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Diets

Back Clinic Diets. The sum of food consumed by any living organism. The word diet is the use of specific intake of nutrition for health or weight management. Food provides people with the necessary energy and nutrients to be healthy. By eating various healthy foods, including good quality vegetables, fruits, whole-grain products, and lean meats, the body can replenish itself with the essential proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals to function effectively.

Having a healthy diet is one of the best things to prevent and control various health problems, i.e., types of cancers, heart disease, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes. Dr. Alex Jimenez offers nutritional examples and describes the importance of balanced nutrition throughout this series of articles. In addition, Dr. Jimenez emphasizes how a proper diet combined with physical activity can help individuals reach and maintain a healthy weight, reduce their risk of developing chronic diseases like heart disease, and ultimately promote overall health and wellness.


Not All Foods Are Beneficial For Bone Health and Osteoporosis Prevention

Not All Foods Are Beneficial For Bone Health and Osteoporosis Prevention

There are certain foods that although healthy, for individuals trying to prevent osteoporosis, they could stunt healthy bone growth. There are ways to prevent osteoporosis, and eating a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D is one of them. However, not all foods are beneficial for bone health. Some nutrients can actually damage bones when consumed in high doses. These foods do not have to be completely removed from an individual’s diet. These foods and nutrients are still important so it would not be healthy to just stop. Individuals with or trying to prevent osteoporosis just need to make adjustments and consume them in moderation.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Not All Foods Are Beneficial For Bone Health and Osteoporosis Prevention
 

Caffeine

Too much caffeine more than four cups of coffee a day decreases calcium absorption, that increases risk for fractures. Coffee and tea contain caffeine naturally, but sodas create even larger concerns. Experts believe that the caffeine content in sodas is not the only danger. It is the substitution of milk and other calcium-based drinks.

Protein

Protein is essential for a balanced diet. This is because it helps build healthy muscle mass. A diet too high in animal protein (beef/pork) as opposed to protein from nuts and grains could contribute to calcium loss. Animal protein/s contain sulfur, that forms acid in the body. Acidic balance is necessary and so the body will release calcium from the bones to neutralize the acid and achieve balance.

What is considered too much protein?

No general amount has been determined. Therefore just an individual’s daily requirement, determined by body weight is what is recommended. Finding out how much protein is needed, take your weight in pounds, and multiply by .37. (Weight/lbs x .37 =) This will tell an individual how many grams they should be consuming every day. There are more specific techniques to get an exact number if need be.

Spinach

Green vegetables are considered some of the best foods to eat when the aim is to strengthen the bones. But spinach can prevent the body from absorbing calcium properly. This is because it contains oxalate. Oxalate interferes with the body’s ability to absorb calcium. Fortunately, spinach can still be included but may need to be adjusted/altered as to how it is prepared. In this case, spinach is best eaten cooked, as the chemical is destroyed through the process.
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Not All Foods Are Beneficial For Bone Health and Osteoporosis Prevention
 

Salt

Too much salt makes it difficult for the body to keep the calcium, which can cause bone loss. Many processed foods are extremely high in sodium. Therefore, try to eat fresh foods and try sea, Himalayan, or healthy form of salt when seasoning meals.

Pure Wheat Bran

Pure wheat bran is the only food that can lower the absorption of calcium in other foods when eaten together. If taking a calcium supplement the effects of this process can be lessened by taking the supplement a few hours before or after eating foods with pure wheat bran. These foods don’t have to be eliminated from your diet but should be consumed in moderation. The focus should be on a balanced diet. Building strong bones and maintaining them can be a delicious endeavor. Osteoporosis prevention is not the only benefit of healthy eating habits. A proper diet will promote and generate the optimal function of the body.

Learning About Food Substitutions

 
 

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*
What is Folate Metabolism?

What is Folate Metabolism?

Folate, and its synthetic form folic acid, is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays a fundamental role in a variety of functions in the human body. Folate is essential for cell division and homeostasis because it acts as a coenzyme in many biological pathways, including amino acid metabolism, methionine production, and DNA methylation. Folate metabolism happens together with the methionine cycle and the choline pathway. Most folate coenzymes are found in the liver.

 

Folate is also used as a coenzyme to convert methionine into homocysteine. Vitamin B6 and B12, together with folate, are also essential for DNA synthesis. Proper dietary intake of folate is fundamental for normal cell growth and DNA repair. Folate or vitamin B12 deficiency can ultimately cause a variety of health issues, including anemia. Oral supplementation may be necessary. In the following article, we will discuss folate metabolism and foods that are high in folate.

 

Folate Metabolism Overview

 

Several of the most important functions of folate metabolism are methylation and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) production, one of the most essential methyl donors in the cell. In the following diagram, we will explain folate metabolism.�

 

Image of a folate metabolism diagram.

 

Figure 1: One carbon metabolism. ATP: adenosyl triphosphate, B6: vitamin B6, B12: vitamin B12, BHMT: betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, CBS: cystathionine-?-synthase, DHF: dihydrofolate, DMG: dimethylglycine, dTMP: deoxythymidine monophosphate, dUMP: deoxyuridine monophosphate, Gly: glycine, Hcy: homocysteine, MAT: methionine adenosyltransferase, Met: methionine, MCM: L-methylmalonyl CoA mutase, MM-CoA: L-methylmalonyl CoA, MMA: methylmalonic acid, MS: methionine synthase, MTHFR: 5,10-methyltetrahydrofolate reductase, SAH: S-adenosyl homocysteine, SAHH: S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase, SAM: S-adenosyl methionine, Ser: serine, SHMT, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, THF: tetrahydrofolate, TS: thymidylate synthase. Adapted from: Hypo- and hypervitaminosis of B and D vitamins � Diagnosis and clinical consequences. Herrmann W. et al. 2013. Uni-Med Verlag AG.

 

Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a component that converts folate to dihydrofolate (DHF) and DHF to the active form, THF. Folate metabolism consists of three cycles. One cycle starts with a component known as 10-formylTHF which is associated with purine production and two cycles utilize 5, 10-methyleneTHF in deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP) and methionine production. 5-MethylTHF is one of the most predominant forms of folate found in the human body.

 

After cellular uptake, 5-methylTHF is converted into THF through the use of vitamin B12 in methionine synthase (MS). The methionine cycle is a fundamental pathway in SAM production. As previously mentioned above, B vitamin deficiencies, including folate, vitamin B6, and B12, as well as genetic birth defects can ultimately cause a variety of health issues. 5,10-MethyleneTHF is finally converted to 5-methylTHF by 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR).

 

Several of the most important functions of folate metabolism are methylation and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) production, one of the most essential methyl donors in the cell. In the following diagram, we will simplify folate metabolism.�

 

Image of a second folate metabolism diagram.

 

15 Foods That Are High in Folate

 

Folate, and its synthetic form folic acid, is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays a fundamental role in a variety of functions in the human body. It�supports cell division and promotes fetal growth and development to reduce the risk of genetic birth defects. Folate is naturally found in many different types of foods. Doctors recommend 400 mcg of folate every day for adults to prevent deficiency. Here are 15 healthy foods that are high in folate or folic acid, including:

 

  • avocado
  • bananas
  • citrus fruits
  • papaya
  • beets
  • leafy greens
  • asparagus
  • Brussels sprouts
  • broccoli
  • nuts and seeds
  • legumes
  • eggs
  • beef liver
  • wheat germ
  • fortified grains

 

In conclusion, folate, and its synthetic form folic acid, is an important micronutrient that can be naturally found in many different types of foods. Eating many different types of healthy foods, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds, as well as fortified foods, is an easy way to increase your folate intake. These foods are not only high in folate but these are also high in other essential nutrients that can ultimately improve other aspects of your overall health.

 

For information regarding the nutritional role of folate, please review the following article:

Nutritional Role of Folate

 


 

Folate or folic acid is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays a fundamental role in a variety of functions in the human body, including cell division and homeostasis. Folate also helps with amino acid metabolism, methionine production, and DNA methylation.�Folate or vitamin B12 deficiency can ultimately cause a variety of health issues. Oral supplementation may be necessary. In the diagrams above, we explain the process of folate metabolism.�Folate is naturally found in many different types of foods, including avocado, citrus fruits, leafy greens, broccoli, nuts and seeds, legumes, eggs, and fortified grains.�Eating many different types of healthy foods is an easy way to increase your folate intake. These foods are not only high in folate but these are also high in other essential nutrients that can ultimately improve other aspects of your overall health.�- Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

Image of the Berry Bliss Smoothie

 

Berry Bliss Smoothie

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1/2 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen, preferably wild)
� 1 medium carrot, roughly chopped
� 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed or chia seed
� 1 tablespoons almonds
� Water (to desired consistency)
� Ice cubes (optional, may omit if using frozen blueberries)

Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth and creamy. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of Almonds.

 

Almonds have twice as much calcium as milk

 

Gram for gram this is absolutely true! According to McCance and Widdowson’s Composition of Foods (the official guide to the nutrients in food used in the UK), about 100g of almonds have 240mg of bone-building calcium while semi-skimmed (2%) milk has 120mg per 100g (3.5oz). With that being said, however, we tend to drink milk in bigger quantities than we eat almonds (and the calcium from milk is easily absorbed), so the dairy option may be a better source day-to-day.

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Almas, Saneea. �Folic Acid: An Overview of Metabolism, Dosages, and Benefits of Optimal Periconception Supplementation: InfantRisk Center.� Infant Risk Center, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, www.infantrisk.com/content/folic-acid-overview-metabolism-dosages-and-benefits-optimal-periconception-supplementation.
  • Homocysteine Expert Panel Staff. �Folate Metabolism.� Homocysteine Expert Panel, Homocysteine Expert Panel Media, www.homocysteine-panel.org/en/folatefolic-acid/basics/folate-metabolism/.
  • Link, Rachael. �15 Healthy Foods That Are High in Folate (Folic Acid).� Healthline, Healthline Media, 27 Feb. 2020, www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods-high-in-folate-folic-acid.
  • Shuhei, Ebara. �Nutritional Role of Folate.� Congenital Anomalies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 11 June 2017, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28603928/?from_term=folate%2Bmetabolism&from_pos=3.
  • MSN Lifestyle Staff. �Coffee Is a Fruit and Other Unbelievably True Food Facts.� MSN Lifestyle, MSN Lifestyle Media, 4 June 2020, www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/did-you-know/coffee-is-a-fruit-and-other-unbelievably-true-food-facts/ss-BB152Q5q?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=mailsignout#image=5.

 

MTHFR Gene Mutation and Health

MTHFR Gene Mutation and Health

The MTHFR or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene is well-known due to a genetic mutation that may cause high homocysteine levels and low folate levels in the bloodstream, among other essential nutrients. Healthcare professionals believe that a variety of health issues, such as inflammation, may be associated with an MTHFR gene mutation. In the following article, we will discuss the MTHFR gene mutation and how it can ultimately affect your overall health.

 

What is an MTHFR Gene Mutation?

 

People can have single or multiple mutations, as well as neither, on the MTHFR gene. The different mutations are often referred to as “variants”. A variant occurs when the DNA of a specific part of a gene is different or varies from person to person. People that have a heterozygous or single variant of the MTHFR gene mutation have a decreased risk of developing health issues like inflammation and chronic pain, among other diseases. Moreover, healthcare professionals also believe that people that have homozygous or multiple variants of the MTHFR gene mutation may ultimately have an increased risk of disease. There are two MTHFR gene mutation variants. These specific variants include:

 

  • C677T. Approximately 30 to 40 percent of people in the United States have a mutation at gene position C677T. About 25 percent of Hispanics and about 10 to 15 percent of Caucasians are homozygous for this variant.
  • A1298C. There are limited research studies for this variant. A 2004 study focused on 120 blood donors of Irish heritage. Of the donors, 56 or 46.7 percent were heterozygous for this variant and 11 or 14.2 percent were homozygous.
  • Both C677T and A1298C. It�s also possible for people to have both C677T and A1298C MTHFR gene mutation variations, which includes one copy of each.

 

What are the Symptoms of an MTHFR Gene Mutation?

 

Symptoms of an MTHFR gene mutation can be different from person to person and from variant to variant. It’s important to remember that further research around MTHFR gene mutation variants and their effects on health are still needed. Evidence regarding how MTHFR gene mutation variants are associated with a variety of other health issues is currently lacking or it has been disproven. Conditions that have been suggested to be associated with MTHFR variants include:

 

  • anxiety
  • depression
  • bipolar disorder
  • schizophrenia
  • migraines
  • chronic pain and fatigue
  • nerve pain
  • recurrent miscarriages in women of child-bearing age
  • pregnancies with neural tube defects, like spina bifida and anencephaly
  • cardiovascular and thromboembolic diseases (blood clots, stroke, embolism, and heart attacks)
  • acute leukemia
  • colon cancer

What is the MTHFR Diet?

 

According to healthcare professionals, eating foods with high amounts of folate may help naturally support low folate levels in the bloodstream associated with MTHFR gene mutation variants.�Good food choices can include:

 

  • fruits, such as strawberries, raspberries, grapefruit, cantaloupe, honeydew, banana.
  • juices like orange, canned pineapple, grapefruit, tomato, or other vegetable juice
  • veggies, such as spinach, asparagus, lettuce, beets, broccoli, corn, Brussels sprouts, and bok choy
  • proteins, including cooked beans, peas, and lentils
  • peanut butter
  • sunflower seeds

 

People with MTHFR gene mutations may also want to avoid eating foods that have the synthetic form of folate, folic acid, however, the evidence is not clear if that�s beneficial or necessary. Supplementation may still be recommended for people with MTHFR gene mutation variants. Furthermore, always make sure to check the labels of the foods you buy, as this vitamin is added to many enriched grains like pasta, cereals, bread, and commercially produced flours.

 

For information regarding the MTHFR and its effects on health issues like cancer, please review this article:

Folate, Methyl-Related Nutrients, Alcohol, and the MTHFR 677C >T Polymorphism Affect Cancer Risk: Intake Recommendations

 


 

MTHFR, or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, gene mutations may cause high homocysteine levels and low folate levels in the bloodstream. We believe that a variety of health issues, such as inflammation, may be associated with an MTHFR gene mutation. People can have single or multiple MTHFR gene mutations, as well as neither. The different mutations are often referred to as “variants”. People that have a heterozygous or single variant of the MTHFR gene mutation have a decreased risk of developing health issues like inflammation and chronic pain. Moreover, doctors also believe that people that have homozygous or multiple variants of the MTHFR gene mutation may ultimately have an increased risk of disease. The two MTHFR gene mutation variants are�C677T, A1298C, or both C677T and A1298C. Symptoms of an MTHFR gene mutation can be different from person to person and from variant to variant. Following what is referred to as the MTHFR diet can ultimately help improve overall health in people with MTHFR gene mutation variants. Also, adding these foods into a smoothie can be an easy way to add them into your diet. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

 

Image of protein power smoothie.

 

Protein Power Smoothie

Serving: 1
Cook time: 5 minutes

� 1 scoop protein powder
� 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed
� 1/2 banana
� 1 kiwi, peeled
� 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
� Pinch of cardamom
� Non-dairy milk or water, enough to achieve desired consistency

Blend all ingredients in a high-powered blender until completely smooth. Best served immediately!

 


 

Image of leafy greens smoothie.

 

Leafy Greens Hold the Key to Gut Health

 

A unique type of sugar found in leafy greens can help feed our beneficial gut bacteria. Sulfoquinovose (SQ) is the only known sugar molecule to be made up of sulfur, an extremely essential mineral in the human body. The human body uses sulfur to produce enzymes, proteins, and a variety of hormones as well as antibodies for our cells. A fast and easy way to get leafy greens into your diet is to toss a couple of handfuls of them into a delicious smoothie!

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require additional explanation as how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Marcin, Ashley. �What You Need to Know About the MTHFR Gene.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 6 Sept. 2019, www.healthline.com/health/mthfr-gene#variants.

 

Good Calories vs Bad Calories Overview

Good Calories vs Bad Calories Overview

Calories are defined as a measurement of the energy our body produces from the foods we eat. However, not all calories are created equal. If we were to eat nothing but spoonfuls of sugar all-day, by way of instance, our health would tremendously deteriorate because there simply aren’t enough nutrients in those calories from sugar. The human body needs a variety of nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and many other compounds in order to function properly.

 

The foods we eat are made up of calories as well as complex mixtures of nutrients, fiber, and additives. This can ultimately affect the hormones that regulate our hunger, known as leptin, and those that manage how we burn or store calories to be used for energy, known as insulin. Our bodies are naturally programmed to protect us against long-term starvation by storing excess calories as fat. Eating “bad” calories in excess amounts can ultimately lead to obesity.

 

In a research study, a group of people was given the same amount of calories but from different food sources. The participants had no significant weight gain, regardless of whether the calories were from carbohydrates, proteins, fats, or any other combination of nutrients. However, environmental factors, such as an individual’s hormonal balance, emotions, and cravings were not taken into consideration. It’s important to understand how calories can affect your health.

 

Good Calories vs Bad Calories

 

Excess calories from processed foods are stored as fat which can lead to obesity. In the United States, obesity is the main cause of health issues like insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. It is naturally produced in the pancreas and helps move excess glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. When the pancreas recognizes high blood sugar levels, it creates more insulin to reduce glucose.

 

However, this can diminish the pancreas of insulin-producing cells which can eventually cause insulin resistance or impaired insulin sensitivity. If the pancreas can’t produce enough insulin, it can lead to prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Excess calories from sugar and processed foods can also cause inflammation which may also lead to chronic pain. So what can we do to prevent these health issues? The answer is simple: eat complex carbohydrates, lean protein, and healthy fats.

 

Replace highly processed carbohydrates that can increase blood sugar levels and insulin, with vegetables, beans, and whole grains. When it comes to eating complex carbohydrates like whole grains, the less processed the better! Consider eating stone-ground whole wheat, quinoa, oats, and brown rice. Then, choose lean proteins, such as fish and chicken. as well as healthy fats that come from plant sources, such as nuts, olive oil, and avocado, among others.

 

Below, we will compare the calories in common foods and drinks to demonstrate the differences and similarities in good calories vs bad calories:�

 

 

Can you tell which are the good calories and which are the bad calories? It�s important to follow the principle of �clean eating� and choose unprocessed foods in the purest forms instead of processed foods. This includes foods like fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, or eggs. You can eat these foods without worrying too much about your daily caloric intake limit. Eating a variety of these is essential in order to provide your body with the nutrients it needs to function properly.

 

Bad calories include processed foods which follow exactly the opposite principle of “clean eating”. Foods with high amounts of sugar and fast food offers you almost no nutrients but a lot of what we call “empty calories”. If you�re trying to lose weight to manage insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes, you�ll have to pay attention to your �bad� calorie intake.

 

For more information regarding the effects of good calories vs bad calories on obesity, please review this article:

Is the calorie concept a real solution to the obesity epidemic?

 


 

Our body needs nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and many other compounds from calories in order to function properly. Calories are a measurement of the energy our body produces from the foods we eat. But, not all calories are created equal. Eating bad calories vs good calories can affect the hormones that regulate our hunger and those that manage how we burn or store calories to be used for energy. Moreover, eating “bad” calories in excess amounts can cause obesity. It’s important to understand how calories can affect your health. In the United States, obesity is the main cause of health issues like insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Excess bad calories can also cause inflammation which may cause chronic pain. Eating complex carbohydrates, lean protein, and healthy fats can help people lose weight and prevent as well as control health issues like insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Learning to identify good calories and bad calories is a helpful strategy for people who want to improve their overall health. Adding healthy foods to a smoothie can also be a fast and easy way to include good calories into your diet. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

 

Image of zesty beet juice.

 

Zesty Beet Juice

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1 grapefruit, peeled and sliced
� 1 apple, washed and sliced
� 1 whole beet, and leaves if you have them, washed and sliced
� 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped

Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of smoothie with nasturtium flower and leaves.

 

Add Nasturtium to Your Smoothies

 

Adding nasturtium flowers and leaves to any smoothie can add extra nutrients. These lovely plants are easy to grow and the entire plant is edible. Nasturtium leaves are high in vitamin C, which is essential for a healthy immune system, and they also contain calcium, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and iron. According to healthcare professionals, the extract from the flowers and leaves have antimicrobial, antifungal, hypotensive, expectorant, and anticancer effects. Antioxidants in garden nasturtium occur due to its high content of compounds such as anthocyanins, polyphenols, and vitamin C. Due to its rich phytochemical content and unique elemental composition, the garden nasturtium may be used in the treatment of a variety of health issues, including respiratory and digestive problems. Not to mention, the flowers and leaves look absolutely lovely in smoothies.

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require additional explanation as how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Glassman, Keri. �The Difference Between Good and Bad Calories.� Women’s Health, Women’s Health Media, 11 June 2019, www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a19930112/the-difference-between-good-and-bad-calories/.
  • Denner, Julia. �Good Calories Vs. Bad Calories >> The Difference Matters.� Adidas Runtastic Blog, Adidas Runtastic Blog Media, 9 Sept. 2019, www.runtastic.com/blog/en/good-calories-vs-bad-calories/.
  • Taubes, Gary. �Good Calories Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health.� CrossFit, CrossFit Media, 31 Jan. 2020, www.crossfit.com/health/good-calories-bad-calories.

 

Stubborn Weight: Genetics or Diet?

Stubborn Weight: Genetics or Diet?

Today, there can be a lot of confusion when it comes to diet. The information received can be contradicting, confusing, and leave individuals feeling lost. This can often result in giving up on the diet and being left with joint pain, inflammation, discomfort, headaches and more.

The reason why there is more than one diet out there is because the research is always advancing. We have come to realize that everyone’s body reacts to different food sources and diets differently.

Genetic Code

As more and more research is being done, the more we are realizing how the genetic factor of individual cells directly correlate to a patient’s weight, diet, and changes as they age. For years, as one would get older and start gaining weight, we would attribute it to age. Although age is a factor, what we are finding now is that the genes are actually changing as we age and that is what creates this weight gain.

Sure enough, there are also genes that will tell us if you are susceptible to snacking. These genes can detect if you have a predisposition for heightened snacking or satiety. Satiety is the feeling of fullness after a meal. If you have reduced satiety, you tend to snack more because you do not feel as full after the meals you eat.

