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Posture

Back Clinic Posture Team. Posture is the position in which an individual holds their body upright against gravity while standing, sitting, or lying down. A proper posture visually reflects an individual’s health, ensuring the joints and muscles, as well as other structures of the body, are working properly. Throughout a collection of articles, Dr. Alex Jimenez identifies the most common effects of improper posture as he specifies the recommended actions an individual should take to improve their stance as well as enhance their overall health and wellness. Sitting or standing incorrectly can happen unconsciously, but recognizing the issue and correcting it can ultimately help many individuals develop healthier lifestyles. For more information, please feel free to contact us at (915) 850-0900 or text to call Dr. Jimenez personally at (915) 850-0900.


Slouching Causes: El Paso Back Clinic

Slouching Causes: El Paso Back Clinic

Unhealthy posture and slouching incorrectly position the body unnaturally, adding chronic strain on the muscles and ligaments. For example, when sitting or standing at a workstation, individuals start to relax by slumping forward because it feels comfortable; however, they don’t realize that their shoulders are hunching over, and their neck is in an awkward forward position. For every inch the head moves forward, its weight on the neck and upper back muscles increases by 10 pounds. Individuals that stay in this position for a long time often experience neck soreness, tension in the shoulder muscles, and low back discomfort. Chiropractic care, massage, and decompression therapy can realign the spine to its natural position and train individuals to maintain a healthy posture.

Slouching Causes: EP's Chiropractic Functional Medicine TeamSlouching

Posture is the body’s position in space, the relationship of the body’s parts, head, torso, and limbs to each other. Maintaining the natural lumbar curve in the low back is essential to preventing posture-related discomfort symptoms. This natural curve works as a shock absorber, helping to distribute weight along the length of the spine. The most common causes for slouching posture are:

  • Repetitive motions or tasks can cause physical and mental fatigue, causing individuals to relax their core muscles.
  • Combined with the repetitiveness, individuals also begin implementing unhealthy movements because it makes the job easier.
  • Often individuals want to finish their work tasks, and even though they can feel their muscles and body stiffening and tightening up, they continue to work through the discomfort and don’t take a quick break to move around and stretch.
  • Stressful situations can cause muscle tension.
  • Carrying heavy bags, purses, backpacks, etc.
  • Weight fluctuation.
  • Pregnancy.

Spine

  • Muscles move the skeletal system and provide resistance against movement.
  • The musculoskeletal system comprises soft tissue structures that provide active and passive spinal stabilization.
  • The spine has natural curves to distribute weight/loads evenly.
  • The cervical and lumbar spine have a lordosis or forward curve.
  • The thoracic spine and sacrum have a kyphosis or backward curve.
  • They help to mitigate the forces exerted on passive stabilizing structures like the ligaments, joint capsules, and intervertebral discs.

A prolonged seated or standing position fatigues the muscles that stabilize the spine from the forces of gravity and body weight. When the tired muscles no longer provide stability, the spine must rely on the passive structures of the musculoskeletal system for support. Without the support, the spine gradually loses its natural cervical and lumbar curves and becomes more kyphotic or slouched. Slouching can provide relaxation and relief to the fatigued muscles; however, repetitive or prolonged stress to the passive structures can result in discomfort and injury to those tissues. This is how nerve compression, ligament inflammation, and disc herniations start.

Symptoms of Unhealthy Posture

  • Head that leans forward or backward.
  • Headaches.
  • Jaw pain.
  • Poor circulation.
  • Rounded shoulders.
  • A decline in breathing efficiency.
  • Muscle fatigue – Certain muscles can change in length, becoming short and tense or long and weak.
  • Body soreness and tightness.
  • Back discomfort symptoms.
  • Bent knees when standing or walking.
  • Sleep problems.
  • Potbelly.

Healthy Posture

The advantages of practicing healthy posture include the following:

  • Prevents abnormal wear on the joints.
  • Lessens stress on the ligaments.
  • Prevents muscle strain and fatigue.
  • Prevents the spine from becoming misaligned.
  • Prevents back aches and soreness.
  • Reduces the risk of chronic diseases or conditions.
  • Helps maintain fitness and overall health.

Chiropractic Realignment

Our approach starts by correcting the physical problems caused by slouching, which involves chiropractic adjustments, therapeutic massage, and non-surgical decompression therapy. The objective is to fix the root cause to ensure that the treatment lasts and maintains neuromusculoskeletal health.

Examination

  • The initial assessment looks at an individual’s posture and a physical evaluation to identify the root cause.
  • When muscles become weak, over or underused, or suffer injury, others tighten or tense up.
  • A chiropractor looks at how an individual stands from behind and from the sides, noting issues like uneven shoulders, arched back, twisted pelvis, or other symmetry issues.

Treatment

  • Massage will increase circulation and reduce tension.
  • Muscle release and relaxation for any overactive muscles.
  • A chiropractor will perform slow joint movements.
  • Targeted stretches and strength exercises will correct imbalances, maintain flexibility, and strengthen the core muscles.
  • Postural training will help individuals learn to use proper body mechanics and to listen to their bodies.

Impact of Stress


References

Defloor, T, and M H Grypdonck. “Sitting posture and prevention of pressure ulcers.” Applied nursing research: ANR vol. 12,3 (1999): 136-42. doi:10.1016/s0897-1897(99)80045-7

Fortner, Miles O et al. “Treating ‘slouchy’ (hyperkyphosis) posture with chiropractic biophysics®: a case report utilizing a multimodal mirror image® rehabilitation program.” Journal of physical therapy science vol. 29,8 (2017): 1475-1480. doi:10.1589/jpts.29.1475

Katzman, Wendy B et al. “Age-related hyperkyphosis: its causes, consequences, and management.” The Journal of orthopedic and sports physical therapy vol. 40,6 (2010): 352-60. doi:10.2519/jospt.2010.3099

Korakakis, Vasileios, et al. “Physiotherapist perceptions of optimal sitting and standing posture.” Musculoskeletal science & practice vol. 39 (2019): 24-31. doi:10.1016/j.msksp.2018.11.004

Snijders, Chris J et al. “Effects of slouching and muscle contraction on the strain of the iliolumbar ligament.” Manual therapy vol. 13,4 (2008): 325-33. doi:10.1016/j.math.2007.03.001

Yoong, Nicole Kah Mun et al. “Commercial Postural Devices: A Review.” Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) vol. 19,23 5128. 23 Nov. 2019, doi:10.3390/s19235128

Posture Adjustments Affects On The Muscles: El Paso Back Clinic

Posture Adjustments Affects On The Muscles: El Paso Back Clinic

Making healthy posture adjustments is a process, especially for individuals that have been practicing unhealthy postures for years. Not only does the body have to relearn how to position itself correctly, but the muscles, especially those that haven’t been working, also have to adjust. This takes time and is usually at the beginning of postural training that individuals want to give up. This is because of the discomfort and soreness that goes with reactivating the core muscles. This is why it is recommended to go through the process with chiropractic care. A chiropractic therapy team can relieve sore muscles, strengthen the body, and help individuals gradually develop and maintain a healthy posture.

Posture Adjustments Affects On The Muscles: Injury Medical TeamPosture Adjustments

Unhealthy postures shift the body out of balance, straining and stressing the muscles, especially those that have to work overtime every day. This causes the muscles to stiffen and tighten up to the point that they begin to pull the skeletal system in different directions, causing various symptoms that can lead to chronic conditions. Muscles can stay tight for years, with individuals getting used to the feeling. Individuals stretch out, thinking the muscles are loose but don’t realize that they return to their tight position because of the unhealthy muscle memory that developed.

Muscle Imbalance

  • Muscle imbalances usually progress over time and are typically caused by daily habitual physical routines.
  • This causes premature and advanced wear and tear on the body.

Postural Dysfunction

  • Individuals all have positions they spend a lot of time in.
  • Postural dysfunction begins with unhealthy positioning that shifts the spine and other joints out of balance and alignment.
  • The muscles become compromised, which leads to various neuromusculoskeletal symptoms.

Symptoms

  • The head either leans forward or backward.
  • The knees are bent when standing or walking.
  • The shoulders become rounded.
  • A potbelly can begin to present.
  • Back discomfort symptoms.
  • Body aches, soreness, tightness, stiffness.
  • Muscle fatigue and weakness occur from being overworked.
  • Headaches can present throughout the day.

Chiropractic Realignment

The muscles have become like tough meat, and the underlying imbalances are straining the neuromusculoskeletal system. The muscle tissues need to be broken up/tenderized and loosened up. Then they can be thoroughly stretched and strengthened to optimal health. Chiropractic care will identify and correct the underlying imbalance, and massage therapy will break up and release the compacted muscle tissue. A personalized treatment plan will consist of the following:

  • Mobilizing the joints and stretching/releasing shortened tight muscles and soft tissues.
  • Strengthening the elongated, weaker muscles to correct the body’s alignment and movement control.
  • Health coaching to identify and recommend lifestyle and nutritional adjustments.
  • This will restore the bio-mechanical systems, ensuring that equal muscle length and strength on both sides of the system joint or motion segment are maintained.

Posture Adjustments and Foot Orthotics


References

Aino, Masaki, et al. “Comparison of spinal column alignment and autonomic nervous activity using the intersegmental tenderness test in the segment above.” Journal of physical therapy science vol. 33,8 (2021): 570-575. doi:10.1589/jpts.33.570

Creze, Maud, et al. “Posture-related stiffness mapping of paraspinal muscles.” Journal of anatomy vol. 234,6 (2019): 787-799. doi:10.1111/joa.12978

Joshi, Reema, and Nishita Poojary. “The Effect of Muscle Energy Technique and Posture Correction Exercises on Pain and Function in Patients with Non-specific Chronic Neck Pain Having Forward Head Posture-a Randomized Controlled Trail.” International journal of therapeutic massage & bodywork vol. 15,2 14-21. 1 Jun. 2022, doi:10.3822/ijtmb.v15i2.673

Langford, M L. “Poor posture subjects a worker’s body to muscle imbalance, nerve compression.” Occupational health & safety (Waco, Tex.) vol. 63,9 (1994): 38-40, 42.

