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Complex Injuries

Back Clinic Complex Injuries Chiropractic Team. Complex injuries happen when people experience severe or catastrophic injuries, or whose cases are more complex due to multiple trauma, psychological effects, and pre-existing medical histories. Complex injuries can be serial injuries of the upper extremity, severe soft tissue trauma, and concomitant (naturally accompanying or associated), injuries to vessels or nerves. These injuries go beyond the common sprain and strain and require a deeper level of assessment that may not be easily apparent.

El Paso, TX’s Injury specialist, chiropractor, Dr. Alexander Jimenez discusses treatment options, as well as rehabilitation, muscle/strength training, nutrition, and getting back to normal body functions. Our programs are natural and use the body’s ability to achieve specific measured goals, rather than introducing harmful chemicals, controversial hormone replacement, unwanted surgeries, or addictive drugs. We want you to live a functional life that is fulfilled with more energy, a positive attitude, better sleep, and less pain. Our goal is to ultimately empower our patients to maintain the healthiest way of living.


TMJ: Jaw Disorders

TMJ: Jaw Disorders

The temporomandibular (tem-puh-roe-man-dib-u-lur) joint TMJ acts as a sliding hinge that connects the jawbone to the skull. There is one joint on each side of the jaw. TMJ jaw disorders are also known as temporomandibular disorders – TMD. These disorders affect the connecting point between the jaw and the skull that causes swelling and pain in the joint and the muscles that control movement. The disorder can be caused by a combination of factors, like stress, genetics, arthritis, or injury. The symptoms, pain, and discomfort are often temporary and can be relieved with self-care and nonsurgical treatment like chiropractic.

TMJ: Jaw Disorders

Jaw Disorders

If the jaw is not moving correctly or becomes imbalanced, it can stress the temporomandibular joint. If this happens, the jaw muscles and the neck and shoulder muscles can tense up and over time become fatigued as they overwork to compensate and keep the jaw balanced. The bones that interact in the joint are covered with cartilage and are separated by a small shock-absorbing disc to maintain smooth movement. Jaw disorders can happen if:

  • The disc erodes or moves out of alignment.
  • The joint’s cartilage is damaged by arthritis.
  • The joint is damaged by impact trauma like hitting the head from a fall or sports accident.
  • Individuals that have been in an automobile accident.

Other factors include:

Symptoms

Symptoms of TMJ vary from case to case. These symptoms might include:

  • Problems with opening or closing the mouth
  • Difficulty or pain while chewing
  • Pain or tenderness of the jaw
  • Pain in one or both of the temporomandibular joints
  • Aching facial pain
  • Neck and shoulder pain
  • Headaches
  • Aching pain in and around the ear
  • Dizziness
  • Locking of the joint
  • Clicking sound
  • Grating sensation

Chiropractic Relief

Chiropractors can help with TMJ by alleviating tension and dysfunction in the shoulder, neck, and jaw. Once the dysfunction is relieved, it reduces the pressure on various nerves. Treatment includes:


Body Composition


The Glycemic Index

Not all carbs are equal, with some having a more significant effect on insulin levels than others. For individuals with diabetes or insulin resistance, this is important. A food’s Glycemic Index – ranging from 0 to 100 – indicates how a particular carbohydrate will affect blood sugar and insulin levels.

  • Foods that digest quickly are high on the index.
  • Foods that digest slowly are lower on the index.

Foods high on the GI scale, include potatoes and white bread, are quickly broken down. This is what happens when going through a sugar rush that comes crashing down minutes later. Foods low on the GI scale, include sweet potatoes and whole oats, are digested gradually. This results in a steady rise in blood sugar levels. The following factors may influence the GI scale:

Food processing

  • The more processed the food, the higher the GI.

Fat and acid content

  • Foods high in fat, acid, or carbs eaten with fat or acid tend to have a lower GI.

Fiber content

  • Fiber slows down the rate of digestion, leading to a gradual, healthy rise in blood sugar levels.