Getting your genes tested will allow the treatment plans created to be more personal and more geared to see results! Believe it or not, your genes can tell us if you are genetically prone to obesity,� if you have weight loss resistance when it comes to carbohydrates, and how your body responds to exercise! Using the genes, we can see how many hours per week you will need for weight loss or to maintain your current weight.

Proven Methods

The best option is to know your genes so the diet plan can be geared more towards you directly. However, if that is not a possibility right away, there has been one diet that has been proven time and time again to work for almost everyone. This diet is referred to as the Ketogenic Diet.

In simple terms, the ketogenic diet is a low carb, high-fat diet. This diet works by sending the body into a state of ketosis which burns fat as fuel.

Research shows that those using a ketogenic diet demonstrated a higher percentage of weight loss and kept the weight off longer when compared to those who did a low-fat diet.

Available Resources

Considering the fact that there is misinformation about diets out there, proper education is going to be the key. As someone who has gone through dietary changes myself and figuring out what works best with my body with type 1 diabetes for optimal health, the right team is what made me successful.

Surround yourself with those who are continuously educating themselves and have a system in place. For example, we make sure our patients get one on one time with the doctor and a health coach. From here, the health coach and patient become connected through a virtual database allowing the patient’s food, weight, supplements, hydration, BMI, BIA, and activity to be tracked by the health coach. The health coach can then instant message or video chat the patient throughout the week to ensure they are staying on track, staying motivated, and answer any questions they may have!

Do not be left confused over diets anymore! Remember that your genetic code holds the key to the right diet for you.

The right diet has the ability to make individuals see the results they have been waiting for. It all comes down to the genes. As mentioned, genes change over time but they hold the code. If you are someone who has struggled with diets, feeling good, or are stuck at a certain weight, I highly recommend getting tested! The information you gain from this is so beneficial! I have seen the results first hand, and they are eye-opening. They let you know if you have the genetics that will hold onto fat. This knowledge can help us prevent health issues such as metabolic syndrome! – Kenna Vaughn, Senior Health Coach�

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post DisclaimerThe scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

REFERENCES
Bueno, Nassib Bezerra, et al. �Very-Low-Carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet v. Low-Fat Diet for Long-Term Weight Loss: a Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials.� British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 110, no. 7, 2013, pp. 1178�1187., doi:10.1017/s0007114513000548.

 

Ketogenic Diet for Metabolic Syndrome

Ketogenic Diet for Metabolic Syndrome

The ketogenic diet also referred to as the keto diet, is a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet that has been demonstrated to have a variety of health benefits, especially for people with metabolic syndrome. Several research studies found that the ketogenic diet can help promote weight loss and improve overall wellness. Researchers also found that the keto diet may even be beneficial against diabetes, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease, and cancer, among others.

 

What is the Ketogenic Diet?

As previously mentioned, the keto diet is a low-carb, high-fat diet similar to the Atkins diet, as well as other low-carbohydrate diets. The primary goal of the ketogenic diet is to considerably decrease the consumption of carbohydrates and replace them with “good” fats. Reducing carb intake will allow the body to enter a metabolic state, known as ketosis. During ketosis, the body becomes tremendously efficient at burning fat in order to turn it into energy for fuel. It will also produce ketones in the liver to be used as energy by the brain. The ketogenic diet can greatly improve high blood sugar levels and insulin resistance.

 

Metabolic syndrome is commonly characterized by 5 risk factors. People with 3 our of 5 risk factors may have metabolic syndrome, including:

 

  • Excess waist fat (> 40 inches in men, and > 35 inches in women)
  • High blood pressure (130/85 mm Hg)
  • Hight blood sugar or glucose levels (100 mg/dL or greater)
  • High triglyceride levels (150 mg/dL or greater)
  • Low HDL cholesterol (< 40 mg/dL in men or < 50 mg/dL in women)

 

Metabolic syndrome can increase the risk of a variety of health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. Fortunately, the keto diet can help improve the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, such as increased HDL cholesterol as well as decreased blood pressure and blood sugar levels. In a controlled 12-week research study, people with metabolic syndrome following a calorie-restricted ketogenic diet lost 14 percent of their body fat. The research study also found that the participants had decreased triglycerides by more than 50 percent and experienced several other health benefits.

 

How the Keto Diet Helps Improve Metabolic Syndrome

The ketogenic diet has been demonstrated to help improve the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. As a low-carbohydrate, high- fat diet, the keto diet is effective in decreasing high blood sugar levels and improving insulin resistance by having the body break down body fat into ketones for energy. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of signs that are associated with various health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. The signs of metabolic syndrome include excess waist fat, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, and low HDL or “good” cholesterol.

 

A research study conducted by researchers at Bethel University, Minnesota, USA, compared the health of three groups of adults with metabolic syndrome. The first group followed the ketogenic diet without exercise, the second group followed the standard American diet without exercise, and the third group followed the standard American diet with 30 minutes of exercise or physical activity for three to five days per week. The findings showed that the ketogenic diet without exercise was much more effective than the other groups at promoting weight loss, decreasing body fat and reducing HbA1c.

 

According to a variety of other research studies like the one above, the ketogenic diet may help improve a variety of other health issues, including:�

 

Type 2 Diabetes

Although there’s a variety of research studies on what is the best type of diet for people with type 2 diabetes to promote weight loss and improve insulin resistance, healthcare professionals recommend following the keto diet. The keto diet lowers carb intake which causes high blood glucose levels to drop, producing less insulin, burning fat, and potentially improving insulin sensitivity. Research studies suggest that the keto diet may be helpful for people with type 2 diabetes. Several hospitals have comprehensive programs dedicated to using the nutritional approach to help treat type 2 diabetes.

 

Obesity

Excess weight and obesity increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A small research study published in December 2016 in the journal Endocrine involved 45 obese participants either on a very-low-calorie ketogenic diet or a standard low-calorie diet. After two years, the participants following the keto diet lost approximately 27 pounds on average compared with less than 10 pounds in the low-calorie participants. The participants following the keto diet also lost more belly fat. The ketogenic diet also helped keep lean body mass during weight loss which prevented a metabolic slowdown.

 

Metabolic Syndrome

 

Metabolic syndrome is a collection of risk factors, including excess waist fat, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, and low HDL cholesterol, according to the American Heart Association. Improving insulin resistance may also reduce the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. One small research study on 30 adults found that adults with metabolic syndrome who followed the ketogenic diet for 10 weeks lost more weight and body fat as well as lowered their A1C levels compared with participants who followed a standard American diet, even with or without exercise.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Insights Image

About 23 percent of adults in the United States have metabolic syndrome. Although the risk factors for developing the collection of signs are significant, there are good news. Many of the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome can be addressed through diet and lifestyle modifications, such as the ketogenic diet as well as exercise and physical activity. By making these changes, people can considerably reduce their risks of developing a variety of other health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. Although metabolic syndrome can be a serious health issue, people can reduce their risks by reducing their weight; increasing exercise and physical activity; eating a heart-healthy diet that’s rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fish; as well as working with a healthcare professional to regulate blood pressure, blood sugar, blood cholesterol. In the following article, we will discuss how the ketogenic diet can help improve metabolic syndrome and its risk factors. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 

The ketogenic diet also referred to as the keto diet, is a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet that has been demonstrated to have a variety of health benefits, especially for people with metabolic syndrome. Several research studies found that the ketogenic diet can help promote weight loss and improve overall wellness. Researchers also found that the keto diet may even be beneficial against diabetes, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease, and cancer, among others.

 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

References:

  1. Mawer, Rudy. �The Ketogenic Diet: A Detailed Beginner’s Guide to Keto.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 30 July 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/ketogenic-diet-101#weight-loss.
  2. Spritzler, Franziska. �15 Health Conditions That May Benefit From a Ketogenic Diet.� Healthline, Healthline , 12 Sept. 2016, www.healthline.com/nutrition/15-conditions-benefit-ketogenic-diet.
  3. Editor. �Ketogenic Diet Improves Metabolic Syndrome in Multiple Ways.� Diabetes, Diabetes Media, 18 Dec. 2017, www.diabetes.co.uk/news/2017/dec/ketogenic-diet-improves-metabolic-syndrome-in-multiple-ways-99064712.html.
  4. Migala, Jessica. �Can Keto Cure You? 11 Conditions It May Help and 6 It Won’t: Everyday Health.� Everyday Health, Everyday Health Media, 28 Dec. 2018, www.everydayhealth.com/ketogenic-diet/diet/health-conditions-it-may-help-and-definitely-wont/.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Podcast: Metabolic Syndrome

 

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that can ultimately increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, among other problems. Central obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglycerides, and low HDL or good cholesterol levels are the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. Having at least three of the five risk factors may suggest the presence of metabolic syndrome. Dr. Alex Jimenez, Alexander Jimenez, Truide Torres, Kenna Vaughn, and Astrid Ornelas explain the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, in further detail, as they recommend diet and lifestyle modification advice and guidelines, such as the ketogenic diet or the keto diet, as well as demonstrate the biochemical and chemical pathways that the body goes through during ketosis to help people with metabolic syndrome improve their overall health and wellness. From eating good fats and staying hydrated to exercise and better sleep, Dr. Alex Jimenez, Alexander Jimenez, Truide Torres, Kenna Vaughn, and Astrid Ornelas discuss how diet and lifestyle modifications, such as the ketogenic diet or keto diet, can help improve the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome to prevent the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. – Podcast Insight

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with a variety of food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs.

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine and it has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). It is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.

 


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

 

Proudly,�Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

 

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

 

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

 

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

 


 

 


 

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders in the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.

 

 

Important Facts to Know About Metabolic Syndrome

Important Facts to Know About Metabolic Syndrome

According to healthcare professionals, metabolic syndrome is a collection of conditions or disorders that can increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. A combination of several of these risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, and excess waist fat, can ultimately increase the risk of a patient being diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and its associated health issues.

 

Metabolic syndrome affects approximately 23 percent of adults and the most common underlying causes of this collection of conditions or disorders include, excess weight and obesity, sedentary lifestyle, genetic factors, and age. As previously mentioned above, having 3 or more metabolic syndrome risk factors can increase the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease, among other health issues.

 

Metabolic syndrome is characterized by three or more of the following metabolic measurements, including:

 

  • Excess waist fat (> 40 inches in men, and > 35 inches in women)
  • High blood pressure (130/85 mm Hg)
  • Hight blood sugar or glucose levels (100 mg/dL or greater)
  • High triglyceride levels (150 mg/dL or greater)
  • Low HDL cholesterol (< 40 mg/dL in men or < 50 mg/dL in women)

 

Diet and lifestyle modifications can help prevent, manage, or even reverse metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome can increase the risk of developing various health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease if left untreated. Below, are important facts to know about metabolic syndrome.

 

Genetics Cause Metabolic Syndrome

If a close family member has diabetes or heart disease, you may already be genetically predisposed to metabolic syndrome. Getting a complete family health record generally includes information from three generations of relatives. Although it may seem challenging to collect this much information from your family, knowing what genetic predisposition you may have for developing metabolic syndrome and its associated health issues is important.

 

Body-Shape Influences Metabolic Syndrome

People with apple body-shapes have a much higher chance of developing metabolic syndrome than people with pear body-shapes. “Reducing your waist circumference can help prevent and manage health issues more than drugs and/or medication,� stated Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of Belly Fat Diet for Dummies. Excess waist fat is a key risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, stroke, and heart disease, as well as cancer.

 

Plant-Based Diets Control Metabolic Syndrome

The current dietary guidelines for adults in the United States encourage plant-based diets. Julie Upton, RD, of San Francisco and co-founder of Appetite for Health, encourages following a Mediterranean diet. The Mediterranean diet includes eating more fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and seafood but involves eating less cheese, meat, and sweets. Plant-based diets and the Mediterranean diet can help lower the risks of developing metabolic syndrome.

 

Fiber Lowers Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Include more foods that are rich in soluble fiber, such as beans and oats, into your diet. Insoluble fibers, such as whole grains, help transport foods through your gastrointestinal (GI) tract while keeping you feeling more satisfied. Fill at least half your plate with fruits and vegetables as well as whole-grain carbohydrates to make less room for less-beneficial food choices. Eating more fiber can ultimately help reduce the risk of developing metabolic syndrome.

 

Beverages & Drinks Also Affect Metabolic Syndrome

Several drinks and beverages, such as fruit juices and sodas, can increase blood sugar and triglyceride levels. Alcoholic beverages and drinks may also cause hypoglycemia and an initial drop in blood sugar. Water is recommended for healthy hydration. According to healthcare professionals, other healthy alternatives which provide water or hydration without extra calories can also include tea, coffee, skim or low-fat milk, fruits, and vegetables.

 

Exercise & Physical Activity Combats Metabolic Syndrome

Joey Gochnour, RDN and exercise physiologist in Austin, Texas discusses that moderate aerobic exercise can improve cholesterol levels. He recommends exercising regularly, preferably at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week to help combat metabolic syndrome. According to Gochnour, �Strength training and intense aerobic exercise may improve your blood sugar and insulin sensitivity.� Exercise boosts metabolism and burns calories for weight loss.

 

Sitting Increases Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

According to several research studies, sitting is associated with the increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome even when you include moderate amounts of regular exercise and physical activity into your day. One research study published in June 2015 in Diabetologia closely associated sitting time with an increased risk of developing diabetes, demonstrated that for every hour of daily TV viewing, increased a person�s risk for diabetes by 3.4 percent.

 

Test Fasting Insulin Levels to Evaluate Risk for Metabolic Syndrome

A test for fasting insulin levels determines the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Insulin plays a key role in metabolism. High insulin levels promote obesity, stimulate hunger, and increase fat storage. Sugary foods increase blood sugar and cause the pancreas to release insulin. But if the body is continuously exposed to high levels of insulin, the cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. Insulin resistance ultimately promotes high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and high cholesterol which are associated with metabolic syndrome, also known as insulin resistance syndrome.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Insights Image

Approximately 23 percent of adults in the United States have metabolic syndrome. Although the risk factors for developing the cluster of conditions or diseases are significant, there are good news. Many of the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome can be addressed through diet and lifestyle modifications, such exercise and physical activity. By making these changes, people can ultimately significantly reduce their risks of developing a variety of other health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. Although metabolic syndrome can be a serious health issue, people can significantly reduce their risks by reducing their weight; increasing exercise and physical activity; eating a heart-healthy diet that’s rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fish; as well as working with a healthcare professional to regulate blood pressure, blood sugar, blood cholesterol. In the following article, we will discuss several important facts to know about metabolic syndrome. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 

According to healthcare professionals, metabolic syndrome is a collection of conditions or disorders that can increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. A combination of several of these risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, and excess waist fat, can ultimately increase the risk of a patient being diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and its associated health issues.

 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

References:

  1. Heart Staff. �About Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/about-metabolic-syndrome.
  2. Heart Staff. �Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/why-metabolic-syndrome-matters.
  3. Heart Staff. �Your Risk for Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/your-risk-for-metabolic-syndrome.
  4. Heart Staff. �Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/symptoms-and-diagnosis-of-metabolic-syndrome.
  5. Heart Staff. �Prevention and Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/prevention-and-treatment-of-metabolic-syndrome.
  6. Taub-Dix, Bonnie. �Metabolic Syndrome: 10 Things You Need to Know About Your Risk: Everyday Health.� Everyday Health, Everyday Health Media, 31 Oct. 2017, www.everydayhealth.com/news/10-things-your-doctor-wont-tell-you-about-metabolic-syndrome/.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Podcast: Metabolic Syndrome

 

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that can ultimately increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, among other problems. Central obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglycerides, and low HDL or good cholesterol levels are the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. Having at least three of the five risk factors may suggest the presence of metabolic syndrome. Dr. Alex Jimenez, Alexander Jimenez, Truide Torres, Kenna Vaughn, and Astrid Ornelas explain the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, in further detail, as they recommend diet and lifestyle modification advice and guidelines, such as the ketogenic diet or the keto diet, as well as demonstrate the biochemical and chemical pathways that the body goes through during ketosis to help people with metabolic syndrome improve their overall health and wellness. From eating good fats and staying hydrated to exercise and better sleep, Dr. Alex Jimenez, Alexander Jimenez, Truide Torres, Kenna Vaughn, and Astrid Ornelas discuss how diet and lifestyle modifications, such as the ketogenic diet or keto diet, can help improve the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome to prevent the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. – Podcast Insight

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with a variety of food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs.

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine and it has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). It is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.

 


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

 

Proudly,�Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

 

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

 

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

 

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

 


 

 


 

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders in the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.

 

 

Understanding Metabolic Syndrome

Understanding Metabolic Syndrome

According to healthcare professionals, metabolic syndrome is a collection of conditions or disorders that can increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. A combination of several of these risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, and excess waist fat, can ultimately increase the risk of a patient being diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and its associated health issues.

 

What is Metabolic Syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome affects approximately 23 percent of adults and the most common underlying causes of this collection of conditions or disorders include, excess weight and obesity, sedentary lifestyle, genetic factors, and age. As previously mentioned above, having 3 or more metabolic syndrome risk factors can increase the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease, among other health issues.

 

Metabolic syndrome is characterized by three or more of the following metabolic measurements, including:

 

  • Excess waist fat (> 40 inches in men, and > 35 inches in women)
  • High blood pressure (130/85 mm Hg)
  • Hight blood sugar or glucose levels (100 mg/dL or greater)
  • High triglyceride levels (150 mg/dL or greater)
  • Low HDL cholesterol (< 40 mg/dL in men or < 50 mg/dL in women)

 

The Importance of Understanding Metabolic Syndrome

Healthcare professionals diagnose metabolic syndrome when a patient has a collection of conditions or diseases that can increase the risk of developing diabetes, stroke, and heart health. Moreover, research studies found that people with metabolic syndrome have a much higher chance of developing these health issues compared with individuals who do not have metabolic syndrome. Chances increase when more of these risk factors are present.

 

Metabolic syndrome has become increasingly common in the United States. Several factors increase the likelihood of acquiring metabolic syndrome:

 

  • Excess weight/obesity. These are critical and potential causes of metabolic syndrome. Too much fat in the abdomen is most commonly associated with metabolic syndrome. The reasons why excess weight/obesity and metabolic syndrome seem to be linked are complex and misunderstood.
  • Insulin resistance: This has been closely associated with metabolic syndrome. Several people are genetically predisposed to insulin resistance.
  • Race and gender: People of certain races, as are men more than women, ultimately have�a greater risk of developing metabolic syndrome.

 

As previously mentioned above, people with metabolic syndrome have an increased risk of developing the following health issues, including:

 

  • Cardiovascular disease and heart attacks. If the arteries that supply blood to the heart are narrowed or blocked by fatty deposits, known as plaque, they decrease the amount of blood and oxygen reaching the heart, which can cause chest pain (angina) or a heart attack.
  • Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is another well-known health issue that happens when the body can’t produce enough insulin or is unable to utilize insulin properly. This causes sugar to build-up in the blood and increases the risk of developing kidney failure and heart disease.

 

Metabolic syndrome is also commonly associated with another well-known health issue, known as insulin resistance. People with insulin resistance experience problems where their own body prevents itself from utilizing insulin efficiently. Healthcare professionals and researchers alike sometimes refer to metabolic syndrome as insulin resistance syndrome. Furthermore, high blood sugar and insulin resistance are associated with diabetes.

 

Diagnosis and Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome

Healthcare professionals will look for the presence of three or more of the following risk factors to diagnose metabolic syndrome, including:

 

  • Excess waist fat (> 40 inches in men, and > 35 inches in women)
  • High blood pressure (130/85 mm Hg)
  • Hight blood sugar or glucose levels (100 mg/dL or greater)
  • High triglyceride levels (150 mg/dL or greater)
  • Low HDL cholesterol (< 40 mg/dL in men or < 50 mg/dL in women)

 

Metabolic syndrome treatment requires addressing several risk factors that can increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including:

 

  • Eating better. Follow a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, skinless poultry, and non-fried fish as well as low-fat or fat-free dairy products. Avoid processed foods, which are often high in saturated and trans fats, sodium and added sugar, among other processed foods.
  • Get active. Add at least 150 minutes of exercise and physical activity to a regular routine. Walking is the easiest place to start but you may want to find something else that gets your heart rate up. If necessary, break your exercise and physical activity into several short, sessions throughout the day.
  • Lose weight. Learn your recommended calorie intake, the number of food calories you’re consuming, and the energy calories you’re burning off with different levels of exercise and physical activity. Balance healthy eating with a healthy level of exercise and physical activity to lose weight.

 

If diet and lifestyle modifications alone do not control the conditions or diseases associated with metabolic syndrome, a healthcare professional may ultimately prescribe drugs/medications to help control blood pressure, cholesterol, and other symptoms. Carefully following your healthcare professional’s instructions can help prevent long term effects of metabolic syndrome. Your hard work and attention will make a difference in overall health and wellness.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Insights Image

Approximately 23 percent of adults in the United States have metabolic syndrome. Although the risk factors for developing the cluster of conditions or diseases are significant, there are good news. Many of the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome can be addressed through diet and lifestyle modifications, such exercise and physical activity. By making these changes, people can ultimately significantly reduce their risks of developing a variety of other health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. Although metabolic syndrome can be a serious health issue, people can significantly reduce their risks by reducing their weight; increasing exercise and physical activity; eating a heart-healthy diet that’s rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fish; as well as working with a healthcare professional to regulate blood pressure, blood sugar, blood cholesterol.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 

According to healthcare professionals, metabolic syndrome is a collection of conditions or disorders that can increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. A combination of several of these risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, and excess waist fat, can ultimately increase the risk of a patient being diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and its associated health issues.

 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

References:

  1. Heart Staff. �About Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/about-metabolic-syndrome.
  2. Heart Staff. �Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/why-metabolic-syndrome-matters.
  3. Heart Staff. �Your Risk for Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/your-risk-for-metabolic-syndrome.
  4. Heart Staff. �Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/symptoms-and-diagnosis-of-metabolic-syndrome.
  5. Heart Staff. �Prevention and Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/prevention-and-treatment-of-metabolic-syndrome.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Podcast: Metabolic Syndrome

 

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that can ultimately increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, among other problems. Central obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglycerides, and low HDL or good cholesterol levels are the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. Having at least three of the five risk factors may suggest the presence of metabolic syndrome. Dr. Alex Jimenez, Alexander Jimenez, Truide Torres, Kenna Vaughn, and Astrid Ornelas explain the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, in further detail, as they recommend diet and lifestyle modification advice and guidelines, such as the ketogenic diet or the keto diet, as well as demonstrate the biochemical and chemical pathways that the body goes through during ketosis to help people with metabolic syndrome improve their overall health and wellness. From eating good fats and staying hydrated to exercise and better sleep, Dr. Alex Jimenez, Alexander Jimenez, Truide Torres, Kenna Vaughn, and Astrid Ornelas discuss how diet and lifestyle modifications, such as the ketogenic diet or keto diet, can help improve the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome to prevent the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. – Podcast Insight

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with a variety of food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs.