McLean, Linda. “The effect of postural correction on muscle activation amplitudes recorded from the cervicobrachial region.” Journal of electromyography and kinesiology: official journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology vol. 15,6 (2005): 527-35. doi:10.1016/j.jelekin.2005.06.003

Szczygieł, Elżbieta et al. “The Impact of Deep Muscle Training on the Quality of Posture and Breathing.” Journal of motor behavior vol. 50,2 (2018): 219-227. doi:10.1080/00222895.2017.1327413

Foot Pain, Plantar Fasciitis, & Trigger Point Pain

Foot Pain, Plantar Fasciitis, & Trigger Point Pain

Introduction

The various muscles and tendons surrounding the foot play an important role as they provide stability to the lower parts of the body and allow the individual to move and flex their feet. These various muscles and tendons help support the ankles and allow leg movement. Many people will be on their feet constantly as the world moves and sometimes have to deal with various issues affecting their ability to walk. As the body naturally ages, many people will begin to shuffle their feet around, which causes strain on the foot muscles and can affect the calves and legs over time. To that point, it can lead to foot pain and other conditions that can affect the individual. Other issues that can affect the feet and its muscle could be incorrect footwear, how they are standing, or how they walk. When this happens, conditions like plantar fasciitis and trigger point pain can affect the feet differently. Today’s article focuses on the superficial intrinsic foot muscles, how trigger points and plantar fasciitis correlate with foot pain, and how to strengthen the foot muscles. We refer patients to certified providers incorporating techniques and therapies in the lower body extremities of trigger points affecting the feet. This helps many people with trigger point pain symptoms associated with plantar fasciitis along the intrinsic foot muscles. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis when it is appropriate. We understand that education is a terrific way when asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request and understanding. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

anatomy-amp-palpation-of-the-sartorius-muscle_63951bec

The Superficial Intrinsic Foot Muscles

 

As stated earlier, the foot has various muscles and tendons that allow stability to the ankles and allow movement when a person is walking. The foot has two muscle groups: the extrinsic and intrinsic muscles. Today we will look at the intrinsic foot muscles and how important these muscles are in the foot. Studies reveal that the intrinsic foot muscles are highly important as they are contained to the foot and contribute to supporting the medial longitudinal arch. The intrinsic foot muscles are superficial and help keep the toes straight while providing flexion and extension when in motion. The foot has about 29 muscles, including 10 surrounding the foot and ankle, while the other 19 are intrinsic and provide the roles for gait and posture. The 19 intrinsic muscles have the following:

  • Abductor Hallucis
  • Quadratus Plantae
  • Flexor Hallucis Brevis
  • Flexor Digitorum Brevis
  • Abductor Digiti Minimi
  • Flexor Digiti Minimi
  • The Interossei Muscles
  • The Lumbricals

These muscles allow individuals to walk, run, or jog without pain. However, when the intrinsic muscles become impaired, studies reveal that intrinsic foot muscle function could be linked to various foot conditions that affect a person’s walking ability.

 

How Does Foot Pain Correlate With Plantar Fasciitis & Trigger Points?

Studies reveal that foot pain can cause an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience as many factors can affect how a person is walking and can lead to various issues affecting the lower extremities’ mobility. When multiple issues affect how a person walks, the intrinsic muscle and other muscles surrounding the ankle and foot could become strained and overlap with other foot conditions. When foot pain affects the intrinsic foot muscles, co-existing muscle impairments could affect the alignment, motion, load distribution, and muscle performance that involves the legs. When these impairments are causing foot pain, it can correlate with trigger points and conditions like plantar fasciitis that can affect a person walking. But how does foot pain connect with plantar fasciitis and trigger points?

 

According to Dr. Travell, M.D.’s book “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” when tension starts to overload the foot, the intrinsic muscles develop tiny nodules in the muscle fibers and reduce the muscle strength of the medial arch. To that point, it can collapse and cause the foot to develop inflammation associated with repetitive actions that cause plantar fasciitis in the feet. When this happens, it can affect a person’s ability to walk, run, stand, and affect the lower extremities’ mobility. If it is not treated right away, it can cause muscle and joint pain in the hips, legs, knees, and lower back.

 


An Overview Of The Intrinsic Foot Muscles-Video

Have you been dealing with issues on your feet? Do you find it difficult to step down or walk? Or have you been rubbing your feet constantly to reduce the soreness in your feet? Many of these issues correlate with trigger points affecting the intrinsic foot muscles that could cause foot issues like plantar fasciitis. The foot has various muscles, like the intrinsic muscles, that allow gait and stability to the body. Multiple factors affecting the intrinsic foot muscles can lead to instability, muscle strain, tendon stress, and muscle and joint pain. This can affect how a person moves throughout the day and their quality of life. The video above explains where each different muscles are, which ones are extrinsic and intrinsic, and how each muscle helps with foot function. When various issues begin to affect the foot and cause mobility issues, multiple techniques are available to help strengthen the foot muscles and prevent future problems from affecting the feet.


Strengthening The Foot Muscles

 

Regarding trigger point pain affecting the intrinsic foot muscles, various techniques can reduce the pain-like symptoms of trigger points and prevent foot issues like plantar fasciitis from re-occurring. Studies reveal that light, non-weight-bearing exercises like cycling and swimming can minimize muscle overload on foot. Other ways to strengthen the intrinsic foot muscles are by stretching the toe flexors to help improve stability and prevent hypermobility in the foot. Other techniques that can reduce trigger points in the foot’s muscle fibers include using a cylindrical or spherical object and rolling under the arches to massage and loosen stiff muscles. Many of these techniques could help restore foot functionality and stability while reducing future issues like plantar fasciitis in the feet. To that point, allow people to walk pain-free again.

 

Conclusion

The foot has 29 muscles, including ten extrinsic muscles surrounding the foot and ankle and 29 intrinsic muscles on the foot. The intrinsic muscles are highly important for foot functionality as they are superficial and contribute to supporting the medial longitudinal arch. The intrinsic foot muscles also help keep the toes straight and allow flexion and extension when in motion. These muscles also help a person walk and stabilize the ankle. When various factors affect a person’s walking ability, it can lead to muscle strain and tendon stress to the foot, leading to the development of trigger points in the intrinsic muscle fibers and causing pain. This could cause foot conditions like plantar fasciitis and other co-existing muscle impairments that can affect the lower extremities’ mobility while causing muscle and joint pain in the hips, legs, knees, and lower back. Luckily there are available techniques that can help massage, stretch, and strengthen the intrinsic foot muscles while reducing trigger points and their associated symptoms from re-occurring. To that point, these techniques can allow many individuals to walk without feeling pain.

 

References

Card, Ryan K, and Bruno Bordoni. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Foot Muscles.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 27 Feb. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK539705/.

Gooding, Thomas M, et al. “Intrinsic Foot Muscle Activation during Specific Exercises: A T2 Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.” Journal of Athletic Training, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5094843/.

Hawke, Fiona, and Joshua Burns. “Understanding the Nature and Mechanism of Foot Pain.” Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 14 Jan. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2631512/.

Hayter, Matt. “Why Do We Need the Intrinsic Muscles of the Foot? [Guide 2022].” Dynamic Podiatry, 2022, www.dynamicpodiatry.com.au/what-are-the-intrinsic-muscles-of-the-foot-guide-2019/#intrinsic.

Lim, Ang Tee, et al. “Management of Plantar Fasciitis in the Outpatient Setting.” Singapore Medical Journal, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Apr. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4853481/.

Soysa, Achini, et al. “Importance and Challenges of Measuring Intrinsic Foot Muscle Strength.” Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 26 Nov. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3544647/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Disclaimer

Healthy Posture Guidelines: El Paso Back Clinic

Healthy Posture Guidelines: El Paso Back Clinic

Healthy Posture Guidelines: Posture is how an individual holds their body. Healthy posture is when minimal stress is applied to the joints. Maintaining and holding your body correctly can prevent pain, injuries, and other health problems. Faulty postures and musculoskeletal imbalances often precipitate painful conditions in the spine and extremities. However, unhealthy postures do not always present with discomfort and pain symptoms that can go unnoticed for years. This leads to chronic stress and advanced wear of the joints. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic can realign the spine, relieve symptoms, and restore flexibility, mobility, and function.

Healthy Posture Guidelines: EPs Chiropractic TeamHealthy Posture Guidelines

There are two types of posture:

Dynamic Posture

  • This posture is when the body moves, like walking, running, or bending to pick up something.

Static Posture

  • This posture is when the body is not moving, like sitting, standing, or sleeping.

Both are important, and the key is the spine’s position. The spine has three natural curves: neck, mid, and low back. Correct posture maintains the curves with the head above the shoulders, and the top of the shoulder should be over the hips.

Unhealthy Positioning

Postural faults include:

  • Forward head positioning
  • Rounded shoulders
  • Loss of the normal lordosis curve in the lower back.

Early warning signs of postural problems may include:

  • The inability to sit or stand for a prolonged period.
  • Stiffness when getting up from a chair after sitting.
  • Feeling of physical exhaustion at the end of the day.
  • Muscle imbalances.
  • Loss of normal flexibility.
  • Symptoms of discomfort.

Affected Health

Unhealthy posture can affect overall health and includes:

  • Misaligned musculoskeletal system.
  • Decreased flexibility.
  • Neck, shoulder, and back pain.
  • The advanced wearing down of the spine making it more fragile and susceptible to injury.
  • Affected joint movement.
  • Affected balance.
  • Increased risk of falling.
  • Digestion problems.
  • Potential breathing problems.

Improvements

Be mindful of your posture during everyday activities, like walking, watching tv, washing dishes, etc.

