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Hip Pain & Disorders

Back Clinic Hip Pain & Disorders Team. These types of disorders are common complaints that can be caused by a variety of problems. The precise location of your hip pain can give more information about the underlying cause. The hip joint on its own tends to result in pain on the inside of your hip or groin area. Pain on the outside, upper thigh, or outer buttock is usually caused by ailments/problems with the muscles, ligaments, tendons, and soft tissues surrounding the hip joint. Hip pain can also be caused by diseases and conditions in other areas of your body, i.e. the lower back. The first thing is to identify where the pain is coming from.

The most important distinguishing factor is to find out if the hip is the cause of the pain. When hip pain comes from muscles, tendons, or ligament injuries, it typically comes from overuse or Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI). This comes from overusing the hip muscles in the body i.e. iliopsoas tendinitis. This can come from tendon and ligament irritations, which typically are involved in snapping hip syndrome. It can come from inside the joint that is more characteristic of hip osteoarthritis. Each of these types of pain presents itself in slightly different ways, which is then the most important part in diagnosing what the cause is.


Uneven Hips Chiropractic Back Clinic

Uneven Hips Chiropractic Back Clinic

Uneven hips can throw the back out of natural alignment and cause back stiffness, tightness, discomfort, and pain. Hips that are off-balance unhealthily affect standing, sitting, sleeping posture, walking gait, and overall movements. Biomechanics issues cause the core and spine stabilizing muscles to become weakened and fatigued from overcompensating to keep the body up and moving. Over time this can lead to chronic pain in the back, hips, knees, and feet. Chiropractic care can restore proper hip and spinal alignment and wellness.Uneven Hips Chiropractor

Uneven Hips

Misaligned hips can be caused by work or sports injury, exercise, vehicle collision, and/or general wear and tear. When hips are out of alignment, they have shifted from their centered position. They could be rotated forward or backward, forcing the spine and the lower limbs to compensate, resulting in the spine tilting that can make the legs appear uneven. Discomfort may be one-sided low back pain near the sacroiliac joint, causing a stiff/tight back, limited motion, and/or pain symptoms. Because the spine and lower limbs have to compensate for the unevenness, the shoulders and upper back, connected to the pelvis through the spine, are also affected and result in:

  • Back pain.
  • Hip and gluteal muscle pain.
  • Uneven leg length.
  • Knee, ankle, and foot issues and pain.
  • Uneven shoulders.
  • The shoulder blades can stick out on the side of the lower hip.
  • Rib discomfort and pain.
  • The rib cage could protrude out on one side. However, this could be due to advanced scoliosis.

Therapy

Staying active is recommended and includes stretching and core strengthening. General stretches recommended to optimize hip equity include:

Hamstring stretch

  • For this stretch, lie on a flat surface with your legs extended straight out.
  • Bend the right leg at the knee, placing the right foot on the ground.
  • Use a towel, belt, or band to grab and wrap around the left foot.
  • Keep the hip/buttock on the left side planted on the floor.
  • Slowly raise the left leg upward as far as possible until you feel the stretch.
  • Once you feel a stretch or restriction in the hamstring, hold the position for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat on the other side.
  • Perform 2 to3 times.

Hip flexor stretch

  • Kneel on the affected leg and bend the healthy leg out in front with the foot flat on the floor.
  • Back straight.
  • Slowly push the hips forward until you feel the stretch in the upper thigh and hip.
  • Hold the stretch for around 15 to 30 seconds.

Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic treatment is a highly recommended non-surgical option for uneven hips and pelvic tilt. Depending on the severity of the misalignment, underlying issues, and body scanning images, hip alignment treatment could include:

  • Soft tissue therapeutic massage
  • Chiropractic muscle release for tight hip flexors, quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes.
  • Decompression
  • Traction
  • Custom orthotics
  • Bracing
  • Posture training
  • Activity modification
  • Health Coaching

Chiropractic Care For Hip Injury


References

Kiapour, Ali et al. “Biomechanics of the Sacroiliac Joint: Anatomy, Function, Biomechanics, Sexual Dimorphism, and Causes of Pain.” International journal of spine surgery vol. 14, Suppl 1 3-13. 10 Feb. 2020, doi:10.14444/6077

Lee, Jeong-Hoon, et al. “The effect of Graston technique on the pain and range of motion in patients with chronic low back pain.” Journal of physical therapy science vol. 28,6 (2016): 1852-5. doi:10.1589/jpts.28.1852

Patel, Rikin V et al. “Pelvic Tilt and Range of Motion in Hips With Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome.” The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons vol. 28,10 (2020): e427-e432. doi:10.5435/JAAOS-D-19-00155

Rivière, C et al. “Spine-hip relations add understandings to the pathophysiology of femoro-acetabular impingement: A systematic review.” Orthopaedics & traumatology, surgery & research : OTSR vol. 103,4 (2017): 549-557. doi:10.1016/j.otsr.2017.03.010

Suits, William H. “Clinical Measures of Pelvic Tilt in Physical Therapy.” International journal of sports physical therapy vol. 16,5 1366-1375. 1 Oct. 2021, doi:10.26603/001c.27978

Ways to Improve Hip & Pelvic Pain With Chiropractic

Ways to Improve Hip & Pelvic Pain With Chiropractic

Introduction

The skeletal joints can keep the body upright and stabilized while protecting the internal organs. The skeletal joints also are at risk of factors (normal and traumatic) that can impact the body, thus potentially causing painful symptoms to affect different body areas. Hip pain is among the most common complaints for many individuals, especially the elderly. To that point, when the body suffers from hip pain, it may involve pelvic pain and associated symptoms that mimic other issues within the body. Today’s article examines the causes of hip and pelvic pain, the symptoms related to hip and pelvic pain, and how chiropractic care may relieve hip and pelvic pain. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in osteopathic treatments to help many individuals with hip and pelvic pain. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

Pain Practice

The Causes Of Hip & Pelvic Pain

Do you experience stiffness located on your low back or hips? What about sciatic nerve pain that travels down your legs? Or have you been experiencing cramping around the pelvic regions of your body? Experiencing these symptoms may be the potential cause that you might be dealing with hip and pelvic pain. Even though hip pain is often associated with older individuals, it can affect many individuals of different ages. Studies reveal that the pathologies outside the hips may be the cause and referred pain, making diagnosing hip pain difficult. Hip pain causes could be overused joints and soft tissues that support the hips due to repetitive motions, strain from the multiple muscles that support the hips, or arthritic symptoms. Studies reveal that individuals who work in a desk job will potentially develop low back pain due to prolonged sitting, thus becoming associated with excessive mobility of the lumbar spine and decreased hip joint mobility. 

 

 

Individuals with hip pain could risk developing pelvic pain associated with the overuse of joints and soft tissues. Now how pelvic pain correlates with hip pain, and what’s the causation? Studies reveal that the stabilizing muscles (iliopsoas, pectineus, obturator externus, gluteus minimus, and piriformis muscles) are overworked and become consequent hip and joint destabilization. This causes the affected muscles to become tired and weak and triggers sciatic nerve compression along the piriformis muscle. Pelvic pain associated with hip pain may cause dysfunctional musculoskeletal symptoms along the lower abdominals, hips, and lumbosacral back.

 

The Associated Symptoms Of Hip & Pelvic Pain

The factors involved with hip and pelvic pain could potentially have associated symptoms that might affect the body’s lower extremities. One of the most prominent symptoms of hip pain is groin pain, which could possibly be involved with pelvic pain since the ligaments and muscles that encompass the hips and groin may be weak and overused. Sometimes various underlying causes do contribute to hip and pelvic pain, causing associated symptoms that may confuse the individual in pain. Hip and pelvic pain may refer to low back and sciatic nerve pain since the lower spine and hips are close together; thus, pinpointing where the true source of pain is in the body’s lower half makes it confusing. Some of the symptoms associated with hip and pelvic pain include:

  • Low back pain
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sacroiliac joint dysfunction
  • Bladder issues
  • Sciatic nerve pain
  • Piriformis syndrome

 


The 3 Common Causes Of Hip Pain-Video

Have you been dealing with muscle stiffness around or along your hips and lower back? Do you have bladder issues? Or have you experienced muscle weakness in the lower extremities of your body? Some of these symptoms could be associated with hip and pelvic pain. The video above explains the three common causes of hip pain, and interestingly, one of the causes of hip pain could potentially involve the lower back. Studies reveal that since the low back and hips are close to each other, alterations in the lumbopelvic region could potentially be involved with low back pain. Some of the issues associated with the alterations in the lumbopelvic area include:

  • Limited range of motion on hip rotation 
  • Tissue injury
  • Stiff joint capsules
  • Micro/macro trauma

Fortunately, hip and pelvic pain management may help alleviate referred pain issues through chiropractic care.


Chiropractic Relief For Hip & Pelvic Pain

 

Individuals dealing with hip and pelvic pain may find relief through chiropractic care. The pelvis is a direct continuation of the spine as the sacrum (the five lowest fused vertebrae) and the pelvic girdle complex interact with the joints from the lower skeletal system. If there is pain in the lower body and the individual is unsure whether it is their back or hips, their first course of action is to visit their primary doctor or a chiropractor. Afterward, they will review the individual’s medical history while performing a series of physical exams like various movements to make an accurate diagnosis. Once the pain diagnosis is identified, chiropractors utilize total body alignment by restoring balance in the pelvis and the spine through manipulation. When the spine and hips suffer from a subluxation, it can cause unnecessary strain on the surrounding muscles around the spine and hips. To that point, realigning the spine from a chiropractic adjustment could reduce or eliminate the excessive stress affecting the surrounding muscles. Chiropractic care can also promote various therapies that increase balance along the hips and pelvic region, which include:

  • Stretching
  • Therapeutic massage
  • Physical activities/Exercise therapy
  • Nutrition

Whether the pain is located in the hips, low back, or pelvic regions, chiropractic care can help restore, address, and alleviate the pain while maintaining optimal long-lasting results.

