt, and then move back to the starting point.
  • Repeat on the opposite side.

Chiropractic

Chiropractic medicine can help alleviate aches and pains and rehabilitate, realign, and strengthen the body to optimal health. Individuals are educated on the musculoskeletal system, injury prevention, nutrition, and exercise to maintain wellness and a pain-free lifestyle.


Pain-Free Gardening Tips and Stretches


References

Howarth, Michelle et al. “What is the evidence for the impact of gardens and gardening on health and well-being: a scoping review and evidence-based logic model to guide healthcare strategy decision making on the use of gardening approaches as a social prescription.” BMJ open vol. 10,7 e036923. 19 Jul. 2020, doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2020-036923

Masashi Soga A et al. “Gardening is beneficial for health: A meta-analysis” www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5153451/pdf/main.pdf.

Scott, Theresa L et al.”Positive aging benefits of home and community gardening activities: Older adults report enhanced self-esteem, productive endeavors, social engagement, and exercise” SAGE open medicine vol. 8 2050312120901732. 22 Jan. 2020, doi:10.1177/2050312120901732

Internal Abdominal Injuries: Athletes

Internal Abdominal Injuries: Athletes

Children, teens, and adults participate in organized and recreational sports activities for fun, exercise, and social benefits. Individuals and parents are used to scrapes, bumps, bruises, sprains, and strains. However, internal abdominal injuries from the body colliding with another player or object are less common but dangerous. Abdominal injuries make up less than 4 percent of sports injuries but can be severe when they occur. These injuries are common in sports like wrestling, gymnastics, soccer, basketball, football, skiing, snowboarding, BMX freestyle, motocross, skateboarding, ice/field hockey, and lacrosse. Early symptoms are not always obvious or apparent and can be mild or seem to go in a different direction away from the abdominal region, which is why it is essential to know what to look for.

Internal Abdominal Injuries Athletes

Internal Abdominal Injuries Athletes

There are about 3oo 000 abdominal sports-related injuries. Kids and young athletes risk injuring their abdominal organs because their abdominal wall is thinner and still in development. However, internal abdominal injuries to the stomach, small and large intestine, spleen, liver, and kidneys can and do happen in adults.

Injury Types

Sports-related internal abdominal injuries are considered rare, but studies suggest they are increasing. The most common sites include:

Liver

  • This causes pain in the upper right side of the abdomen.
  • The liver has two lobes.
  • The right lobe is the one that gets injured more often because it is bigger and presses against the ribcage.
  • A torn liver can cause severe bleeding.
  • Shock can develop from the bleeding, causing heart palpitations, rapid breathing, shortness of breath, and a pale, grey, and/or sweaty appearance.

The liver and spleen are the most commonly injured organs in sports. They are filled with blood and can get bruised, or ruptured, and can cause severe bleeding when torn or cut. Bleeding in the abdomen can irritate the diaphragm, which can cause pain in the shoulder. Sometimes shoulder pain is the only symptom making it difficult to diagnose and because bleeding can take time to develop, the symptoms might not present for several hours.

Spleen

  • This causes pain in the upper left side of the abdomen.
  • The spleen filters around 10% of the body’s blood supply every minute.
  • A torn spleen can cause rapid and life-threatening internal bleeding.

Kidneys

  • The kidneys can be injured by a blow/hit to the back or flank that causes bruising or laceration.
  • This injury can cause flank/side pain, blood in the urine, nausea, and/or vomiting.

Abdominals

  • A single organ or multiple organs can be injured.
  • This can be the pancreas, diaphragm, stomach, gallbladder, bladder, or intestines.
  • Bruising discoloration or bruising, particularly around the belly and flanks.
  • This can cause abdominal pain with movement that does not get better that could be accompanied by fever, nausea, or vomiting.

Running into an object, another player, or falling hard can cause bruising, laceration, or create a tear/opening of a bowel wall. Symptoms can be delayed days to weeks after the injury when inflammation or infection develops.

Recognizing Internal Injuries

Signs and symptoms to look for include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Bruising around the abdominal area.
  • Tenderness over the injured area.
  • Rigid abdomen.
  • Left-arm and shoulder pain.
  • Right-sided abdominal pain and right shoulder pain.
  • Blood in the urine.
  • Cold, sweaty skin.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Rapid heartbeat.
  • Low blood pressure.
  • Loss of consciousness.