Maintain Physical Activity

  • Certain exercises like yoga, tai chi, and other classes focusing on body awareness can help develop healthy posture habits.
  • Exercises that strengthen the core muscles around the back, abdomen, and pelvis.

Maintain Healthy Weight

  • Extra weight can weaken the abdominal muscles, cause problems for the pelvis and spine, and contribute to back pain.

Wear Comfortable Shoes

  • High heels, for example, can throw off the body’s balance and force unhealthy walking movements.
  • This puts added stress on the muscles and affects posture.

Proper Height

  • Make sure workstations are at a comfortable height, whether sitting in front of a computer, making dinner, or eating.

Chiropractic Care

Chiropractors and physical massage therapists specialize in evaluating and treating musculoskeletal dysfunction and identifying and screening for postural dysfunction. Healthy posture can have an immediate effect on health that include:

  • Proper alignment of bones and joints.
  • Reduced wear on the muscles and joints.
  • Reduced stress on ligaments.
  • Decreased risk of back injury.
  • Increased energy.
  • Improved digestion.

A chiropractic team will massage and relax the muscles reducing tension, adjust and realign the spine, increase joint movement, and ease the individual into a healthy posture. The team will also provide careful rehabilitation exercises and nutritional recommendations to maintain a healthy posture.


Custom Foot Orthotics


References

Carini, Francesco, et al. “posture and posturology, anatomical and physiological profiles: overview and current state of the art.”Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis vol. 88,1 11-16. 28 Apr. 2017, doi:10.23750/abm.v88i1.5309

Creze, Maud, et al. “posture-related stiffness mapping of paraspinal muscles.”Journal of anatomy vol. 234,6 (2019): 787-799. doi:10.1111/joa.12978

Korakakis, Vasileios, et al. “physiotherapist perceptions of optimal sitting and standing posture.”Musculoskeletal science & practice vol. 39 (2019): 24-31. doi:10.1016/j.msksp.2018.11.004

newsinhealth.nih.gov/2017/08/getting-it-straight

Oblique Muscle Strengthening: El Paso Back Clinic

Oblique Muscle Strengthening: El Paso Back Clinic

The 0blique muscles support and aid in side-to-side movement, helping maintain back strength and healthy posture. There are two oblique muscle sets, the internal and external obliques. Maintaining a strong core is one recommended way to protect the body and spine. However, many forget to train and strengthen all of the oblique muscles. Individuals tend to focus on the superficial core muscle, or rectus abdominis, and not enough or any attention goes to the lateral stabilizers or the internal and external obliques. Chiropractic and functional medicine can restore musculoskeletal flexibility, mobility, and function.

Oblique Muscle Strengthening: El Paso's Chiropractic TeamOblique Muscles

The external obliques make up a large part of the trunk area. There are two external obliques on either side of the body, located on the lateral sides of the abdominal region. These muscles have an essential role in daily movements.

External

  • External obliques help with trunk rotation and support spine rotation.
  • They assist with pulling the chest down to compress the abdominal cavity.
  • They help with bending from side to side.
  • Any strain or injury to these muscles can lead to abdominal, hip, and back issues.
  • Maximizing external oblique strength is important to maintain a strong core.

Internal

The internal oblique is a muscle deep within the lateral side of the abdomen.

  • The internal oblique muscle is one of the main stabilizers and functions to flex the trunk and compress the chest.
  • Its positioning makes it invisible, but it still has an essential role in body movement.
  • This muscle can function bilaterally, meaning both sides can operate at the same time.
  • These muscles provide spinal and posture support.
  • Strain or injury in this area can cause posture problems and abdominal, hip, and back issues.

Rotation and Mobility

The internal and external obliques are the primary rotators of the spine and provide thoracic spine mobility.

Inhibition

If the internal obliques are inhibited, compensation can cause an alteration in the sequence patterns of the posterior oblique subsystem.

  • When this system is not functioning correctly, individuals usually complain of discomfort in the hips and shoulders.
  • A common sign of oblique inhibition is individuals holding their breath during basic movement patterns to gain stability, indicating dysfunction in the intrinsic stabilization subsystem.
  • Simple movements include walking gait, single-leg stance, flexion, extension, etc.

Symptoms of Dysfunction

  • Rounded shoulders
  • Shoulder pain
  • Flexion posture – Janda’s upper-crossed syndrome.
  • Internally rotated hips.
  • Decreased hip extension.
  • Knee instability and discomfort.
  • Sacroiliac joint locking and soreness.
  • Lower back discomfort and soreness.
  • Lumbopelvic hip destabilization.
  • Decreased ability in acceleration and deceleration when walking.

Dysfunction in one area leads to imbalances in other areas, affecting movement and causing impairment syndromes that can include:

  • Muscle imbalances.
  • Decreased stamina.
  • Decreased strength.
  • Increased fatigue.
  • Central sensitization
  • Increased stiffness and tightness in myofascial structures and kinetic chains.
  • Increased risk of injury from unbalanced movement patterns and reaction times.

Chiropractic Reset

Chiropractic care, massage, and decompression therapy can restore body balance through:

  • Soft-tissue release of the thoracolumbar fascia.
  • Mobilization to subluxated areas of the thoracic spine, pelvis, and hips.
  • Manual therapy
  • Instrument-assisted soft-tissue release. 
  • Muscle stimulation
  • Laser therapy
  • Ultrasound
  • Corrective and strengthening exercises

Chiropractors and spinal rehabilitation specialists recommend specialized exercise regimens to target these muscles that include:

  • Power Plate training
  • Bodyweight exercises
  • Yoga
  • Pilates
  • High-intensity interval training – HIIT

If you are experiencing waistline, hip, and low back stiffness or tightness and pain, consult our professional chiropractic team. We’re ready to help!


Oblique Anatomy and Movement


References

Calais-Germain, Blandine, and Stephen Anderson. Anatomy of Movement. Seattle: Eastland, 1993.

Cook G. Movement: Functional Movement Systems: Screening, Assessment, and Corrective Strategies. Aptos, CA: On Target Publications, 2010.

Elphinston J. Stability, Sport and Performance Movement: Practical Biomechanics and Systematic Training for Movement Efficacy and Injury Prevention. Lotus Publishing, 2013.

Huxel Bliven, Kellie C, and Barton E Anderson. “Core stability training for injury prevention.” Sports health vol. 5,6 (2013): 514-22. doi:10.1177/1941738113481200

Myers TW. Anatomy Trains: Myofascial Meridians for Manual and Movement Therapists. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2001.

Neumann DA. Kinesiology of the Musculoskeletal System: Foundations for Physical Rehabilitation. St. Louis: Mosby, 2002.

Starrett K, Cordoza G. Becoming a Supple Leopard: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance. Las Vegas: Victory Belt Pub., 2013.

Weinstock D. NeuroKinetic Therapy: An Innovative Approach to Manual Muscle Testing. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic, 2010.

Myofascial Trigger Pain Affecting The Sartorius Muscle

Myofascial Trigger Pain Affecting The Sartorius Muscle

Introduction

The lower body extremities help provide stability to the various body parts, including the hips, thighs, pelvis, legs, knees, and feet. The hips and thighs comprise multiple muscles and nerves that provide mobility to the lower half and allow the host to move around in different locations. While the hip muscles act on the thigh muscles at the hip joint and stabilize the pelvis, the thigh muscles allow the lower body to bend, flex and rotate while bearing most of the upper body’s weight and keeping alignment with the hips and legs. One of the thigh muscles is the sartorius muscle, and if it becomes overused and injured can lead to complications in the form of myofascial pain syndrome. Today’s article post examines the sartorius muscle, how myofascial trigger pain is associated with the sartorius, and the effectiveness of myofascial pain treatment on the thighs. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like thigh pain treatments correlating to myofascial pain syndrome, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the sartorius muscle. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-release-serratus-anterior_63546d25

What Is The Sartorius Muscle?

 

Are you experiencing pain in the upper, mid, or lower parts of your thighs? Do you have difficulty walking for long periods? Or do your knees hurt more than usual? Most of these issues correlate with myofascial trigger pain associated with the sartorius muscle. As the longest muscle that spans from the hips to the knee joints, the sartorius muscle, or the “tailor muscle,” serves as both a hip and knee flexor while working with other muscles that allow hip mobility. The sartorius shares its origin location with the TFL (tensor fascia latae) muscle at the anterior superior iliac spine and is responsible for internal rotation at the hips. In the book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” the author Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., mentioned that the sartorius muscle assists the iliacus and the TFL muscles in hip flexion while assisting the short head of the bicep femoris in the knees for knee flexion, allowing the individual to walk for long distances. Even though this long muscle assists in hip and knee flexion, it can succumb to injuries and create issues with the hips and knees in the lower body.

 

Myofascial Trigger Pain Associated With The Sartorius Muscle

 

When traumatic forces or normal factors begin to affect the sartorius muscle, the surrounding muscles on the thighs and hips are also affected. The sartorius muscle allows the individual to move around and allows flexion to the hips and knees when injuries or the muscle is being overused; it can cause pain-like symptoms that correlate with hip and knee issues associated with myofascial trigger pain. Myofascial trigger pain along the sartorius muscle doesn’t usually occur in the muscle but can occur in conjunction with trigger point involvement in the surrounding muscles. Studies reveal that myofascial trigger pain is found in the hip muscles and can cause issues in the lumbopelvic-hip muscles of the lower body. This causes referred pain on the sartorius to be more diffused and superficial to the knees. When myofascial trigger pain is associated with the sartorius, many individuals often mistake it for knee pain. To that point, myofascial trigger pain could affect how a person walks and bends at the knees. 