Ripeness

  • Ripened fruits tend to have a higher GI than unripened fruit.
References

Alcantara, Joel et al. “Chiropractic care of a patient with temporomandibular disorder and atlas subluxation.” Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics vol. 25,1 (2002): 63-70. doi:10.1067/mmt.2002.120415

DeVocht, James W et al. “A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder.” Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) vol. 144,10 (2013): 1154-63. doi:10.14219/jada.archive.2013.0034

Pavia, Steven et al. “Chiropractic Treatment of Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Retrospective Case Series.” Journal of chiropractic medicine vol. 14,4 (2015): 279-84. doi:10.1016/j.jcm.2015.08.005

Rubis, Lisa M et al. “A collaborative approach between chiropractic and dentistry to address temporomandibular dysfunction: a case report.” Journal of chiropractic medicine vol. 13,1 (2014): 55-61. doi:10.1016/j.jcm.2013.10.003

Thoracic Back Pain

Thoracic Back Pain

The thoracic spine, also known as the upper or middle back, is designed for stability to anchor the rib cage and protect the organs in the chest. It is highly resistant to injury and pain. However, when thoracic back pain does present, it is usually from long-term posture problems or an injury. Thoracic back pain is less common than lower back and neck pain, but it does affect up to 20% of the population, particularly women. Treatment options include chiropractic for quick and long-term pain relief.

Thoracic Back Pain

Thoracic Back Pain and Soreness

The thoracic area is vital for various functions related to:

Common reasons for experiencing thoracic back pain include:

  • A direct hit or high-impact injury from a fall.
  • Sports injury.
  • Automobile accident.
  • Unhealthy postures that put the spine in chronic misalignment, causing strain.
  • Repetitive overuse injury from bending, reaching, lifting, twisting.
  • Poor core or shoulder mechanics, causing muscle imbalance.
  • Muscular irritation, the large upper back muscles are prone to developing strains or tightness that can be painful and difficult to alleviate.
  • De-conditioning or lack of strength.
  • Joint dysfunction can come from a sudden injury or natural degeneration from aging. Examples include facet joint cartilage tear or joint capsule tear.

Upper back pain usually feels like a sharp, burning pain localized to one spot or a general achiness that can flare up and spread out to the shoulder, neck, and arms.

Types of Upper Back Pain

These include:

  • Myofascial pain
  • Spine degeneration
  • Joint dysfunction
  • Nerve dysfunction
  • General spinal misalignments

Depending on what specific tissues are affected, pain can occur with breathing or arm use. It is recommended to have a healthcare professional perform an examination and get an accurate diagnosis. A chiropractor understands the delicate balance and functions that the thoracic spine provides and can develop a proper treatment plan.

Chiropractic

Treatment options will depend on the symptoms, underlying dysfunctions, and individual preferences. ​Recommendations for treatment often include:

  • Spine adjustments to improve alignment and nerve integrity.
  • Posture training to maintain spinal alignment.
  • Therapeutic massage.
  • Exercise training to restore muscular balance.
  • Non-invasive pain-relieving techniques.
  • Health coaching.

Body Composition


Plant-Based Diets for Weight Loss

Individuals who follow vegan, vegetarian, and semivegetarian diets have reported and shown they are less likely to be overweight or obese. This can indicate that reducing intake of meat and animal products is beneficial for weight loss. Studies have found that individuals who follow a vegan diet may lose more weight than individuals on a more conventional weight loss diet, even with similar calories consumed, and often have significant improvements in blood sugar and inflammation markers.

Plant-Based Protein and Muscle Gain

Some plant-based proteins are just as effective as animal protein at promoting muscle gain. A study found that supplementing rice protein following resistance training had similar benefits to whey protein supplementation. Both groups had:

References

Briggs AM, Smith AJ, Straker LM, Bragge P. Thoracic spine pain in the general population: prevalence, incidence and associated factors in children, adolescents and adults. A systematic review. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2009;10:77.