 

Conclusion

The skeletal joints can help keep the body upright and stabilized while protecting the internal organs from normal and traumatic factors. When these factors begin to cause an impact on the body, the skeletal joints are at risk of developing pain along the musculoskeletal structure. Hip and pelvic pain have an overlapping relationship as they are amongst the most common complaints for many individuals. To that point, pain from the hips or the pelvic may mimic other issues associated with chronic disorders. Incorporating treatments like chiropractic care can help alleviate, address, and restore the body through spinal manipulation. This allows individuals to be pain-free and help restore balance in their joints.

 

References

Harris-Hayes, Marcie, et al. “Relationship between the Hip and Low Back Pain in Athletes Who Participate in Rotation-Related Sports.” Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2699456/.

Lee, Dae Wook, et al. “Chronic Pelvic Pain Arising from Dysfunctional Stabilizing Muscles of the Hip Joint and Pelvis.” The Korean Journal of Pain, The Korean Pain Society, Oct. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5061646/.

Luthra, Jatinder Singh, et al. “Understanding Painful Hip in Young Adults: A Review Article.” Hip & Pelvis, Korean Hip Society, Sept. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6726866/.

Nishimura, Takaaki, and Ryo Miyachi. “Relationship between Low Back Pain and Lumbar and Hip Joint Movement in Desk Workers.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, The Society of Physical Therapy Science, Oct. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7590845/.

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An Overview Of Polymyalgia Rheumatica

An Overview Of Polymyalgia Rheumatica

Introduction

The body is exposed to various environmental factors daily. Whether it is the environment that a person is living, the foods being consumed, or the level of physical activities a person has plays a part in the body. Many individuals that want to live a healthier lifestyle will start small by incorporating nutritious foods they can add, sticking to an exercise regime they might enjoy, and finding time to meditate. Those who don’t want to change their lifestyle habits will continue eating foods that are high in fats, not exercising enough, or have problems sleeping. Over time, the body will be at risk of developing autoimmune disorders associated with musculoskeletal symptoms when exposed to environmental factors that impact a person’s lifestyle. Today’s article looks at an autoimmune disorder that causes inflammatory effects on the joints, known as polymyalgia rheumatica, the symptoms associated with this disorder, and how chiropractic care can help manage the symptoms of polymyalgia rheumatica. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in autoimmune treatments to help many individuals with autoimmune diseases associated with musculoskeletal disorders. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

10_Kaplan Redefining Chronic Pain

What Is Polymyalgia Rheumatica?

 

Have you been experiencing pain along your shoulders, neck, hips, or thighs? Does your body feel stiff in the morning and better throughout the day? Or have you been experiencing a limited range of motion in certain areas of your body? Many of these symptoms are signs that you might be at risk of developing polymyalgia rheumatica in your joints. Polymyalgia rheumatica is defined as a rheumatic disorder that is common in elderly adults over the age of 50. Polymyalgia rheumatica is an inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder that induces muscle pain and stiffness around the joints, especially in the morning. Studies reveal that polymyalgia rheumatica is often characterized by aching muscle pain in the shoulders, pelvis, and neck; it can mimic other rheumatic diseases like RA (rheumatoid arthritis), SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus), and polymyositis. When the body is dealing with the inflammatory effects of polymyalgia rheumatica, many people believe they are dealing with a different disorder affecting their bodies. To that point, diagnosing polymyalgia rheumatica is difficult.

 

The Symptoms Associated With Polymyalgia Rheumatica

Since polymyalgia rheumatica can mimic other rheumatic diseases, some of the symptoms associated with this inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder are similar to other chronic common diseases in the body. Studies reveal that the cause of polymyalgia is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors contribute to this inflammatory disease. Another disease that shares similar symptoms with polymyalgia is a disease known as giant cell arteritis. Giant cell arteritis causes inflammatory effects along the lining of the arteries, and individuals with this disease may have polymyalgia rheumatica. Some of the symptoms associated with polymyalgia rheumatica include:

  • Shoulder pain
  • Pelvic pain
  • Limited range of motion
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Joint pain
  • Inflammation
  • Neck pain

 


An Overview Of Polymyalgia Rheumatica- Video

Have you been experiencing pain in some regions of your body, like the shoulders, pelvis, and neck? Do you feel muscle stiffness every morning, but does it get better throughout the day? Have you been dealing with joint inflammation? If you have been experiencing these musculoskeletal symptoms, you might be at risk of developing polymyalgia rheumatica. The video above gives an insightful overview of what polymyalgia is and the symptoms associated with this inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder. Polymyalgia rheumatica is an auto-inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder that affects many adults over 50 and causes muscle stiffness in the body’s neck, shoulder, and pelvic regions. This inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder does mimic other rheumatic disorders like RA (rheumatoid arthritis) and lupus. The symptoms associated with polymyalgia rheumatica are generally similar to other common chronic disorders, making diagnosis challenging to pinpoint. Luckily there are ways to manage polymyalgia rheumatica and its associated musculoskeletal symptoms.


Managing Polymyalgia Rheumatica With Chiropractic Care

 

Since the body is dealing with symptoms from polymyalgia rheumatica is challenging to diagnose since it mimics other rheumatic disorders and their associated symptoms. When the body is suffering from joint pain associated with polymyalgia rheumatica, the surrounding muscles, and ligaments that help stabilize the joints become inflamed and cause discomfort to the body. Fortunately, treatments like chiropractic care are available to help manage the joint inflammation associated with polymyalgia rheumatica. Chiropractic care utilizes spinal manipulation of the body by manipulating spinal subluxation or misalignment of the joints. Spinal manipulation helps the body relax and incorporates healing properties into the inflamed joints. Chiropractic care helps loosen up the stiff muscles and ligaments surrounding the joints to reduce pressure on the nerves and help bring the range of motion back to the joints. Many individuals who incorporate chiropractic care to help manage musculoskeletal symptoms associated with rheumatic disorders like polymyalgia rheumatica will be pain-free on their wellness journey.

 

Conclusion

Polymyalgia rheumatica is an inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder common in elderly adults that induces muscle pain and stiffness around the joints. This inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder affects the shoulder, neck, and pelvic region while mimicking other rheumatic disorders like RA (rheumatoid arthritis) and lupus. Since the body is exposed to various environmental daily, over time may be at risk of developing autoimmune diseases associated with musculoskeletal symptoms that can impact the individual. To that point, making it difficult to diagnose. Fortunately, treatments like chiropractic care can help manage the musculoskeletal symptoms associated with polymyalgia rheumatica. Chiropractic care can help reduce stiff joint inflammation by manipulating the body, causing the aching muscles to relax and increase their range of motion. Utilizing chiropractic care can help a person get back to their health and wellness journey.

 

References

Acharya, Saurav, and Rina Musa. “Polymyalgia Rheumatica – StatPearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 21 June 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537274/.

Al-Kaabi, Juma, et al. “Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Mimicking Polymyalgia Rheumatica in a Young Patient.” Oman Medical Journal, OMJ, July 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3282323/.

Michet, Clement J, and Eric L Matteson. “Polymyalgia Rheumatica.” BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), BMJ Publishing Group Ltd., 5 Apr. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2287267/.

Milchert, Marcin, and Marek Brzosko. “Diagnosis of Polymyalgia Rheumatica Usually Means a Favourable Outcome for Your Patient.” The Indian Journal of Medical Research, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, May 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5644293/.

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Pinched Nerve In The Hip Back Clinic

Pinched Nerve In The Hip Back Clinic

A pinched nerve in the hip can cause numbness, tingliness, weakness, and pain. A pinched/compressed nerve creates pressure that can result from a bone structural issue like hip misalignment or the nerve getting overly stretched, stuck, twisted, or kinked. The pressure obstructs the neural pathways and decreases neural activity. This causes pain. If discomfort or pain is present, chiropractic, physical rehabilitation, rest, exercise, and ice and heat can release and reset the nerve and help prevent re-injury.

Pinched Nerve In The Hip Chiropractor

Pinched Nerve In The Hip

A pinched or compressed nerve results from pressure being applied to the nerve. A pinched nerve in the hip often causes pain in the groin region, radiating down the inner thigh to the knee. The pain can feel like a dull ache or a sharp, burning pain. Individuals also report tightness, numbness, or a tingling sensation in the buttocks. The most common causes include:

  • Unhealthy posture.
  • Sitting for too long without moving around.
  • Misaligned bone or cartilage.
  • Muscle strain.
  • Pregnancy.
  • Obesity.
  • Inflamed tissue.
  • Herniated disc.
  • Arthritis.
  • Bone spurs.

Chiropractic

Different causes require different treatment approaches. For example, an obese individual could require chiropractic adjustments, specific exercises/stretches, and diet adjustments to address the whole body. The recommended treatment plans can vary but usually include:

  • Physical therapeutic massage.
  • Manipulative therapies of the joints and muscles.
  • Mobilization of the joints.
  • Soft tissue treatments.
  • Spinal decompression.
  • Exercise.

Walking and activity can worsen the pain when the hip presents with pain. This can cause the rest of the body to compensate by shifting the weight to the healthy side, which can cause even more pain in the back or legs or cause another injury. Regular chiropractic hip adjustments will improve posture, maintaining muscle and skeleton alignment that will prevent pinching nerves in the hip.


Chiropractic Hip Treatment


References

Ahuja, Vanita, et al. “Chronic hip pain in adults: Current knowledge and future prospective.” Journal of anaesthesiology, clinical pharmacology vol. 36,4 (2020): 450-457. doi:10.4103/joacp.JOACP_170_19

Christmas, Colleen, et al. “How common is hip pain among older adults? Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.” The Journal of family practice vol. 51,4 (2002): 345-8.

“Free Communications: Case Reports: Hip.” Journal of Athletic Training vol. 38,2 Suppl (2003): S.73–S.74.