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine and it has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). It is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.

 


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

 

Proudly,�Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

 

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

 

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

 

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

 


 

 


 

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders in the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.

 

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Podcast: Metabolic Syndrome

Dr. Alex Jimenez Podcast: Metabolic Syndrome

 

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that can ultimately increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, among other problems. Central obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglycerides, and low HDL or good cholesterol levels are the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. Having at least three of the five risk factors may suggest the presence of metabolic syndrome. Dr. Alex Jimenez, Alexander Jimenez, Truide Torres, Kenna Vaughn, and Astrid Ornelas explain the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, in further detail, as they recommend diet and lifestyle modification advice and guidelines, such as the ketogenic diet or the keto diet, as well as demonstrate the biochemical and chemical pathways that the body goes through during ketosis to help people with metabolic syndrome improve their overall health and wellness. From eating good fats and staying hydrated to exercise and better sleep, Dr. Alex Jimenez, Alexander Jimenez, Truide Torres, Kenna Vaughn, and Astrid Ornelas discuss how diet and lifestyle modifications, such as the ketogenic diet or keto diet, can help improve the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome to prevent the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. – Podcast Insight

 


 

[00:00:14] All right, guys, we’ve come to another podcast. And welcome to Dr. Jimenez and crew podcast. Welcome. And you have a family here.

 

[00:00:23] We’re gonna go over metabolic syndrome today. Metabolic syndrome is a disorder that ultimately affects a whole lot of people. What happens is it actually affects one of the largest populations in El Paso, pretty much in this region. And what we have is, it’s not a disease. OK. First of all, it’s a combination of presentations that medical doctors and the World Health Organization have determined that high-risk factors in order to have a stroke, kidney disorders and even problems with dementia. But overall, it’s pretty much if you have metabolic syndrome, you really feel crummy. So today what we’re going to do is we’re gonna discuss the issues and we’d like to at least present it to you so that it becomes useful for you. And the information provided by us is going to be helpful for you or a family member. So if you have the opportunity and it’s something that you enjoy, please go ahead and at the bottom area, there’s a little bell to subscribe and a little belt in markets so that you could be the very first person to get information in the future when we ever post it. And it also gives you the opportunity to present or ask us for things that are important to you in the health-related realm. And now what we’re going to do today, my name is Dr. Alex Jimenez, I have my entire staff here. We’re gonna go ahead and we’re going to present each one of them in different moments. And we’re gonna do some really interesting dynamics. We also have our resident biochemist at the National University of Health Science who’s actually going to chime in, who’s gonna give us a little bit of a foundation about chemistry. This information is gonna be helpful. We’re gonna try to make it as simple but as useful as possible. Now, bear in mind everything that we’re gonna be talking about today revolves around the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is what the health care organizations have determined as well as the cardiac departments have determined, as five major symptoms, now, you have to have three of them at least in order to be classified as metabolic syndrome. Now, the first thing is to ask, what do you feel? Pretty much you feel like crap. And it’s not really a good feeling to feel this way, but you’ll see that if you have some of these presentations, you’re gonna notice that your doctor may give you a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Now, the first thing that happens is you have usually a little bit of belly fat. Now, the belly fat that people have, people measure it. Now, for men, it’s a belly, kind of like the lonja, the belly that actually hangs over. And it’s about a good I’d say about 40 inches or greater in the male, in women it’s 35 inches or more. Now, that’s one of the first presentations. Now, the other presentation is high blood pressure. Now the high blood pressure that they use is 135 milligrams over deciliter. Oh, sorry. Yeah. Miller Mercury’s millimeters or Mercury or the slaters over to determine exactly the diastolic and the systolic. So the systolic is gonna be 135. The diastolic is going to be over 85. Now that doesn’t, again, you’re gonna notice something. These aren’t really extreme ranges. Okay. Now metabolic syndrome has high triglycerides. Now the high triglycerides are going to be noted in the blood. Okay. Now one of the things that can be determined early on is high blood pressure which is also a study associated with metabolic syndrome. So the other final one is the elevation of or decrease actually of HDL or the good fragments of cholesterol. Alexander is going to be a resident biochemist, is going to talk to us a little bit more about that in the latter part of the show. Now, bear in mind, I’ve given five things A, fat, B, high blood pressure, C, the blood glucose levels and also the triglycerides along with the lowering of the HDL. The question is, how are we going to be able to control this? Now, I want to give you some real good basic ways that you can actually control metabolic syndrome. And by the time we’re done today, we’re going to be able to assess the situation. And even if you have it, you basically will be able to control it. There are rare diseases that you can actually have. And again, this is not a disease. It’s a combination of syndromes or symptoms, collectively called a syndrome. So metabolic syndrome is one that can be misconstrued. Now, you’ll notice that the level of blood glucose is going to be elevated, usually over a hundred. Now, these are really relatively normal numbers that people have. But if they’re higher than that, they do create issues. Now, also, when you have the belly fat 40, that much. A lot of people have it. People have also blood glucose levels that are higher than 5.6 on your blood glucose when we would see now these numbers, along with the 150 milligrams per deciliter of triglycerides, they’re all normal. But in combination together, they do ultimately create a scenario that is not favorable to a cardiac issue. Cardiovascular issues do present as a result. So what we’re gonna try to do is try to bring down and control these issues. Now, what are the things that cause metabolic syndrome? Well, one of the things is stress, smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, and also even sleep problems and disturbances. Each one of these we’re going to be elaborating in the future podcasts but we’re gonna be able to tell exactly what’s actually going on in a better way. We also have issues of inflammation and processed foods. Now, at the core, metabolic syndrome, the main issue is insulin sensitivity issues along with high blood pressure issues and inflammation. So what are we going to do to control that? I want you to know that every single one of these five issues, whether its blood glucose, high triglycerides, low HDL counts or blood glucose, they’re all relatable to one disorder. It’s insulin sensitivity, insulin sensitivity controls every one of these factors from raising high blood pressure, the kidneys actually are controlled by the insulin causing their increase in blood pressure. We’ll discuss that issue and the correlation of it so we can bring ourselves to control the blood glucose. We ultimately have the fastest and the surest way to provide the fastest route to heal and to fix an individual with metabolic syndrome. So let’s go ahead and talk about the issues that are going to be resulting from that. Now, as I’ve got this, we’re gonna notice that if over a period of time you continue to have a lifestyle that has high levels of these particular five factors, you’re going to notice that you’re going to tend to have high cardiac risks. Now we have a team here and I want to introduce each one. We have Kenna Vaughn, who is our health coach. Our health coach is the one that’s going to be the one that explains to our patients what is going on. I’ll bring her in. We also have the clinical liaison, which is Truide Torres, the individual that is going to be able to bring out and ask the questions and determine what kind of issues and treatments are appropriate for you. So we’ll be discussing those. And we have our resident chief editor Astrid Ornelas, who’s gonna be the one that also explains the studies on it. All the way from Illinois. We also have Alexander, which we have here. Right. We added the backway. You can’t see him, but he’s presenting in. Say Hello, Alexander. You got him there. Hello. All right. So he’s out there. He’s going to be able to discuss the issues on the biochemistry side of things. And we’re looking forward to being able to explain those issues. Now, one of the things we have to do is go back to the issue of insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity is at the root of all these issues. So what we’re gonna do is we’re going to discuss exactly how insulin can actually be controlled. But what we’ve learned through these studies and I’m going to bring in Mrs. Ornelas here to discuss the studies that we have pertaining to how to control blood glucose and blood sensitivity study. What did you find out recently that actually shows the proof and actually presents the easiest way to control blood, insulin and elevate HDL?

 

[00:08:08] OK. Well, first of all, just as you mentioned, metabolic syndrome, it’s a collection of health issues that can increase the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Basically like, you know, it can affect our overall health and wellness.

 

[00:08:29] And I’ve done quite some research. And I’ve found through the National Center of Biotechnology Information, the NCBI, there’s a variety of research which basically states that metabolic syndrome or people with metabolic syndrome, one of the easiest, you know, quote-on-quote, easiest. Or one of the best ways maybe out there that can be used to help.

 

[00:09:04] Restore it, yeah, to help restore or reverse your metabolic syndrome would be through the ketogenic diet, or the Keto diet, as a lot of people know it best by. It is a low carbohydrate, high-fat diet, which according to research studies, offers many benefits to people with metabolic syndrome.

 

[00:09:28] It can help improve or promote weight loss. And it can help reduce diabetes.

 

[00:09:38] Basically, you know what I mentioned right there?

 

[00:09:42] I have found nothing faster to lower blood glucose and actually reverse triglycerides issues in HDL issues. Than the ketogenic diet. So in essence, if you want to do it fast, it’s amazing the speed at which it restores the body back. What else is there?

 

[00:10:00] Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So basically the human body normally uses glucose or sugar. It is supposed to be our main source of fuel. Our main source of energy. But for people that have metabolic syndrome. People who have obesity. Insulin resistance. Diabetes or an increased risk of diabetes. The ketogenic diet can be very beneficial towards that because the ketogenic diet, first of all, it is a low carbohydrate diet. Carbohydrates essentially turn into sugar or glucose and we don’t want that.

 

[00:10:41] Like if people have metabolic syndrome, they have, you know, diabetes and insulin resistance. You don’t want sugar in their bodies because they produce too much of it. They have too much blood sugar.

 

[00:10:53] But by increasing the number of fats that you eat and then decreasing the number of carbohydrates, you actually keep a low amount.

 

[00:11:05] If you keep insulin low by eating more fats, you basically make the body go into a state of ketosis.

 

[00:11:18] You know what? Let me ask you something. I’m going to feed this over to right now to Kenna. And I’m gonna ask Kenna. Kenna, in your experiences with the blood sugar issues, how is it that we contain and we learn to be able to manage someone’s blood sugar the quickest, the fastest? What is it that you do in terms of coaching individuals, helping them back by coaching individuals?

 

[00:11:41] I definitely always evaluate their diet. And the main thing I like to focus on is education because so many people are not educated about, as she was saying, carbs and how they actually feed your body. A Big Mac might have 54 carbs and a sweet potato might have 30 carbs. And people don’t really realize that they’re that different. They only see 20 points or something like that. But the way that the carbohydrate breaks down in the body is huge. And that’s why the ketogenic diet works so well because you’re using those good carbs that are going to actually contain protein as well. And so it’s going to help to break it down slower versus a Big Mac, which is just going to spike your insulin way out.

 

[00:12:23] And what part of the Big Mac is the thing that spikes the sugar? I mean, in terms of.

 

[00:12:26] Right. So the bread, the carbs in the bread, it actually breaks down differently in the body than a sweet potato would. And so that’s what’s going to give you that high glucose level. And then after that, you’re gonna have the fall of the glucose level, which just your blood sugar going up and down does not feel great.

 

[00:12:43] So it’s not good. Of course, you’re paying for the sugars. When you ask the types of sugars that you have. You just mentioned right now that the quality of the type of carbohydrate matters.

 

[00:12:52] Yes, a little bit about the quality. Like I was saying, sweet potatoes, avocados, things like that. They’re going to have the carbohydrates that are better for you, meaning you break them down differently than you would faster sugar like sucrose and things like that.

 

[00:13:12] So simple sugars are out, basically, which is the reason that, first of all, metabolic syndrome did not even exist prior to the advent of refined foods. So refined sugars have caused this problem. So what we want to do is, sugar leads to inflammation. Sugar leads to triglyceride issues, sugar or basically insulin sensitivity issues are the things that are the basis of this process. All roads lead to insulin sensitivity in this process and in the organ that provides us with insulin. The greatest amount is in the pancreas. The pancreas is nonstop. And depending on how the pancreas responds to this blood sugar drama, it really determines the fate of the individual. It will alter the triglycerides. They will alter the blood pressure by having a direct effect of holding sodium in the kidneys. The body prepares, it retains the sodium, and by nature of sodium, the blood pressure soars, so the fastest way to lower your blood pressure is a ketogenic diet. And this is amazing because it really is simple. It’s not that complex. We can go extreme. And I know that our state really had a good research document on that. Tell me a bit about what you noticed.

 

[00:14:24] Yeah, basically, like what I was saying before. A lot of people don’t know the difference between what type of carbohydrates they want to eat. Like, for example, as you said, you know, a lot of people will eat a Big Mac and don’t eat that sweet potato. And they don’t know the difference between a good carbohydrate. Basically, we want to eat what you call complex carbohydrates. We want to eat whole wheat or we want to eat good starches because the body breaks those down into glucose, into sugar. But they’re used much more slowly. The body won’t immediately use them. And then you’ll get that crash, that sugar crash, because of the insulin spike.

 

[00:15:11] Right. So that controls the spike. You know what? I want to bring in our resident biochemist here. OK, so our biochemist is Alexander. He’s got a presentation here, actually, if I can see it there and see if it pops up here. Let me see it. And there he is. Alex, can you tell us a bit about what you’re trying to explain here on the biochemistry side of things?

 

[00:15:30] So as you guys were mentioning, just in general. Glucose is the main energy source in the way that we use it for the breakdown. Its breakdown of energy consumption is called glycolysis. So without getting too much into it, our end goal here is pyruvate, which then goes into the citric acid cycle to be turned into an acetyl-CoA in normal conditions. It’s good to have a carbohydrate meal, but in excess, you produce too much acetyl-CoA. When too many acetyl-CoA is used? You end up inducing fatty acid synthesis which is induced by large levels of insulin. So by doing so, you have an acetyl-CoA that ends up turning into palpitate. And one thing that I was mentioning is that not all foods are of equal quality. So here we can kind of see all the different types of fatty acids. So without going too much into the biochemistry, but kind of just giving you an idea of what’s going on here, these numbers on the left side represent the number of carbons in a row and then the numbers to the right of the semicolon are the number of double bonds. And normally double bonds will play a large role until you get into the effect of digestion in the way the body uses these. So by having more double bonds, it’s more fluid. So you notice the difference between a piece of lard and olive oil. What’s the difference? The only difference really is the number of carbons and the number of double ones. So here we have olive oil and then we have some sort of saturated fat. We can see that the difference is large in the number of carbons as well as double bonds. Double bonds allow for a lower melting point. That’s why olive oil is a liquid at room temperature vs. fatty acids and this plays a large role when it comes into how the body uses these types of things.

 

[00:17:26] Alex, are you saying that, obviously we all know that the good work of olive oil and avocado oil and coconut oil are the best thing. Is this the reason why this happens?

 

[00:17:35] Exactly. So the more double bonds they have, the more fluid it is going to be within the body and allow for the body to use those fats in a timely manner versus clogging up arteries and creating plaques within those arteries?

 

[00:17:48] Excellent. You know what? One of the things that insulin does? It packs away carbohydrates and energy in the cell. If you do that, what happens with this blood sugar? Eventually, insulin spikes it and puts it in the cells. Eventually, the cell grows. Hence the belly fat. That is ultimately what happens to the belly, it starts gaining fat cells and they start getting bigger, bigger, and bigger because they get injected in there. That stuff starts seeping out and once it can’t go anymore, it ends up in places like the pancreas. It ends up in places like the liver. It ends up in the intramuscular, in the muscular tissue. And that’s why we have the accumulation. And when you have a big belly, that’s what tips off the doctor, not only with the triglycerides and the blood glucose levels but also the belly fat. And that’s one of the things we have to kind of assess. So is this.

 

[00:18:36] Now, these fatty acids, which are fatty acids used for, almost everything within the body, especially for energy consumption. It’s like saying, would you rather be able to go five miles or 10 miles a week? Or go 10 miles. Right. And so gram for gram fat as an energy source is much more fuel-efficient and glucose or carbs.

 

[00:19:04] So carbs provide four grams of calories per gram and fats are around nine. So it’s almost more than double, the amount of energy that you’re producing from these sites, from these fatty acids. The difficult part is just knowing which ones are good. So kind of going into the good fatty acids which are going to be the ones with the double bonds. So I mean, any plant oils, animal fats, depending on which ones, we tend to want to stay away from large amounts of acid that tend to cause inflammation responses through the inflammation path. But the rest of these are really, really good, especially EPA and DHA. So DHA is actually used within the nervous system. It’s turned into neurotic acid any day as well. So getting these marine oils are really, really going to be good for your system just in general.

 

[00:19:55] You know what, as I understand these processes and I start realizing the biochemistry behind it, bring it home to this process, down to the cellular component it honors and it shows appreciation in terms of what creates the fatty acid excess. Now, again, what happens as a result of too much of these fatty acids or carbohydrates in the bloodstream? The body tries to store it in the form of fat and it’s shoved into the pancreas. So you get this fat inside the pancreas. If it can’t do it there, it eventually puts it in the liver. And like we mentioned, it gets it in the stomach or that’s when we see it as a final thing. I’d like to take the explanation and break apart one other point. The high blood pressure component. Insulin has a direct effect on the kidneys. Insulin tells the kidneys.

 

[00:20:43] Look, we need to pack this stuff into the fat and without getting beyond too much of the chemistry dynamics. You can see that what’s going to occur is that the kidneys are going to be commanded to hold more sodium. What we learned in chemistry and in biochemistry and in clinical sciences that the more sodium we retain, the blood pressure rises. In essence, that’s how quick the blood pressure goes. So you do that for a period of time and then you force the collection of atherosclerotic plaques because of the fat that is in there and it can’t go anywhere. You’re going to have a problem in the long-term future. So speaking about the oils, as Alexander just did, one of the things we ask, well, what oils do we not want to use? Canola oil, corn oil, sesame seed oil. I love sesame seeds. But the problem is that sesame seed oil causes inflammation, as Alex said, with acids. So what we got to do is we got to figure out exactly what types of oils we can do. And avocados, as Kenna had mentioned, are a great source of fats that we can use and make things more able to be processed. Our bodies and the old pyramid of diet is really bad because it’s heavy on carbohydrates. So one of the things that we look at is maintaining all those components. So we talked about the triglycerides, right? We talked about the belly fat, how it’s put together. And in each one of these, I wanted to point this out again. Each one of these, the high blood pressure, which is 135, high blood pressure is not considered high. High blood pressure at 135 usually it’s at 140, OK. So, why are we using triglycerides at 150 are not considered excessive. You know, HDL is lower than 50 are not considered horrible, but in combination together, if you have one at all, these three of these components out of the five, that’s what leads to a preposition of being sick and feeling crummy, let alone any prolonged period of this will end up leading to metabolic disorders, heart problems, stroke problems, dementias that actually occur as a result of prolonged metabolic syndrome, states that are within the individual. I know Alexander when I ask Alexander, he’s got some really interesting dynamics as I want to present right now. I’m going to show his screen right here because he’s got some interesting components on what also affects metabolic syndrome.

 

[00:23:00] Alexander. So kind of going into what it is, I guess, ketosis, because everyone wonders kind of what goes on. So I kind of got this diagram here to draw for you guys. We’re going to ignore the Federer pathway over here, but just in general. So what’s going to happen first is you’re going to deplete any glucose that you have. So the body normally stores around 100 grams of glucose in the liver and around 400 grams within the muscle components of the entire body. So if you times, 500 times four, that’s about 2000 calories, which is your daily limit. So you’ve got about a day worth of glucose always stored within your body. But once you deplete that, your body’s gonna start looking for other things. In the meantime, it takes a few days for your body to switch over from burning sugar, which is glucose, to burning ketone bodies from fat. So what’s going to happen? Your, first of all, your adrenals are releasing epinephrine, its precursor is norepinephrine. And it causes a couple of different things?

 

[00:23:56] You’re gonna get a little jittery at first and you can feel really bad for the first couple days. But then your body is gonna start switching over as your brain starts to start using these ketone bodies for its energy source. So as you’re producing norepinephrine, these are just like this is the cell surface here. These are just different precursor markers. So we have B1, B2, B3 and eight. So by doing these, they’re going to mark and signal to the G.S. protein, which is going to allow for adenosine class to activate ATP into cyclic AMP. Now, cyclic AMP is a very important component of degradation of fatty acids and the cool part is it’s actually inhibited by phosphodiesterases. So when people come in and say, why is caffeine a good fat burner? The main reason why is because caffeine actually inhibits phosphodiesterase to a certain extent. You don’t want to go too crazy with the caffeine and start doing lots of cups.

 

[00:24:52] Alex should I have like 8 glasses of coffee or how many?

 

[00:24:56] I think one glass of coffee is definitely more than enough. So by having cyclic AMP more active, you end up activating this thing called protein kinase which activates ATP and then it activates hormone-sensitive light base, once hormone-sensitive light base is activated. It begins degradation against a breakdown, fatty acids. Once these fatty acids enter and are broken down, they then become they then enter into the mitochondria and the mitochondria will then end up producing heat from this. So that’s why people who are in ketosis are always really warm. So what do I recommend when people are starting Keto. Ketosis Diet, Water, Keto diet. Definitely water. And as well as I would say L-carnitine. So as we’re looking at L-carnitine here, we could see that during fatty acid degradation you use L-carnitine as a main transporter between the outer mitochondrial membrane and the inner mitochondrial membrane. So by using fatty acids here, fatty acetyl-CoA after we’ve broken down these fatty acids. It’s going to enter CBT-1 which is carnitine. Poly transferase one. It’s going to enter and interact with carnitine and then it’s gonna turn it to acetylcarnitine. Once acetylcarnitine turns into it that it can enter the inner mitochondrial membrane through these two enzymes translocated and CPT-2 to be broken down back into acetyl-CoA, which is the same biproduct as glucose eventually.

 

[00:26:29] So then your mitochondria can use these in beta-oxidation. One thing to note is you have to drink a lot of water because people who are going through ketosis are going to be up-regulating the urea cycle. So you need to make sure that you drink a lot of water throughout the day. I would say anyone who’s doing it could drink a minimum of a gallon of water throughout the day. Not all at once. Throughout the day.