Cichoń, Dorota et al. “Efficacy of Physiotherapy in Reducing Back Pain and Improve Joint Mobility in Older Women.” Ortopedia, traumatologia, rehabilitacja vol. 21,1 (2019): 45-55. doi:10.5604/01.3001.0013.1115

Fouquet N, Bodin J, Descatha A, et al. Prevalence of thoracic spine pain in a surveillance network. Occup Med (Lond). 2015;65(2):122-5.

Jäger, Ralf et al. “Comparison of rice and whey protein isolate digestion rate and amino acid absorption.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition vol. 10,Suppl 1 P12. 6 Dec. 2013, doi:10.1186/1550-2783-10-S1-P12

Joy, Jordan M et al. “The effects of 8 weeks of whey or rice protein supplementation on body composition and exercise performance.” Nutrition journal vol. 12 86. 20 Jun. 2013, doi:10.1186/1475-2891-12-86

Medawar, Evelyn et al. “The effects of plant-based diets on the body and the brain: a systematic review.” Translational psychiatry vol. 9,1 226. 12 Sep. 2019, doi:10.1038/s41398-019-0552-0

Newby, PK et al. “Risk of overweight and obesity among semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women.” The American journal of clinical nutrition vol. 81,6 (2005): 1267-74. doi:10.1093/ajcn/81.6.1267

Pope, Malcolm H et al. “Spine ergonomics.” Annual review of biomedical engineering vol. 4 (2002): 49-68. doi:10.1146/annurev.bioeng.4.092101.122107

Musculoskeletal Disorders

Musculoskeletal Disorders

Musculoskeletal Disorders, or MSDs, are injuries, conditions, and disorders that affect the body’s musculoskeletal system. It includes the muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, discs, blood vessels, bones, and joints. MSDs are common, and the risk of developing them increases with age. The severity of an MSD can vary. They cause discomfort, recurrent pain, stiffness, swelling, and aching that interfere with everyday activities. Early diagnosis and treatment can alleviate symptoms and improve long-term health. Common disorders include:

  • Tendonitis
  • Tendon Strain
  • Epicondylitis
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Trigger Finger
  • Radial Tunnel Syndrome
  • DeQuervain’s Syndrome
  • Rotator Cuff Tendonitis
  • Muscle strain
  • Ligament Sprain
  • Rheumatoid arthritis – RA
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Tension Neck Syndrome
  • Thoracic Outlet Compression
  • Mechanical Back Syndrome
  • Degenerative Disc Disease
  • Ruptured Disc
  • Herniated Disc
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Digital Neuritis
  • Bone Fractures

Musculoskeletal Disorders

Musculoskeletal Disorders Discomfort and Pain

The term musculoskeletal disorder is used as it accurately describes the injury or condition. Other terms used are repetitive motion injury, repetitive stress injury, and overuse injury. When individuals are exposed to MSD risk factors, they begin to fatigue. This can start a musculoskeletal imbalance. With time, fatigue completely overtakes recovery/healing, and the musculoskeletal imbalance continues, a musculoskeletal disorder develops. The risk factors are broken into two categories: work-related/ergonomic risk factors and individual-related risk factors.

Ergonomic Factors:

  • Force
  • Repetition
  • Posture

High Task Repetition

  • Many work tasks and cycles are repetitive and are typically controlled by hourly or daily production targets and work processes.
  • High task repetition combined with other risks factors like high force and/or awkward postures can contribute to the formation of MSD.
  • A job is considered highly repetitive if the cycle time is 30 seconds or less.

Forceful Exertions

  • Many job tasks require high force loads on the body.
  • Muscle effort increases in response to high force requirements. This increases associated fatigue.

Repetitive or Sustained Awkward Postures

  • Awkward postures place excessive force on joints, overload the muscles and tendons around affected joints.
  • The joints of the body are most efficient when they operate close to the mid-range motion of the joint.
  • The risk of MSD is increased when the joints are worked outside of this mid-range repetitively for sustained periods without a proper amount of recovery time.