The Beneficial Properties Of Yoga For The Body

The Beneficial Properties Of Yoga For The Body

Introduction

When many individuals look for ways to relax after a stressful event in their daily lives, many people have an exercise regime that allows them to take their minds off of their hectic lives. When finding the proper exercise, it is best to consider that everybody is different and has different fitness levels. Many individuals could be dealing with chronic issues that affect them drastically and with so much pain in their bodies. When these chronic issues overlap with muscle and joint pain, it can make the body dysfunctional while potentially being involved in environmental factors. Yoga is a low-impact exercise that helps tone muscles, relax tension in the body, and focus on deep breathing. Today’s article looks at the benefits of yoga for the body, how chiropractic care works together with yoga, and different yoga poses can help manage various chronic issues. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to help many individuals with musculoskeletal problems affecting their bodies. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

SpineMed

The Benefits of Yoga For The Body

Have you been dealing with chronic stress affecting your quality of life? Have you been dealing with bladder or gut issues constantly? What about feeling muscle stiffness in your back, neck, shoulders, or pelvic regions? Some of these symptoms are signs that you could risk developing musculoskeletal problems associated with pain. Dealing with musculoskeletal issues related to pain can make a person feel miserable and have stress affecting their bodies. Yoga is a low-impact exercise that doesn’t put pressure on the joints and will provide a full-body workout through strengthening and stretching weak muscles. Yoga has many benefits for many individuals that are dealing with the following:

  • Muscle weakness
  • Back pain
  • Neck pain
  • Pelvic Pain
  • Arthritic symptoms
  • Cardiovascular issues
  • Chronic stress

Studies reveal that environmental factors are involved in non-specified chronic pain in the spine, overlapping musculoskeletal disorders causing many individuals to try to find relief. Many individuals incorporate yoga because it is a safe and effective way to alleviate various forms of back, neck, or pelvic pain causing issues to the body. Yoga utilizes gentle stretching and strengthening of weak, injured muscles while increasing blood circulation to promote healing in the body. 

 

Chiropractic Care & Yoga

When people are dealing with health conditions or injuries that have affected their bodies, it can make them feel frustrated and think their injuries are taking forever to heal. Many individuals don’t realize that incorporating yoga practices provides impressive health benefits while mirroring the similar foundations of chiropractic care. Both chiropractic care and yoga provide many beneficial results to an aching body that needs a good stretch and ready the body to heal itself naturally. Chiropractic care includes spinal manipulation to the spinal joints while reducing inflammation and strengthening weak muscles. Yoga allows the body to increase its flexibility and stamina, reduces stress and blood pressure, and provides a better sense of breathing and balance.


Yoga For Chronic Pain-Video

Have you felt muscle stiffness in your neck, back, or body? Have you felt sluggish or overly stressed from your day-to-day lives? Do you want to improve your balance? If you have been experiencing these issues affecting your quality of life, why not incorporate yoga as part of your exercise regime? The video above shows that yoga poses for chronic pain affect the body, including the neck, back, and pelvic regions. Studies reveal that yoga can help relieve intense neck pain while improving pain-related function disability. Yoga allows the muscles to not only relax but strengthen them as well. Yoga can also help improve the body’s range of motion through deep breathing and give more awareness of how the body holds tension in places a person hasn’t realized they were holding onto.


Yoga Poses For Different Issues

When a person does yoga, they will go through various poses and repeat them constantly as their body begins to get used to the movements. This allows the body to challenge itself and helps the individual focus more on deep breathing. A good example would be an individual taking a yoga class due to experiencing pelvic pain. By going through each yoga pose, many individuals suffering from pelvic pain will reduce the pain intensity while improving their quality of life. Below are some yoga poses that anyone can do to reduce pain associated with their back, neck, or pelvis.

Bridge Pose

  • Lie on your back
  • Bend both knees while placing the feet on the floor at hip-width apart
  • Arm on the sides with palms facing down
  • Press feet to the floor and lift the hips as you inhale
  • Engage the legs and buttock 
  • Hold 4-8 breaths and exhale to lower the hips back to the ground slowly

 

Cobra Pose

  • Lie on your stomach with hands near the chest just under the shoulders and fingers facing forward
  • Keep elbows close to sides
  • Press hands on the floor and slowly lift your head, chest, and shoulders while slightly bending the elbows by inhaling
  • Exhale to go back down slow and rest your head

 

Cat-Cow

  • Be on all fours, hands under the shoulders and knees under hips (Think like a table)
  • Inhale to lower your core to the floor as your head looks up to the sky
  • Exhale slowly to lower your chin to the chest as you round your back
  • Continue fluid motion for a minute

 

Forward Bend

  • Be in a standing position, and feet are at a hip distance apart
  • Lengthen the body as you lean forward while keeping the knees slightly bended
  • Place hands on either legs, yoga block, or the floor (Whichever makes you comfortable)
  • Tuck the chin into the chest, letting the neck and head relax
  • Gently rock your head side to side to relieve tension in the neck and shoulders
  • Slowly roll up to a standing position allowing the arms and head to be the last to rise

 

Supine Spinal Twist

  • Lie on your back while your knees bent and feet flat on the floor
  • Extend arms out of the side and place palms down on the floor
  • As you inhale, breathe into the gut and lower limbs
  • Exhale to lower knees on the left side (Look at the opposite way to slowly stretch the neck and shoulder muscles)
  • Pay attention to the stretches for 5 breathes as well as the lengthening sensations on the ribs
  • Return the knees to the middle and repeat on the right side

 

Child’s Pose

  • Sit back on the heels with the knees together (For added support, you can use a rolled-up blanket under your knees)
  • Bend forward and walk hands in front of you
  • Gently rest your forehead on the floor
  • Keep arms extended in the front while focusing on relieving tension in the back as the upper body falls to the knees
  • Stay in that pose for 5 minutes

 

Conclusion

Incorporating yoga as part of an exercise regime allows the individual to focus on deep breathing while calming the mind. Yoga is a low-impact exercise that helps strengthen weak muscles associated with pain and inflammation. Yoga provides a full-body workout that benefits many people dealing with chronic pain. Utilizing yoga as part of a daily practice might help individuals learn to be calm and practice mindfulness.

 

References

Busch, Fred. “Healing Benefits of Yoga.” Spine, Spine-Health, 27 Jan. 2004, www.spine-health.com/wellness/yoga-pilates-tai-chi/healing-benefits-yoga.

Crow, Edith Meszaros, et al. “Effectiveness of Iyengar Yoga in Treating Spinal (Back and Neck) Pain: A Systematic Review.” International Journal of Yoga, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, Jan. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4278133/.

Li, Yunxia, et al. “Effects of Yoga on Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Prisma Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” Medicine, Wolters Kluwer Health, Feb. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407933/.

Saxena, Rahul, et al. “Effects of Yogic Intervention on Pain Scores and Quality of Life in Females with Chronic Pelvic Pain.” International Journal of Yoga, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5225749/.

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The Impact On Osteoarthritis On The Hips

The Impact On Osteoarthritis On The Hips

Introduction

The hips in the lower extremities of the body help stabilize the weight of the upper half while providing movement to the lower half. The hips also allow the body to twist, turn, and bend back and forth. The hip joints connect to the inside of the pelvic bone, while the pelvic bone is connected to the sacroiliac joint, which connects to the spine. When natural wear and tear affects the joints as the body ages, issues like hip pain and osteoarthritis associated with low back pain occur, causing various symptoms to arise in the body. Today’s article looks at osteoarthritis, how it impacts the hips, and how to manage hip osteoarthritis. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal therapies to help those with hip pain and osteoarthritis. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

94 patient retro study

What Is Osteoarthritis?

 

Have you been experiencing pain in your hips or lower back? How about muscle stiffness near the groin? Do symptoms associated with sciatica seem to flare up near your hips and the back of your leg? Many of these symptoms are signs that you could be at risk of developing osteoarthritis near your hips. While arthritis refers to inflammation of the body’s joints, osteoarthritis is a type of arthritis that causes degeneration of the joint cartilage, triggering joint pain and functionality loss. Even though there are several hundred types of arthritis, osteoarthritis is one of the most common types that many people, especially older adults, are affected by. As the body becomes older naturally through age, the repairs from an injury begin to slow down, and the cartilage (the connective tissue that protects the bones from each other) will start to thin out, triggering bone rubbing together, causing inflammation to occur, bone spurs, and inevitable pain. Osteoarthritis is often associated with old age and is multifactorial as factors that can increase the risk of developing osteoarthritis include:

  • Sex 
  • Age
  • Obesity
  • Joint injuries
  • Genetics
  • Bone deformities

 

How Does It Impact The Hips?

Since osteoarthritis affects the joints, how does it cause an impact on the hips? When health issues affect the body, it can cause painful symptoms to gradually worsen and become a risk of developing hip pain. Studies reveal that hip pain is common in all adults and activity levels in the anterior, lateral, or posterior regions near the hips.

  • Anterior hip pain: Causes referred pain (pain felt in one part of the body but is actually in a different location) associated with internal organ systems.
  • Lateral hip pain: Causes wear-and-tear pain on the soft muscle tissues on the sides of the hips.
  • Posterior hip pain: Causes referred pain associated with the lumbar spinal pathology like sciatic nerve entrapment correlating with a deep gluteal syndrome.

All these issues affecting the hips overlap with various issues associated with osteoarthritis. When hip pain originates from osteoarthritis, factors like minimal physical activity or slight movements while resting in bed can worsen due to the hip joints having limited or restricted movement. Studies reveal that hip pain is associated with simple movement impairments that make it difficult to diagnose due to referred pain from the spine, knees, or even the groin area.

 

How does hip osteoarthritis correlate with groin pain? Studies reveal that when a person is dealing with hip osteoarthritis, groin and buttock pain are slightly more common. The hip joint is behind the groin muscle, which is why groin pain overlaps with hip pain as the root. Hip and groin pain could also be involved with radiating pain down toward the knees in the body.


Exercises For Hip Osteoarthritis- Video

Are you experiencing bladder issues? How about stiffness near or around your hips and groin area? Do issues like low back and sciatica pain? Experiencing these issues could be signs of hip osteoarthritis affecting your lower body. Studies reveal that hip osteoarthritis is a significant source of morbidity, pain, gait abnormalities, and functional impairments potentially involved with other issues. Fortunately, there are ways to manage hip osteoarthritis, as the video above shows eight great exercises for hip osteoarthritis. Certain exercise moves for individuals with hip osteoarthritis can help strengthen the surrounding muscles around the joints while increasing joint mobility to reduce pain and stiffness. Exercising can also be beneficial to the individual as it can provide:

  • Increase blood circulation
  • Maintain weight
  • Provides energy boost
  • Improves sleep
  • Promotes muscle endurance

Other available therapies help manage hip osteoarthritis while alleviating associated symptoms affecting the body.