Treatment

Chiropractic focuses on whole-body health and can help with abdominal injuries. The nervous and digestive systems are interconnected, meaning that damage could lead to viscerosomatic reflexes even if not directly injured. If internal damage or bleeding has occurred, individuals will be referred to a specialist, surgeon, or another emergency medical professional. If internal damage is ruled out, a chiropractic treatment plan that includes adjustments, massage therapy, manual and mechanical decompression, exercises, stretches, and health coaching will help with tissue injuries and problems that are causing gastrointestinal distress.


Spinal Non-Surgical Decompression


References

Arumugam, Suresh, et al. “Frequency, causes and pattern of abdominal trauma: A 4-year descriptive analysis.” Journal of emergencies, trauma, and shock vol. 8,4 (2015): 193-8. doi:10.4103/0974-2700.166590

Barrett, Cassie, and Danny Smith. “Recognition and management of abdominal injuries at athletic events.” International journal of sports physical therapy vol. 7,4 (2012): 448-51.

Kucera, K. L., Currie, D. W., Wasserman, E. B., Kerr, Z. Y., Thomas, L. C., Paul, S., & Comstock, R. D. (2019). Incidence of Sport-Related Internal Organ Injuries Due to Direct-Contact Mechanisms Among High School and Collegiate Athletes Across 3 National Surveillance Systems. Journal of athletic training, 54(2), 152–164. doi.org/10.4085/1062-6050-271-17

Slentz, Cris A et al. “Effects of aerobic vs. resistance training on visceral and liver fat stores, liver enzymes, and insulin resistance by HOMA in overweight adults from STRRIDE AT/RT.” American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism vol. 301,5 (2011): E1033-9. doi:10.1152/ajpendo.00291.2011

Athletic Referred Pain Care

Athletic Referred Pain Care

Referred pain is the interpretation of feeling pain in a different location than the actual cause. For example, a pinched nerve in the spine/back causes pain not to show up not where it is pinching but further down in the buttock, leg, calf, or foot. Similarly, a pinched nerve in the neck could translate to shoulder or elbow pain. Referred pain is often caused by the muscles overcompensating weaker ones, like feeling pain outside the knee, with the actual injury stemming from hip joint dysfunction caused by weakened lateral hip muscles. The athletic referred pain could have been brought on by an acute sports injury, an overuse injury from the repetitive motion/s.

Athletic Referred Pain

Athletic Referred Pain

Somatic referred pain originates from the muscles, skin, and other soft tissues and is not to be confused with visceral pain, which refers to the internal organs/viscera. However, the pain presents in regions supplied by the same nerve roots. Damaged or injured body structures can cause referred pain. This includes the muscles, nerves, ligaments, and bones.

Common Sites

Individuals can experience referred pain almost anywhere. Athletic referred pain commonly occurs in these areas:

  • The neck and shoulder where pain can be felt in the elbow, arm, and hand or cause headaches.
  • The back where pain can be felt in the hips, buttocks, and thighs.
  • The hip/s area, where pain can be felt in and around the low back and abdominal regions.
  • The groin, where pain can be felt in and around the abdominal region.

Problems with the vertebral discs, nerve root compression, muscle spasms, osteoarthritic changes, spinal fracture, or tumor/s can affect the body’s ability to transport sensory information, which can cause strange sensations and weakness of muscle tissues, and sometimes problems with coordination and movement. Part of an accurate diagnosis is knowing the patterns of referred pain in all the muscles and internal organs.

Pain Activation

Many nerve endings come together and share the same nerve cell group in the spinal cord. When signals travel through the spinal cord to the brain, some signals follow the same path as the pain signals from a different body part. Pain awareness is felt in a deeper center of the brain known as the thalamus, but the sensory cortex determines the perception of where the pain is coming from and the location of the pain. The intensity and sensation of the athletic referred somatic pain vary for different structures and depend on the inflammation level. For example:

  • Nerve pain tends to be sharp or shooting.
  • Muscle pain tends to be a deep dull aching or a burning sensation.
  • However, muscles can give a sensation of tingling where referred pain is presenting, but tingling is more commonly associated with a nerve injury.