 

[00:26:51] It’s amazing, Alex, that you put that together because that makes perfect sense to me. And also explains why people do say when we put them on the ketogenic diet that they do increase body temperature and the water obviously helps you kind of keep the whole system pumping because that’s what we’re pretty much made of. And also the pathways that you indicated, the hydrogen in the water are necessary for the process to occur.

 

[00:27:15] Yes. Yes. There are certain aspects within each of these that they fuel each other, it’s all an interconnected pathway. But you will up-regulate the urea cycle during ketosis much more than when you’re not. For example, cats are notoriously known for having a rancid urine smell.

 

[00:27:37] And we have to take a look at that from the reason why. Right. So, in general, in humans, the urea contents in our urine is 3 percent. In cats, on the other hand, it’s anywhere between 6 to 9 percent. You have to think about it. What is the only mammal on the planet that is a carnivorous animal that only eats meat? The feline family.

 

[00:27:57] So since they only eat meat, they upregulate the urea cycle, thus having more urea in their urine. So if you’re only a meat-eater, you’re gonna have more urea. Thus you need to drink more water to flush it out through your kidneys.

 

[00:28:09] That’s amazing because it explains why we make sure that everybody drinks a lot. And then they feel better. And I guess if we don’t monitor it. Right, if we don’t do it right. We get that thing called the ketogenic flu. Right. And then the body just feels kind of crummy until it restores and it stabilizes the blood glucose through ketones. Now, the body can use ketones for sugar as it’s known. So one of the things that we do is we teach the people exactly how to go through the process. And I know we got some research articles here. And Astrid wants to discuss a little bit about that.

 

[00:28:42] So basically, as Alex mentioned, when people start following the ketogenic diet.

 

[00:28:49] You know, as he said, we want to make sure that they stay hydrated. But more so than that.

 

[00:28:56] I guess another thing that we want to educate people on is that not a lot of people know that we need to store up the body with good fats so that as the body adjusts, it starts up basically burning fat as a fuel rather than sugar or glucose. So we want to teach people what are the good fats that we want them to basically eat because like we need to store up fat in these parts so the body can go into ketosis and it can go through the whole process that Alex just explained.

 

[00:29:39] You know what? I’d like to bring Truide here because she’s the one that actually connects with the patients at the moment. We do assess someone to have metabolic syndrome in terms of the resources. How do we? How do you go through the process of presenting? Hello, Truide. And what we’re gonna do there is going to ask you, how do you bring this? Because she’s our clinical liaison, our wellness liaison. And she’s the one that basically is going to give us the information that helps the patient in the right direction.

 

[00:30:05] Well, hello. You know, it is all great information. And, you know, which is amazing that we are able to provide this to the public. And I know this can be very overwhelming for people that don’t have this information. So that’s where I come in. When people come, you know, either call us or come in inquiring about different symptoms that they have. They don’t necessarily know that they’re experiencing metabolic syndrome. But, you know, one of the main concerns is their weight gain based on their concerns. I connect them either to their primaries, which is Kenna, and they go ahead and say, OK, well, what is it that, what are the steps that we have to take and Kenna certainly educates them as far as ok this is your lab work, we’re going to have to take, we connect them with Dr. Jimenez. After we know exactly what is their main concern. And we’re going to start kind of peeling things apart like an onion to get to the bottom of things and get them feeling better. They’re not only going to walk away with the specific results, but they’re also going to walk away with like what Astrid was saying, what are the good fats to have? What should I be eating? They’re going to be walking away with a lot of information, but also structure. Another thing that we’re offering is that Kenna is always going to be there to answer any questions. And also, Dr. Jimenez. So they don’t have to feel overwhelmed with the processes they’re going through for a better, healthy lifestyle.

 

[00:31:27] You know what? That’s one of the things is it’s, there’s a lot of confusion out there. And I got to be honest with you, there’s a lot of misinformation out there. This misinformation can be categorized as intentional or kind of old or not. It’s just not up to date with these five elements and an individual having three of them. It’s very important to make it repeat. Exactly how to fix this issue with the individual and how to change your lives, because there’s nothing quicker to change the body than the ketogenic diet. We also have to monitor the individuals with the monitor them through the process. Now we have Kenna Vaughn that she’s got some methods that we use, that we employ in the office and are useful for that. Doctors do this around the country, but it’s very helpful in helping guide and allow for interaction and communication between us, the providers and the patient. What kind of things do we offer?

 

[00:32:18] We have one on one coaching, which is great for when you’re just starting something out like they were talking about the ketogenic diet. You might be confused and there is misinformation. So what this one on one coaching, it’s great because we can connect through an app that we have and you just pull out your phone. You can send a quick text message, hey, I saw that I could one website said that I could eat this, but another said this. Can I have this? Things like that. We can clear up that confusion fast, which can really keep you on track rather than doing that guessing game. We also have scales that connect to this app which allows us to monitor the water weight that they have as well as the fat that they have. And we can also monitor their activity through a wristband that we can constantly check the steps that they’re taking. Make sure that they’re doing exercise because exercise is also great to help lower blood glucose level.

 

[00:33:08] You know, you mentioned that about the monitoring. We do that in the office along where we send the patients home with actual scales that actually are BIAs. Many BIAs along with their hand and wrist. We can pretty much for those patients that want to have a connection with our office. We directly can get the information downloaded and we can actually see their BIAs changing. We also use the InBody system, which we do a deep analysis of the basal metabolic rate along with other factors that we’ve discussed on prior podcasts. This allows us to put together a quantifiable method to assess how the body is changing and a very quick way of restoring the body back to or away from metabolic syndrome episodes. It’s a very uncomfortable feeling. It really can. There’s nothing that destroys the body as these combination of issues at one time. However, it’s easy to see that the body does everything really quickly and it fixes, a ketogenic diet removes body weight. It decreases the fat in the liver, it decreases the intramuscular fat, it restores the blood sugar. It gets the mind working better. It actually helps the HDL through some studies. And I know that Astrid knows there’s a study out there that actually pulls the information up on the on how the HDL is actually are actually elevated with and with a ketogenic diet. We have a study here actually presented put it on the screen right there that I think you found that actually shows that the HDL. Am I correct? And the apple protein, the lipid part of the HDL also is raised and activates the genetic component. Tell me about that.

 

[00:34:53] So basically something that a lot of researchers, something that a lot of health care professionals out there, doctors, they often say is that people have high cholesterol.

 

[00:35:07] You know we’re usually talking about the bad cholesterol and they have high-bat cholesterol or the LDL. It’s generally associated with the genetic predisposition, like according to several research articles out there. If your parents, if your grandparents had high cholesterol, there is also like an increased risk of you having a genetic predisposition to already having high cholesterol plus like add that like your diet. And if you have if you follow a sedentary lifestyle and you don’t do it enough exercise or physical activity, you do have an increased risk of having higher bad cholesterol.

 

[00:35:59] You know, I’m going to pull the information from my notice that Alexander is pulling something information up here on the screen. And he’s actually presenting the monitor where you can actually see his blood glucose and the screens that he’s going. Go ahead and put that up there for him. There you go. Alex, tell me which you’re talking about right there. I see that you’re talking about the apoprotein and the lipoproteins and the HDL fragments there.

 

[00:36:23] So I’m kind of going into a little bit of everything here. So what happens when you eat something that is going to cause an increase in cholesterol? So first of all, is you have these genes called kilomicrons that are within the intestinal lumen or within your GI tract. And they have apoprotein B-48. The reason they have 48 percent of apoprotein B 100. So it’s just a little different variation. These kilomicrons are actually going to bring these in through the body and transfer it into the capillaries using apoprotein C2 and apoprotein E once they enter the capillaries. They are going to degrade and allow for different aspects of the body to use them. So I have three tissues. We have adipose tissue, cardiac tissue, and skeletal muscle.

 

[00:37:14] So cardiac tissue has the lowest KM and adipose tissue has the highest KM. So what is KM? KM is just a measurement of the way that the enzymes use. So a low KM means a high specificity for binding to these fatty acids and a high KM means that it has a low specificity for them. So what are the three parts of the body they use the most energy?

 

[00:37:40] It’s the brain, the heart, and the kidneys. Those are the most caloric consumption parts of the body. Just to stay alive. So first of all, the heart relies large amounts on these fatty acids here.

 

[00:37:52] And transferring them to the heart uses mostly fatty acids. I think it’s about 80 percent, 70 to 80 percent of its fuel comes from fatty acids. And to deliver these, your body uses these KM. So once the KMs exits the capillaries. It’s already as an LDL. So it needs to have it has two choices. The LDL. It can be taken back to the liver or it can switch its contents with HDL and the deals can deliver them correctly to the proper places.

 

[00:38:25] So that’s why HDL is so important because they deliver them to the proper places in the event that these� kilomicrons or these LDL aren’t transferred correctly back to the liver. So why are LDL so detrimental to the system of our body? So here’s a couple of reasons why. So as an LDL is scavenged throughout the body, they are seen as a foreign object by our macrophages or macrophages are our cells that are used for immune response. So macrophages end up engulfing these LDLs and they turn it into these things called foam cells. Foam cells become plaques eventually. But what they do is they actually embed themselves within or under the surface of the epithelial lining, causing a buildup of these foam cells here and eventually blocking the pathways, causing a plaque. So by eating better fats, having a higher amount of HDL as you can get these plaques and avoid plaques which are clogging up your arteries.

 

[00:39:27] You know, actually the link between sclerotic plaques and metabolic syndrome, you’ve made it very, very clear at this point, and that is the reason why prolonged states of metabolic syndrome do create these disorders. I want to take a moment to thank the entire crew here because what we’re doing is we’re bringing in a lot of information and a lot of teams. And if someone has an issue, I want them to meet the face that they’re going to see when they walk in the office. So, Truide, tell them how we greet them and what we do with them when they walk in if they feel that they may be a victim of metabolic syndrome.

 

[00:40:01] Well, we’re very blessed to have a very exciting and energized office. You’re always going to feel at home. You’re always going to if we don’t have the right answer at that moment, we’re certainly going to research. We’re not going to toss you aside we’re always going to get back with you. Everybody gets treated as an individual. You know, each vessel that we have, it’s unique in its own way. So we certainly don’t create a cookie-cutter approach. We’re always going to make sure that, as I said, you walk away with the most valuable informed option for yourself. We’re just a phone call away. We’re just a click away. And you don’t ever feel that there’s not a reasonable question. We always want to make sure that all the questions and concerns that you have they always get the best answer possible.

 

[00:40:50] Guys, I want to tell you. Thank you. And I want to also share with you that we happen to be in one of the most amazing facilities when we do, there’s exercise involved with returning the body back to a normal state. We function out of the PUSH Fitness Center. We’re actually actually. Doing the podcast from the fitness center. And you can actually see the information here with Danny Alvarado. And he’s the one that or Daniel Alvarado, who is the director of Push Fitness, who we work with, a bunch of therapists and physical therapists to help you restore your body back to where it should be. We look forward to coming back. And like I say, if you appreciate or you like what we have here, you reach down on the little bottom, hit the little button and hit subscribe and then make sure you hit the bell so you can be the first to hear what we got to go on. OK. Thank you, guys. And we welcome you again. And God bless. Have a good one.

 


 

Neurotransmitter Assessment Form

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The following Neurotransmitter Assessment Form can be filled out and presented to Dr. Alex Jimenez. The following symptoms listed on this form are not intended to be utilized as a diagnosis of any type of disease, condition, or any other type of health issue.

 


 

Podcast: Metabolic Syndrome Explained

Metabolic syndrome is a collection of risk factors that can ultimately increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, among other problems. Central obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglycerides, and low HDL are the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. Having at least three of the five risk factors may suggest the presence of metabolic syndrome. Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja explain the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, in further detail, as they recommend diet and lifestyle modification advice and guidelines to help people with metabolic syndrome improve their overall health and wellness. From eating fiber and staying hydrated to exercise and better sleep, Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja discuss how diet and lifestyle modifications can help improve the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome to ultimately prevent the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. – Podcast Insight

 

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with a variety of food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs.

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine and it has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). It is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.

 


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GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

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Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders in the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.

 

 

Podcast: Metabolic Syndrome Explained

Podcast: Metabolic Syndrome Explained

 

Metabolic syndrome is a collection of risk factors that can ultimately increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, among other problems. Central obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglycerides, and low HDL are the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. Having at least three of the five risk factors may suggest the presence of metabolic syndrome. Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja explain the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, in further detail, as they recommend diet and lifestyle modification advice and guidelines to help people with metabolic syndrome improve their overall health and wellness. From eating fiber and staying hydrated to exercise and better sleep, Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja discuss how diet and lifestyle modifications can help improve the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome to ultimately prevent the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. – Podcast Insight

 


 

[00:00:07] And we are live. Yes, we are. Hi, this is Dr. Alex Jimenez. Today we’re gonna be talking with Dr. Mario Ruja. We’re here together today. We’re testing out a new technology of head to head conversations regarding the whole process. Mario, how you feeling, baby?

 

[00:00:24] Feeling incredibly metabolic, Alex.

 

[00:00:29] Yes, really metabolic. I’m about to go through this mic right now. That’s what I’m talking about. Hey, we’re here.

 

[00:00:37] Mario and I are, you know, we’re gonna be hitting you every day. Every week. Every time we can. As much as we can. We’re gonna be going through the airways. Yeah. And we’re gonna be using the new technology to discuss exactly what we’re up to. Today, we’re focusing on an interesting disorder called metabolic syndrome. Many of you have heard the word. But really, you know, tying in exactly what it is that we’re talking about requires kind of elaborate conversation. You’ve seen it in many pictures. Mario, you can pop up the picture there PIP and you can see that a lot of times people see this gut thing going on. And that’s one of the components of it. Metabolic syndrome, when you break it down is ultimately and people notice it when they go to their doctors. Doctors are very good at assessing clinical assessments at the point where they show up in the lab work. Now, metabolic syndrome is one of these issues that many people have. And when they’re diabetic, well, they are pretty much in that range already.

 

[00:01:39] But before it happens, the body can stray into a metabolic area where a lot of times, for example, if your blood sugar is over 100 and you’re starting to feel like really bad, your bellies are really large. We need to have some parameters to determine it. But most people end up having metabolic syndrome and just feeling like crap. So the idea behind this process and understanding what metabolic syndrome is, understanding that there are some underlying pathologies with it. So what we’re going to talk about today is we’re going to talk about issues that are related to it. Now, in the areas of diabetes, we have, you know, complicating issues such as sleep apnea, large waistline, people who take metformin, liver disorders, nonalcoholic delivered diseases that we have heard of all fall under the realm of metabolic. But we have certain criteria that we can do that actually determines what metabolic syndrome is. Now, Mario, you’ve noticed some things regarding blood pressure. Yeah. Now, if you can show the PIP and when we see this, we can actually determine if you can kind of explain that a little bit.

 

[00:02:44] Yeah, it’s very simple, when you’re looking at blood pressure, your whole system. When you are out of balance in terms of your sugar, Alex, and your gut is overflowing your belt and you have issues tucking in your shirt. Now that blood has to pump hard. It has to work as a turbo. So what happens is this, at that point, this is what we call the breaking point. Anything over 140. OK, and over 90.

 

[00:03:27] Systolic, diastolic. Now you’re running into problems that that engine has so much pressure to make up for the resistance.

 

[00:03:38] Yeah, OK. Yes. The overweight, the diabetic factor, the inflammatory factor. You’re talking about triglycerides over 150. You’re talking about type 2 diabetes. OK, again, type 2 diabetes, basically, you know, you’re not born with it. It’s something that you create. You create that diabetes. Where that insulin is out of balance. And now you’re talking about, again, a very large waistline, abdominal obesity. So a lot of times if you look at people, Alex, they look great.

 

[00:04:16] From the chest up. Yeah. And that mid-abdomen. That torso is scary. Yeah. Yeah. It’s a showstopper, as they say. OK. So this is where the high blood pressure comes in because again, that abdominal aorta, that pressure on it puts so much pressure that it goes above 140 and sometimes it goes over 180, which is like critical, critical. And again, with these characteristics, again, it creates abdominal cholesterol. It creates blood glucose over. We mentioned that over a plus 100 and again, high blood pressure connected with what stroke? So you have triglycerides.

 

[00:05:15] Clogging up. Triglycerides and yes, this is huge when the arteries clog up.

 

[00:05:21] Yeah. We have an issue with ultimately all the roads metabolically lead to the liver. Right. So one of the things that we’ve noticed is that when we assess the liver, sometimes they look pretty good and the symptoms may be highly elevated. There’s a huge range of liver enzymes. But what we’re noticing is that if we start having a blood sugar that is elevated. If we start having enzymes, if we start having disorders like what we call nonalcohol, this was a new disease that actually just came aboard. We always knew about alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis. Now we have nonalcoholic liver cirrhosis and liver disease. Now, how did that happen? Because our sugar was too high and the triglycerides add these fats into the fat level of the liver and start actually destroying the liver. So we started having this disorder and it’s a huge issue, as you indicated, when we start having HDL levels and that which we measure, we start noticing greater levels in 40, lower levels than 40 for men and 50 for women. We start noticing little trends. We also start noticing abdominal obesity, high blood pressure. There are other areas like ovarian cysts.

 

[00:06:35] Mario, you’ve noticed that there are other areas that are indicated that are collaborative or even equal or what we use to determine metabolic syndrome.

 

[00:06:44] What are the ones you have noticed? The two major ones where we’re looking at the studies that you see. I’m going to pull this up for you. So we can kind of get a grasp on that. We’re looking at two just very simple.

 

[00:07:04] Let’s make things simple for the listeners and viewers. Number one.

 

[00:07:11] Right away. You’re talking about.

 

[00:07:15] Abdominal obesity. OK, that’s number one. Number two, insulin resistance. So what happens is that your whole sugar balance within your system is not tolerating, the insulin is not effective in your body. So this is where people, Alex, are always hungry and are always eating. And so what I call it. It’s almost like you’re overeating and you’re starving at the same time. Yeah. Because that sugar is in your blood vessels. Okay. And it’s not being taken into the cells. So the cells are starving. But your whole body is overeating. Does that make sense?

 

[00:08:01] Mario, you know, in your practice. Like, how many people? What percentage of people? Do you notice that even have metabolic syndrome?

 

[00:08:10] Just a scan and again, the literature says 23 percent of the population now, I would say and in our past community here, I would say at least double that to 40 to 45. And it’s really, really a point. This is why we’re here today. You know, we’re here to educate, inspire and most of all, give people simple understanding and solutions on what to do. And one thing that I can tell you with a lot of my patients, number one, increase your fiber intake. Like, eat more vegetables. You know, I tell them that. So what do you eat? Yeah. OK. You know, so, I mean, you come in and people want to get on treadmills and they want to climb mountains. They want to do burpees. It’s like, yeah, you know what? You’re 100 pounds overweight. Those burpees are going to kill you. Okay. You’re going to wake up tomorrow morning. You can’t get out of bed. So the major factor to really start to address this is not getting in and starting a workout in gyms. First, we’ve gotta handle and we need to really educate the public on, the food intake is the solution. That is the primary solution. Medicine of the body. The food is primary medicine. And this is what we’re talking about, becoming more vegetarian, increasing fiber, reducing alcohol intake. I know I’m hurting some folks right now. Yeah. Yeah. And the point is, you know, again, reducing. It doesn’t say, you know, if you want to have a beer or something, that’s great. But again, let’s be mindful. This metabolic syndrome is a beast. OK.

 

[00:10:07] It’s a beast that’s affecting our parents, our grandparents. And now, Alex, I can see these patterns in elementary school kids, OK? And what they’re eating, they’re eating a lot of sugars, right? They’re eating a lot of fast foods, processed foods. This is one thing like right now I’m looking at you and you’re drinking this green. Green, you know?

 

[00:10:32] Yeah. There you go. Yeah.

 

[00:10:35] It’s like a jolly green giant drink. OK. That is a live food. It’s uncooked. It’s raw. The vitamins are there. The nutrition is there. It’s not denatured. OK. Anytime we cook food, you kill it. Right. Anytime you bottle it up and you preserve it for a month and two months.

 

[00:11:02] I can tell you right now, you are not eating live. So the rule that I share with my patients and when I do seminars all over the nation and people invite me over, I say, look, if you want to be alive, why are you eating dead? Simply, why are you eating dead? Right. And like right now, you know, let’s make it simple. Number one, increase hydration. Right. OK. Have a gallon of water or more is a must. Excellent. That’s number one. Number two, increase live foods. Live foods are what? Vegetables. Fruits, right? Juice them. Eat them.

 

[00:11:38] I mean, from what I understand and what I do is that everything leads to, any sort of nutritional component, whether it’s a treatment for diabetes or a treatment for, let’s say, rheumatoid issues when there is a nutritional component, many times it’s hard getting the foods that you need. So the world has turned on smoothies. Smoothies can date different formats. And these smoothies, as we work them, ultimately have the solution. Now, what kind of smoothies? What’s the best type of approach with them? Well, we have that stuff in terms of awareness in our offices and gladly we’ll share that stuff whenever it’s necessary. However, the reason is that those inner parts of the cells, those living enzymes, those DNA molecules, those proteins, those…

 

[00:12:37] Actually, probiotics, even in the fiber, prebiotics, because when you do these smoothies or even do juicing that fiber you eat, that fiber that sometimes is lost while you do it juicy, juicing. This is important for the bacteria. So that helps even with disorders, such as leaky gut or intestinal dysbiosis, because they all come together. Someone who has metabolic syndrome most likely has leaky gut and vise versa. And not every single time, we can assess that, but what we want to do is we want to assess a person completely in terms of the drugs. You pretty much know that your doctor is trying to get you away from diabetes because you’re in that losing control place when you’re taking metformin.

 

[00:13:20] Metformin is very powerful, it’s a special medication that ultimately guides to restores the blood sugar back to where or it makes it more effective or makes you less insulin tolerant and more sensitive. So there’s a lot of things that we’re looking at that are useful for us. But one of the things is, well, what am I going to do with this?

 

[00:13:41] How am I going to get better? Well, diet? Diet has everything to start with. You start with your diet. You start with being vegetarian. You start with Mediterranean style foods. What kind of techniques do you use in terms of diets? Because I can go off and explain those things. But I want you to kind of get. Simple.