Managing Hip Osteoarthritis Pain

 

Many individuals suffering from hip osteoarthritis try to find ways to relieve the pain. While they can’t do anything to prevent wear and tear on the joints completely, there are ways to slow down the process and manage hip osteoarthritis in the body. Small changes like incorporating food can dampen inflammatory effects on the joints while providing nutrients to the body. An exercise regime can help strengthen the weak muscles supporting the joints while increasing mobility and range of motion. Treatments like spinal traction and chiropractic care relieve pain and stiffness from joint disorders like osteoarthritis. Chiropractic care provides spinal manipulation on the back and joints to be adjusted. While spinal traction helps the compressed discs lay off the pressure on the surrounding nerves associated with hip pain. Incorporating any of these can help slow the progression of hip osteoarthritis and bring back mobility to the hips.

 

Conclusion

The hips provide stability to the upper and lower parts of the body. While supporting the weight of the upper half and movement to the lower half, the hips can succumb to wear and tear in the body. When the hip joints begin to wear and tear slowly, it can lead to the progression of hip osteoarthritis, where the cartilage of the joints begins to cause the bones to rub against each other, triggering inflammation. Hip osteoarthritis makes diagnosing difficult because the referred pain from the spine, knees, or groin area overlaps the symptoms. All is not lost, as there are available treatments to manage hip osteoarthritis that can help slow the progress of this disorder and bring back the mobility of the lower half of the body.

 

References

Ahuja, Vanita, et al. “Chronic Hip Pain in Adults: Current Knowledge and Future Prospective.” Journal of Anaesthesiology, Clinical Pharmacology, Wolters Kluwer – Medknow, 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8022067/.

Chamberlain, Rachel. “Hip Pain in Adults: Evaluation and Differential Diagnosis.” American Family Physician, 15 Jan. 2021, www.aafp.org/pubs/afp/issues/2021/0115/p81.html.

Khan, A M, et al. “Hip Osteoarthritis: Where Is the Pain?” Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Mar. 2004, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15005931/.

Kim, Chan, et al. “Association of Hip Pain with Radiographic Evidence of Hip Osteoarthritis: Diagnostic Test Study.” BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), BMJ Publishing Group Ltd., 2 Dec. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4667842/.

Sen, Rouhin, and John A Hurley. “Osteoarthritis – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 1 May 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482326/.

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Sacroiliac Dysfunction Causes More Than Back Issues

Sacroiliac Dysfunction Causes More Than Back Issues

Introduction

Maintaining healthy joints is crucial to preventing injuries from affecting the body. Incorporating physical activities, eating healthy foods, staying hydrated, and getting a routine check-up are ways to ensure that the body is functional, including the joints. The joints in the body act like shock absorbers that soften the impact of any injuries that the body has sustained. However, as the body ages, so do the joints, causing them to become hardened and cause problems in the body. In today’s article, we will look at sacroiliac dysfunction, what issues it affects besides back pain, and how chiropractic care manages sacroiliac dysfunction. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal therapies to help those with sacroiliac dysfunction. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

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What Is Sacroiliac Dysfunction?

 

Are you experiencing pain in the pelvis? Do your hips seem tighter than usual? Do you feel muscle stiffness when you twist from side to side? Some of these issues are signs that you might be experiencing sacroiliac dysfunction. Around the pelvic region lies the sacroiliac joint, a weight-bearing solid joint connecting the pelvis to the sacrum. It is surrounded by tough ligaments that support the body as it distributes the weight from the upper body to the lower body. However, like all the other joints in the body, any injury or condition can cause this joint to be unstable and succumb to the pain, causing sacroiliac dysfunction. Sacroiliac dysfunction or sacroiliac joint pain is defined as one of the potential causes of axial low back pain. When there are issues affecting the sacroiliac joints, it’s associated with about a quarter of most low back pain cases. This is due to the problems that overlap with pain associated with the low back. Studies reveal that dysfunction in the sacroiliac joint can relate to leg or back pain, making diagnosing the problem difficult. Back pain associated with sacroiliac dysfunction causes the pelvis to be hypermobile, causing the risk of developing radiating groin pain. Leg pain associated with sacroiliac dysfunction causes muscle tension and stiffness to the low back, legs, or buttock region, mimicking sciatica-like symptoms.

What Other Issues Does It Affect?

Many individuals may not realize that when they are experiencing sacroiliac dysfunction, symptoms show that they overlap with lumbar spine pathologies. However, sacroiliac dysfunction can also affect the pelvic region of the body. Studies reveal that when the muscles around the body’s pelvic area become inflamed or irritated, it can cause stiffness in the sacroiliac joints, thus developing the risk of pelvic pain. Pelvic pain is usually defined as non-menstrual pain that causes functional disability to the lower extremities. Around the pelvic region, the lower sacral nerves provide extensive neurologic connections to the structures throughout the pelvic area that maintain normal pelvic organ function. When issues like sacroiliac dysfunction become the risk of pelvic pain, it may potentially involve pelvic symptoms like constipation. Studies reveal that constipation is significantly associated with a high prevalence of pelvic organ prolapse and low urinary tract symptoms. Other issues that sacroiliac dysfunction correlates with are:

  • Ankylosing spondylitis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Inflammatory issues
  • Hip pain
  • Pelvic pain
  • Low back pain
  • Piriformis syndrome

An Overview Of Sacroiliac Joint Pain- Video

Are you experiencing radiating from your lower back down to your leg? How about stiffness in your hips? Are you feeling constipated or have a sense of fullness in your bladder? You may suffer from sacroiliac dysfunction in your pelvic region if you notice these symptoms. The video above explains how to understand sacroiliac joint pain. The sacroiliac joint connects the pelvis and sacrum, surrounded by tough ligaments and muscles that help support the body by distributing weight from the upper body to the lower body. When issues affect the sacroiliac joints can overlap other risk profiles like low back pain, leg pain, and pelvic pain. This can make diagnosing sacroiliac dysfunction difficult because the symptoms are similar to other issues. For example, hip pain is associated with piriformis syndrome while potentially being involved with sciatica. How would hip pain be correlated with piriformis syndrome? The piriformis muscle can become overused and injured and can entrap the sciatic nerve (which runs from the lumbar spine, through the hips, and down to the leg), causing radiating, throbbing pain. Other times referred pain in the low back can affect different areas in the body due to sacroiliac dysfunction. Luckily, there are treatments available to manage sacroiliac dysfunction.


How Chiropractic Care Manages Sacroiliac Dysfunction

 

When issues of sacroiliac dysfunction become associated with leg or back pain, physicians often misdiagnose it as a soft tissue issue rather than a joint issue. Many doctors might rule out various medical conditions before including sacroiliac dysfunction as part of the diagnosis. Some treatments like massage therapy can help loosen up the tight muscles surrounding the joints relieving the pain and discomfort. At the same time, chiropractic care utilizes spinal manipulation and mobilization to the affected spinal area. Since the sacroiliac joint is an essential part of the musculoskeletal system, chiropractors specialize in this area. Through practical, non-invasive methods, chiropractic care has proven to not only relieve pain in the spine but can also help rehabilitate the spine. Chiropractors are specially trained to guide the individual through several phases of care that help loosen the stiff muscles and strengthen the joints. Chiropractic care will help decrease the pain from returning to the body and let the individual return to their health and wellness journey.

 

Conclusion

Maintaining healthy joints is crucial to prevent injuries from affecting the body. The sacroiliac joints are part of the musculoskeletal system that connects the pelvic bone to the sacrum. This joint is surrounded by tough ligaments and muscles that support the upper and lower half of the body through weight distribution. When the sacroiliac joint becomes unstable, it can succumb to pain, thus becoming sacroiliac dysfunction. Sacroiliac dysfunction sometimes mimics low back and leg pain, making it difficult to diagnose. Co-morbidities like pelvic pain correlate to sacroiliac dysfunction, causing somato-visceral pain in different body areas. Treatments like chiropractic care can help strengthen the stiff muscles and joints in the body through spinal manipulation and mobilization in practical, non-invasive treatment. Chiropractic care can help rehabilitate the spine while decreasing the pain from returning to the body.

 

References

Jonely, Holly, et al. “Chronic Sacroiliac Joint and Pelvic Girdle Dysfunction in a 35-Year-Old Nulliparous Woman Successfully Managed with Multimodal and Multidisciplinary Approach.” The Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy, Maney Publishing, Feb. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459139/.

Raj, Marc A, et al. “Sacroiliac Joint Pain.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 12 Feb. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK470299/.

Singh, Prashant, et al. “Pelvic Floor Symptom Related Distress in Chronic Constipation Correlates with a Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation and Constipation Severity but Not Pelvic Floor Dyssynergia.” Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, 31 Jan. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6326213/.

Yeomans, Steven. “Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction (SI Joint Pain).” Spine, Spine-Health, 7 Feb. 2018, www.spine-health.com/conditions/sacroiliac-joint-dysfunction/sacroiliac-joint-dysfunction-si-joint-pain.

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Piriformis Syndrome May Cause More Than Hip Pain

Piriformis Syndrome May Cause More Than Hip Pain

Introduction

The muscles in our body help us be active when we want to be, rest and repair after activities, and continue to provide everyday movements that help keep the body functioning correctly. For athletes and the general population, physical training and eating healthy foods help deliver fuel to not only the internal organs but also help support the muscles, ligaments, and skeletal joints from injuries. As many individuals start to think about their health and wellness, many factors tend to pop up that can cause them to halt their health and wellness journey. Issues like stress, accidents, traumatic events, and lifestyle habits can affect the body and, over time, can become the risk of developing into chronic problems. An example would be where a person is experiencing hip pain associated with piriformis syndrome. Today’s article looks at piriformis syndrome, how it can cause more than hip pain, and how there are available treatments for piriformis syndrome. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal therapies to help those with piriformis syndrome. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

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What Is Piriformis Syndrome?