Individual Factors

  • Unhealthy work practices
  • Lack of physical activity/fitness
  • Unhealthy habits
  • Poor diet

Unhealthy Work Practices

  • Individuals that engage in poor work practices, body mechanics, and lifting techniques are introducing unnecessary risk factors.
  • These poor practices create unnecessary stress on the body that increases fatigue and decreases the body’s ability to recover properly.

Poor Health Habits

  • Individuals who smoke, drink excessively, are obese, or exhibit numerous other poor health habits put themselves at risk for musculoskeletal disorders and other chronic diseases.

Insufficient Rest and Recovery

  • Individuals that do not get adequate rest and recovery put themselves at higher risk.
  • MSDs develop when fatigue outruns the individual’s recovery system, causing a musculoskeletal imbalance.

Poor Diet, Fitness, and Hydration

  • Individuals who eat unhealthily are dehydrated, at a poor level of physical fitness, and do not take care of their bodies are putting themselves at a higher risk of developing musculoskeletal and chronic health problems.

Causes

The causes of musculoskeletal disorders are varied. Muscle tissue can be damaged with the wear and tear of daily work, school, and physical activities. Trauma to the body can come from:

  • Postural strain
  • Repetitive movements
  • Overuse
  • Prolonged immobilization
  • Jerking movements
  • Sprains
  • Dislocations
  • Falling injuries
  • Auto accident injuries
  • Fractures
  • Direct trauma to the muscle/s

Poor body mechanics can cause spinal alignment problems and muscle shortening, causing other muscles to be strained, causing problems and pain.

Treatment Rehabilitation

A doctor will recommend a treatment plan based on the diagnosis and severity of the symptoms. They may recommend moderate exercise and over-the-counter medications like ibuprofen or acetaminophen to address occasional discomfort or pain. They often recommend chiropractic and physical therapy rehabilitation to learn how to manage pain and discomfort, maintain strength, range of motion, and adjust everyday activities. Different types of manual therapy, or mobilization, can treat body alignment problems. A doctor may prescribe medications like nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories NSAIDs to reduce inflammation and pain for more severe symptoms. For individuals with musculoskeletal disorders like fibromyalgia, medications to increase the body’s level of serotonin and norepinephrine may be prescribed in low doses to modulate sleep, pain, and immune system function.


Body Composition


Types of Pain

Pain can be grouped into three categories:

Early Warning Pain

  • This is most recognizable after having just touched a pan, and the hand jerks away before realizing how hot the pan is, also known as the withdrawal reflex.
  • This is a protective mechanism that helps avoid danger and is vital for survival.

Inflammatory Pain

  • This type of pain happens after an injury or surgery while the body is healing and recovering.
  • Inflammation prevents the body from performing movements to prevent and avoid re-injury.

Pathological Pain

  • This type of pain can happen after the body has healed, but the nervous system has been damaged.
  • This is often the case with individuals who sustain an injury and inform doctors that the injured area is never the same.
  • If the rehabilitation does not correctly heal the nervous system, protective pain measures can generate a false alarm causing pain signals to fire off.
References

Asada, Fuminari, and Kenichiro Takano. Nihon eiseigaku zasshi. Japanese journal of hygiene vol. 71,2 (2016): 111-8. doi:10.1265/jjh.71.111

da Costa, Bruno R, and Edgar Ramos Vieira. “Risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders: A systematic review of recent longitudinal studies.” American journal of industrial medicine vol. 53,3 (2010): 285-323. doi:10.1002/ajim.20750

Malińska, Marzena. “Dolegliwości układu mięśniowo-szkieletowego u operatorów komputerowych” [Musculoskeletal disorders among computer operators]. Medycyna pracy vol. 70,4 (2019): 511-521. doi:10.13075/mp.5893.00810

Musculoskeletal system diseases. (n.d.). dmu.edu/medterms/musculoskeletal-system/musculoskeletal-system-diseases/

Roquelaure, Yves et al. “Troubles musculo-squelettiques liés au travail” [Work-related musculoskeletal disorders]. La Revue du praticien vol. 68,1 (2018): 84-90.