 

[00:13:56] You know, simplicity is golden. Complexity is chaos, Alex. The more complex we make it for ourselves, the more likely it is that we’re going to quit. OK. You can’t sustain complex things. We need to make them simple. So number one, as much as possible, eat raw, eat live foods. That’s number one. Number two. Number two, stop eating processed things like you’re talking about like high corn sirup, like simple, stop drinking Cokes and all of these fruity drinks and everything else, you know. And it tells you right there on the bottle, right there on a can. It’s 10 percent fruit. Do you know what 10 percent means? It’s not 100 percent. There’s a missing zero, baby. OK. It’s missing. So you know what? After a while, you’re gonna be missing off the planet. OK. You’re going to be extinct. Yeah. So, yeah. We need to get real, you know, this is real stuff. Like I can tell you, you know, I visit, I do home visits sometimes because I give back to the community and I go to families and I sit there and, you know, people are losing legs. People are losing limbs. They have wound care, you know. They have, you know, they have issues in terms of that. And that’s painful, not only for the person but for the whole family. So you know what? I take this very seriously. We take this very seriously at the show. You know, we want to make it live. We want to make it interesting. But I want to tell you right now, I’m not playing games. This is not game time. This is showtime. And so in terms of that, get off the Cokes, get off the fruity drinks, get off the candy bars. OK. You know, I think that commercial with Snickers, they need to change that. You know, instead of the Snickers satisfy, how about the Snickers gonna kick your ass? How about that one? Yeah, yeah. I said it. Thank you. I think we are physicians so we can say that word. Right. So that’s what’s happening. And then again, the lifestyle. If you’re drinking, the two things I can tell you right now. Yeah. Two things that are going to kick you in your gut, no pun intended. Metabolic boys and girls. OK. Number one is going to be smoking. And number two is going to be alcohol. You do those two.

 

[00:16:16] OK. And here it is. I’m going to tell you what it’s, you know, can you find that on the slide. OK. It’s gonna be the statistic. Oh, here it is. There. Bam, right there. Pull that up. Yeah, ok. Bam. OK. So if you’re looking at that, I’m going to tell you this is scary. Lifestyle factors, the two factors right there. Can you enlarge that? So we can see that. We can do that. OK. Excellent. I appreciate that. That’s all big. There it is. So now watch this. Do you see this? OK. Here it is. The number one life factor right here. Number one, is that? Yes. The one right here? OK. Now watch. I want to circle this. OK, where is it? It’s right there. Tools. I’ll get it for you. OK. Go ahead. Circle that, smoking and heavy drinking. Okay. I just want everyone to kind of take note, smoking and heavy drinking. That is one of the most destructive things that you can do right now. And guess what? Most people do them together, don’t they? Yes, sir. That’s it. So now watch, the ratio that metabolic syndrome affecting the man. OK. This is, again, something new. Mm-hmm. It’s affecting the man less than the women. Do you see that, guys? Yes, I do. Look at that. The women is 4.45. The women are affected most out of everyone. Out of everyone. And the men are at1.85. Now, the lesser evil is heavy drinking and poor diet, and the less one is smoking and physical activity. But if you really look at it, that’s what’s scary, smoking and heavy drinking. And this has really come down to a shift.

 

[00:18:04] You know, you used to be that men smoked and men drink. Now it’s changed, Alex. This is scary because it’s affecting, you know, momma is the boss. And to me, you know, mom is the doctor in the house. OK. And no, I don’t want to take responsibility for the man because you know what? We need to be the head, not the tail, but at the same time, who is going to take care of the kids?

 

[00:18:28] It’s got to be mama. You know, most of the time. Who’s going to take the kids to the doctor? Who’s gonna be wrong? So we need moms healthy. We need moms healthy. OK. We can, you know, because there’s a saying that says this, Alex. When mom ain’t happy. Dad ain’t happy.

 

[00:18:44] Nobody’s happy. No, thank you. Here, even the dog ain’t happy, Alex. He’s leaving now. He’s gone. He’s gone.

 

[00:18:52] I happen to know a lot of, I think after about 40, I think that in general there’s a tendency for the love of wine and it gets a little crazy for a wine to three a night. Yeah. This leads to metabolic syndrome. So we need to. Moderation is key. Right. Yeah. So we’re going to you know, if you’re if one of the biggest treatments is cardio, well why give yourself those extra calories and doing their process?

 

[00:19:19] Now one glass is fine. I understand that. But we don’t have to go crazy with the wine in the evening because it’s a more relaxing thing. You know, there’s always women’s night out, right? You know, I mean, it’s shot here, but women’s night out. You know, and when there’s women’s night out. And for many women, it’s a little bit of vino. So we need to kind of cater to those things, shall I say.

 

[00:19:39] And it’s woman’s night out. But it’s not all night, baby, you know?

 

[00:19:42] Yeah, OK. I mean, you know, there is.

 

[00:19:45] Exactly. I mean, you know, let’s have a glass but not the bottle, baby. Come on. Well, you know. Right. If you have 4 people a bottle is OK. OK. I said wine. Okay. I’m sorry. I lost. I lost the meaning of that. Go ahead Alex. Yeah.

 

[00:19:57] So the bottom line is, that we’re here to bring in awareness of this disorder, which is metabolic syndrome.

 

[00:20:05] Honestly, I’ve been going to school for a long time. And this is a new revelation of the last decade.

 

[00:20:12] The gastroenterologist is really focusing on. They’re the first to see it, the dimensions of. And here’s the thing. Crazy metabolic syndrome leads to nonalcoholic, fatty liver disease. And you were seeing this in rampant levels, literally. Gallstones. Exactly. Because the liver, the cholesterol issues, all these dynamic changes are affecting even our children. We’re having kids with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Why? Too much sugar? Too much sugar? We have to control the sugars. And there are things that we can do in our diets. Plan on bringing all those concepts.

 

[00:20:46] But we want to bring awareness as to what happens. Lack of sleep, cortisol raising, you know, all this kind of stuff alters the blood sugar in our system. So it’s very important to do the best we can. Exercising is awesome for this stuff in terms of cardiogenic exercises, cardiometabolic dynamics, though. That’s where we want to still focus on. We have to do a little bit of cardio. We got to, you know, eat more of vegetables, greens, juicing, those kinds of things sleep better. It’s important to sleep.

 

[00:21:15] Alex. Oh, OK. I want to jump in because I know we’re jumping here, you know, and people and I like the fact what you mentioned earlier, you know, we want to, you know, get some wine and some things to relax. Why don’t we do this? I encourage people to meditate. OK. And to try to create some stress management strategies. OK. Right.

 

[00:21:38] Like a nice, you know, nice warm cup of tea an hour before we go to sleep. You know, some chamomile tea and I mean, you know, chamomile, you know, and.

 

[00:21:50] Yeah. Good stuff. Yerba buena. You know, stuff like that. You heard about it? Yeah. Yeah. So.

 

[00:21:56] So you know, all of these things. Meditation because why? Stress levels, as you mentioned, I’m on one accord with that stress level increase cortisol, which contracts, arterial function and then decreases dopamine.

 

[00:22:13] OK, and oxytocin, which is like the love thing going on. OK. And so now all of this creates sleep apnea. And how many people do you know, Alex, that suffers from sleep apnea and instead of dealing with the causation? OK. So this is why chiropractic is such a beautiful thing.

 

[00:22:35] You know, for 25 plus years, a quarter of a century plus, you know, between both of us, we’re like, gosh, 60 plus years. Correct? Yes, 60 plus years. All right. Chiropractic and chiropractors have such a beautiful story and beautiful platform because we’re all about natural healing and helping our community and our country at very, very cost-effective.

 

[00:23:09] You know, we do one of the most cost-effective ways of not only treating health but preventing health. And we are ambassadors of health. I mean. And so this is where when we’re talking about, again, sleep apnea, meditation, I see so many people in my practice, they’re taking a pill to go to sleep.

 

[00:23:32] Every night.

 

[00:23:34] They suffer from depression. They suffer from anxiety. Okay. And then I look and I go, you know what? Let’s talk about your lifestyle. What are you doing? What are you doing every day to put your body in a high, intense, inflammatory system in high, intense stress? Yeah, you’re redlining. I always tell people. Right now you’re redlining it’s just like a car. You cannot maintain it. You better change gears, otherwise, you’re going to blow the engine. And this is what I see, sleep apnea. Sleep is again, all the way from athletics to life function. That is where the neuroreceptors neuroplasticity, Alex. Okay. That’s where we heal. We recover. We reset for the next fight, which is early in the morning. And if we don’t do that, we go to the next day with that fog. Yeah. You know that mental fog. Alex. Hey, you know, and this is where people say, you know, I can’t focus. I’m forgetting, you know, and I don’t know what’s happening, you know, and I’m going, you know why you’re not sleeping?

 

[00:24:47] Exactly. You know, we’ve done the studies and the studies specifically about sleep. If you’re a person that you need seven hours of sleep and you miss one hour, just one hour of sleep.

 

[00:24:58] The mind is very just speaking about just the brain fog that happens with this metabolic syndrome because it really starts disrupting everything. One hour of sleep actually diminishes your ability to be creative. Creativity. Yes, the brain is altered. And you may think that you know, 25 percent by one hour, it makes a difference. But literally two hours of sleep, you lose 50 percent of your creativity if you lose four hours of sleep. Well, no one of those when you just push it like four hours. Your creativity is so low that even just trying to figure out how to find where your keys are or creativity, how to solve problems, how to deal with issues, you go to work and someone’s got some drama. It stresses you out and metabolically and then what would a lot of people do? You go to work. You jack yourself up with some coffee and then you grab what? Many people grab the donut instantly, send in the blood sugar into chaos. This constant repetitive issue of habits leads to the disorder of metabolic syndrome.

 

[00:26:02] The body, the body. Alex cannot sustain us. You know, you can’t. As I mentioned before, you can’t drive that, that your car in first gear going 80 miles an hour. You cannot. And so it’s going to rip at the seams. The gasket is going to come off. The oil is going to spray out. OK. And this is what’s happening. If you really look at the body, we look at the HDL cholesterol, it’s lower than 40. They should be the highest, high density.

 

[00:26:33] High density should be the highest. Cholesterol, good cholesterol stuff.

 

[00:26:37] You know, you want, LDL should be low and the HDL should be high. You’re looking at insulin. You’re looking at strokes. You’re looking at again, you know, triglycerides over 150, you know, sleep apnea again, more than ever. Now I’m hearing about it. Polycystic ovaries. I just hear this, you know. You know, I have another surgery. You know, I have cysts.

 

[00:27:04] I have this with all of these things. If we really look at it, we are seeing that we are pushing ourselves over the cliff. Yeah, OK. And then I’m going to throw this in there with the onset of overuse of cell phones by adults and by youth. Now it is disrupting the cognitive pattern, the focus pattern. And it’s throwing people where they don’t go to sleep because they have a cell phone in front of them at 11 o’clock at night in bed. You know, and then you’re talking about like one hour less than two hours. Well, let me tell you, the worst thing you could do, Alex, is have your cell phone next to your head with the radiation, with the sounds every time that phone beeps. Tweaks a bell, sounds for an email or your Facebook. Guess what your subconscious in your brain does? It wakes up. It wakes up and bam, it blows up.

 

[00:28:11] That REM sleep you only have. What is it, Alex? What, ten, 10 minutes, less than 15 minutes, of REM sleep? Oh, there’s a lot of. What is it?

 

[00:28:20] What happens is the body goes into a bunch of different stages as it does. What we’ve learned over the years is that we used to believe that REM was something intermittent. It goes into these deep, deep levels throughout the night.

 

[00:28:31] Your body temperature, what your blood sugars at, what’s your mental state, what’s your tired levels is, what your electrolyte balance is. This matters. So sleeping is very important. So in the restoration of your body through to get it back in order. Sleep is one of the greatest ways to be able to restore the body. So it’s important to try to you know, if you go to bed at 10, push yourself to start working the process, to go to bed probably about an hour earlier or start working. And the TV is going to be there. They’re going to keep on going 24/7. But, you know, we’re the ones dealing with the issue later on in the next day where we are brain doesn’t work well.

 

[00:29:10] Our bodies are needing carbohydrates, our foods are. And don’t eat, you know, and put yourself on one of the things that I encourage. Again, my children and, you know, Karen and the kids. Is this. Put your cell phone in the kitchen and get a real alarm clock. I don’t think they make them anymore, do they? They don’t make alarm clocks anymore. Now, forget it. What’s an alarm clock? It’s kind of like a pager, Alex. You know what? We’re gonna get to the point where we’re going to say, hey, do you have an alarm clock? And I go, now I’ve got a pager. All right. Okay. It’s ridiculous. We need to have a phone in the kitchen. You remember back in the days with that long cord. About like 80 yards. You used to take it in your room for those private sessions, you know, with your girlfriend and all of that.

 

[00:29:58] Well, let me tell you, that cell phone needs to be in the kitchen. It needs to be turned off. Okay. And then you need to have an alarm clock next to your bed. You need to honor sleep. You cannot eat foods before you go to sleep. Go to sleep hungry.

 

[00:30:16] One of the things that I’m reading more and more in terms of research and in terms of data. Go to sleep, hunger, you’re not going to die. All right. Calm down. Well, I know what you’re talking about. Yes. Intermittent fasting. Absolutely. OK. Yeah. Yeah. You can’t. I mean, at the end, you know, let’s say 8:00. That’s enough. Put the burger down.

 

[00:30:35] Yeah. Look at that. You know.

 

[00:30:37] You know, 300 years ago, we would be we many of us were nomadic. You know, people live culturally on the sides of the earth. And the terrain was different. We got the food during the daytime. Nighttime was a time when you kind of just, you know, settled in. All right. If you did, have you had some grains, some nuts, and it was different. So just by using the sunlight in order to kind of like you, as soon as the sun comes up, you can eat and shut off at night if you get really good and you start using what we’re learning, that is a great method, which is intermittent fasting. The body has the ability to rectify itself. This is an amazing, metabolic syndrome or not. The body even activity stream has the ability to rectify itself.

 

[00:31:23] So if you allow the body to cleanse itself throughout the day, let’s say you do an eating cycle of only eight hours on a window, so to speak. Well, you got a good, you know, 16 hours of what period of where your body breaks things down. Well, the metabolic processes of the breakdown of usually the mitochondria, the mitochondria, as it starts working, the process needs to rest. Our bodies need to rest. I mean, if I told you to cut the grass, Mario, you know, cut the grass. And as soon as you walked in the house and you were done and I gave you some lemonade and you were just kinda, that was rough. And I said, go back and cut it again. Right. And then also you go back out and you’re like, wow, this is crazy. When what kind of guy? And then right when you’re tired and you’re shaking because you have no energy and you’re about to go to bed. All right. And you go get up because you’re gonna go cut the grass again and you never let the body rest. Eventually, your body breaks down. That’s what happens with mitochondria. If you’re constantly eating, you’re constantly going through a process, burn out, burning, burning and burning. It needs time to settle and relax, to recover. And that’s what metabolic syndrome recovery process is. Do we try to calm the body through sleep, through lifestyle changes, through blood sugar issue changes? And little by little, we’ll start getting back control of your life because otherwise you have increased steroid or what we call a cortisol steroid production, which then makes the body store fat. Right. And then that’s where you get the belly issues because one of the first indicators of metabolic syndrome is a big belly. Right. For a woman, it’s over a certain amount, over 35 inches. And for men, anywhere over 40, that’s a lot of people over 40 inches. You pretty much have a kickoff towards metabolic syndrome.

 

[00:33:00] And how many times have you heard in your practice, Alex? You know, people come in and go, you know, I just need to lose weight. I just need to lose weight. And, you know, I look at him and I go, you know, forget about the weight.

 

[00:33:14] What are you doing?

 

[00:33:15] Are you sleeping well? All right. Right. Exactly. I mean, first. I mean, let’s forget about the weight. The body knows how to calibrate, Alex. It knows how to calibrate. It knows the zone, the sweet zone, the target zone. It knows genetically DNA, RNA. We have an innate intelligence. OK. We learned this in school and chiropractic school.

 

[00:33:38] The body has innate intelligence to know how to heal, to know how to recover, to know how to grow. And to know how to survive when we put undue stress to our system, to that fiber optics, to that circuit, we blow it and then it goes a wall. And that’s what happened. So I tell people, you know, no, the answer is not for you to go to a gym for 20 hours a day. No. Why don’t you start with letting go of high corn, syrup high fructose corn, syrup drinks?

 

[00:34:17] Why don’t you do that first? That’s what I tell them right away. Do that first. Number two, eat more fiber. What does fiber mean? Eat more legumes. Spinach, OK. Like broccoli. And instead of cooking them. And I know most people don’t want to eat raw. Why don’t you just steam them? OK. Just kind of steam them a little bit. OK. Don’t fire. Don’t kill them. Steam them. The other thing you want to do is, you know, get up on a Mediterranean diet, you know, fresh seafood, things like that, regular exercise, just get up in the morning. The first thing that I would share with people is just make things simple.

 

[00:34:53] Wake up when the rest of the animals wake up, OK? Wake up. And just go for a walk.

 

[00:35:02] At least, you know, let’s not get on a treadmill and break a record, OK? Let’s not do that because you’re gonna do that twice. You’re gonna get hurt and you’re gonna quit for the next three months to recover. So why don’t you just get up and walk? And then next time walk a little more and walk a little faster and next time walk a little faster and jog. So we need to create that patterning, rituals. We need healthy rituals, Alex, in our lives instead of rituals that are killing us slowly. OK. And so in terms of that, I look at eating more fresh vegetables, Mediterranean, sleep better and honor that sleep. Get up earlier, get up before 5 o’clock. OK. Get up. Get into a routine that way when you when you’re not sleeping late. OK. Your body’s tired. So now you can go to sleep at nine-thirty, at ten o’clock, OK. And then create a new pattern to where you let go of the cell phone. And I would say, you know how people do like fasting or cleansing. I recommend at least two cleanses a year, two cleanses a year. You know, stop eating meats.

 

[00:36:15] OK. Stop eating meats.

 

[00:36:17] And just go vegetarian. Okay. Let your body cleanse, I know you have wonderful programs at your clinic. Alex, in terms of detox, I believe in that twice a year. You gotta do it. It’s just like flushing your car. Alex Right.

 

[00:36:31] From detoxing. We start we really begin the process at the intestine. So from the things we start eating. So one of the best ways to do it is to go through a detox program and the detox programs help us cleanse it.

 

[00:36:45] You know what? If your garage is full of mud, if you’re you know, you just open the garage, you see it’s just a mess and your body’s metabolically a wreck similar to a garage as an analogy. Well, you can have a couple of things. The first thing we do is we open up the garage and we got to plunge that garage. We’ve got to get the hose. Or you can take the broom. And you know what? Many times you’ll realize that taking the hose is probably the best thing. So when we do detox programs, we begin by helping with the colon cleanse. And we basically clean out the colon and eventually also repurpose the direction where the probiotics go. We actually add probiotics in the diet. We add the fibers, the prebiotics, the post probiotics. And we start working from the intestine out. The body instantly starts recovering. And little things that we can do in the mornings on a regular basis such as increase water, take a lemon, for example. We start with water. We start with let’s say you squeeze four or five, three lemons, just three lemons, squeeze the juice, put it in a drink that you’re gonna spend all day. Take one whole lemon to squeeze it nice and just take it as a shot. Some people use apple cider vinegar. Exactly. So what we do is we start that well, that goes into the intestines, into the stomach. It is much it just basically showers the liver with a process that begins the process of cleansing as the body starts recovering. You start eating better. You let’s say you do a fast and you begin your process of eating at around 12:00 and you stop at six or maybe seven or maybe eight. And it gives you an eight-hour window, six to eight-hour window and that’s it. And then you start recovering in that process. So early on, we start doing the changes with the beautiful thing about the body if you give it time, it’s all recoverable to do it. And if you teach the body, you don’t have to be taken metformin the rest of your life. Now, if your doctor thinks it’s appropriate, well, then, you know, you speak to your doctor. And here’s the other thing is, is that when you’re dealing with metabolic issues and you’ve got someone that’s giving you metformin and as it or other diabetes or different types of medications that help with diabetes, it is appropriate to have it under a doctor’s control. Now, the constant taking medications without, having lifestyle changes or not having dietary alterations is inappropriate. It’s malpractice, I believe, in my opinion, after being here so long, you just don’t give people pills and not change their diet. You got to have a doctor who’s willing to sit down and help you out with lifestyle changes, diet or someone that has some staff to support you or a dietician or a registered dietetic dietitian. So that can help you or a nutritionist. Sorry. Or a health coach that can help you. We have to have people that can do that. So to help you with the process, because it’s not just saying, hey, take a pill and go off on your own, that confuses a lot of people. We have to have a change and we’re here to help you with that. So as we go through this process over the next couple of weeks, Mario, as we discuss each one of these particular topics, we’re going to bring it to you. We’re going to talk about ways that you can change your diet that simple. Just make it simple and it adapts. So I know you’ve got some points you want to mention again.

 

[00:39:50] Absolutely. You know, with metabolic syndrome, the two things that are markers are number one, your belly fat. OK, so let’s get going in at home. Yeah. Let’s wrap it up. You know, let’s button this thing up and make it simple. First of all, it’s belly fat. So. So if your belt, when you’re buying a belt and you’re looking at the little notches and the little holes and they’re over 40 inches, OK, 40, you’re in trouble. For male. Yeah, for male. And if you’re over 35 for a female, you’ve got issues.

 

[00:40:24] Metabolic syndrome. Absolutely. Absolutely. And the other point is this. If you have a hard time and you can’t even wear a belt, then I don’t need to explain any further. It’s time to come in and get a coach, get a health coach, get someone to make you accountable because time is ticking. Time is ticking and we need to be proactive instead of reactive. And at the same time, when you are always hungry, you’re overeating and you keep being hungry. You cannot lose weight. Now the things are coming to fruition. And on top of that, if you have blood pressure, over 140, over 90. So let’s say 145 over 100, let’s say 150 over 105. It’s time to get real. You can do this. Just go buy a blood pressure cuff, OK? Quit playing games. Get-go. Go to Walgreens. Get a blood pressure cuff and check it tonight. And if it’s over. Check it at least. I always tell people, don’t do it once. Keep a record and do it for at least three, three to four days. OK. And take it in the morning. In the afternoon at night so you can see a cycle. Bring that over and find yourself a team. Find yourself a team that will that has a program for you to naturally empower you and give you the right tools to get back to your best life ever. It is up to you. It’s called self-responsibility. No pill is going to take the responsibility from you. And at the same time, you can enjoy your family more, enjoy your life, and be happier in the process.