 


Anatomy & Palpation Of The Sartorius Muscle- Video

Are you experiencing issues when you are walking? Do your knees hurt constantly? Or are you experiencing tenderness or pain in your thighs? Most of these issues correlate with myofascial trigger pain associated with the sartorius muscle. The sartorius is a long muscle that connects the hips and spans to the knee joints to provide hip and knee flexion. The sartorius muscle works with the other muscles in the thighs and hips, allowing hip mobility and motor function to the legs. When multiple issues affect the sartorius and the surrounding muscles, it can develop into myofascial trigger pain and cause overlapping risk profiles to the knees and hips. To that point, it causes referred pain issues in the hips and knees, making the individual have difficulty walking from place to place. However, there are available treatments to reduce the pain in the hips and knees and manage the myofascial trigger pain from affecting the sartorius muscle on the thighs. The video above explains the anatomy of the sartorius muscle location and how palpation is used to locate the muscle to see if it is tight or could be affected by trigger points along the muscle fibers. This is one of the techniques that is used when a person is dealing with myofascial trigger pain associated with the sartorius muscle.


The Effectiveness Of Myofascial Pain Treatment On The Thighs

 

When a person is dealing with myofascial trigger pain in their thighs, and it is affecting the sartorius, many will often try to find available treatments to alleviate the pain. Treatments like dry needling are one of the various myofascial pain treatments that can reduce pain and related disability on the thighs, hips, and knees. Studies reveal that dry needling treatments can help manage knee pain syndrome associated with trigger points on the thighs. However, treatment alone can not be the only solution to reduce myofascial trigger pain in the thighs. Various hip stretches can loosen up tight hip flexors and help elongate the sartorius muscles to break up the nodules and improve mobility function to the hips and knees. People can even utilize self-ischemic compression to allow a more effective stretch on the sartorius muscle.

 

Conclusion

As the longest muscle in the thighs, the sartorius helps provide a service to hip and knee flexion while working with various muscles to keep the legs moving. When the sartorius muscles become overused and start to cause referred pain to the hips and knees, it can develop into myofascial trigger pain along the sartorius muscle. This can make many individuals believe they are suffering from knee pain when it’s their thigh muscle. However, myofascial trigger pain is treatable through treatments and corrective actions that people can incorporate into their daily activities to prevent pain from escalating and manage trigger points along the sartorius muscle. This can allow people to get back their mobility in their legs.

 

References

Rahou-El-Bachiri, Youssef, et al. “Effects of Trigger Point Dry Needling for the Management of Knee Pain Syndromes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” Journal of Clinical Medicine, MDPI, 29 June 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7409136/.

Samani, Mahbobeh, et al. “Prevalence and Sensitivity of Trigger Points in Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Muscles in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome.” Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 15 Oct. 2019, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31987531/.

Simons, D. G., and L. S. Simons. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Walters, Benjamin B, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Thigh Sartorius Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK532889/.

Disclaimer

Sciatica Pain & The Gluteus Minimus Muscles

Sciatica Pain & The Gluteus Minimus Muscles

Introduction

The buttock and the lower back have a casual relationship to the body, as the lower back has various muscles and nerves surrounding the spinal column. In contrast, the buttock region has multiple muscles and the sciatic nerve to keep the body upright. The sciatic nerve travels from the lumbar region of the spine across the gluteus muscles and down to the legs. The gluteus muscles include the Maximus, medius, and minimus, and they work with the sciatic nerve regarding good posture. When normal or traumatic factors begin to affect the body, like sciatica or poor posture, it can lead to developing trigger points associated with the gluteus minimus affecting the sciatic nerve. Today’s article examines the gluteus minimus, how trigger points mimic sciatic pain on the gluteus minimus, and various treatments to relieve sciatic nerve pain. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like sciatic pain treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the gluteus medius muscles associated with sciatica. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

exercises-for-neck-and-shoulder-pain-from-myofascial-trigger-points-by-dr-andrea-furlan-md-phd_63543ea0

What Is The Gluteus Minimus?

 

Have you been experiencing radiating pain traveling down to your leg? Do you have difficulty walking or sitting down? Do you feel tenderness or referred pain near your buttock region? Some of the issues correlate with trigger points affecting the gluteus minimus, causing pain in the sciatic nerve. As the smallest muscle in the gluteal region of the buttock, the gluteus minimus shares similar characteristics to the gluteus medius while being located beneath the medius muscle. One of the primary functions of the gluteus minimus is that it predominantly acts as a hip stabilizer and abductor. The nerves from the gluteal muscles include the sciatic nerve, which is on top of the gluteus muscles and the other nerves help supply the muscles to function in the posterior region of the body. Studies reveal that the structural integrity of the gluteus minimus muscles is the key to the lateral hip muscle, which contributes to pelvic stability and lower extremity function. However, when issues affect the gluteal muscles’ posterior region could trigger point pain mimicking sciatica.

 

How Trigger Points Mimic Sciatic Pain On The Gluteus Minimus?

When the lower body extremities begin to suffer from multiple issues that cause the individual to have mobility dysfunction, various factors could correlate to the dysfunction. When the gluteus minimus muscles have been overused or been through a traumatic experience, they can develop trigger points along the muscle fibers and even cause nerve entrapment along the sciatic nerve. Trigger points along the gluteus minimus can mimic sciatic nerve pain down to the back or even the side of the legs that causes excruciating and deep pain in the posterior region. Studies reveal that pain in the buttock region is a deep gluteal syndrome caused by non-discogenic pain that causes sciatic nerve entrapment.

 

 

The book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., states that many patients with active trigger points located in their gluteus minimus would complain about hip pain that could cause them to limp-walk when they are going to places. The pain caused by the active trigger points can make it difficult to stand up from a seated position due to the painful movements. The associated pain that the trigger points are causing to the gluteus minimus can be constant and excruciating; even small stretches can not alleviate the pain. The book also mentioned that trigger points could cause referred pain to the gluteus minimus that can cause various somato-visceral issues to the hips, legs, and knees if the pain worsens.


Sciatic Type Pain: Gluteus Minimus Trigger Points- Video

Are you dealing with pain in your hips, low back, and legs? Do you find it difficult to walk or stand up constantly? Or are you experiencing sciatic nerve pain that is radiating down your leg? All these pain-like symptoms are associated with trigger points along the gluteus minimus affecting the sciatic nerve. The gluteus minimus is the smallest of the gluteal muscles with the same function as the gluteus medius and predominately acts as the hip’s stabilizer and abductor. When the gluteus minimus muscles have been overused from traumatic events or normal factors, they can develop trigger points in the muscle fibers, entrap the sciatic nerve and irritate the nerve causing sciatica. The video above explain where the gluteus minimus is located and pinpoints where the trigger points are in the muscle fibers. Trigger points along the gluteus minimus can mimic sciatica by causing referred pain to travel down the leg. This can cause the individual to be unable to walk or even stand up due to the excruciating pain that they are in. Luckily, trigger points are treatable even though they are tricky to diagnose.


Various Treatments To Release Sciatic Nerve Pain

 

Even though trigger points along the gluteus minimus are tricky to diagnose, they are treatable through various treatments to alleviate the pain that the person is experiencing and can reduce sciatic nerve pain from causing more issues in the legs. Studies reveal that the effectiveness of active soft tissue release and trigger point block treatments combined can release entrapped nerves from the gluteus minimus and reduce low back and sciatic pain from the lower extremities. Now the treatments alone can only do so much to the individual, as many doctors tell their patients to take corrective actions or techniques to reduce the chances of trigger points from forming again on the gluteus minimus. Techniques like glute stretches, ischemic compressions, or using a foam roller can break the myofascial triggers from the gluteus minimus muscles and reduce the pain in the glutes and legs. This will help bring mobility back to the lower extremities.

 

Conclusion

As the smallest muscle in the body’s gluteal region, the gluteus minimus is the lower body’s predominant hip stabilizer and abductor. The gluteus minimus contributes to pelvic stability and lower extremity functionality that can be overused and can develop trigger points associated with sciatica. Trigger points along the gluteus minimus can cause referred pain to the legs and lower back while mimicking sciatic nerve pain. Thankfully various treatments and techniques can help reduce the chances of trigger points forming along the gluteus minimus and release nerve entrapment from the aggravated muscles pressing on the sciatic nerve, bringing back lower extremity mobility to the body.

 

References

Greco, Anthony J, and Renato C Vilella. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Gluteus Minimus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 May 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK556144/.

Kameda, Masahiro, and Hideyuki Tanimae. “Effectiveness of Active Soft Tissue Release and Trigger Point Block for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back and Leg Pain of Predominantly Gluteus Medius Origin: A Report of 115 Cases.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, The Society of Physical Therapy Science, Feb. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6382483/.

Martin, Hal David, et al. “Deep Gluteal Syndrome.” Journal of Hip Preservation Surgery, Oxford University Press, July 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4718497/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Whiler, Lisa, et al. “Gluteus Medius and Minimus Muscle Structure, Strength, and Function in Healthy Adults: Brief Report.” Physiotherapy Canada. Physiotherapie Canada, University of Toronto Press, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963550/.

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Lumbago Pain & Gluteus Medius Trigger Pain

Lumbago Pain & Gluteus Medius Trigger Pain

Introduction

Many individuals utilize the lower half of their bodies to go to different places and use the various surrounding muscles that provide stability on the hips and low back while supporting the upper body’s weight. Along the lower back is the buttock region, where the gluteal muscles help stabilize the pelvis, extend the hips, and rotate the thighs. The gluteal muscles also help shape and support the spine and have an erect posture in the body. One of the gluteal muscles that support the lower body is the gluteus medius, which can succumb to injuries and strain when overused or strained. This leads to developing trigger points that can cause various issues in the lower extremities and lead to corresponding chronic conditions. Today’s article focuses on the gluteus medius muscles, how the lumbago is associated with gluteus medius trigger pain, and various techniques to manage trigger points along the gluteus medius muscle. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like butt and low back pain treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the gluteus medius muscles near and surrounding the body’s lower extremities. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-anatomy-levator-scapulae

What Is The Gluteus Medius?