Villa-Forte A. (n.d.). Diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. merckmanuals.com/home/bone,-joint,-and-muscle-disorders/diagnosis-of-musculoskeletal-disorders/introduction

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). (2014). ccohs.ca/oshanswers/diseases/rmirsi.html

Cold Weather Muscle Spasms, Cramps

Cold Weather Muscle Spasms, Cramps

Muscle spasms also referred to as muscle cramps, are painful contractions and tightening of the muscles. They are common, involuntary, and unpredictable. Temperature drops and cold weather can cause the muscles and joints to contract and tighten, leading to spasms and pain. Chiropractic, physical therapy massage, exercises, stretching, and an anti-inflammatory diet can bring relief and help strengthen the muscles to prevent future episodes.

Cold Weather Muscle Spasms, Cramps

Muscle Spasms

Spasms are common and can affect any of the muscles. They can involve part of a muscle, all of a muscle, or several muscles in a group. Spasms occur when the muscle/s involuntary and forcibly contract uncontrollably and are unable to relax. The most common sites for muscle spasms include:

  • Hands
  • Arms
  • Abdomen
  • Back
  • Legs
  • Thighs
  • Calves
  • Thighs
  • Feet

How Cold Affects the Muscles

As the weather gets colder, this causes the muscles in the body to lose heat, causing them to contract. As a result, the muscles and joints become tighter, stiffer, and decrease mobility and range of motion. This forces the muscles to work harder than usual to compensate. This can increase the fatigue of the muscles, leading to more prolonged bouts of pain and discomfort after physical activity, movement, exercise, etc.

Symptoms and Causes

A cramp can last a few seconds or last up to 15 minutes. During a muscle spasm, the following may be experienced:

  • Twitching in the muscle.
  • Pain in the muscle.
  • Throbbing.
  • Hardness and/or stiffness.
  • The muscles appear physically distorted.

Because the muscles have to work harder, the cold weather can increase muscle spasms. One of the most common causes of muscle spasms is overuse and fatigue. However, exact causes vary from person to person. Some experts believe that one or more of the following contribute to the spasms/cramps, and they include:

  • Dehydration.
  • Stress.
  • Not stretching the body regularly.
  • Muscle fatigue.
  • Restricted blood circulation.
  • Involuntary nerve discharge/s.
  • Over-exercising.
  • Exercising in the heat.
  • Exhaustion of salts and minerals:
  • Potassium
  • Magnesium
  • Calcium

Possible causes for leg cramps at night or nocturnal leg cramps specifically include:

  • Sitting for too long without moving around to keep circulation healthy.
  • Sitting with unhealthy posture.
  • Overusing the muscles.
  • Standing or working on hard floors.

Dealing With The Cold

One way to deal with the cold is to warm up before any physical activity. Taking a few minutes to get the heart rate up can increase the blood flow and flexibility of the muscles. This will ensure the muscles are functioning correctly and avoid the need to work harder to stop spasms. When a cramp strikes, there are a few steps to try to alleviate the spasm:

  • Stretching the affected area.
  • Massaging the affected area manually with a massage roller, percussive massager.
  • Stand up.
  • Move around.
  • Apply heat or ice.
  • A warm bath, shower with massage setting if possible.
  • Ibuprofen and acetaminophen.
  • Vitamin B12 complex can help prevent cramps.

Body Composition


Getting Back To Fitness

Get back into regular exercising with a few tips for making the transition as smooth as possible.

Start Slow

  • Don’t try to jump back into exercise in attempting to crush out a challenging workout.
  • Commit to a few light workouts a week that integrate stretching pre and post-exercise.
  • Over-exerting the body increases the risk of injuries, motivation loss, and prolonged exhaustion.

Create a Workout Schedule That Works For You

  • Routines and habits can help stay on track.
  • Build a sustainable exercise routine to stay focused and committed.
  • Find times that work.
References

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Muscle Cramp. (http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00200) Accessed 3/1/2021.