 

[00:42:19] So I really appreciate it, Alex. And I want to thank our listeners and viewers and we look forward to continue the conversation of health and wealth. Because I want to tell you, the message for today is your health is your ultimate wealth. Thank you. And we’ll leave it there.

 

[00:42:38] All right, guys. Thank you.

 

[00:42:39] And we’ll come back tomorrow and we’ll add another health nugget, so to speak, for you guys. Two miners.

 

Podcast: BIA and Basal Metabolic Rate Explained

Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja discuss basal metabolic rate, BMI, and BIA. Body mass and body fat can be measured in a variety of ways, however, several measurement tools may ultimately be inaccurate for many athletes. According to Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja, calculating an individual’s body mass and body fat utilizing various tools is essential to determine overall health and wellness. BMI uses a person’s height divided by twice their weight. The results may be inaccurate for athletes because their body mass and body fat are different, in terms of weight, compared to the average person. Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja demonstrate that BIA, or bioelectrical impedance analysis, and various other tools, such as the DEXA test, the Tanita scale, and the InBody, among others, can help more accurately determine an athlete’s body mass and body fat. Basal metabolic rate, BMI, and BIA are essential for parents that have young athletes as well as for the general population. Healthcare professionals that have these tools available can ultimately help provide individuals with the results they may need to maintain overall health and wellness.

 

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with a variety of food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs.

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine and it has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). It is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.

 


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

 

Proudly,�Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

 

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

 

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

 

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

 


 

 


 

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders in the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.

 

 

Podcast: BIA and Basal Metabolic Rate Explained

Podcast: BIA and Basal Metabolic Rate Explained

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja discuss basal metabolic rate, BMI, and BIA. Body mass and body fat can be measured in a variety of ways, however, several measurement tools may ultimately be inaccurate for many athletes. According to Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja, calculating an individual’s body mass and body fat utilizing various tools is essential to determine overall health and wellness. BMI uses a person’s height divided by twice their weight. The results may be inaccurate for athletes because their body mass and body fat is different, in terms of weight, compared to the average person. Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja demonstrate that BIA, or bioelectrical impedance analysis, and various other tools, such as the DEXA test, the Tanita scale, and the InBody, among others, can help more accurately determine an athlete’s body mass and body fat. Basal metabolic rate, BMI, and BIA is essential for parents that have young athletes as well as for the general population. Healthcare professionals that have these tools available can ultimately help provide individuals with the results they may need to maintain overall health and wellness.

Podcast Insight

 

[00:00:08] All right. It’s Mario and Alex time. The two favorite chiropractors from El Paso, TX. Ok. We’re going to be… Functional medicine, Alex. That’s what we’re gonna do. It’s about functional medicine in 2020, baby.

 

[00:00:21] This 2020, we’re gonna be focusing on BMI and we’re gonna be focusing on everything. Mario, my awesome co-host here we’re tearing it up. We’re gonna give some points of view. We’re gonna be discussing certain things. Today our focus is going to be on anthropometric measurements and measuring the body composition rationale and its interpretation.

 

[00:00:46] Now I’m afraid of that. All right.

 

[00:00:49] I’m afraid of measurements, Alex, I’m telling you right now, I don’t want measurements around my body.

 

[00:00:55] Okay. Thank you. All right Mario. Yeah.

 

[00:01:00] Mario, we’ve got to get a little bit of knowledge here. Okay. Well, what we’re not going to do is we’re not going to try to make this boring. No. If you really want to see boring. I think we have plenty of examples of what boring looks like. Yeah. Have you seen those boring guys, Mario? You know, it’s like the measurement of what’s going on. Yeah. Here you go.

 

[00:01:20] Video plays in the background.

 

[00:01:31] You know what? I can go to sleep with that one, Alex. Now, that’s what I’m talking about Mario. I can go to sleep and just shut it off.

 

[00:01:40] But, you know, learning has to be fun. It has to be interactive and it has to be functional.

 

[00:01:47] So that’s what we’re… Absolutely I totally agree. So what we’re gonna do is we’re gonna try to bring the facts as it can be and we’re gonna try to bring it with a little bit of slapstick fun.

 

[00:01:56] So it’s gonna be fun. Mario, tell me a little bit about your interpretation of BMI as how people understand basal metabolic rate.

 

[00:02:05] Well, this is what I understand and what I hear about basal metabolic rate.

 

[00:02:13] Bottom line is, can you put your belt around your pants and can you tuck your shirt in? How about that?

 

[00:02:25] You know, that’s pretty scientific. Right. That is scientific. Yes, that is scientific. Yes. We could talk pear, we could talk apple, sizes, apple-shaped bodies types.

 

[00:02:33] But we’re going to get specific here because people want to know, Ok, what’s going on. Let’s start. One of the things that we can do is we can start discussing calculating energy requirements, because one of the things that we want to see, as you can see, I put up here a little bit of facts so that it can help us out a little bit in terms of figuring out what’s the best approach in terms of what we do. Now, you can tell here that sedentary, no exercise, what we want to do is talk about basal metabolic rate. Ok. So this is a measurement that has occurred by height as well as weight index. So it comes out to that number and we can start looking at calorie, caloric intake burn. But when we do a BMR and we calculate this number, we typically want to get about a 1.2. And that’s what would be normal in most situations if you’re sedentary, light activity, we start noticing that there’s an increased activity expenditure and BMR should be one point 1.375. If you are moderately active, you should start doing that. So in its interpretation…

 

[00:03:33] Mario, when you see these kind of things and these kind of figures, what does it bring to mind for you in terms of these numbers? As we keep on going back to this, we’ll be able to see exactly what’s going on. What’s your incentive sense of the rates and the metabolic processes?

 

[00:03:52] Well, again, very simple, when you look at it as the more active you are, the higher your metabolic rate is. That’s it. So at the end of the day, we want to put it in very simplistic terms to the public. We want to be more active about that. So science is supporting that, you know, park the car as far away as possible from the Wal-Mart entrance and your work. So by doing that every day, you are creating a higher function. Ok, metabolic, that’s the burn. That’s your whole system burning fuel within yourself. So it’s simple. And the studies are showing that the more active you are, the higher your metabolic rate is. It can go up to a 1.9 from a 1.2. Correct.

 

[00:04:50] Exactly. So what we’re looking at here is that the requirements are going to be pretty high. If you are one of those people that are very active. So ultimately, our goal is to get you as active or what you’re your lifestyle could require. So, you know, if you’re a mechanic, you say moderately active. If you’re someone who works in, let’s say, an office, your BMR is going to be calculable. Using these numbers for the body mass index, the whole idea is to try to figure out the body mass index using the BMR. So the BMR allows us to kind of give an estimate, the best estimate as to where you’re BMR should be at and then we can use the same number, this BMR to assess your body mass index. So our goal is to continue with kind of learning about this thing. And as we kind of go through that, we look at body measurement types. Now, in the past, what we’ve looked at in terms of this, we assess the body in a bunch of different ways. Historically, we’ve been able to do a weight, underwater weight assessment. Remember, Mario, we used to have like a tank and put someone in water, have them float, actually measure the oxygen consumption. Those were the old methods, the true standard way of doing our fat analysis.

 

[00:05:57] Pretty expensive. Sometimes, though, we use the DEXA test. The DEXA test is a similar test that is used for bone density. We can actually do that. We also have, historically the body pod test. Now, I know that you have noticed different types of tests and we’re going to put up here.

 

[00:06:13] What are the other tests that you’ve seen? Alex, on that one. When you’re talking about the underwater weighing and DEXA and even the body pod, those are again, more research-based, more scientific.

 

[00:06:30] Exactly. In that. So when you’re looking at that, I look at it from my perspective.

 

[00:06:38] You know what’s functional? What’s can everyone do? Exactly. Skinfold is easy. Yeah. You know, skinfold and the BIA and the Tanita scale. Yeah. I mean that one, electrical impulses going through and you’re looking at resistance and impedance. Those are simple. You can’t just buy them from Wal-Mart or anywhere and step on it. Make sure you don’t eat and make sure you don’t drink before you do your test. So do it early morning. Let’s say six, seven o’clock. Right. On an empty stomach so you can get some good readings with the scan. And also, you know, skin fold is easy.

 

[00:07:21] And again, with the BMI, you’re looking at weight divided by twice your height, your height squared. Exactly.

 

[00:07:31] So that’s kind of like a simplistic view in terms of BMI. Anyone can do this. Yes. So those are right now. Those are the standards. Those are things, most of the time, when you go to your trainer. Most of the time when you go workout in your CrossFit gym or your, you know, what I call functional gym. Now people are going into more a functional aspect of fitness.

 

[00:07:55] So they incorporate less wear-and-tear and trauma. Now they’re looking at skin fold and InBody. They even have the new InBody systems that are very popular that give you a nice ratio even of your hydration, which is really nice.

 

[00:08:13] You know, when you actually say that, when we look at this thing like the Tanita, these scales, like you said, that you can get them at home. The BIA is where it’s at. What we’re finding is that a lot of the studies are reflecting that the BIA actually shows quite a correlation with accuracy with these more complex underwater weighing as well as the DEXA test. So these standards research-based, you’d always want to maintain some sort of research-based, at least collaborative information that makes sense. Right. So now the BIA assessment machines, they can actually determine through OHMS, through impedance to fat analysis to actually measuring the electrical current of the body, a very accurate approach to weight assessment. And by, you know, basal metabolic rates. So now the studies are actually better and they’re easier for people to do. And we don’t have to do some real complex things.

 

[00:09:09] Yeah. And, you know, if you can show everyone the body part, I think that’s really cool. That’s like a cool thing. You know, I mean, look at that. Can you. Yeah.

 

[00:09:21] Yeah. That’s really cool. So when you look at a body pod. Right.

 

[00:09:24] This is an incredible thing. But this is not something you would want to have in your office. Right? Thirty, Forty-thousand dollars. Right. Jesus, man.

 

[00:09:31] Yeah, you know, it’s crazy, I mean, they’re probably looking at you like they should have you on an alien channel or something. But the simple one, if you can scroll up on the BIA, it’s a simple machine and the readings are awesome. You know, the readings are very good. They’re portable. And you can see the resistance level and you can see the phase angle, which is really nice because then you’re looking at very specific patterns and turns your metabolism.

 

[00:10:06] Absolutely. These tests now are available in most clinics, or at least the clinics that focus on functional fitness. We have them at the fitness centers and many fitness centers have them. And you and I are used to using these things in our offices. So as we do these things, as we assess these things, we really can give kind of the patients a quantitative point of view that really helps them figure out exactly how everything is.

 

[00:10:38] You’re exactly right, Alex. You know, in my work, you know, working with athletes and also what I call performance professions, where we’re talking about military S.F., Special Forces, Rangers, things like that. It’s all about performance. So in that, we use calipers. You know, those are very, very useful, easy to use. And the one that I particularly like, which.

 

[00:11:08] Again, with BMI, there are a lot of discrepancies, Alex, and you know, this being, you know, in the world of bodybuilding and athletics and all of our kids are athletes. I mean, they’re, that’s just part of the family structure. That’s who we are. So now you got to run, jump, catch a ball or kick a ball or do something. Right. So the point is in that what I have found out is that the BMI is not very accurate. Not very accurate at all Alex, when it comes down to athletes. Right. So this is where the discrepancy comes in, where it gets crazy because now you go to a regular assessment, a regular assessment or a regular, I don’t want to say regular doctor, but, you know, your doctor and then he’ll test your BMI and you’re gonna be off, you’re going to be high and you’re going to say, you know, you need to get your BMI lower. Yeah, the point is that the BMI is the mass, right? So again, muscle is heavier than fat. So in your environment of bodybuilding, what do you think about that?

 

[00:12:22] I mean because I’m sure it was crazy. Well, one of the things that I’ve been able to see over the years is that when you have someone, as we understand this, that the BMR is obviously the thing that we’re using to assess height and weight. But those numbers get skewed when you have an athlete and they don’t work well for the muscular individual, someone that’s I mean, my son, for example, he was 195 pounds, 5′ 8″. In all reality, he’s clinically obese. Right. Yet he’s shredded and ripped. And he was a national champion in wrestling. Literally had no body fat. So the caliper method, the BMR, the BMI based on height and weight has deficiencies. And that’s where the BIA came in and the body impedance assessment. That’s where the studies became very popular. And as what we see, Mario is that in essence, when we look at these situations, we find out that there are great assessment tools out there. These tools are the ones that are actually going to give us the ability to kind of come up with an accurate for a large range of individuals, whether they’re bodybuilders, whether they’re women. There’s a standard between, you know, a good 13 percent body fat and 29 percent body fat for females. Women typically have a larger number of between 18 and 29 percent body fat. At times, that’s a range that is kind of in there. Hopefully, they can stick around 22 to 24, boys in the 13 range just because the body density is different in a female. Right. So what we look at is what’s the norm? One of the things that we can do is try to calibrate people for their numbers so that they make sense for that individual and be able to work them towards it because a true athlete will be able to almost blow the BMR, BMI into the wrong number skew. And if we can get it to a nice number, we’re gonna have to use a lot of different tools. Now, what we’re going to present today are our ideas and fundamental philosophies and knowledge points that we use to determine actual true health. Right. So we’re going to be discussing those particular issues and we’re going to go over those particular areas here. Now, the BIA is the body impedance. Okay. So when we look at the bioimpedance areas, we can see that these kinds of tests are not only just affordable, but they actually determine the electrical current. And because of the body amount of muscle fat and the fat that occurs, we are using the fat as kind of like the thing that allows us to assess body dynamics as well as body density. Right. So as the more, there’s more impedance or more ohms or more resistance in the body, the greater the body fat. So it’s very important that these tests be done properly. Many of the times before you do a BIA, you’ve got to kind of, you know, you’ve got to not take, first of all, you’ve got to be dry. Ok. Because if you’re sweaty, it throws it off. Right. If you eat too much or too many fluids. So typically you try to keep away from foods, eating food prior to this and you try to get this thing to work. So resistance, as we look at it, are the things that we’re trying to measure. So one of the things that, when you look at these particular graphs, you see low resistance associated with large amounts of body fat mass, which is where the body is stored. Right. So when we look at this, this is one of the areas we can kind of put together when we look at the resistance numbers. Now, as we look at different angles, let’s say we got the phase angles. We also look at the ability. This is the new number that is assessing actually the intracellular and extracellular activity as well as the permeability of the cells. Ok. Now, as we range this. They’re looking at ranges between 0 and 20 percent. But the higher the phase angle, Ok, the higher the number where it pops, the better it is for the individual, the lower it is. It’s not as good. So what we want to do is we want to see where your phase angle is and we want to be able to assess it as it gets calculated. So one of the things that we look at, we assess this and our tools that we use, such as the BIA assessments, such as the InBody testing systems, we can actually determine the ranges that are for the individuals. But here’s where things make sense. But what we’re in general, when you look at this, Mario, what is your take from when we assess this particular type of under fundamental research technology as we can apply to athletes? Your daughters are athletes, right? And do you? What have you used in the past for this?

 

[00:17:07] Usually, when they go on to programs, I mean, they’re super fit, first of all. So they’re looking more at anywhere between like performance in terms of speed, agility, and sustainability. Right. Like, you know, vertical in terms of explosiveness, those types of things. In the area of recovery and energy. This is where I can tell you with the girls and even the boys, they really focused on the energy consistency. Ok. And I can see even with this, which is critical that the phase angle, again, the lower the phase angle, it shows the inability of the cell to store, you know, energy.

 

[00:18:09] So that’s why that storage of energy, Alex, is real critical because why that is where we get the maximum output and everyone is talking about performance and performance is about what, output. So if that cell can not store the energy, it cannot release the energy and perform. So that’s how nice these are nice markers. I would say that with the latest technology, we need to use them. We need to use them and we need to have benchmarks where it’s not just generalities. A lot of times we talk about generalities. How do you doing? I’m doing good. You know, I had a good workout. Well, what does it mean to you to have a good workout? And what does it mean to have a great workout? The difference is, show me proof. Show me results. It’s all about results. So the better, I guess a good takeaway. A good, good. Kind of, you know, assessment for people. Look at number one. Go to a professional and get your BMR and BMI done. That’s number one. And use the equipment.

 

[00:19:26] And the specifics so you can mark and you can assess them afterward.

 

[00:19:34] If you don’t have a straight baseline of pre, you will not have a post. And this is the same thing in performance. If you don’t have your electronic time and track your pre, then your post is meaningless. You really don’t know where you’re going. So for a lot of the performance, you know, to me, life is performance. You’re going to have to perform either at work or at home or you’re going to perform on the field, whatever that may be. On a mat. On a field, you know, in your sports. It’s about keeping track of markers, your pre and post. That way, you know where you’re going and you know your performance in our world. We love scores. Just imagine, go into a game and you never have a score. We don’t keep score. We just want to have fun. It doesn’t. It’s not fun anymore. Right. So.

 

[00:20:34] So for the things that we’re covering today in terms of the instruments, the methods of measuring body composition all the way from professional, DEXA and water displacement and body pods to skin folds, you know, everyday use, that you can just buy it at your local Wal-Mart anywhere and do the count protest.

 

[00:21:02] That’s a great baseline.

 

[00:21:06] And with a lot of the trainers, make sure that when you are training with someone, make sure that they do a baseline so you know and they know where you’re at and the performance and the programming.

 

[00:21:23] It’s really important to understand programming. There has to be a scaling. There has to be a periodicity in that development. And I know when little Alex was training for state, you know, in the wrestling, there has to be a periodicity. You can’t just go hard and go home like everybody says. No. You have to have your point of performance and you’ve got to have your track, your flow to that. Just like when Mia is training for nationals or international competition in tennis, there has to be a plan where she is developing to peak at that time. Is that correct? Yes, yes, yes, yes. That’s so critical. And we, you, cannot create that plan to peak at that specific if you’re in the dark in terms of having a knowledge of where you’re at. And I think for our listeners and our viewers, it’s critical and it’s very, very easy to get. I think sometimes people get lost, like all, you know, BMI. I would venture to say 80 percent of the people that are listening today. Right. That are watching this video. Have no clue what BMI means. They’ve heard about it, but they have no clue what it is. Yeah, they think it’s some scientific something. No, it’s not. All right. We want to bring it down to earth, down into your living room, where you can actually do a BMI for your kids, right? Yeah. Why don’t we do that? Why don’t we do a BMI for your kids? Do it for your husband, your wife. Make sure you know where you’re at again, with a BMI. And this, you know, refresh my memory. The target is from 19 to 20. Ok, 19 to 20. Anything beyond that is obesity. If you’re talking about 25 BMI, you’re in the obesity range. Right. If you’re talking about 30, you are morbidly obese. And the word morbidly obese means death. That should get everyone’s attention. Oh, yes. Yes, it does. It kinda like wakes you up. So what we’re looking at is, number one, understand where you are. Then measurements and then also understand that these measurements fit the profile of a person. So if you’re a bodybuilder, if you are very heavy muscle-bound. Ok. Then you already know you need to go into impedance. Not measurements. But what I have found out. A very reliable measurement is. The measurement for your waist and that’s where, Alex, I want to kind of share this with our listeners and viewers. Just a simple waist measurement is so powerful because it is actually…

 

[00:24:24] Some people say it’s better than BMI. It sure is. Right. I mean, actually, yes, it’s yes, it’s very much. That waist measurement gets down and makes it so simple because that abdominal mass, that abdominal fat is the one that’s gonna kill you.

 

[00:24:41] That’s the one that has the highest risk. Is that correct?

 

[00:24:44] That’s correct. And if your belly is wide. If it sticks over your belt, we got issues. Ok. So we’re noticing that if there is a certain distance between the chest and the waist, those are better measurements in general. Yeah. So as those numbers are calculated, you don’t need a high-level test. To do this. Ok. I like that. So it’s a very important component to look at. But as we advance and we’re dealing with high-performance athletes, people want to know and you can take a sport like, let’s say, just wrestling, for example, you got these individuals. Or soccer. Huge. We’re dealing with to assess a tight BMI or in a tight body mass index. You got to have body fat. You got to have body fat to be able to sustain the loads of an exercise routine. You’re going to see that during season you got some guys that got some good body fat density. Right. And let’s say their weight class is 198, for example. And the guy is about 215 pounds. Well, if he drops from 215 to 198 overnight, he’s going to be exorbitantly exhausted. And this is something that we’re going to see now if he slowly works towards the goal towards the arena of 198 over a period of two weeks. Or he is better off. But let’s assume he gets there to the exact bodyweight 198 and its 3 days before competition, right? It’s going to be exhausting. He’s gonna be tired. However, if he can get there two weeks earlier and adapt his body as his body starts getting better, it will be able to respond better during the loads that it needs.

 

[00:26:31] And this is what we are talking about, that it needs to be sports specific. You follow me Alex? Exactly. So that same conversation cannot be held with a soccer player. Exactly. A football player and a tennis player or anything in that what I call long aerobics exertion of over, you know, over, let’s say 10, 15 minutes. And this is what’s happening is and I love it when you said that example with wrestlers, you know, I would say the same goes towards MMA fighters, which I take care of. Yes. MMA fighters in Phoenix and in different areas that then you’re talking about also boxers. Again, they have to make weight. Yes. Ok. Though the world of making weight is a beast, that is a world where you have to be on or you’re going to die. Exactly. You either go into that fight feeling like a beast or you’re praying that it ends quickly. And so. Yeah. Yeah. You gotta pin him in the first 10 seconds. Yes. So. So this is where it’s so important that the training, the measurements, the analytics, and metrics. We’re in a world of analytics and metrics, Alex. We’re not in a world of. Oh, he looks good.