 

Have you been experiencing pain near your buttock and lower back? Have you been feeling unstable when you are walking? What about feeling pain in your tailbone that makes it unbearable to sit down? Many of these issues are associated with referred pain caused by trigger points affecting the gluteus medius. As part of the gluteal muscle region, the gluteus medius lies between the gluteus maximus and minimus is a flat, triangular muscle and is the primary hip abductor. The gluteus medius and minimus work together for internal rotation for the thighs and lateral rotation for the knees when they are extended. The gluteus medius muscles also help stabilize the pelvis, while the trunk maintains an upright position when the legs are in motion. Studies reveal that the gluteus medius is a key lateral hip muscle that correlates with muscle function with other muscle groups like the quadriceps and abdominal muscles. When injuries or not activating the gluteal muscles often, various muscle issues can cause problems to the gluteus medius muscles. 

 

Lumbago Associated With Gluteus Medius Trigger Pain

Dysfunction in the hips can lead to various issues that can either be acute or chronic, depending on how severely the muscles have been overused or injured. Studies reveal that low back pain has been identified as the leading contributor to disability and when there is dysfunction in the lumbopelvic-hip complex, causing a reduction in gluteus medius strength. When the gluteus medius muscles have become overused or injured through trauma, it can develop trigger points on the muscle causing low back pain issues. When trigger points affect the gluteus medius, additional studies reveal that latent trigger points along the gluteus medius muscles may cause joint movement limitation while causing overload by affecting muscle activation from the hips.

 

 

According to Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D.’s book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual,” patients with active trigger points along their gluteus medius complain of pain when they are doing normal actions like walking or sitting. The pressure from the trigger points along the gluteus medius causes the individual to be in a slumped position, causing them to be uncomfortable. This causes instability in the hips and lower body extremities, making many people miserable. The book also explains that the referred pain patterns caused by gluteus medius trigger points can overlap other chronic conditions like sacroiliac joint dysfunction, low back pain, and inflammation of the subgluteus medius bursa.

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Gluteus Medius- Video

Have you been dealing with hip pain? Do you feel uncomfortable pain when walking or sitting down? Or Do you feel muscle stiffness or tenderness near your tailbone constantly? If you have been experiencing these painful symptoms constantly in your lower back or your hips, it could be due to your gluteus medius muscles being affected by trigger points. The video above overviews the gluteus medius location and how trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome causes referred pain to the lower back and hips. When trigger points affect the gluteus medius, the referred pain can overlap and correlate to low back and hip pain, thus causing various issues to the muscles surrounding the low back and buttock region. Regarding trigger points affecting the gluteus medius, they can be treatable through multiple techniques specific to the low back, buttocks, and hips.


Various Techniques For Managing Trigger Pain Along The Gluteus Medius

 

When issues of low back or hip pain begin to cause a problem in the lower extremities, the gluteus muscles can invoke pain-like symptoms in the affected muscle regions, thus developing trigger points. Even though trigger points are tricky to diagnose, they can be treated with various techniques that many people can incorporate into their daily lives. Exercises like resistance training on the gluteus medius can help improve hip abductor functionality and increase the strength of the gluteus medius. To manage trigger points along the gluteus medius, many people must do these corrective actions to reduce the pain that they may be causing to their glutes. When people are putting on pants, it is best to sit down and then put on their pants to prevent muscle strain on their hips and gluteus medius. Another corrective action is to move around after sitting down for a prolonged period to avoid trigger pain from developing. These corrective actions and techniques can help strengthen the lower body extremities and improve hip mobility. 

 

Conclusion

As part of the gluteal muscle region, the gluteus medius lies between the gluteus maximus and minimus by being a primary hip abductor. The gluteus medius helps with pelvic stabilization and helps the trunk maintain an upright position when the legs are in motion. When normal or traumatic factors affect the gluteus medius, it can develop trigger points on the muscle fibers, causing referred pain to the hips and lower back. Trigger points along the gluteus medius are manageable through various techniques that people can use to prevent hip and low back issues. These techniques can minimize the trigger points and strengthen the gluteus medius muscles in the glutes.

 

References

Bagcier, Fatih, et al. “The Relationship between Gluteus Medius Latent Trigger Point and Muscle Strength in Healthy Subjects.” Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2022, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35248262/.

Sadler, Sean, et al. “Gluteus Medius Muscle Function in People with and without Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review.” BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, BioMed Central, 22 Oct. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6805550/.

Shah, Aashin, and Bruno Bordoni. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Gluteus Medius Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 25 Jan. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK557509/.

Stastny, Petr, et al. “Strengthening the Gluteus Medius Using Various Bodyweight and Resistance Exercises.” Strength and Conditioning Journal, Strength and Conditioning Journal, June 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890828/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Whiler, Lisa, et al. “Gluteus Medius and Minimus Muscle Structure, Strength, and Function in Healthy Adults: Brief Report.” Physiotherapy Canada. Physiotherapie Canada, University of Toronto Press, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963550/.

Disclaimer

Experiencing Pain In Your Gluteus Max? Could Be Trigger Points

Experiencing Pain In Your Gluteus Max? Could Be Trigger Points

Introduction

The body’s lower extremities have various muscles that allow the legs and feet to move around from one location to another. The different muscles that make up the lower extremities of the body help stabilize the hips and allow mobility to the legs. The legs and hip muscles have a mutual relationship with one body muscle that helps the lower body, and it’s the glutes, specifically the gluteus maximus. Many individuals must realize that the glutes must be activated when working out. When the glutes are not activated, it can lead to the rest of the lower extremities, like the lower back, hips, and knees, taking most of the loaded weight on the body. This leads to the development of trigger points associated with butt pain along the gluteus maximus, causing referred pain down the legs. Today’s article looks at the gluteus maximus muscles, how trigger points are associated with butt pain, and relieving pain is associated with trigger points along the gluteus maximus. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple techniques in the lower body extremities, like butt pain treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the gluteus maximus muscles near and surrounding the body’s lower extremities. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-anatomy-levator-scapulae

What Is The Gluteus Maximus?

 

Have you been experiencing pain in your hips, low back, and knees? Are you uncomfortable when you are trying to sit down? Or are you experiencing sciatic pain-like symptoms running from your buttock to your leg? These issues affecting the body’s lower extremities may correlate with trigger points along the gluteus maximus in the buttock. The gluteus maximus is the largest gluteus muscle that makes up the shape and form of the buttock and hip areas of the body. The gluteus maximus can come in different sizes depending on the individual’s body type. This large muscle plays a prominent role in the body as it helps maintain an erect posture for the upper body. Studies reveal that the gluteus maximus is one of the primary hip extensors, and some of its functions include extending and externally rotating the thighs. The gluteus maximus, when trained properly through exercise, can increase in size and strength while supporting the upper body. However, only a few people realize that when their gluteus maximus muscles are not properly trained, it can lead to various issues that can cause trigger points to form along the gluteus maximus.

 

Trigger Points Associated With Butt Pain

 

As mentioned earlier, when individuals don’t properly strengthen their gluteus maximus through exercises, it can lead to unwanted pain symptoms affecting the lower back, hips, and knees in the lower body. When the gluteus maximus muscles are not fully activated to their full potential, they can develop into trigger points associated with butt pain. Studies reveal that trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome associated with the gluteus maximus can affect the entry point of the inferior gluteal nerve, causing pain and a limited range of motion to the joints. Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., who wrote “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” mentioned that the symptoms caused by active trigger points could make the individual uncomfortable and cause a cramping sensation to the gluteus maximus. At the same time, trigger points along the gluteus maximus can correlate with referred pain that can entrap the sciatic nerve causing sciatica to affect the legs. When this happens, many other issues can pop up and affect the lower extremities, mimicking low back pain.

 


How To Release Trigger Points On The Gluteus Maximus-Video

Are you experiencing a cramping sensation in your buttock? What about feeling an electric sense running down your leg? Or are you dealing with low back pain? Many of these issues are associated with trigger points affecting the gluteus maximus, causing butt pain. The gluteus maximus is a large, superficial muscle that helps support the hips and ensures that the upper body has an erect posture. When issues affect the gluteus maximus, it can lead to unwanted pain in the lower back, hips, and knees, causing the individual to be in constant pain. This leads to the development of trigger points along the gluteus maximus, thus mimicking sciatica. The video above demonstrates where the trigger points are located in the gluteus maximus and how they can potentially overlap to cause sciatica nerve pain. The video also shows how to use various techniques to relieve the pain from the trigger points and help release the trapped muscle from causing additional pain in the lower body.


Relieving Pain Associated With Trigger Points Along The Gluteus Maximus

 

Since the gluteus maximus is a large important muscle, it is important to strengthen the glutes to prevent low back pain. When it comes to relieving pain associated with trigger points along the gluteus maximus, there are various techniques that many people can utilize to release the tension from the gluteus maximus and the rest of the lower body. Various glute stretches can help elongate the gluteus maximus muscle after a workout and reduce the chances of triggering points and referred pain re-occurring. Another technique that many people should do is to bend at the knees when lifting heavy objects to reduce overload on the lower back and cause more issues on the gluteus maximus.

 

Conclusion

The gluteus maximus is a large superficial muscle with a very important function in the body. This muscle helps with extending and externally rotating the thighs and helps keep the posture erect for the upper back. However, the gluteus maximus muscles are not properly trained and can lead to unwanted issues that cause referred pain to the hips, low back, and knees that correlate with triggering points. Luckily though, through proper training and stretching, the lower body can prevent the gluteus maximus from developing trigger points and help improve a person’s posture.

 

References

Akamatsu, Flavia Emi, et al. “Anatomical Basis of the Myofascial Trigger Points of the Gluteus Maximus Muscle.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5733974/.

Elzanie, Adel, and Judith Borger. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Gluteus Maximus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 28 Mar. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538193/.