Have you been experiencing pain radiating from the buttock down to your legs? Does it hurt when you are sitting down? Or are you feeling tingling sensations and numbness on your butt and thighs? Some of these symptoms might be signs that you might be experiencing piriformis syndrome. Research studies have defined piriformis syndrome as a clinical condition where everyday stress affecting the body causes the piriformis muscle (the small muscle deep in the buttock region) to become tight and irritates the sciatic nerve. When that sciatic nerve becomes aggravated, it can become the risk of developing into sciatica. Many individuals don’t realize that the sciatic nerve also gets affected when their piriformis muscles in the buttock region become overused and tight through strenuous activities. This is due to the belief that any unusual traumatic abnormality in the piriformis muscle will be associated with sciatica symptoms. However, when a person is experiencing buttock pain that travels down the leg caused by the affected piriformis muscle, many will rule out some of the more common causes of sciatica like nerve root impingement triggered by disc herniation.

Surprisingly, three primary causing factors can be associated with piriformis syndrome. The first causing factor is myofascial trigger points may be the results of referred pain (pain or discomfort from another body location). The second causing factor is nerve entrapment against the greater sciatic foramen passing through the various piriformis muscles. And finally, the third causing factor is sacroiliac joint dysfunction due to piriformis muscle spasm. Studies reveal that the piriformis muscle helps stabilize the sacroiliac joint; when the small muscle starts to become irritated, it causes pain in the buttock region. But how does sacroiliac dysfunction relates to piriformis syndrome? Well, since low back pain is associated with sacroiliac dysfunction, the pain will often radiate down to the knee and the groin muscles while becoming a risk of developing piriformis syndrome. 

 

Piriformis Syndrome Causes More Than Hip Pain?

Due to its broad size in the greater sciatic foramen, the piriformis muscle can become overused and tight, thus becoming piriformis syndrome. Piriformis syndrome can also become a risk to the numerous vessels and nerves that exit out in the pelvis region and may become compressed, causing more than just hip pain. Studies reveal that piriformis syndrome may be masquerading as ischiofemoral impingement triggering extra-articular hip pain by entrapping the quadratus femoris muscle causing groin pain. Another cause that piriformis syndrome is associated with is chronic pelvic pain. How does chronic pelvic pain correlate with piriformis syndrome? Chronic pelvic pain is a non-cyclic pain localized in the pelvis, potentially involving the surrounding muscles like the piriformis muscle supporting the irritated hip joint and pelvis region. Piriformis syndrome could also be an overlapping condition risk of developing other health issues like fibromyalgia in many people. Some conditions have common symptoms associated with piriformis syndrome, including:

  • Tingling sensations
  • Numbness
  • Muscle tenderness
  • Pain while sitting
  • Discomfort while exercising

The Difference Between Sciatica & Piriformis Syndrome-Video

Have you found it challenging to be comfortable while sitting down doing leisure activities? How about radiating pain that travels down your leg? Or do your hips feel tight and stiff? Experiencing these symptoms means that you might suffer from piriformis syndrome. The video above explains the difference between piriformis syndrome and sciatica. Studies reveal that piriformis syndrome is classically defined as sciatic pain; however, it is not sciatica. Sciatica is caused by compressed sciatic nerve due to herniated disc in the lumbar spine. In contrast, piriformis syndrome is caused when a traumatic injury or an underlying condition causes the piriformis muscle to spasm and aggravate the sciatic nerve. Various factors like prolonged sitting, repetitive movements that involve the legs, and even extensive stair climbing can cause the piriformis muscle to be easily damaged or injured, causing piriformis syndrome. Fortunately, there are ways to alleviate sciatic nerve pain and improve piriformis syndrome.


Treatments Available For Piriformis Syndrome

 

Many treatments are accessible to manage the pain and discomfort caused by piriformis syndrome for suffering individuals. Some people take over-the-counter medicine to decrease the pain, while others utilize a hot/cold pack on the affected area to relieve discomfort. The symptoms associated with piriformis syndrome usually go away without any additional treatment; however, if the pain or discomfort is still there, many people might benefit from alternative options for treatment, like chiropractic care, physical therapy, or even spinal decompression. Whether it is through gentle stretching, spinal manipulation, or decompression, these treatments are for anyone dealing with piriformis syndrome and its associated symptoms. Physical therapy can help decrease the painful symptoms associated with piriformis syndrome through gentle stretches that help return a person’s range of motion. Chiropractic care incorporates spinal adjustments and manual manipulations to treat various injuries or conditions. Spinal decompression uses traction to gently pull on the spine to release the aggravated nerve from causing pain. The relief can gradually restore a person’s natural health while managing its associated symptoms with various treatments available for individuals with piriformis syndrome.

 

Conclusion

Piriformis syndrome is a condition where everyday stress affects the piriformis muscle in the buttock region to become irritated and tight while aggravating the sciatic nerve. Many think traumatic abnormalities affecting their piriformis muscle will be associated with sciatica symptoms. However, sciatica is due to nerve root compression triggered by disc herniation. Piriformis syndrome is where that small muscle is overused from various factors that cause more than hip and butt pain. Some overlapping conditions associated with piriformis syndrome can become mediators for groin and pelvic pain. Fortunately, chiropractic care, physical therapy, and decompression can help restore the body gradually by managing piriformis syndrome and its associated symptoms.

 

References

Hicks, Brandon L., et al. “Piriformis Syndrome.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 21 Apr. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK448172/.

Newman, David P, and Liang Zhou. “Piriformis Syndrome Masquerading as an Ischiofemoral Impingement.” Cureus, Cureus, 16 Sept. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8520408/.

Professionals, Northwest Medical. “Piriformis Syndrome/Sacroiliac Dysfunction.” Northwest Medical Center, 2021, nw-mc.com/piriformis-syndromesacroiliac-dysfunction/.

Ro, Tae Hoon, and Lance Edmonds. “Diagnosis and Management of Piriformis Syndrome: A Rare Anatomic Variant Analyzed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.” Journal of Clinical Imaging Science, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 21 Feb. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5843966/.

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The Somatovisceral Interface With Pelvic Pain

The Somatovisceral Interface With Pelvic Pain

Introduction

Pain in different body areas can excruciate the host as it can affect other regions. In the body, pain can affect the muscles, tissues, organs, and skeletal joints through environmental factors that affect the body’s systems. For example, the gut system provides the body with overall health and wellness by regulating homeostasis and metabolism, which can be affected by common factors like stress or unhealthy eating habits that can cause joint inflammation due to overproducing harmful gut bacteria. Or how about poor posture affecting the organs in the pelvic region and causing the lower back and neck muscles to have a dull ache in the body. Today’s article looks at how pelvic pain affects the somato-visceral reflexes in the body and how there are treatments for relieving pelvic pain. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in chiropractic treatments that help those with pelvic pain. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

Lobzova.NYCOMEC.05.25.2017

Somatovisceral Reflexes & Pelvic Pain

Have you experienced pain in your lower back or pelvic regions from sitting too long? Have you experienced bladder dysfunction that is causing you to urinate frequently? Or are you suffering from muscle cramps in the pelvic area? Studies have revealed that pelvic pain can be a chronic, persistent pain associated with co-morbidities like IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), neurological disorders, or low back pain. Pelvic pain is challenging to diagnose since it is multifactorial and shares various nerve roots that send signals to the brain. For example, individuals that suffer from pelvic pain will complain about the somatovisceral convergence affecting their reproductive organs and connective tissues. Other issues like prolonged sitting and poor posture can also affect the lumbosacral nerve root as it is being compressed, causing low back pain and pelvic organ dysfunction.

 

 

The somato-visceral reflexes of the pelvic muscles can become overstretched and compress the surrounding nerve roots like the sciatic nerve and the lumbosacral nerve, causing issues of sciatica or lower back pain. Studies have also revealed that individuals who suffer from spinal cord injuries can disrupt the somatic lumbosacral nerve pathway that is responsible for coordinating bladder function to the pelvic region. These pathways can also produce different autonomic reflex responses to the various organs and somatic afferents. For example, if a female is experiencing pain in her hips or thighs from hyper-sensitive nerve roots, the brain will register that as pain in her reproductive system. Or, if the pelvic muscles are hypersensitive to the touch, something might be affecting the genital regions.


An Overview Of Pelvic Pain- Video

Have you experienced muscle tenderness located in the pelvic region? Have stressful events caused changes in the reproductive system? Have you experienced pelvic pain that is associated with low back pain? You might be experiencing these systems due to pelvic pain and associated co-morbidities. The video above gives an overview of pelvic pain and how it affects the body. Research studies have revealed that the characteristic of mechanically induced pelvic pain and organic dysfunction that correlates to lower sacral nerve root compression results from low back disorders. The environmental factors that can cause low back conditions include:

  • Obesity
  • Heavy lifting
  • Muscle strain
  • Poor posture
  • Herniated disc

Treatments For Pelvic Pain

 

Various treatments can help relieve these overlapping risk profiles associated with pelvic pain and low back pain that are causing the issue and strengthen the weak muscle affected. Exercising can help support the hip and thigh muscles to prevent muscle strain on the low back and pelvic muscles with the combination of chiropractic therapy to provide beneficial pain relief. Chiropractic therapy on the lumbar spine can help alleviate pelvic pain and lumbosacral nerve root irritation affecting the pelvic region. The effects of chiropractic therapy help sustain the caudal flexion of the lumbar spine and release the muscle that aggravates the lumbosacral nerve root that is running along the pelvic region. 

 

Conclusion

Pain affecting the pelvic region can be due to co-morbidities affecting different areas in the body. With pelvic pain being multifactoral, it can be a challenge to diagnose since it shares various nerve roots signaling to the brain. This causes many individuals to complain about somatovisceral convergence that can affect their reproductive organs and connective tissues in the pelvic region. Other issues like low back pain associated with prolonged sitting and poor posture can cause pelvic pain too. Treatments like chiropractic therapy and exercising can help strengthen the low back and pelvic muscles to alleviate painful symptoms that are causing underlying issues and discomfort in the body.

 

References

Browning, J E. “Mechanically Induced Pelvic Pain and Organic Dysfunction in a Patient without Low Back Pain.” Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 1990, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2212886/.

Browning, J E. “Chiropractic distractive decompression in treating pelvic pain and multiple system pelvic organic dysfunction.” Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics vol. 12,4 (1989): 265-74. pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2527938/

CM;, Spitznagle TM;Robinson. “Myofascial Pelvic Pain.” Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 9 June 2014, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25155122/.