Diagnosing referred pain injuries can be complex as there are various areas where the pain can show up. The source of damage needs to be identified; otherwise, achieving lasting pain relief will not last. A biomechanical analysis can help to find movement/motion patterns that may be causing pain and help identify the source.

Treatment

Athletic performance and spinal health are interconnected. Chiropractic treatment involves whole-body wellness that involves the spine and nervous system. Routine chiropractic care relieves neck, shoulder, arm, back, leg, and foot conditions/injuries and helps prevent disorders of joints and muscles. It calms the mind, provides pain relief, and educates individuals on being more aware of the body. Chiropractic adjustments improve blood flow and nerve function to increase agility, reaction times, balance, strength, and expedited healing of the body.


DRX9000 Decompression


References

Kapitza, Camilla, et al. “Application and utility of a clinical framework for spinally referred neck-arm pain: A cross-sectional and longitudinal study protocol.” PloS one vol. 15,12 e0244137. 28 Dec. 2020, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0244137

Murray, Greg M. “Guest Editorial: referred pain.” Journal of applied oral science: Revista FOB vol. 17,6 (2009): i. doi:10.1590/s1678-77572009000600001

Weller, Jason L et al. “Myofascial Pain.” Seminars in neurology vol. 38,6 (2018): 640-643. doi:10.1055/s-0038-1673674

Wilke, Jan, et al. “What Is Evidence-Based About Myofascial Chains: A Systematic Review.” Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation vol. 97,3 (2016): 454-61. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.07.023

Herniated Disc Decompression Clinic

Herniated Disc Decompression Clinic

Older and elderly individuals have an increased risk of developing a herniated disc/s. The age of the intervertebral discs/cushions causes deflation, drying out, and shifting, making it easier for discs to herniate. Muscle mass also reduces/lessens with age; specifically, the muscles parallel to the spinal column are responsible for stability. When the spine loses strength, the risk of injuries like slips and falls can damage the spine and the rest of the body. Herniated disc decompression will keep the vertebral cushions healthy, functioning, and properly aligned.

Herniated Disc Decompression

Symptoms of Disc Herniation

A herniated disc bulge or tear/s will press on the spinal nerves causing discomfort that can range from mild to severe pain and can last for weeks to months. The symptoms of disc herniation vary and depend on the injury angle, how much of the disc ruptured and if it is touching or has leaked out on the nerve roots. The most common symptoms include:

  • Restricted hip and waist flexion.
  • Continuous back pain that radiates.
  • Sciatica symptoms
  • Back muscles contract/spasm
  • The pain can worsen by sudden body movements caused by coughing, sneezing, or hiccups.
  • Numbness in the affected area
  • Numbness or tingling in the leg or foot
  • Decreased knee or ankle reflexes
  • Weakness
  • Bladder or bowel function changes like difficulty moving waste through the colon or large intestine.

Herniated Disc Decompression

Nonsurgical herniated disc decompression therapy can help heal the herniation by:

  • Stretching the spine to the total capacity.
  • Removing the pressure.
  • Pulls the herniated disc back into its correct position.
  • Fills the injured/damaged areas and the rest of the spine with blood, oxygen, nutrients, and lubricating fluids.
  • Helping to rebuild joint and muscle strength.
  • Increasing flexibility in the muscles that support the affected area of the spine.

The therapy duration depends on the herniation, injury, and damage severity. The objective is to bring significant improvement that will last.

Chiropractic, Physical/Massage Therapy, and Health Coaching

A chiropractor and physical massage therapy team will develop a personalized herniated disc decompression treatment plan with specific goals. The therapy will include:

  • Mechanical decompression.
  • Manual chiropractic adjustments.
  • Massage sessions.
  • Health coaching.
  • Exercises and stretches will be given that will help maintain pressure relief and flexibility.
  • Core stabilization exercises will strengthen and stabilize the spine and muscles.
  • Aerobic conditioning will help increase endurance.

Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression El Paso, Texas


References

Carla Vanti, PT, MSc, OMPT, Alice Panizzolo, PT, OMPT, Luca Turone, PT, OMPT, Andrew A Guccione, PT, Ph.D., DPT, FAPTA, Francesco Saverio Violante, MD, Paolo Pillastrini, PT, MSc, Lucia Bertozzi, PT, MSc, Effectiveness of Mechanical Traction for Lumbar Radiculopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, Physical Therapy, Volume 101, Issue 3, March 2021, pzaa231, doi.org/10.1093/ptj/pzaa231

Dydyk AM, Ngnitewe Massa R, Mesfin FB. Disc Herniation. [Updated 2022 Jan 18]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK441822/

Maistrelli, G L et al. “Lumbar disc herniation in the elderly.” Spine vol. 12,1 (1987): 63-6. doi:10.1097/00007632-198701000-00012

Suri, Pradeep, et al. “Nonsurgical treatment of lumbar disk herniation: are outcomes different in older adults?.” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society vol. 59,3 (2011): 423-9. doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03316.x

Sports Strength, Balance, Core Decompression Clinic

Sports Strength, Balance, Core Decompression Clinic

Injury Medical Chiropractic Decompression Clinic focuses on the whole body, realigns the bones and joints, and helps strengthen the muscles. This helps prevent pain and injury and maintains spinal stability. Strong back muscles can help promote correct posture and keep the spine free from restriction. A stable spine is achieved when the back muscles can support and balance the everyday forces and stress of rigorous physical activity. Strengthening the back muscles can be done through yoga, weightlifting, and other recommended chiropractic exercises.

Sports Strength, Balance, Core Decompression Clinic

Sports Strength, Balance, Core Decompression Clinic

The primary muscles in the back include:

  • Latissimus dorsi/lats) are in the area below the armpits and down the sides of the back
  • Rhomboids are in the mid-upper back
  • Trapezius/traps run from the neck to the mid-back
  • Erector spinae run along the spine

Major Core Muscles

  • The transverse abdominis
  • Multifidus
  • Internal and external obliques
  • Erector spinae
  • Diaphragm
  • Pelvic floor muscles
  • The rectus abdominis/abs

Minor Core Muscles

  • Lats
  • Traps
  • Glutes

Exercises should target a combination of these muscles.

Core Importance

The core is a crucial area of the body. The body utilizes the core for all movements and as a stabilization unit. Lack of strength places unwanted tension and pressure on the spine. Chiropractic ensures all the joints function correctly and enhances the core to brace more effectively and efficiently.

Chiropractic Balance

Adjustments and decompression realign the muscles into the proper position and help lubricate the muscles to help ease the stabilizer muscles that could be tight or tense. Treatments used can include:

  • Spinal manual and motorized decompression
  • Extremity adjustments
  • Myofascial release
  • Active Release Technique
  • Trigger point therapy

Benefits

  • Natural pain relief
  • Injury prevention
  • Enhanced muscle performance
  • Expedited recovery
  • Increased endurance
  • Mobility enhancement
  • Increased strength

Core strength and stability play a huge factor in everyday life and functions. Maintaining health results requires attention to detail. Injury Medical Decompression Clinic will create a personalized optimal health treatment plan that focuses on whole-body realignment, simple lifestyle adjustments, health coaching/nutrition, and strength training to improve balance, strength, and core stability.


Spinal Decompression DRX9000


References

Globe G, Morris C, Whalen W, et al., “Chiropractic Management of Low Back Disorders: Report from a Consensus Process,” Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics November/December 2008: 651-658.

Keller, MD, et al., “Trunk Muscle Strength, Cross-sectional Area, and Density in Patients With CLBP Randomized to Lumbar Fusion or Cognitive Intervention and Exercises,” Spine, 2004 29(1): 3-8 (3)

Mayer J, DC, Ph.D. Mooney V, MD, Dagenais S, DC Ph.D., “Evidence-informed management of CLBP with lumbar extensor strengthening exercises,” T Spine J, 2008;8:96-113. (3)

McKenzie, RA, “The Lumbar Spine: Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy,” Spinal Publications/Printed by Wright & Carman, LTD, Upper Hutt, New Zealand, 1989 reprinted.

Sculco AD, Paup DC, Fernhall B, Sculco MJ, “Effects of aerobic exercise on low back pain patients in treatment,” Spine J, 1(2):95-101 (2001).