Neto, Walter Krause, et al. “Gluteus Maximus Activation during Common Strength and Hypertrophy Exercises: A Systematic Review.” Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, Uludag University, 24 Feb. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7039033/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Pelvic Floor Muscles & Trigger Points

Pelvic Floor Muscles & Trigger Points

Introduction

The body’s pelvic region has many functions crucial for functionality with the host. The various muscles surrounding the pelvis help provide stability to the body’s core, allow circulation to the heart in the cardiovascular system, support the reproductive and abdominal organs, and much more the body requires. The pelvic joints’ various muscles also allow hip mobility and function for the lower body extremities. When traumatic injuries or abnormal activities start to affect the pelvic floor muscles, the various issues can affect the functionality of the pelvic region and cause problems in bladder control for both the male and female bodies. Many of these issues correlate with trigger points surrounding or on the pelvic floor muscles that can affect how the vital organs operate in the body. Today’s article examines the pelvic floor muscles, how trigger points correlate with pelvic pain, and managing pelvic pain is associated with trigger points. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple techniques in the lower body extremities, like pelvic pain treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the pelvic floor muscles near and surrounding the pelvis. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-week-spelenius-cervicis

What Are The Pelvic Floor Muscles?

 

Have you been experiencing bladder issues that constantly make you go to the bathroom? Have you been dealing with severe cramps that mimic sciatica pain? Or does it hurt when you are sitting down? Many of these issues correlate with muscle pain associated with trigger point pain along the pelvic floor muscles. The pelvic floor muscles are a unique anatomical body location with a balance of different pressures (visceral, muscular, or liquid) that play a fundamental role in the body’s lower extremities. The pelvic floor muscles have four divided compartments but have different parts and functions to allow optimal bodily function. The four pelvic floor compartments include:

  • Anterior or urinary (bladder)
  • Medium or genital (uterus in women, prostate in men)
  • Posterior or anterior (anus, anal cavity, and rectum)
  • Peritoneal (endopelvic fascia and perineal membrane)

Some of the functions that the pelvic floor muscles allow the body to perform properly include proper contraction for sexual function, allowing respiration in the abdominal organs, maintaining bodily fluid actions like going to the restroom, and maintaining good posture by working together with the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral columns of the spine. Studies reveal that the spine’s autonomic nerves, which include the sympathetic and parasympathetic, help supply the posterior and anterior compartments in the pelvic floor. When traumatic factors affect the pelvic floor muscles, it can lead to correlating issues regarding trigger points in the pelvic muscles.

 

How Do Trigger Points Correlate With  Pelvic Pain?

The pelvic floor has four different components to allow the muscles to function properly when traumatic factors start to invoke pain-like symptoms that can affect pelvic functionality in both the male and female body, thus developing trigger point pain associated with pelvic pain. For the female body, trigger points along the bulbospongiosus muscle (part of the pelvic floor muscles) may cause aching pain in the perineal region. In contrast, in the male body, trigger points along the retroscrotal area may cause discomfort while sitting erect. According to the book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., stated that many individuals that are dealing with trigger point pain along their pelvic floor muscles would often complain about feeling localized aching pain in their anal region and may experience painful bowel movements when going to the bathroom.

 

Studies reveal that myofascial trigger points develop “muscle contraction knots” of the pelvic floor muscles, may be identified in many patients suffering from pelvic pain syndrome (urological, colorectal, and gynecological), and are associated with trigger points. Trigger points are tricky when diagnosing where the pain is located since myofascial pain syndrome mimics other chronic conditions of the surrounding muscles, causing referred pain. Additional studies reveal that the location and severity of pelvic floor myofascial pain was significantly correlated with various pelvic pain symptoms that can affect both males and females with different conditions. When doctors recognize that their patients are dealing with trigger points associated with pelvic pain after an examination, they devise a treatment plan and work with other specialists to manage trigger points and reduce pain in the pelvic region.

 


Top 3 Pelvic Floor Exercises- Video

Have you been dealing with urinary issues that make it tricky to go to the bathroom? Do you have trouble finding a comfortable position when you are sitting down? Or do you feel pain radiating down your buttock and leg? Pelvic pain is a common issue that can affect both men and women that can cause various pain symptoms that correlate with trigger points along the pelvic floor muscles. When trigger points affect the pelvic floor muscles, it can lead to referred pain that connects with pelvic pain in the body’s lower extremities. Many factors can affect the pelvis, like issues affecting the digestive, reproductive, or urinary systems, a trauma in the surrounding pelvic muscles that causes them to be weak or corresponding issues on the hips and lower back. Trigger points associated with pelvic pain may be tricky. Still, they can be treatable with different therapies that can reduce the pain and help strengthen those weak muscles in the pelvic region. The video above demonstrates three other pelvic floor exercises that can help support the pelvic muscles and reduce the trigger points from reoccurring in the pelvic area of the lower body.


Managing Pelvic Pain Associated With Trigger Points

 

Various treatments can manage pain associated with trigger points through multiple therapies that can reduce pain-like symptoms along the pelvic floor muscles. Many therapies, like trigger point therapy and muscle training, can help reduce the pain along the pelvic floor muscles and bring back bowel function to the pelvic region. Studies reveal that doctors provide a range of protocols designed to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles and the different muscle groups around the pelvic area while improving function. However, treatment alone can only go so far, as people must take corrective actions to ensure that the trigger points do not return in the future. Movements like corrective posture exercises focusing on the lower back, hips, and pelvis and eating a fiber-rich diet can reduce pelvic pain. This allows the individual to get their lower half mobility back. 

 

Conclusion

The pelvic floor muscle has four divided components that will enable optimal bodily function that has different jobs in the male and female bodies. The pelvic floor muscles have many crucial functions that provide the host stability in the body’s core, allow circulation to the cardiovascular system, and, most importantly, support the reproductive and abdominal organs. When issues affect the pelvic floor muscles, it can lead to pelvic pain associated with trigger points that can disrupt many from going to the bathroom or disrupting sexual functionality. All is not lost, as various therapies can reduce the pain and strengthen the pelvic muscles in the lower body. This allows lower body mobility back to the host and prevents unnecessary issues from reoccurring.

 

References

Bordoni, Bruno, et al. “Anatomy, Abdomen and Pelvis, Pelvic Floor.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 18 July 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482200/.

Marques, Andrea, et al. “The Status of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training for Women.” Canadian Urological Association Journal = Journal De L’Association Des Urologues Du Canada, Canadian Medical Association, Dec. 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2997838/.

Meister, Melanie R, et al. “Pelvic Floor Myofascial Pain Severity and Pelvic Floor Disorder Symptom Bother: Is There a Correlation?” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6732028/.

Moldwin, Robert M, and Jennifer Yonaitis Fariello. “Myofascial Trigger Points of the Pelvic Floor: Associations with Urological Pain Syndromes and Treatment Strategies Including Injection Therapy.” Current Urology Reports, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2013, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23943509/.

Raizada, Varuna, and Ravinder K Mittal. “Pelvic Floor Anatomy and Applied Physiology.” Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2617789/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Scoliosis Diagnosis: The Adams Forward Bend Test Back Clinic

Scoliosis Diagnosis: The Adams Forward Bend Test Back Clinic

The Adams forward bend test is a simple screening method that can help with scoliosis diagnosis and help in developing a treatment plan. The exam is named after the English physician William Adams. As part of an examination, a doctor or chiropractor will look for an abnormal side-to-side bend in the spine.Scoliosis Diagnosis: The Adams Forward Bend Test

Scoliosis Diagnosis

  • The Adams forward-bend test can help determine if there are indicators for scoliosis.
  • It is not an official diagnosis, but the results can be used as a starting point.
  • The test is done with school-age children between 10 and 18 to detect adolescent idiopathic scoliosis or AIS.
  • A positive test is a noticeable asymmetry in the ribs with a forward bend.
  • It can detect scoliosis in any part of the spine, especially in the thoracic middle and upper back.
  • The test is not only for kids; scoliosis can develop at any age, so it is also effective for adults.

Adams Forward Bend Test

The test is quick, easy, and painless.

  • The examiner will check to see if anything is uneven when standing straight.
  • Then the patient will be asked to bend forward.
  • The patient is asked to stand with their legs together, facing away from the examiner.
  • Then patients bend forward from the waist, with arms hanging vertically downward.
  • The examiner uses a scoliometer-like level to detect asymmetries within the spine.
  • Deviations are called the Cobb angle.

The Adams test will reveal signs of scoliosis and/or other potential deformities like:

  • Uneven shoulders
  • Uneven hips
  • Lack of symmetry between the vertebrae or the shoulder blades.
  • The head does not line up with a rib hump or the pelvis.

Detection of Other Spinal Issues

The test can also be used to find spinal curvature issues and conditions like:

  • Kyphosis or hunchback, where the upper back is bent forward.
  • Scheuermann’s disease is a form of kyphosis where the thoracic vertebrae can grow unevenly during a growth spurt and cause the vertebrae to develop into a wedge-like shape.
  • Congenital spine conditions that cause an abnormal curve of the spine.

Confirmation

The Adams test by itself is not enough to confirm scoliosis.

  • A standing X-ray with Cobb angle measurements above 10 degrees is required for diagnosing scoliosis.
  • The Cobb angle determines which vertebrae are tilted the most.
  • The higher the angle, the more severe the condition and the more probable it will produce symptoms.
  • Computed tomography or CT and magnetic resonance imaging or MRI scans can also be used.