Craggs, Michael D. “Pelvic Somato-Visceral Reflexes after Spinal Cord Injury: Measures of Functional Loss and Partial Preservation.” Progress in Brain Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2006, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16198702/.

Dydyk, Alexander M, and Nishant Gupta. “Chronic Pelvic Pain – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 11 Nov. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK554585/.

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A Look Into Pelvic Dysfunction & Lower Abdominal Pain

A Look Into Pelvic Dysfunction & Lower Abdominal Pain

Introduction

The lower half helps stabilize the body and provides movement from the legs and rotation in the hips. The lower abdominal organs help control bowel movement while the muscles allow movement by regulating internal abdominal pressure. Combined with the back muscles, the lower abdomen can keep the body stable while protecting the lumbar section of the spine. When external factors begin to affect the lower back or disrupt the lower abdominal organs, it can trigger different symptoms that correspond to other sections of the body, like knee or leg pain being associated with menstrual cramping in the lower abdominals or even having pelvic pain that is an associated mediator to having constipation. Today’s article looks at pelvic pain, how it affects the lower abdominals, and ways to treat pelvic dysfunction in the body. We refer patients to certified, skilled providers specializing in chiropractic treatments that help those suffering from pelvic pain. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

Lobzova.NYCOMEC.05.25.2017

How Does Pelvic Pain Occur?

 

Have you suffered from frequent urination or irregular periods? Have you felt excruciating pain when bending down? Or feeling muscle weakness in the lower extremities of the body? Many of these symptoms are correlated to pelvic pain and can trigger different symptoms affecting the body’s lower half. Research studies have mentioned that pelvic pain in its chronic form is a non-cyclic pain located in the pelvis, and the multiple causations can make it difficult to source where the pain is coming from. The overlapping profiles of pelvic pain can be traced through the numerous nerve pathways that are connected to the spine that can become aggravated and become the mediators for pelvic pain. For example, a person having low back pain might experience uncontrollable urinary discharge in their pelvic region. This could be due to the lower sacral nerve root being impaired and causing an overlap of the profiles resulting from mechanical legions to the lumbar spine, thus increasing the risk associated with the pelvis. 

 

How Does It Affect The Lower Abdominals?

The pelvic region ensures that the body’s lower half is stable and protects the lower abdominal organs from disruptive factors like pelvic pain. Research studies have shown that pelvic pain is a relatively common pain associated with comorbidities affecting the body. Some of the various associated symptoms of pelvic pain can cause a correlation to disturbances of the bladder and sexual function in both sexes while also triggering abdominal and low back pain. Additional research studies have found that chronic pelvic pain can cause a correlated issue with PBS or painful bladder syndrome. What PBS does is that it can make a person have a frequent need to urinate and can cause the pelvic muscles to become tense and sensitive. This coincidentally causes the lower sacral nerves to be aggravated and become a mediator for the genital region to be hypersensitive.


Pelvic Pain Overview-Video

Are you feeling stiffness or tenderness in the groin region? How about going to the bathroom constantly? Or have you been experiencing low back pain? Many of these symptoms correlate to pelvic pain and other symptoms associated with the body. The video above overviews pelvic pain and how it affects the body’s lower extremities. The pelvic region consists of lower sacral nerve roots connected to several different nerve pathways that correspond to the primary nerves and provide an extensive neurological connection to the other areas in the pelvis. When mediators cause an increased risk in the pelvic region, the pelvic splanchnic nerves start to trigger muscle dysfunction in the lower abdominal organs. This causes numerous combinations of symptoms and disorders that causes overlapping of profiles in the body. The lower sacral nerve that is aggravated in the pelvic region could be the causation of pelvic and leg pain.


Treatments For Pelvic Dysfunction

 

Since the pelvic region has many nerve roots that are intertwined and connect to the major nerves in the spinal cord, it can become aggravated by accompanying the lower lumbar and upper sacral nerve roots to be impaired. Research studies have found that pelvic pain can cause an overlap in risk profiles that involves either the visceral or somatic system and the encompassed structures that help the nervous system form a causal relationship to the spine and lower extremities. When the nerve roots become irritated and affect the pelvic region, treatments like chiropractic therapy and physical therapy can help relieve the pelvic area and even help alleviate other symptoms. Physical therapy helps strengthen the hip and abdominal muscles from becoming weak and can reduce overlapping pathologies. Chiropractic therapy can help manipulate the L-1 through 5 vertebrae in the lumbar region of the spine, causing low back pain and bladder dysfunction. Research studies have mentioned that spinal manipulation can help reduce lower sacral nerve root compression triggering low back pain associated with leg pain. This overlap of risk profiles may cause pelvic pain affecting the body and causing organ dysfunction.

 

Conclusion

The lower half of the body consists of the lower abdominal organs and the pelvic region that allows bowel movement and keeps the body stable when in motion. When external factors begin to affect the lower back or the lower abdominal organs, it can cause a triggering effect on different sections of the body. Pelvic pain can affect the internal organs in the lower abdominal and pelvic region and cause comorbidities affecting the body’s lower back and bladder function. Treatments that help strengthen the hips and abdominal muscles or manipulate the spine to reduce the encased nerves trapped in the pelvic muscles will provide relief to the body’s lower extremities and improve functionality.

 

References

Browning, J E. “Chiropractic Distractive Decompression in Treating Pelvic Pain and Multiple System Pelvic Organic Dysfunction.” Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 1989, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2527938/.

Dydyk, Alexander M, and Nishant Gupta. “Chronic Pelvic Pain – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 11 Nov. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK554585/.

Grinberg, Keren, et al. “New Insights about Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS).” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, MDPI, 26 Apr. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7246747/.

Hwang, Sarah K. “Advances in the Treatment of Chronic Pelvic Pain: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Treatment.” Missouri Medicine, Journal of the Missouri State Medical Association, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6143566/.

Lee, Dae Wook, et al. “Chronic Pelvic Pain Arising from Dysfunctional Stabilizing Muscles of the Hip Joint and Pelvis.” The Korean Journal of Pain, The Korean Pain Society, Oct. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5061646/.

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Pelvic Pain & Gut Disorders

Pelvic Pain & Gut Disorders

Introduction

The body is held up by skeletal joints that keep the body upright and provide everyday movements for the body to go anywhere at any time. The musculoskeletal system provides the muscles, tissues, and ligaments that encase the skeletal joints protecting them from unknown factors that can cause harm to the body. The internal organs also have a purpose in the body as they help provide the nutrients and necessary hormones to the muscles and joints that need these nutrients to function. When environmental factors affect the body, either internal or external, it can cause the body to become dysfunctional and even cause unwanted symptoms that affect the internal organs that correspond to the muscles suffering. Today’s article looks at pelvic pain, how gut disorders are associated with pelvic pain, and how viscerosomatic pain affects the pelvis. We refer patients to certified, skilled providers specializing in osteopathic and gut treatments that help those with gut disorders and pelvic pain issues. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

06 - Clarke John Integrative Dysmotility

What Is Pelvic Pain?

 

Have you been experiencing gut issues that are affecting your pelvic region? Has your gut been feeling inflammatory effects? Have you noticed that you need to go to the bathroom more frequently than usual? Many of these symptoms are some of the signs that are associated with pelvic pain. Research studies have defined pelvic pain as disabling, chronic, and persistent pain that commonly affects women. Pelvic pain can range from acute to chronic depending on how severe the pain affects the pelvic region of the body. Additional research studies have mentioned that pelvic pain in its chronic form can become a multifactorial disorder that can cause pain in the gastrointestinal, pelvic musculoskeletal, or nervous system, making the immune, neurological, and endocrine metabolism dysfunctional. When pelvic pain begins to affect the gastrointestinal system, it can lead to various gut disorders that can cause the pain to become worse if it is not treated.

 

How Do Gut Disorders Associate Pelvic Pain?

Research studies have mentioned that since pelvic pain is a multifactorial disorder, it can cause pain to arise in the internal organs in the gastrointestinal system. When pelvic pain starts to affect the gastrointestinal system, it can cause the development of gut disorders to affect the body further. When gut disorders co-exist with pelvic pain, it can cause an enhancement to the overall pain symptoms that are becoming the result of viscerosomatic dysfunction through the cross-organ sensitization mechanisms. Additional information studies have mentioned that gut disorders like IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) can cause changes in thermal/visceral pain sensitivity that overlap in the lower body’s pelvic region, further enhancing rectal/thermal pain. This can cause a person to become miserable and even affect their quality of life since they are suffering from so much pain.


Visceral Afferent Nerves Being Affected By Pelvic Pain-Video

Have you experienced gut issues like IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), inflammation, or IBD (inflammatory bowel disease)? Have you felt pain in your pelvic region constantly? Has the pain-affected certain areas in your body, not just your pelvis? If you have these symptoms, it might be due to your visceral nerves being involved. The video above explains what the visceral afferent nerves from the pelvic region are doing to keep the body functioning in the lower extremities. The visceral afferent nerves become aggravated by environmental factors affecting the body, including the gut system. Symptoms of inflammation and gut disorders from persistent aspects of many forms of stress or trauma can cause visceral pain to affect the body, thus causing pelvic pain, gut issues, lower back pain, and other body pains.


How Viscerosomatic Pain Affects The Pelvis

 

The body’s viscerosomatic pain can be complex since the organs also affect the corresponding muscles. The way the pain is described in the body from viscerosomatic pain ranges from dull to excruciating pain. Research studies have mentioned that the burden of viscerosomatic pain emanates from the internal thoracic, pelvic, and abdominal organs associated with the muscles. For visceral pain to affect the pelvic region, research studies have shown that the nociceptive pain from the pelvic area is usually visceral from the results from the pelvic organs that are poorly localized and can overlap with the somatic sensory tracts that are located in the spinal cord. When this happens, it can cause significant discomfort to the pelvic organs in the body and affect the individual with excruciating painful symptoms. 

 

Conclusion

The body provides everyday movements held by the skeletal joints that help the body go anywhere. While the musculoskeletal system and the internal organs help give the muscles, tissues, ligaments, and nutrients the body needs to function. When environmental factors affect the body, it can lead to various issues that cause gut disorders and even pain in the pelvic region, known as visceral pain. Visceral pain is a complex disorder since the affected organs also affect the corresponding muscles. For visceral pain to affect the pelvic area, it can lead to dull excruciating pain in the pelvic organs and affect the individual. Visceral pain can also overlap the sensory somatic tracts in the spinal cord, causing unbearable painful symptoms to the body while inflammatory issues in the gut system are developing. When people realize that the pain is affecting them, they can start to find treatments from their specialized providers to help alleviate their pain.