 

[00:28:09] No, no, we’re past that. We’re way past. No, Mario, we’re in the world of making sure that when we wait, when we compare the athlete, we can measure their changes. And every stage down the road as they compete, as they become more and more in tune to that moment of competition, their body changes, their bodies adapt, their bodies become more refined. And as the season gets better or further along in the season, towards the competitions, towards the season, towards the heavy loads. Yeah. That’s when we can kind of see how the body’s changing. So these tests can actually help us determine how the body reacts. And once these competitors have years of competing and during those years they have offseason and on the season and we need to be able to measure those things in an easy way. That’s what these tests do in terms of tennis, for example, when you’ve done these kind of things. What have you noticed in terms of, let’s say, just the athlete of tennis or even the boxers that you deal with? What have you noticed in terms of the, specifically the…

 

[00:29:15] Progression through the season. It’s critical, it’s critical and Alex, I can tell you this, that it’s not just performance. The other conversation that I think really needs to be. Dialed in is recovery, recovery, Alex. Ok. And the other one that fits together with recovery is the phase angle. Yes. And decreasing injuries. Exactly. That’s where it kind of gets real, real crazy because you can not have this sustainable pattern. Without recovery and without that specificity and knowing when to push it, one to max out, as they say, and when to shut it down or when to go half-speed, and these are conversations that are really, really critical for young athletes. Alex. Yeah, I see a lot of them, you know, and they’re starting nowadays. They’re starting earlier. They’re starting at six and seven years old. Six and seven. I mean, tell your body hasn’t even woke up to the conversation of sports yet. And they are practicing three times a week, having games every weekend, or some of them practice three times a week with one team and then go with another team and practice the other two days just so they can be at their best peak.

 

[00:30:48] What sports are you dealing with that kids are doing at six or seven?

 

[00:30:53] They’re running like right now. I have patients that are doing basketball and track at the same time.

 

[00:31:01] Yeah. And during middle school.

 

[00:31:05] That’s amazing. This is crazy. Yeah. So this is my question. Our question. We’re here to help the community. We’re here to help the parents because their vision is my little kid’s gonna be a superstar, right. He’s going to sign a D1 contract. UT Austin, Texas tag, guns up, baby. Yeah, guns up or U of A. You have Wildcats wildcat.

 

[00:31:34] No, you know walk-ins.

 

[00:31:35] Yes. And I’m thinking you’re not gonna make it past high school. I mean, you’re not gonna make it past Montwood or past Franklin. I mean, you are going to hit the wall so hard, so hard with repetitive traumas. Ok. And so those are the components that to me as a health care provider, as a, you know, a sports functional medicine…

 

[00:32:05] Cognitive.

 

[00:32:08] Coach, I mean, I need to teach people this, forget taking care of injuries. I want to teach you so you don’t get injured. It’s critical. And then they go into middle school and high school and there’s no season off. There is no season off.

 

[00:32:24] So in your opinion, what have you seen these tests do in order to help the parent or the athlete or the individual or the coach, for that matter? Understand, as a form of betterment for them? What do we get out of these tests in terms of the athlete?

 

[00:32:46] Very simple. There is a time to turn it on and a time to turn it off. Ok. So, you reach your goal, rest. Ok. You’ve done the tournament, recover, get the recovery, get the mind and body to recover, Alex. A lot of times we don’t even think about the mind. Yeah, the mind gets beat up in the war, in the battlefield of performance, the mind gets beat up. Yes. Ok. It affects your sleep pattern. It affects your focus. Emotions, anger management, all of those things. So what I would say is we’re here to share knowledge and tools or health. But most of all, for performance. Yes. So that way. Each child and each person, let’s say you’re not in middle school, high school. Let’s say you’re in your 20s and 30s and 40s. Well, you’re performing for life. And so let’s really invite everyone to learn more to look up BMI, BMR, all of these and incorporate them into their plan of workouts and challenge them and ask them, when’s the last time you got measured? How about that? Yeah.

 

[00:34:13] When’s the last time? We have to kind of teach people that these tests are not, you know, at any point. Just one test. You have to follow through these tests for a lifetime to see what’s actually going on. If you really have a center where you can go and the BIA tests are so simple now that we and the correlation between the highest level of research show that we’re very, very tight. Less than 1 percent variation from clinical research methods. So we know that the BIA works in terms of extremity inflammation, in terms of joint swelling, in terms of the metabolic processes for the mass density in the…

 

[00:34:56] In each extremity. So if you have one muscle that is larger on one side as a result of an injury from the other extremity, we’ll be able to see the changes.

 

[00:35:05] So the studies are very clear now. We use phase angles to determine health. We use fat analysis. We use the changes and the progression during a very athletic era or a very athletic season is very important to be able to determine. So that today we’re starting the children a lot younger. We’re starting them at four, five, six years old as the child has to around 4 years old, as long as he can focus is in long as he can pay attention. That’s when we start him active. So it is wise to start the process of understanding the metabolism methods that we use to calculate body mass index through their ages so that we have a measurement of what’s normal for that particular child. Because what we really have to see is what’s good for that individual. Specific gravity is another method to determine if you’re cutting down too much. But that’s another topic running. This particular issue is, particularly on the body mass index. And what we want to do is we want to bring that to the towns and to El Paso, particularly because we have those research capacities here, specifically the ones that we have liked is, you know, body mass index so InBody is one of the most top used. They use it at UTEP. They use it at the top research centers. And it’s pretty much the standard now. And, you know, and since we use it, it offers us an ability to quickly assess an individual. I’ve been at UTEP. I’ve seen the types that they use and it’s very accurate. And since we’ve seen the research said that it follows now we know that this stuff is very accurate. And specifically, now you can actually assess your own and have it online and the determinant through methods where you can keep up with your child, see what’s going on. Any other ideas, any other comments that you have, Mario, in terms of bringing this logic or this kind of approach to understanding basal metabolic indexes to the public?

 

[00:37:10] I would say, Alex. Number one, let’s make it very simple. You know, let’s make it very simple. So with that, this is as simple as getting on a scale to see how much you weigh. That’s it. So let’s bring that conversation to everyone so everyone gets a scan. Minimal. Minimal. I would say seasonal every season. You should get a scan. You should get a BMI. You should have you should log it in just like your weight. You know, let’s be functional. Let’s think of ourselves as important as our cars. Right. So. So I look at it as you have a little tag up on your windshield that says oil change, you know. So why don’t we do this? Why don’t we have? And I really challenge everyone listening. And, you know, we’re here because we need to take care of our community. You know, our community is probably one of the highest rates of diabetes in the nation. Ok. And all of that starts… Mario. Mario. Yeah. Yeah.

 

[00:38:20] I’m sorry. I don’t want to say it, but you have to. There’s a big elephant in the room. But El Paso, our town was considered the fattest, sweatiest town in the whole United States at one point. That sickened me when I heard it. It was a different town. We are much more advanced. There were very few gyms. Now we’re all about fitness. So if we’re gonna be the leaders out there and man, I gotta tell you, we got some beautiful athletes coming out of El Paso now. Absolutely. We are one of the tops. We can put our athletes against the best, even the most. Well-bred. Top schools. So as we compete in those areas, we really want to use the tools that all the other places use in order to assess our athletes, our children, and our high-performance individuals. So it’s very important we do that kind of stuff now because we have the technology. And no longer is El Paso going to be the fattest, sweetest town of the United States. That’s unforgivable. You definitely agree with that.

 

[00:39:23] So just bring in that and the division that I would like to share. Is that the measurement, the simplicity of just getting your weight and your height is now complemented with a BMI that you understand. You have some goals. It’s 2020. Yeah, yeah. It’s 2020, baby. You know what, 2020 means that let’s do better than last year. Let’s be healthier than last year and let us integrate and have a better understanding and better objective plan for our own health. And with this, I would say this test and the body measurement index is a word and an understanding that needs to be spread throughout families. So the family can talk about that, like, hey, what are we doing? How are we doing? Ok. And then with that, use it accordingly. Ok. Accordingly. To create positive outcomes where there is just to be able to play with your child if you have children. That’s your sport. Your sport is not to sit and watch. Your sport is to participate. Throw the ball. Kick the ball. Run with your child. Or if your child is really into sports. Give him the tools. Give her the best tools. They’re not that expensive. Now they’re available. So that way they can get training that is on point and results that are extraordinary.

 

[00:41:04] Exactly. I couldn’t have said it better myself. We have the technology. It’s here. This is not the six million dollar man, kind of world or this is not outside of our realm. We can give it to our kids. We can show them, parents become the educators.

 

[00:41:22] They are the ones that seek out the coaches. They are the ones that are the nutritionist for the children. They are the ones that are the psychologists that every aspect of developing a child requires a lot of different aspects. So those parents that have athletes, athletes that want to learn more about their bodies and the world of heavy tech research methods are over. Now, it’s simple. You get on scale really accurate methods and you can monitor your body a few times a year, two, three, four times a year, depending on your type of sport and your level of performance. These are the things we can do. And we need to provide that information so that you have tools in order to gage.

 

[00:42:11] You can’t get in a car without looking at a speedometer. So if don’t know how fast you’re going. You don’t know if you’ve gone too far. You don’t know if you’re having protein metabolic catabolism, which is breakdown or if you’re anabolic. So these are the tools that help us figure things out. You don’t know if certain joints or certain extremities are swollen because of just water or if it’s this protein breakdown. These tools we can actually see inside the body and monitor the improvement or changes. So the world changed. So now El Paso, we have the ability to change the way we understand our own physiology as well as the patient’s physiology and our client’s physiology. So I welcome this technology. And by no means is it limited to anything that we do. This is many providers in the town who can do this. Many hospitals have it. But for a facility, it’s within our practices as well. So we use those things. So I look forward to being able to share this with the patients as well as the town.

 

[00:43:15] Absolutely.

 

[00:43:16] I second emotion on that, Alex, and the challenge and the motivation and passion that we’re going to have this year in 2020. Absolutely.

 

[00:43:26] As to not only motivate and be cheerleaders for functional health and fitness, but also to educate and empower the community with the latest technology and knowledge so they can do their best.

 

[00:43:43] Amen, brother. This is awesome. And I look forward to being able to continue. We’re going to be coming at you often because we’re motivated.

 

[00:43:53] We’re parents and we want to be able to touch our El Paso and make it a better place because, you know, without getting too crazy, we’re pretty badass, as they say.

 

[00:44:04] Right. Yeah. We’re pretty intense in our town, right? Yeah.

 

[00:44:07] Mario. Don’t get me started.

 

[00:44:11] They’re gonna shut me down. No, no, no, no.

 

[00:44:16] We won’t do that later, guys. We’ll go ahead and see the show. And it’s been a blessing. So from all of us here, we can actually see how you guys are doing. So. Blessings to you guys. Thank you, guys. Bye-bye.

 

Additional Topic Discussion: Chronic Pain

Sudden pain is a natural response of the nervous system which helps to demonstrate possible injury. By way of instance, pain signals travel from an injured region through the nerves and spinal cord to the brain. Pain is generally less severe as the injury heals, however, chronic pain is different than the average type of pain. With chronic pain, the human body will continue sending pain signals to the brain, regardless if the injury has healed. Chronic pain can last for several weeks to even several years. Chronic pain can tremendously affect a patient’s mobility and it can reduce flexibility, strength, and endurance.

 

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with a variety of food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs.

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine and it has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). It is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.

 


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

 

Proudly,�Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

 

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

 

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

 

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

 


 

 


 

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders in the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.

 

 

Functional Neurology: Foods to Eat and Avoid with Hyperthyroidism

Functional Neurology: Foods to Eat and Avoid with Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism, or an overactive thyroid, causes the thyroid gland to produce excess amounts of hormones. The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ found in the center of the neck which releases hormones that regulate various bodily functions, such as breathing, heart rate, temperature, and metabolism. Hyperthyroidism can cause bodily functions to speed up, which may result in a variety of symptoms. Diet and lifestyle modifications can ultimately help improve an overactive thyroid. The following article will discuss foods to eat and avoid hyperthyroidism or an overactive thyroid.

Diet and lifestyle modifications can help improve an overactive thyroid. Several vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients are essential to balance thyroid function. Healthcare professionals generally recommend following a low-iodine diet together with other treatment options for hyperthyroidism. By way of instance, people with hyperthyroidism, or an overactive thyroid, may follow a low-iodine diet before having radiation therapy. After treatment, it’s often still essential to follow a low-iodine diet. A variety of other foods can also help to protect the thyroid gland and reduce hyperthyroidism symptoms.

Foods to Eat with Hyperthyroidism

Low-iodine Foods

Iodine is an essential mineral that plays a role in the production of thyroid hormones. Low-iodine foods may help reduce thyroid hormones, including:

  • fresh or canned fruit
  • plain popcorn
  • unsalted nuts and nut butter
  • potatoes
  • oats
  • homemade bread or bread without dairy, eggs, and salt
  • egg whites
  • honey
  • maple syrup
  • coffee or tea
  • non-iodized salt

Cruciferous Vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables may also prevent the thyroid gland from utilizing iodine. Cruciferous vegetables that are beneficial for hyperthyroidism can include:

  • kale
  • collard greens
  • bok choy
  • Brussels sprouts
  • broccoli
  • cauliflower
  • bamboo shoots
  • mustard
  • cassava
  • rutabaga

Healthy fats

Healthy fats may help reduce inflammation. This helps balance thyroid hormones. Non-dairy fats are ultimately essential in a low-iodine diet, including:

  • coconut oil
  • avocados and avocado oil
  • olive oil
  • unsalted nuts and seeds
  • sunflower oil
  • flaxseed oil
  • safflower oil

Spices

Several spices have anti-inflammatory properties that may help balance thyroid function. Add a dose of antioxidants and flavor to your daily meals with:

  • green chilies
  • black pepper
  • turmeric

Vitamins and Minerals

Iron

Iron is essential for a variety of bodily functions, including the production of thyroid hormones. Add iron into your diet by eating various foods, including:

  • green leafy vegetables
  • nuts
  • seeds
  • dried beans
  • lentils
  • whole grains
  • poultry, such as chicken and turkey
  • red meat

Selenium

Selenium-rich foods may also help balance thyroid hormones. Selenium prevents cell and tissue damage. Several good sources of selenium can include:

  • Brazil nuts
  • chia seeds
  • sunflower seeds
  • mushrooms
  • couscous
  • oat bran
  • rice
  • poultry, such as chicken and turkey
  • meat, such as beef and lamb
  • tea

Zinc

Zinc helps turn the food we eat into energy. This mineral also promotes thyroid and immune health. Several food sources of zinc can also include:

  • cashews
  • pumpkin seeds
  • mushrooms
  • chickpeas
  • beef
  • lamb
  • cocoa powder

 

Calcium and Vitamin D

Hyperthyroidism causes brittle bones. Vitamin D and calcium are necessary to support healthy bones. Several good sources of calcium can include:

  • calcium-fortified orange juice
  • kale
  • spinach
  • collard greens
  • okra
  • almond milk
  • white beans
  • calcium-fortified cereals

Foods to Avoid with Hyperthyroidism

Excess Iodine

Eating excess iodine-rich or iodine-fortified foods can cause hyperthyroidism or an overactive thyroid. Avoid eating foods with excess iodine, including:

  • seaweed
  • algae
  • alginate
  • nori
  • kelp
  • agar-agar
  • carrageen
  • milk and dairy
  • cheese
  • egg yolks
  • sushi
  • fish
  • prawns
  • crabs
  • lobster
  • iodized water
  • some food colorings
  • iodized salt

 

Gluten

Gluten may cause inflammation and damage the thyroid. Even if you don�t have a gluten sensitivity or intolerance, avoid eating foods with gluten, including:

  • triticale
  • rye
  • malt
  • barley
  • brewers yeast
  • wheat

Soy

Although soy doesn’t have iodine, it’s been shown to affect treatments for hyperthyroidism in animal models. Avoid eating foods with soy, including

  • tofu
  • soy sauce
  • soy milk
  • soy-based creamers

Caffeine

Foods and drinks that have caffeine, such as soda, chocolate, tea, and coffee, can worsen hyperthyroidism and increase symptoms of irritability, nervousness, anxiety, and rapid heart rate. Instead, try replacing caffeinated foods and drinks with flavored water, natural herbal teas, or hot apple cider.

Nitrates

Substances known as nitrates may cause the thyroid gland to absorb too much iodine. This can lead to an enlarged thyroid and an overactive thyroid. Nitrates are naturally found in several foods. Processed foods and drinking water may also have added nitrates. Avoid foods with nitrates, including:

  • spinach
  • parsley
  • dill
  • lettuce
  • cabbage
  • celery
  • beets
  • turnip
  • carrots
  • pumpkin
  • endive
  • leeks
  • fennel
  • cucumber
  • processed meats, such as bacon, sausage, salami, and pepperoni

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Insights Image

Hyperthyroidism, or an overactive thyroid, causes the thyroid gland to produce excess amounts of hormones. The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ found in the center of the neck which releases hormones that regulate a variety of bodily functions, such as breathing, heart rate, temperature, and metabolism. Diet and lifestyle modifications can ultimately help improve an overactive thyroid. Several vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients are essential to balance thyroid function. Healthcare professionals generally recommend following a low-iodine diet together with other treatment options for hyperthyroidism. A variety of other foods can also help to protect the thyroid gland and reduce hyperthyroidism symptoms. In the following article, we will discuss what foods to eat and what foods to avoid with hyperthyroidism or an overactive thyroid. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Hyperthyroidism, or an overactive thyroid, causes the thyroid gland to produce excess amounts of hormones. The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ found in the center of the neck which releases hormones that regulate various bodily functions, such as breathing, heart rate, temperature, and metabolism. Hyperthyroidism can cause bodily functions to speed up, which may result in a variety of symptoms. Diet and lifestyle modifications can ultimately help improve an overactive thyroid. In the article above, we discussed foods to eat and avoid with hyperthyroidism or an overactive thyroid.

Diet and lifestyle modifications can help improve an overactive thyroid. Several vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients are essential to balance thyroid function. Healthcare professionals generally recommend following a low-iodine diet together with other treatment options for hyperthyroidism. By way of instance, people with hyperthyroidism, or an overactive thyroid, may follow a low-iodine diet before having radiation therapy. After treatment, it’s often still essential to follow a low-iodine diet. A variety of other foods can also help to protect the thyroid gland and reduce hyperthyroidism symptoms.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

References:

  1. Lights, Verneda, et al. Hyperthyroidism. Healthline, Healthline Media, 29 June 2016, www.healthline.com/health/hyperthyroidism.
  2. Mayo Clinic Staff. Hyperthyroidism (Overactive Thyroid).Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 7 Jan. 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hyperthyroidism/symptoms-causes/syc-20373659.
  3. Aleppo, Grazia. Hyperthyroidism Overview. EndocrineWeb, EndocrineWeb Media, 10 July 2019, www.endocrineweb.com/conditions/hyperthyroidism/hyperthyroidism-overview-overactive-thyroid.
  4. Iftikhar, Noreen. Hyperthyroidism Diet. Healthline, Healthline Media, 12 June 2019, www.healthline.com/health/hyperthyroidism-diet.

 

Additional Topic Discussion: Chronic Pain

Sudden pain is a natural response of the nervous system which helps to demonstrate possible injury. By way of instance, pain signals travel from an injured region through the nerves and spinal cord to the brain. Pain is generally less severe as the injury heals. However, chronic pain is different than the average type of pain. The human body will continue sending pain signals to the brain with chronic pain, regardless of the injury has healed. Chronic pain can last for several weeks to even several years. Chronic pain can tremendously affect a patient’s mobility, reducing flexibility, strength, and endurance.

 

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual’s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to various neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with various food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers precise antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual’s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Finally, utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient’s specific needs.

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine. It has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). Therefore, it is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.

 


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

 

Proudly, Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

 

Please call our office for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

 

If you are an Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic patient, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

 

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products, please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.


 

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders at the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.

 

 

Functional Neurology: Hypothyroidism Diet

Functional Neurology: Hypothyroidism Diet

Hypothyroidism is a health issue that occurs when the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormones. According to healthcare professionals, thyroid hormones regulate metabolism, cell and tissue repair as well as growth, among other essential bodily functions. People with hypothyroidism experience weight gain, hair loss, cold sensitivity, depression, fatigue, and a variety of other symptoms. Diet and lifestyle modifications may ultimately help improve thyroid function. In the following article, we will discuss the best diet as well as what foods to eat and what foods to avoid with hypothyroidism.

 

What is Hypothyroidism?

 

The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ found in the center of the neck. It produces hormones that affect almost every cell and tissue in the human body. When the thyroid hormones are low, the pituitary gland, a small gland found in the base of the brain, sends a signal, known as the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which causes the thyroid gland to release necessary hormones into the bloodstream. Occasionally, the thyroid gland doesn’t release enough hormones even when there is enough TSH. This is referred to as primary hypothyroidism and it’s one of the most common types of thyroid dysfunction.

 

Approximately 90 percent of primary hypothyroidism cases occur due to Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, an autoimmune disease that causes a person’s own immune system to attack and destroy the thyroid gland. Primary hypothyroidism may also occur due to iodine deficiency, genetic disorders, drugs and/or medications as well as surgery. In other cases, the thyroid gland won’t receive enough TSH signals. This happens when the pituitary gland isn’t functioning properly and it’s referred to as secondary hypothyroidism. Thyroid hormones regulate our metabolism which helps turn the foods we eat into energy.

 

Foods to Eat with Hypothyroidism

 

Thyroid hormones can help regulate the speed of our metabolism. Faster metabolisms ultimately burn much more calories. However, because people with hypothyroidism produce fewer thyroid hormones, their metabolism slows down and burns much less calories. Slower metabolisms can cause a variety of health issues, such as increased fatigue, blood cholesterol levels, and weight gain. Research studies found that eating a balanced diet can help increase the rate of metabolism. There are a variety of foods that can also help improve overall health and wellness in people with hypothyroidism, including:

 

  • fruits, including bananas, berries, oranges, tomatoes, etc.
  • vegetables, including moderate amounts of cooked, cruciferous vegetables
  • gluten-free grains and seeds, including rice, buckwheat, quinoa, chia seeds, and flax seeds
  • dairy, including milk, cheese, yogurt, etc.
  • eggs (eating whole eggs is often recommended)
  • fish, including tuna, halibut, salmon, shrimp, etc.
  • meat, including beef, lamb chicken, etc.
  • water and other non-caffeinated beverages

 

Essential Nutrients for Hypothyroidism

 

Iodine

 

Iodine is an essential mineral that�s used to produce thyroid hormones. People with iodine deficiency may have an increased risk of developing hypothyroidism. Iodine deficiency is a common health issue that affects almost one-third of the population worldwide. If you have an iodine deficiency, consider adding iodized table salt to your meals or eating more iodine-rich foods, such as seaweed, fish, dairy, and eggs. Iodine supplements are unnecessary, as you can get plenty of iodine from your diet. Doctors have also found that getting too much iodine can damage the thyroid gland.