Forward Bend Test


References

Glavaš, Josipa et al. “The role of school medicine in the early detection and management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.” Wiener klinische Wochenschrift, 1–9. 4 Oct. 2022, doi:10.1007/s00508-022-02092-1

Grossman, T W et al. “An evaluation of the Adams forward bend test and the scoliometer in a scoliosis school screening setting.” Journal of pediatric orthopedics vol. 15,4 (1995): 535-8. doi:10.1097/01241398-199507000-00025

Letts, M et al. “Computerized ultrasonic digitization in the measurement of spinal curvature.” Spine vol. 13,10 (1988): 1106-10. doi:10.1097/00007632-198810000-00009

Senkoylu, Alpaslan, et al. “A simple method for assessing rotational flexibility in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: modified Adam’s forward bending test.” Spine deformity vol. 9,2 (2021): 333-339. doi:10.1007/s43390-020-00221-2

Rounded Shoulders Functional Chiropractic Back Clinic

Rounded Shoulders Functional Chiropractic Back Clinic

Look how young children position their backs. There is a natural S curve, and their movements are effortless. As the body ages, too much sitting, slouching, and inactivity can cause muscle fatigue and tension leading to posture issues. Rounded shoulders describe a resting position that has shifted the shoulders out of the body’s natural alignment, which can worsen if left untreated. Chiropractic care can realign the shoulders, as well as the spine, and restore musculoskeletal health to optimum levels.Rounded Shoulders Functional Chiropractor

Rounded Shoulders

Rounded shoulders are an excessive thoracic kyphosis referring to an uneven forward rounding or curvature of the middle and upper back. Rounded shoulders shift out of proper alignment with the spine, causing posture-related problems like shoulder/neck/back discomfort, tightness, stiffness, and pain. Overall unhealthy posture contributes to the following:

  • The head constantly being in a forward or backward position
  • Headaches
  • Body aches and pains
  • Muscle fatigue
  • Chronic back soreness
  • Bent knees when standing or walking
  • Body movement dysfunction
  • Joint problems
  • Potbelly
  • Rounded shoulders

Body responses to rounded shoulders include:

  • Chronic musculoskeletal aches and pains
  • Breathing problems
  • Limited body function
  • Impaired mobility performance
  • Increased mental and musculoskeletal stress

Causes

Rounded shoulders are typically caused by unhealthy posture, but can also be caused by muscle imbalances from, for example, overfocusing on building chest strength but neglecting the core and upper back. Other causes include:

  • Standing and sitting for long periods
  • Stress
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Environmental factors
  • Too much exercise, sports, and physical activities

Musculoskeletal Imbalance

Postural imbalances anywhere in the body can cause rounded shoulders.

  • For example, when an individual tilts their head forward to look at their phone, the upper back has to round forward to hold the head. Constantly tilting can begin to generate an unhealthy muscle memory causing the neck and shoulder muscles to remain in a semi-flexed position that starts to become the norm.
  • Another example is when the arms are held out and in front for prolonged periods, like driving, typing, and cooking, the chest muscles get shortened. As time goes on, this causes the shoulder blades to move forward on the ribcage, making the upper back and shoulder area hunch awkwardly and unhealthily.

Stress

When the brain perceives a threat, the body physically prepares to take action through the fight or flight response. Common reactions include:

  • Jaw tensing
  • Tightening the abdominal muscles
  • Holding one’s breath
  • Rounding the shoulders

Stressors can include:

  • Job worries
  • Money issues
  • Relationship problems
  • Family responsibilities
  • All can cause changes in the body that result in rounded shoulders.

Environmental Factors

  • Respiratory conditions like asthma, COPD, and allergies can affect the body’s breathing and the ability of the diaphragm to contract and relax correctly.
  • Ribcage restrictions caused by chronic breathing problems can result in the thoracic/middle back tightening up, causing excessive shoulder rounding.

Exercise and Physical Activities

  • Exercise and physical activities can contribute to rounded shoulders because of the long periods of spinal flexion. These can include:
  • Bike riding, martial arts, and swimming.
  • Knitting requires the arms to be out in front.
  • Gardening requires kneeling and being hunched over.

Chiropractic Treatment

Chiropractic adjustments, therapeutic massage, and decompression therapy can unlock tight shoulder and chest muscles. A chiropractor uses gentle targeted adjustments to relieve pain, restore function, and retrain the muscles.

  • The doctor will look at the individual’s resting position while standing.
  • An individual with slumped shoulders can slouch, even when standing up straight.
  • Their hands will likely face behind them, with their thumbs pointed at each other.
  • Once the adjustments are made, a correct standing posture will make the hands face the body with the thumbs facing ahead.
  • Exercises will be recommended to strengthen the core and stretches to maintain the adjustments.

Posture Chiropractic


References

Fathollahnejad, Kiana, et al. “The effect of manual therapy and stabilizing exercises on forward head and rounded shoulder postures: a six-week intervention with a one-month follow-up study.” BMC musculoskeletal disorders vol. 20,1 86. 18 Feb. 2019, doi:10.1186/s12891-019-2438-y

Go, Seong-Uk, and Byoung-Hee Lee. “Effects of scapular stability exercise on shoulder stability and rehabilitative ultrasound images in office workers.” Journal of physical therapy science vol. 28,11 (2016): 2999-3002. doi:10.1589/jpts.28.2999

Kwon, Jung Won, et al. “Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders.” Journal of physical therapy science vol. 27,6 (2015): 1739-42. doi:10.1589/jpts.27.1739

Lee, Do Youn, et al. “Changes in rounded shoulder and forward head posture according to exercise methods.” Journal of physical therapy science vol. 29,10 (2017): 1824-1827. doi:10.1589/jpts.29.1824

Park, Sang-In, et al. “Effects of shoulder stabilization exercise on pain and functional recovery of shoulder impingement syndrome patients.” Journal of physical therapy science vol. 25,11 (2013): 1359-62. doi:10.1589/jpts.25.1359

Healthy Driving Posture: Back Clinic Chiropractic

Healthy Driving Posture: Back Clinic Chiropractic

The body is designed to move. For individuals who spend a significant amount of time driving each day, whether for a living or a long commute, over time can lead to headaches, neck and back pain, sciatica, and increases the risk for serious injury. Chiropractic can retrain individuals to practice healthy driving posture. This is accomplished through decompression and massage therapy combined with recommended stretches/exercises, and an anti-inflammatory diet will bring pain relief and help prevent injury.

Healthy Driving Posture Chiropractor

Healthy Driving Posture

Two main reasons driving impacts the back are poor posture and being in a fixed position for an extended period. Individuals who regularly drive for more than 4 hours a day are more at risk. An unhealthy driving posture can lead to an increased risk of discomfort/pain in the:

  • Neck
  • Shoulders
  • Arms
  • Wrists
  • Fingers
  • Back
  • Legs
  • Feet
  • Over time these issues can become chronic, making the body vulnerable to various injuries.

Back Pain Symptoms

Sometimes back pain needs immediate medical attention if any of the following symptoms present:

  • Inflammation in the back.
  • Swelling on the back.
  • Constant pain does not go away or ease up after resting or movement.
  • Pain in the upper back that radiates to the chest.
  • A high temperature.
  • Unexplained weight loss.
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control.
  • Numbness or tingling around the buttocks or groin area.

Driving Recommendations

Spine Support

  • Slide the tailbone as close to the back of the seat as possible.
  • Leave a gap between the back of the knees and the front of the seat.
  • If the vehicle doesn’t allow for the proper position, a back support cushion can help.

Raise The Hips

  • If possible, adjust the area you sit on, so the thighs are supported along their entire length.
  • The knees should be slightly lower than the hips.
  • This will increase circulation to the back muscles while opening up the hips.

Sitting Too Close

  • An individual should be able to comfortably reach the pedals and depress them through their full range with the entire foot.
  • A safety study found that drivers whose chests were closer to the wheel were significantly more likely to suffer head, neck, and chest injuries in front and rear-end collisions.

Proper Height

  • Ensure the seat raises the eye level a few inches above the steering wheel to allow sufficient clearance between the head and roof.

Seat Angle

  • The angle of the back of the seat should go a little beyond 90 degrees to 100-110 degrees places minimal pressure on the back.
  • Leaning too far back forces the individual to raise/push their head and neck forward, which can cause neck pain, shoulder pain, and tingling in the fingers.

Headrest Height

  • The top of the headrest should be between the top of the ears and the top of the head.
  • It should slightly touch the back of the head when sitting with a healthy driving posture.
  • The headrest is vital in reducing whiplash injuries in the event of a rear-end collision.

Mirror Adjustments

  • Ensure the rear-view and side mirrors are correctly adjusted will prevent straining the neck.
  • Individuals should be able to see the traffic behind them without having to crane their necks.

Be Sure To Take Breaks

  • Even with a healthy driving posture, fatigue can and will set in.
  • Listen to your body and take breaks.
  • Park in a safe place at a rest stop or designated area to get out of the vehicle, move around, and stretch.

Driving Posture Exercises

The following exercises can help improve driving posture and prevent pain while making deliveries or transporting people.

Shoulder Blade Squeeze

This exercise helps reduce pressure on the neck and shoulders.

  • Bring the shoulder blades back and up with the hands on the steering wheel.
  • Squeeze your shoulder blades together in the middle of the back.
  • Hold for 3 seconds, then release.
  • Repeat ten times.

Seated Pelvic Tilt

This exercise activates the abdominal and external oblique muscles.

  • Press the lower back into the car seat.
  • Inhale and tilt the pelvis forward to create an arch in the lower back.
  • Hold for 3 seconds, then release.
  • Repeat ten times.

Posture is more than just how one carries themselves. The effects of unhealthy posture can carry over into an individual’s physical, mental, and emotional health. Whether it’s caused by injury, stress, work, or sports, a professional chiropractor will help you get back to optimal health.