 

References

Dydyk, Alexander M, and Nishant Gupta. “Chronic Pelvic Pain – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 11 Nov. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK554585/.

Grinberg, Keren, et al. “New Insights about Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS).” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, MDPI, 26 Apr. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7246747/.

Origoni, Massimo, et al. “Neurobiological Mechanisms of Pelvic Pain.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4119661.

Udoji, Mercy A, and Timothy J Ness. “New Directions in the Treatment of Pelvic Pain.” Pain Management, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3979473/.

Verne, G Nicholas, et al. “Viscerosomatic Facilitation in a Subset of IBS Patients, an Effect Mediated by N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors.” The Journal of Pain, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3489925/.

Yuan, Tian, and Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld. “Abdominal and Pelvic Pain: Current Challenges and Future Opportunities.” Frontiers in Pain Research (Lausanne, Switzerland), Frontiers Media S.A., 4 Feb. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8915637/.

Disclaimer

Alleviating Hip Pain With Decompression Therapy

Alleviating Hip Pain With Decompression Therapy

Introduction

The body is a marvelous functional machine that requires constantly moving worldwide. The body can do everyday movements from the head to the feet and be in weird positions without feeling pain. However, ordinary factors like natural aging, wear and tear, and issues affect the body over time. When these factors start to affect the body, they can cause unwanted symptoms that can inflict pain on specific areas around the body. Some areas that suffer pain include the hips, lower back, neck, the body’s internal systems, and the spine, causing the individual to be miserable. Luckily many treatments do relieve pain in the body and help dampen the effects of the unwanted symptoms that are hindering the individual. Today’s article focuses on hip pain, its symptoms, and how decompression therapy can help many individuals suffering from hip pain. By referring patients to qualified and skilled providers specializing in spinal decompression therapy. To that end, and when appropriate, we advise our patients to refer to our associated medical providers based on their examination. We find that education is the key to asking valuable questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

G-9 - DRX_ClinicalTrial

 

What Is Hip Pain?

 

Are you feeling stiffness from your lower back and hips? Do your hips hurt after falling due to playing sports? How about pain from the lower back to the hips down to the feet? You might be experiencing hip pain. Research studies have stated that hip pain can be associated with many factors that can cause many individuals to be in distress, impair their daily activities, and affect their quality of life. Hip pain can be associated with simple movements that are damaged, like sitting and standing, which can be hard after a while. Other associations that hip pain can occur can be lower back painneuropathiesherniation, or chronic pain. According to research studies, hip pain is considered a musculoskeletal disorder. It shows that posterior hip pain in adults is caused by osteoarthritis or traumatic causes like sacral stress fractures that can affect the hips. This musculoskeletal disorder can become a problem for many older adults suffering from hip issues. 

 

The Symptoms

Research studies have found that hip pain is a musculoskeletal complaint affecting young and old adults. Since hip pain is associated with various chronic issues, it can cause many individuals to be miserable and be in constant pain. For adults, hip pain can be one of the issues for those suffering from osteoarthritis in the anterior hip region. As research shows, in the posterior hip region, hip pain can be associated with chronic conditions like piriformis syndrome and lumbar radiculopathy that are centralized in the lower back. Other symptoms that hip pain cause on its own do associate with other chronic conditions, including:


Preparing For Lubar Traction Therapy-Video

Are you experiencing discomfort from your hips while sitting or standing? How about sharp, throbbing pain coming from your lower back and affecting your hips and legs? Do you feel tenderness and swelling on your joints? These symptoms are various forms of hip pain, and lumbar traction can help lower hip pain symptoms. The video above mentions how to prepare for lumbar traction therapy and how it can alleviate symptoms caused by hip pain. Lumbar traction helps compressed disc in the lumbar region of the spine to be restored to its original state and even takes the pressure off the sciatic nerve and other nerve roots that are causing hip pain to the body. Utilizing traction therapy increases the disc height and allows the lumbar spinal discs to be rehydrated again. Suppose you want to learn more about lumbar traction or decompression and how it can benefit you? In that case, this link will explain what decompression does for the lumbar area in the spine and provide relief from hip pain and its associates.


How Decompression Therapy Helps With Hip Pain

 

Since hip pain is associated with various other conditions that can affect the body, the most common condition that the body has suffered from is low back pain. There are ways to treat hip and low back pain; some individuals utilize heat and ice to neutralize the pain to go away, and others use chiropractic therapy to get the joints to realign themselves. One of the treatments used to relieve hip and low back pain is decompression therapy. Research studies have found that decompression therapy is safe and effective in helping to improve the blood circulation to the hips to provide relief to the hips. Since hip pain is associated with low back pain, decompression allows the herniated discs to be taken off the nerves surrounding the hips and provide pain relief. Other research studies show that traction is used to create negative gravity pressure to help reduce the pressure that is causing pain to the soft tissues and the nerve roots. This negative gravity allows the spine to separate and create more height for the disc to rehydrate while relieving the individual.

 

Conclusion

Overall the body is a marvelous machine that has the ability to move without pain. When issues start to affect the body, like the hips and lower back, it can cause the individual to suffer from various forms of pain. Since hip pain is associated with low back pain, it can lead to other chronic issues like sciatica or osteoarthritis, affecting the joints and causing them to swell. Treatments like decompression or traction therapy are used to alleviate the pain caused by the hips or lower back. When people incorporate decompression or traction into their wellness journey, they relax a bit as they are laid down and have their spine stretched slowly. This will cause them relief and take the pressure off the nerve roots that are sending pain signals to the brain. This ensures them that they can take back their lives pain-free.

 

References

Ahuja, Vanita, et al. “Chronic Hip Pain in Adults: Current Knowledge and Future Prospective.” Journal of Anaesthesiology, Clinical Pharmacology, Wolters Kluwer – Medknow, 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8022067/.

Battaglia, Patrick J, et al. “Posterior, Lateral, and Anterior Hip Pain Due to Musculoskeletal Origin: A Narrative Literature Review of History, Physical Examination, and Diagnostic Imaging.” Journal of Chiropractic Medicine, Elsevier, Dec. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5106442/.

Choi, Jioun, et al. “Influences of Spinal Decompression Therapy and General Traction Therapy on the Pain, Disability, and Straight Leg Raising of Patients with Intervertebral Disc Herniation.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, The Society of Physical Therapy Science, Feb. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4339166/.

Lee, Yun Jong, et al. “Causes of Chronic Hip Pain Undiagnosed or Misdiagnosed by Primary Physicians in Young Adult Patients: A Retrospective Descriptive Study.” Journal of Korean Medical Science, The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences, 11 Dec. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6300658/.

Wilson, John J, and Masaru Furukawa. “Evaluation of the Patient with Hip Pain.” American Family Physician, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 Jan. 2014, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24444505/.

Disclaimer

Out Of Alignment Hips Decompression

Out Of Alignment Hips Decompression

Healthy hips are necessary for standing, sitting, walking, running, bending, twisting, lifting, etc. Hip problems can seriously interfere with everyday activities. Out of alignment hips don’t just cause pain and soreness in the hip area but can radiate to other body areas. When the hip joint is out of alignment, the rest of the body has to start compensating for the misalignment, which can cause chronic pain in the back and/or legs.

Out Of Alignment Hips Decompression

Out of Alignment Hips

Discomfort and soreness begin as occasional but can quickly become regular. Individuals may also begin to limp when they walk, have a reduced range of motion in the hips, and pain that escalates with physical activity and improves with immobility/rest. Out of alignment hips can be caused by:

  • Lifting incorrectly
  • Repetitively carrying heavy loads on one side of the body places uneven pressure on the pelvis, causing an imbalance.
  • Performing repetitive motions that begin to stress the joint
  • Wearing shoes that do not provide proper support
  • Standing and leaning on one leg regularly
  • Injury/trauma
  • Physical leg length discrepancy
  • Functional leg length discrepancy
  • Scoliosis

Physical Leg Length Discrepancy

If the legs are different lengths, this can cause the hips to go out of alignment. Using a foot wedge/foot orthotic in the shoe can remedy the situation.

Functional Leg Length Discrepancy

Functional leg length discrepancy is a common cause of hip misalignment, meaning that leg length is equal, but the individual is doing something to cause the hips to go out of alignment. It usually involves posture, standing, walking, sitting, lifting, and carrying improperly or awkwardly and repetitively could create functional leg length discrepancy.

Scoliosis

Scoliosis is only one cause of hip misalignment. It is not likely that an individual has scoliosis if they are an adult and have not previously been diagnosed with the condition. If a child has what looks like a misaligned hip, it is recommended to take them to get tested for scoliosis. Most children with the disorder will outgrow it, but they need to be monitored by a medical professional.

Symptoms include:

  • Uneven gait
  • Uneven shoulders
  • Hip pain on one side
  • Groin pain
  • Tight buttock muscles
  • Tight leg muscles
  • Back pain – upper and lower
  • Sciatica
  • Knee pain
  • Ankle pain

One of the most prominent signs that it is a hip problem is the presence of groin pain. Groin pain can radiate downward toward the buttocks, front of the thighs, and knees. The hip joint is located behind the groin; pain usually means the hip is the root cause.

Chiropractic Decompression

A chiropractic examination can identify uneven hips. Chiropractic and motorized spinal decompression can reset the hips to their proper position. A chiropractor will be able to rebalance the hips and help avoid invasive surgical treatments and long-term rehabilitation.


DRX9000 90 Seconds Spinal Decompression


References

Battaglia, Patrick J et al. “Posterior, Lateral, and Anterior Hip Pain Due to Musculoskeletal Origin: A Narrative Literature Review of History, Physical Examination, and Diagnostic Imaging.” Journal of chiropractic medicine vol. 15,4 (2016): 281-293. doi:10.1016/j.jcm.2016.08.004

Jones HR, Burns TM, Aminoff MJ, Pomeroy SL. Pain. Chapter: Diagnosis of Low Back, Buttock, and Hip Pain. Netter Collection of Medical Illustrations: Spinal Cord and Peripheral Motor and Sensory Systems, Section 8, 201-224.