 

Selenium

 

Selenium is an essential mineral that helps �activate� thyroid hormones so that they can be used by the human body. This nutrient also has antioxidant properties that may protect the thyroid gland from damage by molecules, known as free radicals, that can cause oxidative stress. Adding selenium-rich foods to your diet is a great way to increase your selenium levels. Selenium-rich foods include Brazil nuts, legumes, tuna, sardines, and eggs. However, avoid taking selenium supplements unless advised by a healthcare professional. Selenium supplements may be toxic if they are taken in large amounts.

 

Zinc

 

Similar to the essential mineral, known as selenium, zinc also helps the human body �activate� thyroid hormones so that they can also be readily used by the human body. Research studies found that zinc may ultimately help regulate the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), or the hormone released by the pituitary gland that signals the thyroid gland to produce hormones. Zinc deficiency is rare in developed countries, as zinc is abundant in the food supply. However, people with hypothyroidism should eat a balanced diet with more zinc-rich foods, including beef, chicken, oysters and other shellfish, among other foods.

 

Foods to Avoid with Hypothyroidism

 

Fortunately, people with hypothyroidism don�t have to avoid eating too many different types of foods. However, foods that have goitrogens should be eaten in moderation and they should also be cooked accordingly as these can ultimately affect the production of thyroid hormones by interfering with iodine uptake in the thyroid gland. People with hypothyroidism should also avoid eating processed foods, as these generally have a lot of calories. This can be a problem for people with hypothyroidism, as they may gain weight more easily. Here is a list of foods and supplements you should avoid, including:

 

  • millet (including all of the different varieties available)
  • processed foods, including cakes, cookies, hot dogs, etc.
  • supplements (only take supplements recommended by a healthcare professional)

 

Here is a list of foods you can eat in moderation. These foods have goitrogens which can be harmful if they’re eaten in large amounts, including:

 

  • soy-based foods, including edamame beans, tofu, tempeh, soy milk, etc.
  • cruciferous vegetables, including kale, spinach, broccoli, cabbage, etc.
  • certain fruits, including strawberries, pears, and peaches
  • beverages, including green tea, coffee, and alcohol

 

Harmful Nutrients for Hypothyroidism

 

Goitrogens

 

Goitrogens are substances that may affect thyroid function. People with hypothyroidism should avoid eating foods with goitrogens, however, this only appears to be a problem for people who have an iodine deficiency or eat large amounts of goitrogens. Also, cooking foods with goitrogens may inactivate these substances. One exception to the previously mentioned foods above includes pearl millet. Several research studies found that eating pearl millet may ultimately affect thyroid function, even if you don�t have an iodine deficiency. Furthermore, many common foods have goitrogens, including:

 

  • soy foods, including edamame, tempeh, tofu, etc.
  • certain vegetables, including cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, kale, etc.
  • fruits and starchy plants, including strawberries, peaches, cassava, sweet potatoes, etc.
  • nuts and seeds, including peanuts, pine nuts, millet, etc.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Insights Image

The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ found in the center of the neck which produces hormones when the pituitary gland releases a signal known as the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). However, thyroid dysfunction can ultimately cause a variety of health issues, including hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism, also known as an underactive thyroid, occurs when the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormones. Diet and lifestyle modifications may ultimately help improve thyroid function. In the article, we discuss the best diet as well as what foods to eat and what foods to avoid with hypothyroidism. Several essential nutrients can also help improve hypothyroidism while certain substances can affect thyroid function.Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 

Hypothyroidism is a health issue that occurs when the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormones. According to healthcare professionals, thyroid hormones regulate metabolism, cell and tissue repair as well as growth, among other essential bodily functions. People with hypothyroidism experience weight gain, hair loss, cold sensitivity, depression, fatigue, and a variety of other symptoms. Diet and lifestyle modifications may ultimately help improve thyroid function. In the article above, we discussed the best diet as well as what foods to eat and what foods to avoid with hypothyroidism.

 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

References:

  1. Mayo Clinic Staff. �Hypothyroidism (Underactive Thyroid).� Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 7 Jan. 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothyroidism/symptoms-causes/syc-20350284.
  2. Norman, James. �Hypothyroidism: Overview, Causes, and Symptoms.� EndocrineWeb, EndrocrineWeb Media, 10 July 2019, www.endocrineweb.com/conditions/thyroid/hypothyroidism-too-little-thyroid-hormone.
  3. Holland, Kimberly. �Everything You Need to Know About Hypothyroidism.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 3 Apr. 2017, www.healthline.com/health/hypothyroidism/symptoms-treatments-more.
  4. Raman, Ryan. �Best Diet for Hypothyroidism: Foods to Eat, Foods to Avoid.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 15 Nov. 2019, www.healthline.com/nutrition/hypothyroidism-diet.

 


 

Additional Topic Discussion: Chronic Pain

Sudden pain is a natural response of the nervous system which helps to demonstrate possible injury. By way of instance, pain signals travel from an injured region through the nerves and spinal cord to the brain. Pain is generally less severe as the injury heals, however, chronic pain is different than the average type of pain. With chronic pain, the human body will continue sending pain signals to the brain, regardless if the injury has healed. Chronic pain can last for several weeks to even several years. Chronic pain can tremendously affect a patient’s mobility and it can reduce flexibility, strength, and endurance.

 

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with a variety of food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs.

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine and it has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). It is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.

 


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

 

Proudly,�Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

 

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

 

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

 

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

 


 

 


 

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders in the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.

 

 

Functional Neurology: Foods to Eat and Avoid with Metabolic Syndrome

Functional Neurology: Foods to Eat and Avoid with Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is medically defined as a collection of health issues that can increase the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, such as heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. These health issues are characterized by increased blood pressure (greater than 130/85 mmHg), high blood sugar (insulin resistance), excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal triglyceride or cholesterol levels. Although having a single one of these health issues doesn’t necessarily mean that you may have metabolic syndrome, it can ultimately increase your risk of developing various other health issues. �

 

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), approximately 23 percent of adults in the United States have metabolic syndrome. Fortunately, healthcare professionals can help properly diagnose and start treatment accordingly for the collection of health issues that can increase the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. As a matter of fact, healthcare professionals recommend diet and lifestyle modifications for metabolic syndrome. In the following article, we will discuss how the metabolic syndrome diet can ultimately help improve overall health and wellness. �

 

Good Foods to Eat with Metabolic Syndrome

 

Eat More Fiber and Fiber-rich Foods

 

Eating more fiber and fiber-rich foods is essential for people with metabolic syndrome because these can help decrease the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Fiber reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, best known as �bad cholesterol.� Fiber can also help regulate blood sugar levels. Women should eat at least 25 grams of fiber per day and men should eat at least 38 grams of fiber per day. Good fiber and fiber-rich foods can include:

 

  • fruits
  • vegetables
  • oats
  • bran
  • barley
  • beans
  • lentils
  • brown rice
  • quinoa
  • couscous
  • whole-wheat bread and pasta

 

Eat More Potassium-rich Foods

 

Eating more potassium-rich foods is essential for people with metabolic syndrome because these can help balance blood pressure. This heart-healthy mineral helps combat the effects of sodium which can increase blood pressure. Several good potassium-rich foods you can eat can include:

 

  • oranges
  • grapefruits
  • bananas
  • cantaloupe
  • dates
  • oats
  • bran
  • black beans
  • edamame beans
  • lentils
  • tomatoes
  • collard greens
  • mushrooms
  • potatoes with skin
  • yogurt

 

Eat More Foods with Omega-3 Fatty Acids

 

Eating more foods with omega-3 fatty acids is essential for people with metabolic syndrome because these can help increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, best known as �good cholesterol� and they help promote heart health. Good foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids can ultimately include:

 

  • avocados
  • chia seeds
  • flax seeds
  • pumpkin seeds
  • almonds
  • walnuts
  • pine nuts
  • navy beans
  • olive oil
  • tuna
  • salmon
  • trout
  • mackerel
  • sardines

 

Bad Foods to Avoid with Metabolic Syndrome

 

Avoid Eating Foods with Too Much Sugar

 

Bad foods to avoid for people with metabolic syndrome can include foods with too much sugar, such as simple, refined carbohydrates. Following a low-carbohydrate diet is essential for people with metabolic syndrome because it can help promote weight loss, regulate blood sugar levels, and prevent heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Sugar is often disguised by its many chemical names in foods. Bad foods with too much sugar to avoid include:

 

  • candy
  • chocolate bars
  • corn syrup
  • white flour
  • white bread
  • white rice
  • cookies
  • pastries
  • crackers
  • potato chips
  • sugary drinks
  • fruit juices
  • soda

 

Avoid Eating Foods with Artificial Sweeteners

 

A research study found that having too many diet drinks and artificially sweetened foods can ultimately increase blood sugar levels and it may also increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, such as heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Bad foods with artificial sweeteners to avoid include:

 

  • sucralose
  • aspartame
  • saccharin

 

Avoid Eating Foods with Trans Fats

 

Trans fats are found in artificial, partially hydrogenated oils and processed foods. Trans fats can increase bad cholesterol levels and increase the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Bad foods with trans fats that a person with metabolic syndrome may want to avoid can include:

 

  • deep-fried foods
  • frozen dinners
  • frozen pizza
  • crackers
  • pies and pastries
  • cake mixes and frosting
  • packaged biscuits and cookies
  • margarine
  • microwave popcorn with artificial butter
  • frozen fries
  • potato chips
  • nondairy creamers

 

Avoid Eating Foods with Too Much Sodium

 

A 2015 research study found that avoiding foods with too much sodium can help lower blood pressure. Eating foods with too much sodium can ultimately increase blood pressure. Salt contains sodium but even foods that don�t taste salty can often have too much sodium. You need to eat approximately less than 1/4 teaspoon of salt a day. Bad foods with too much sodium that a person with metabolic syndrome may ultimately want to avoid can include:

 

  • table salt, sea salt, Himalayan salt, kosher salt
  • frozen dinners
  • canned vegetables
  • salad dressings and marinades
  • prepared pasta sauces and salsa
  • ketchup and mustard
  • salted nuts
  • boxed cereals
  • packaged rice, potato, and pasta mixes
  • potato chips
  • canned soup
  • instant noodles
  • pudding and cake mixes
  • salted butter and margarine
  • smoked or cured meats and fish
  • cheese
  • soy sauce

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Insights Image

Metabolic syndrome is medically defined as a collection of health issues that can increase the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, such as heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Although having increased blood pressure (greater than 130/85 mmHg), high blood sugar (insulin resistance), excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal triglyceride or cholesterol levels doesn’t necessarily mean that you may have metabolic syndrome, it can ultimately increase your risk of developing various other health issues. Fortunately, healthcare professionals can recommend diet and lifestyle modifications for metabolic syndrome. We will discuss how the metabolic syndrome diet can help improve overall health and wellness. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 

Metabolic syndrome is medically defined as a collection of health issues that can increase the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, such as heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. These health issues are characterized by increased blood pressure (greater than 130/85 mmHg), high blood sugar (insulin resistance), excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal triglyceride or cholesterol levels. Although having a single one of these health issues doesn’t necessarily mean that you may have metabolic syndrome, it can ultimately increase your risk of developing various other health issues. �

 

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), approximately 23 percent of adults in the United States have metabolic syndrome. Fortunately, healthcare professionals can help properly diagnose and start treatment accordingly for the collection of health issues that can increase the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. As a matter of fact, healthcare professionals recommend diet and lifestyle modifications for metabolic syndrome. In the article above, we discussed how the metabolic syndrome diet can ultimately help improve overall health and wellness. �

 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez �

 

References:

  • Burke, Darla. �Metabolic Syndrome.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 9 Jan. 2017, www.healthline.com/health/metabolic-syndrome.
  • Mayo Clinic Staff. �Metabolic Syndrome.� Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 14 Mar. 2019, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/metabolic-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20351916.
  • MacGill, Markus. �Metabolic Syndrome: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Causes.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 18 May 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/263834.php.
  • Iftikhar, Noreen. �Metabolic Syndrome Diet.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 20 Apr. 2018, www.healthline.com/health/metabolic-syndrome-diet.

Additional Topic Discussion: Chronic Pain

Sudden pain is a natural response of the nervous system which helps to demonstrate possible injury. By way of instance, pain signals travel from an injured region through the nerves and spinal cord to the brain. Pain is generally less severe as the injury heals, however, chronic pain is different than the average type of pain. With chronic pain, the human body will continue sending pain signals to the brain, regardless if the injury has healed. Chronic pain can last for several weeks to even several years. Chronic pain can tremendously affect a patient’s mobility and it can reduce flexibility, strength, and endurance. �

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention. �

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with a variety of food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs. �

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine and it has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). It is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders. �

 


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

Proudly,�Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

 


 

 


 

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders in the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine. �

 

 

Functional Neurology: How to Improve Adrenal Fatigue with Diet

Functional Neurology: How to Improve Adrenal Fatigue with Diet

The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of the kidneys, and they are essential for our everyday wellness because they create a variety of hormones, such as cortisol and sex hormones. In addition, the adrenal glands create hormones that control sugar and blood pressure, react to stress, and burn protein and fat. If these small glands don’t create enough of the essential hormones for our everyday wellness, it can ultimately cause various health issues. Adrenal fatigue is a health issue recognized by many healthcare professionals. However, there is no evidence to prove that the condition exists.   Adrenal fatigue is characterized as a collection of non-specific symptoms. James Wilson, Ph.D., naturopath, and alternative healthcare professional, coined the term in 1998 when he first identified the condition as a collection of associated symptoms when the adrenal glands aren’t functioning accordingly. He also described that the condition is typically associated with severe stress and fatigue that doesn’t get better with sleep, followed by other health issues, such as bronchitis, flu, or pneumonia. In the following article, we will discuss how to improve adrenal fatigue with diet ultimately.  

What is Adrenal Fatigue?

According to healthcare professionals, adrenal fatigue can commonly develop in people that have experienced mental, physical, or emotional stress for an extended period of time. However, as previously mentioned, there is currently no evidence to prove that the condition exists. Many doctors are also concerned that if a patient is told that they have this condition, it may ultimately cause them to miss another underlying source of their symptoms that probably also won’t be diagnosed and treated accordingly. However, there are a variety of other health issues that may affect the adrenal glands.   Adrenal fatigue develops when the adrenal glands are overworked due to chronic stress. Many healthcare professionals believe that excessive, long-term stress causes these small glands to become fatigued and unable to keep up with the demands to produce enough hormones. All of the symptoms below are relatively generic; however, they could signal an underlying health issue. Many of the symptoms could also be due to a busy life and a lack of sleep and caffeine addiction, poor nutrition, or increased amounts of stress. The common symptoms associated with adrenal fatigue can include:  

  • tiredness
  • craving sugar and salt
  • abnormal weight loss
  • trouble getting to sleep and waking up
  • dependence on stimulants like caffeine
  • nonspecific digestive problems

 

What is Adrenal Insufficiency?

Adrenal insufficiency, commonly referred to as Addison’s disease, develops when the adrenal glands aren’t producing enough hormones we need for overall health. Adrenal fatigue is believed to be a mild type of adrenal insufficiency caused by severe stress over a long period of time. Adrenal insufficiency develops when the adrenal glands are damaged, causing them not to produce enough hormones, including cortisol and aldosterone. Cortisol regulates our stress response, while aldosterone regulates sodium and potassium. Symptoms associated with adrenal insufficiency can include:  

  • fatigue
  • muscle weakness
  • lightheadedness
  • headaches or head pain
  • loss of appetite
  • unexplained weight loss
  • salt cravings
  • excessive sweating
  • loss of body hair
  • irregular menstruation in women
  • irritability and/or depression
  • hypoglycemia
  • low blood pressure
  • abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea

  In more severe cases, when the adrenal glands aren’t producing enough of the necessary hormones due to adrenal insufficiency, you may experience:  

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • low blood pressure
  • hyperpigmentation
  • depression

 

Understanding the Adrenal Fatigue Diet

  As previously mentioned, adrenal fatigue is a health issue that occurs when the adrenal glands aren’t creating enough of the essential hormones we need for our everyday wellness. Fortunately, many healthcare professionals recommend following the adrenal fatigue diet to help improve symptoms ultimately. The adrenal fatigue diet is a nutritional treatment approach that helps improve adrenal fatigue. The adrenal fatigue diet can increase energy levels and control various bodily functions because it promotes healthier eating habits and lifestyle modifications. Following the adrenal fatigue diet can help promote:  

  • proper adrenal gland function
  • increased nutrients in the body
  • balanced blood pressure
  • reduced stress levels

  Moreover, the adrenal fatigue diet is similar to the most balanced diets recommended by healthcare professionals, including eating plenty of vegetables, high-protein foods, and whole grains. This nutritional treatment approach aims to naturally increase your energy levels for the body, not burn too many essential nutrients. The adrenal fatigue diet is still being tested. Healthcare professionals are still performing research studies on adrenal fatigue. However, it has been demonstrated that eating a proper diet, and lifestyle modifications can ultimately make you feel overall wellness.  

Foods to Eat with Adrenal Fatigue

  Following a balanced diet is the best way to regulate the essential functions of the human body and maintain overall wellness. Healthcare professionals recommend eating complex carbohydrates, proteins, and healthy fats. Also, eat plenty of vegetables to get the necessary amount of vitamins and minerals and eat foods that are high in vitamin C, B vitamins, and magnesium to support the adrenal glands. It’s also essential to stay hydrated. Dehydration can affect your stress levels and make the adrenal glands produce cortisol. Foods to eat on the adrenal fatigue diet can include:  

  • low-sugar fruits
  • leafy greens and colorful vegetables
  • nuts
  • legumes
  • whole grains
  • dairy
  • fish
  • lean meats
  • eggs
  • healthy fats such as olive oil and coconut oil
  • sea salt (in moderation)

 

Foods to Avoid with Adrenal Fatigue

  Although the adrenal fatigue diet also doesn’t require any major dietary restrictions that could harm your health, you should still talk with your healthcare professional before changing your eating habits. If you begin to experience any adverse symptoms or if the adrenal fatigue diet makes your condition worse, visit your healthcare professional immediately. Furthermore, if you decide to try following the adrenal fatigue diet, many healthcare professionals recommend limiting foods and drinks high in refined and processed sugars and fats. Several foods to avoid eating with adrenal fatigue can include:  

  • refined white sugar
  • refined white flour
  • fried food
  • processed food
  • fast food
  • artificial sweeteners
  • soda
  • caffeine
  • alcohol

  Dr. Alex Jimenez Insights Image

The adrenal glands are small glands found on top of each kidney. The outer region of the adrenal gland, known as the adrenal cortex, creates a variety of hormones, including cortisol and aldosterone. The inner region of the adrenal gland, known as the adrenal medulla, creates other hormones, such as adrenaline or epinephrine and norepinephrine. These essential hormones are necessary for a variety of functions in the human body, including: regulating sugar, salt, water, metabolism, and blood pressure, as well as regulating stress and inflammation, among other essential bodily functions. Adrenal fatigue can commonly develop in people that have experienced severe mental, physical, or emotional stress for an extended period of time. However, as previously mentioned above, there is currently not enough evidence to ultimately prove that the condition exists. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

  The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of the kidneys, and they are essential for our everyday wellness because they create a variety of hormones, such as cortisol and sex hormones. In addition, the adrenal glands create hormones that control sugar and blood pressure, react to stress, and burn protein and fat. If these small glands don’t create enough of the essential hormones for our everyday wellness, it can ultimately cause various health issues. Adrenal fatigue is a health issue recognized by many healthcare professionals; however, there is no evidence to prove that the condition exists. Instead, adrenal fatigue is characterized as a collection of non-specific symptoms. James Wilson, Ph.D., naturopath, and alternative healthcare professional, coined the term in 1998 when he first identified the condition as a collection of associated symptoms when the adrenal glands aren’t functioning accordingly. He also described that the condition is typically associated with severe stress and fatigue that doesn’t get better with sleep, followed by other health issues, such as bronchitis, flu, or pneumonia. In the article above, we will discuss how to improve adrenal fatigue with diet ultimately.  

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

  Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez   References:

  1. Newman, Tim. Adrenal Fatigue: Myths, Symptoms, Disorders, and Treatment. Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 27 June 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/245810.php#treatment.
  2. Frothingham, Scott. Adrenal Fatigue Treatment. Healthline, Healthline Media, 22 Aug. 2018, www.healthline.com/health/adrenal-fatigue-treatment.
  3. Felson, Sabrina. Adrenal Fatigue: Is It Real? Symptoms, Causes, Treatments. WebMD, WebMD, 8 Feb. 2019, www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/adrenal-fatigue-is-it-real#1.
  4. Anthony, Kiara. The Adrenal Fatigue (AF) Diet. Healthline, Healthline Media, 28 Feb. 2019, www.healthline.com/health/adrenal-fatigue-diet.

 


 

Neurotransmitter Assessment Form

[wp-embedder-pack width=”100%” height=”1050px” download=”all” download-text=”” attachment_id=”52657″ /]   The following Neurotransmitter Assessment Form can be filled out and presented to Dr. Alex Jimenez. The following symptoms listed on this form are not intended to be utilized to diagnose any type of disease, condition, or other type of health issue.  


 

Additional Topic Discussion: Chronic Pain

Sudden pain is a natural response of the nervous system which helps to demonstrate possible injury. By way of instance, pain signals travel from an injured region through the nerves and spinal cord to the brain. Pain is generally less severe as the injury heals. However, chronic pain is different than the average type of pain. The human body will continue sending pain signals to the brain with chronic pain, regardless of the injury has healed. Chronic pain can last for several weeks to even several years. Chronic pain can tremendously affect a patient’s mobility, reducing flexibility, strength, and endurance.  

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual’s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to various neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.  

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with various food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers particular antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual’s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Finally, utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient’s specific needs.  

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). In addition, the Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine. It has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). Therefore, it is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.  


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders at the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.