American Association of Osteopathy. Muscle Cramp—A Common Pain. (http://www.osteopathic.org/osteopathic-health/about-your-health/health-conditions-library/general-health/Pages/muscle-cramp.aspx) Accessed 3/1/2021.

Herzberg J. Stevermer J. Treatments for Nocturnal Leg Cramps. (https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/1001/od3.pdf) Am Fam Physician 2017;96(7):468-469. Accessed 3/1/2021.

Young G. Leg Cramps. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4429847/) BMJ Clin Evid 2015; May 13;1113. Accessed 3/1/2021.

Pain Running Down The Leg

Pain Running Down The Leg

A common symptom of sciatica is radiating/spreading pain running down the leg. However, the leg pain could be something to do with the blood vessels. If the pain travels from the low back to the hip, through the buttocks, down the leg, and into the foot, then more than likely it is sciatica. However, sciatica is just one condition that causes leg pain; other causes of leg pain include:

  • Bone spurs
  • Herniated disc
  • Arthritis
  • All can irritate the sciatic nerve causing sciatica.

The vascular system, also called the circulatory system, comprises the vessels that circulate blood and lymph throughout the body. Problems with the vascular system are a less common cause of leg pain but can be severe. Therefore, it is vital to learn to tell the difference.

Pain Running Down The Leg

Deep Vein Thrombosis

Deep vein thrombosis – DVT happens when a blood clot forms in a deep vein in the body and not the superficial veins just under the skin. The legs’ deep veins are susceptible to clotting. The formation of a clot can happen:

  • After surgery
  • From an accident
  • When recovering, bed resting and not moving.
  • When the body is in the same position for a long time with little to no movement, like a long plane ride.
  • On long plane rides, try to get up and walk around every hour. If unable to walk, do three sets of 20 reps of heel-to-toe exercises every hour.

Deep vein thrombosis can cause leg pain or swelling but can also present without causing any symptoms. Other risk factors include:

Blood Clots

Three main factors place individuals at risk for blood clots. They are:

Hypercoagulability

  • This is when the blood is more prone to clotting. This can occur through:
  • Genetics
  • Medications
  • Pregnancy
  • Kidney disease
  • Trauma

Venous stasis

  • This is when blood flow circulation is slower than it should be. This usually happens from:
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Heart conditions
  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • Clotting disorders

Vascular Trauma

  • Blunt or penetrating injury to the blood vessel and/or its walls.

Pain running down the leg from a blood clot feels like:

  • Tightness
  • Cramping soreness
  • Throbbing
  • Possible warmth
  • Swelling.

Blood clots and sciatica are reported to feel relatively different. The pain from a blood clot does not spread out and does not extend from or to the back. Sciatica does not cause swelling, redness, and warmth. If a doctor suspects a blood clot is causing the pain, they will order an ultrasound to confirm the diagnosis. If it is deep vein thrombosis, blood thinners could be recommended for three to six months.

  • A doctor may recommend aspirin, which can help in the prevention of blood clots.
  • Compression stockings/socks could also be recommended.
  • In some cases, the clot may have to be surgically removed.

Vascular Conditions and Pain Running Down The Leg

Other blood vessel conditions that can cause individuals to believe they have sciatica include:

Peripheral artery disease – PAD

This often presents in individuals with diabetes or who smoke. It causes pain in the calf area but does not radiate throughout the leg. The pain usually presents with physical effort movement. If the pain occurs when at rest, this could be a serious medical emergency. Peripheral artery disease is a chronic condition that can worsen if lifestyle changes are not made to reduce risk factors.

Acute limb ischemia

This condition can cause leg pain, but not the same as sciatica. What happens is the leg is not receiving blood, causing:

  • Intense pain in the extremity
  • Change in the color of the skin
  • Numbness
  • Weakness
  • Loss of a pulse

This vascular condition is a medical emergency and requires immediate treatment.