Khamis, Sam, and Eli Carmeli. “A new concept for measuring leg length discrepancy.” Journal of orthopedics vol. 14,2 276-280. 27 Mar. 2017, doi:10.1016/j.jor.2017.03.008

Miyagi, Masayuki, et al. “Hip-spine syndrome: cross-sectional-study of spinal alignment in patients with coxalgia.” Hip international: the journal of clinical and experimental research on hip pathology and therapy vol. 29,1 (2019): 21-25. doi:10.1177/1120700018803236

Nunes, Guilherme S et al. “Acute Effects of Hip Mobilization With Movement Technique on Pain and Biomechanics in Females With Patellofemoral Pain: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.” Journal of sport rehabilitation vol. 29,6 707-715. 18 Oct. 2019, doi:10.1123/jsr.2018-0497

Hip Sprain

Hip Sprain

The hips are highly active joints. Hip sprains are rare but do occur. A hip sprain is caused by tearing or stretching the ligaments that surround the hip and join the bones to each other. This is different from a hip strain, which is an injury to the muscles and is generally caused by over-use of the hip flexor muscles and tendons, causing them to tear. Hip sprains usually happen after a fall or a sudden twisting motion, which can occur during sports or an accident.

Individuals involved in sports that require quick stops, body shifting, and sudden direction changes, like soccer, football, basketball, tennis, volleyball, etc., have an increased risk. Most hip sprains can be effectively treated with conservative treatments like self-massage, rest, ice, and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory medications. For more severe cases, physical therapy and chiropractic can treat the condition.

Hip Sprain

Hip Sprain Symptoms

  • Tenderness in the hip increases when lifting the thigh.
  • Cramping sensation/s in the muscles of the upper leg.
  • Swelling in the hip or thigh
  • Bruising in the hip or thigh.
  • Sudden pain in the hip or pelvis.
  • Sharp pain in the hip or pelvis.
  • Pain that worsens when walking, running, or stretching the hip muscles.
  • Loss of strength in the front of the groin.
  • Tugging or pulling sensation.
  • Limping.

Diagnosis

The doctor or chiropractor will:

  • Look into medical history.
  • Inquire about symptoms.
  • Inquire about activities that could cause symptoms.
  • Perform a physical examination.
  • Ask the individual to perform a variety of movements to determine what type of injury has been sustained.
  • Other conditions could cause radiating pain.
  • Pain in one or both hips might not have anything to do with the hips but a pinched nerve root in the lower back.
  • Sciatica can develop when certain nerve roots in the lower back are irritated or compressed, causing symptoms to travel down the sciatic nerve and radiate around the pelvis and leg.
  • X-rays can help rule out hip stress fractures, which can have similar symptoms.
  • MRI or CT scans are used to see if any soft tissue damage has occurred.

Hip Sprain Treatment

  • Treatment usually begins with over-the-counter pain medications and anti-inflammatories to reduce swelling and relieve pain.
  • Resting the hip will help prevent further damage.
  • Applying ice will help prevent tissue damage and reduce swelling.
  • It is recommended to use an ice pack several times a day for the first 48 hours after an injury.
  • Once the swelling goes down, a chiropractor and physical therapy team will create a personalized treatment plan that includes:
  • Adjustments.
  • Exercise therapy.
  • Posture training.
  • Stretching.
  • Massage.

Treatment/Rehabilitation Objectives

  • Reduce inflammation.
  • Relax muscle spasms.
  • Strengthen weakened muscles.
  • Improve joint mobility.

Individuals will be shown how to prevent the risk of sprains in the future. This includes:

  • Avoiding exercising when the body is tired
  • Wearing proper footwear and protective equipment
  • Warming up properly before exercise/physical activities.

Depending on the severity of the sprain, surgery could be the last resort to repair the ruptured or torn ligaments.


Body Composition


Realistic Goals

Not seeing results after putting in the work through exercise and diet can be frustrating. Setting realistic goals can help when results are not showing.

Realistic Fat Loss

  • Do not expect actual fat loss without being in a caloric deficit.
  • The body needs to use more energy than the amount of food/energy taken in; otherwise, excess energy/food gets stored, primarily as adipose tissue.
  • Total Daily Energy Expenditure or TDEE is necessary to set a realistic caloric deficit to achieve measurable fat loss.
  • There are caloric deficit variations, but most doctors, dieticians, trainers, and fitness experts agree that a caloric deficit of around 500 calories a day that equals to about 3,500 calories a week will result in a pound of fat loss per week.
  • One pound of fat a week lost might seem slow, but the one pound of fat is a real pound removed.
  • The long-term goal is not to fall back into unhealthy habits and develop and maintain new healthy ones.
References

Brantingham JW, Globe GA, Cassa TK, et al. A single-group pretest posttest design using full kinetic chain manipulative therapy with rehabilitation in the treatment of 18 patients with hip osteoarthritis. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapy 2012; 33(6): 445-57.

Kamali, Fahimeh and Esmaeil Shokri. The effect of two manipulative therapy techniques and their outcome in patients with the sacroiliac joint syndrome. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. 2012; 16: 29-35.

McMorland G, Suter E, Casha S, du Plessis SJ, Hurlbert RJ. Manipulation or microdiscectomy for sciatica? A prospective randomized clinical study. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. 2010; 33(8): 576-584.

Tibor, Lisa M, and Jon K Sekiya. “Differential diagnosis of pain around the hip joint.” Arthroscopy: the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery: official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association vol. 24,12 (2008): 1407-21. doi:10.1016/j.arthro.2008.06.019

Wedro, Benjamin. “Hip Pain: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment Information and Diagnosis-eMedicineHealth.” www.emedicinehealth.com/hip_pain/article_em.htm.

Tense Hips, Hamstrings, and Back Pain

Tense Hips, Hamstrings, and Back Pain

The body is a connected whole and more than just separate parts and regions. When back pain presents, it might not be the back muscles or spine but could be tense, tight hips, and hamstrings causing low back pain. How it happens, how to stretch and loosen up, and target these areas could help alleviate the pain.

Tense Hips, Hamstrings, and Back Pain

The Hips and Hamstrings

When the hip flexors and hamstrings become tense, the tightness can alter the pelvic alignment. This affects spinal alignment leading to discomfort and low back pain. The hip flexors are a group of muscles around the front of the hips, and they activate when moving the leg and knee upward. The hamstrings are the muscles in the back of the thighs that allow for flexion of the knees and hip extension. Muscle tightness in the hips and/or hip joint stiffness can also contribute to low back pain. Not being able to rotate, flex, or extend the hip forward or backward can affect:

  • Walking
  • Running
  • Swinging
  • Twisting movements
  • This increases mechanical strain on the lower back.

Hamstring tightness can be a side effect of:

  • Low back pain
  • Pelvic positioning
  • Muscle guarding
  • Weakness
  • All can contribute to the hamstrings feeling tight.

Tense Hips and Hamstrings

The factors creating this tightness can come from:

  • A sedentary lifestyle
  • Little to no physical activity
  • Sitting too long with no stretching or movement.
  • Injury
  • Intense workout

Losing the ability to function through the entire length of motion can also indicate muscle weakness and a lack of joint movement where the joint around the muscle becomes stiff. This can be caused by:

  • A lack of movement
  • Arthritis
  • Age-related changes

Stretching and Treatment

Stretching exercises can be the first line of treatment. It is recommended to start with gentle stretches targeting these areas. What works best for the individual is the stretch they are comfortable repeating enough to make a difference. Warming up the muscles first will generate the best results. An easy place to begin is a gentle forward fold stretch.

  • Stand up straight, or sit with the legs extended out in front.
  • Then, reach with the fingers toward the toes. Don’t worry if you can’t reach them.
  • Don’t bounce.
  • Hold the position for a few seconds.
  • Repeat five to 10 times.

For the hip flexors, stretches include:

If the stretching does not bring relief, it is recommended to progress to a personalized treatment and stretching program with a chiropractor or physical therapist. Chiropractic and physical therapy can relieve the problems without medication, injections, or surgery and provide lifelong techniques for maintaining optimal flexibility, mobility, and strength. The hands-on treatment loosens and relieves the tense tightness, reinforcing the flexibility and range of motion. Treatment includes:

  • Joint mobilization to the hips and spine.
  • Soft tissue mobilization.
  • A personalized strengthening program with stretches and exercises that target the specific muscles.
  • Health coaching.
  • Anti-inflammatory diet recommendations.

Body Composition


Monounsaturated Fats

Monounsaturated fat is considered healthy fat. This type of fat makes up a significant component of the Mediterranean diet. Studies have shown monounsaturated fats like extra-virgin olive oil can help prevent adverse events related to cardiovascular disease. A meta-analysis evaluating diets high in monounsaturated fats indicated a significant reduction in:

  • Triglycerides
  • Bodyweight
  • Systolic blood pressure in individuals with type II diabetes.
  • A significant increase in HDL or good cholesterol.

Another study showed the protective effects of monounsaturated fatty acids reduced the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Monounsaturated fats can have a positive impact on overall health. Monounsaturated fat sources include:

  • Olive, peanut, and canola oil
  • Avocados
  • Almonds
  • Pecans
  • Hazelnuts
  • Sesame and pumpkin seeds
References

Estruch, Ramón et al. “Retraction and Republication: Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease with a Mediterranean Diet. N Engl J Med 2013;368:1279-90.” The New England journal of medicine vol. 378,25 (2018): 2441-2442. doi:10.1056/NEJMc1806491

Gillingham, Leah G et al. “Dietary monounsaturated fatty acids are protective against metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease risk factors.” Lipids vol. 46,3 (2011): 209-28. doi:10.1007/s11745-010-3524-y

American College of Physicians. (February 2017) “American College of Physicians issues guideline for treating non-radicular low back pain” www.acponline.org/acp-newsroom/american-college-of-physicians-issues-guideline-for-treating-nonradicular-low-back-pain

MedlinePlus. (2019) Hip flexor strain – aftercare medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000682.htm

NCBI. (2021) Hamstring Injury www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK558936/