Driving Position


References

Cvetkovic, Marko M et al. “Assessing Post-Driving Discomfort and Its Influence on Gait Patterns.” Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) vol. 21,24 8492. 20 Dec. 2021, doi:10.3390/s21248492

Pope, Malcolm H et al. “Spine ergonomics.” Annual review of biomedical engineering vol. 4 (2002): 49-68. doi:10.1146/annurev.bioeng.4.092101.122107

Tinitali, Sarah, et al. “Sitting Posture During Occupational Driving Causes Low Back Pain; Evidence-Based Position or Dogma? A Systematic Review.” Human factors vol. 63,1 (2021): 111-123. doi:10.1177/0018720819871730

van Veen, Sigrid, and Peter Vink. “Posture variation in a car within the restrictions of the driving task.” Work (Reading, Mass.) vol. 54,4 (2016): 887-94. doi:10.3233/WOR-162359

Children’s Postural Health Back Clinic

Children’s Postural Health Back Clinic

Practicing improper/unhealthy postures throughout the day can severely fatigue the mind and body. Children’s postural health is vital to their overall health and energy levels to perform tasks, school work, and play. An unhealthy posture causes the body to lose its ability to dissipate forces evenly and correctly. Symptoms like soreness, pain, tightness, and irritability can begin to present, which is the body’s way of letting the individual know something is off. When the body is in proper alignment, the spine disperses body weight correctly and efficiently. Chiropractic adjustments can effectively counter the unhealthy posture effects, and simple postural exercises can strengthen the body, increasing healthy posture habits.

Children's Postural Health Chiropractor

Children’s Posture Health

Healthy posture is more than simply sitting and standing up straight. It is how the body is positioned, meaning the head, spine, and shoulders, and how it moves unconsciously like a walking gait. An uneven gait or awkward body position can indicate a problem and cause long-term consequences to a child’s health.

Challenges

Kids and children are constantly hunched, slumped, and slouched over device screens. This constant awkward positioning adds weight to the spine, increasing the pressure, which can cause issues ranging from headaches, mild neck pain, low back pain, and sciatica. Severe health effects from poor posture include:

  • Shoulder problems.
  • Chronic pain.
  • Nerve damage.
  • Difficulty breathing from prolonged hunching-over.
  • Spinal joint degeneration.
  • Vertebral compression fractures.

Poor alignment of the muscles begins to restrict postural muscles from relaxing correctly, making the muscles stay stretched or slightly flexed, causing strain and pain. As a child’s body grows, practicing unhealthy postures can drive continued awkward positioning, abnormal spine growth, and an increased risk for arthritis later in life.

Chiropractic Adjustments

A chiropractor will check for any imbalances, like a hunched back, one shoulder higher than the other, or a pelvic tilt/shift. Through a series of adjustments, chiropractic releases the muscles, relieves pressure on ligaments, allows the postural muscles to relax and realign to their proper position, prevents further muscle overuse, strain, abnormal joint wear, and helps reduce fatigue by conserving/utilizing energy as the muscles are functioning correctly and efficiently.

Exercises

Simple postural exercises can help maintain children’s postural health.

Triangle Stretch

  • Standing, spread the legs into an A shape shoulder-width apart.
  • Bend and stretch to one side.
  • Raise the opposite arm of the side, bending straight above the head, so the bicep touches the ear.

Arm Circles

  • Raise the arms above the head.
  • Elbows bent at 90 degrees.
  • Make small circles forward and backward ten times.

Cobra Pose

  • Lay flat on the floor.
  • Place hands next to the chest so that they are underneath the shoulders.
  • Gently press the chest upward.
  • Keeping the legs on the ground.
  • Look straight ahead.

They only take a few minutes, but the objective is consistency. Doing the poses for one week won’t immediately change unhealthy posture habits. It is developing consistent healthy postural habits that generate improvement. They should be done at least three times weekly to build strength and endurance.


Kids and Chiropractic


References

Achar, Suraj, and Jarrod Yamanaka. “Back Pain in Children and Adolescents.” American family physician vol. 102,1 (2020): 19-28.

Baroni, Marina Pegoraro, et al. “Factors associated with scoliosis in schoolchildren: a cross-sectional population-based study.” Journal of epidemiology vol. 25,3 (2015): 212-20. doi:10.2188/jea.JE20140061

da Rosa, Bruna Nichele et al. “Back Pain and Body Posture Evaluation Instrument for Children and Adolescents (BackPEI-CA): Expansion, Content Validation, and Reliability.” International journal of environmental research and public health vol. 19,3 1398. 27 Jan. 2022, doi:10.3390/ijerph19031398

King, H A. “Back pain in children.” Pediatric clinics of North America vol. 31,5 (1984): 1083-95. doi:10.1016/s0031-3955(16)34685-5

Dancing For Your Health & Wellness

Dancing For Your Health & Wellness

Introduction

Everyone is trying to find what exercise works for them as they start looking for ways to improve their health and wellness. Many individuals who begin to work out would go with finding a personal trainer or a gym that helps incorporate muscle strength training and cardio training to improve their heart and lung capacity to make the body feel good while strengthening their muscles. One of the unique forms of exercise that involve both the heart and muscles is dancing. Dancing is a great way to not only improve musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health but can help reduce overlapping conditions that a person is dealing with in their bodies. Today’s article looks at how dancing helps with musculoskeletal health, affects the heart and brain, and how chiropractic care goes hand in hand with dancing. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal and cardiovascular therapies to help those with heart and muscle issues. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

03 Minich Nutrition in CVD

 

Dancing For Musculoskeletal Health

 

Have you ever noticed people take a cardio class with music playing in the background and see them happy afterward? How do athletes incorporate cardio into their exercise regime to improve their mobility and flexibility? Or how do particular video games make you get up and move around? All these scenarios imply that cardio exercises like dancing may help improve musculoskeletal function. Dancing is one of the many aerobic exercises that can help improve a person’s social skills and is something that can be taken up early while providing many beneficial qualities like:

  • Increase strength
  • Improve gait and balance
  • Reduce functional loss
  • Reducing the risk of falls
  • Rehabilitating musculoskeletal injuries
  • Stabilize core muscles

For the musculoskeletal system, dance would be considered an isometric exercise involving different muscle groups like the hips, shoulders, back, and abdominals without using the joints. When a person is dancing, each of the various movements is related to strengthening the core muscles by working thoroughly with the abdominals. Dance can even help improve posture by maintaining strength and enhancing stability in the body. Studies reveal that dance’s impact on individuals with chronic issues like Parkinson’s disease associated with motor and non-motor symptoms can increase their quality of life. So what does that mean? It means that dancing, even for just one song, can help with movement and foster balance, flexibility, and muscle endurance through repeated tasks while associating with accessible, social, and attractive aspects of a person’s physical abilities.

 

How Does Dancing Affect The Heart and Brain?

Dancing not only helps with musculoskeletal issues, but it can help improve brain and heart function in the body. Studies reveal that moderate-intensity dancing was inversely associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease mortality. What dancing does to the heart is that it makes the body intake more oxygen to the lungs, which relates to the heart beating faster and circulating the blood to be transported throughout the entire body. But how does dancing correlate to brain health? Let’s look at dance fitness classes, like Zumba, and use it as an example. Studies show that dance fitness classes provide several health benefits that could reduce mood disorders like depression and anxiety while improving cognitive skills. This means that dance fitness classes like Zumba do repetitive movements to the beat of the music that engages the individual to repeat the steps while having fun. When the muscles begin to do repetitive movements, this motor function sends the signal to the brain, making the person remember the movements later, known as muscle memory. When an individual suffers from neurological disorders like dementia or Alzheimers, dancing could potentially be involved with music therapy, allowing the individual to reduce the risk of developing neurological disorders from progressing further.


How Does The Body React To Dancing?-Video

Have you felt terrific after listening to a good song? How about feeling like you just had a workout? Or have you noticed certain areas in your body like your abdominals, legs, and back looked more toned? All these are beneficial signs that you should add dancing to your regime. The video explains what happens to the body when people are dancing. Dancing could potentially be a mediator for many athletes that play sports.

 

 

An example would be football and ballet. How do football and ballet relate to each other? Football utilizes efficient and precise movements that benefit every position on the field, while ballet requires speed to make them flawless on stage. Combining the two, many football players will increase their speed and agility associated with ballet to avoid tackles, jump higher, catch passes and avoid injuries on the field. Dancing is an excellent way to get some cardio exercises in, and combined with other treatments can make a difference in a person.


Chiropractic Care & Dancing

 

Like all athletic individuals, professional dancers utilize various treatments to recover and improve their performance. Treatments like chiropractic care are safe, effective, and widely used by young and professional athletes that want to prevent injuries from progressing. Chiropractic care for professional athletes and the general population can help prevent and treat injuries like back and neck pain or aggravating conditions like sciatica through spinal manipulation. Chiropractic care also helps restore an individual’s original well-being while increasing their strength, flexibility, and mobility. By working with an experienced chiropractor, an individual can regain their stamina by adopting new ways to prevent injuries caused by spinal complications from reoccurring in the body.

 

Conclusion

Dancing for 30 minutes to an hour can be used as part of an exercise regime and could potentially reduce chronic issues that affect the body’s brain, heart, and muscles. Dancing could also enhance a sports athlete’s performance by increasing their agility, endurance, and performance. Combined with chiropractic care, individuals will begin to see improvements in their range of motion, flexibility, and even an increase in their brain function to dance longer and improve their health and wellness. So whether you are a professional or not, dancing is for everyone.

 

Reference

Barranco-Ruiz, Yaira, et al. “Dance Fitness Classes Improve the Health-Related Quality of Life in Sedentary Women.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, MDPI, 26 May 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7312518/.

Ferchak, Dawn. “Belly Dance Your Back Pain Away – Spineuniverse.” Spine Universe, 14 Oct. 2020, www.spineuniverse.com/wellness/exercise/belly-dance-back-pain.

Gyrling, Therese, et al. “The Impact of Dance Activities on the Health of Persons with Parkinson’s Disease in Sweden.” International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being, Taylor & Francis, Dec. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8547839/.

Merom, Dafna, et al. “Dancing Participation and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: A Pooled Analysis of 11 Population-Based British Cohorts.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2016, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26944521/.

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