Acute compartment syndrome

This can happen after some kind of trauma to the leg.

  • The pain is acute, with the leg swelling up and a building up of tight pressure.
  • It usually affects the lower part of the leg.
  • This condition can also cause:
  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Visible swelling
  • Bruising

It is considered a medical emergency and needs to be treated quickly to avoid complications.

Varicose veins

Varicose veins can cause some pain running down the leg and/or aching, but the discomfort is not as intense. Treatment has come a long way, is less invasive, and includes:

  • Compression stockings, including prescription socks/stockings
  • Laser treatments
  • Minimally invasive procedures
  • Not staying on the feet too much
  • Elevating the legs
  • Maintaining an ideal weight can help

Vascular Disorder Prevention

Healthy lifestyle habits are recommended to keep the vascular system operating correctly. This includes:

Sciatica Treatment

If it is sciatica, fortunately, most cases go away on their own, but if treatment is needed, it is recommended to start with conservative treatments such as:

  • Chiropractic
  • Physical therapy
  • Anti-inflammatory medication
  • Muscle relaxants
  • Corticosteroid injections
  • In severe cases, surgery like a microdiscectomy or laminectomy will be performed to relieve pressure on the sciatic nerve.

Body Composition


Why might blood pressure be different when measuring on each arm?

The heart sits just to the left of the midline in the chest cavity. The aorta is the largest blood vessel in the body. It leaves through the left side of the heart and transports blood to a network of blood vessels that branch out, supplying the body with oxygen and nutrients. The arteries that branch off the aorta and go to the left and right sides of the body are different.

On the right, the brachiocephalic trunk comes off the aorta and splits into the right common carotid artery and right subclavian artery. The left common carotid and left subclavian arteries branch directly off the aorta. The differences mean that the risk for arterial thrombosis is not the same for the right and left subclavian arteries. Arterial thrombosis causes the blood vessels to become stiff, causing obstruction over time and is more likely to happen in the left subclavian than in the right. The difference in arterial branching affects blood pressure measurements on the left and right arms. The blood vessels are surrounded by:

  • Muscle
  • Fat
  • Connective tissue

When muscles place pressure on the blood vessels around the heart, it can cause short-term turbulence changes that can affect blood pressure.

References

American Heart Association. Atherosclerosis and cholesterol. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/cholesterol/about-cholesterol/atherosclerosis

American Heart Association. What is excessive blood clotting (Hypercoagulation?) https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/venous-thromboembolism/what-is-excessive-blood-clotting-hypercoagulation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What is venous thromboembolism? https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dvt/facts.html

Cleveland Clinic. Compartment syndrome. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/15315-compartment-syndrome

Mayo Clinic. Deep vein thrombosis overview. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/deep-vein-thrombosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20352557

Mayo Clinic. Sciatica. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sciatica/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20377441

Mayo Clinic. Sciatica overview. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sciatica/symptoms-causes/syc-20377435

Mayo Clinic. Varicose veins. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/varicose-veins/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20350649

Obara, Hideaki et al. “Acute Limb Ischemia.” Annals of vascular diseases vol. 11,4 (2018): 443-448. doi:10.3400/avd.ra.18-00074

ScienceDirect. (n.d.) “Virchow’s Triad.” https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/virchows-triad

Polymyositis: Inflammatory Myopathy

Polymyositis: Inflammatory Myopathy

Polymyositis is a disease that causes the body’s muscles to become irritated and inflamed. It can affect the muscles all over the body. The muscles gradually begin to break down and weaken, making everyday movements difficult. This disease falls into a category known as inflammatory myopathies.

Polymyositis: Inflammatory Myopathy

Polymyositis Unknown Causation

The causes of polymyositis are currently unknown. However, experts believe it could be associated with or triggered by a virus or an autoimmune reaction. An autoimmune response is when the body attacks itself along with the body’s tissues. It’s seen in individuals ages 31 to 60 and is rarely seen in individuals younger than 18. In some instances, medication can lead to an allergic reaction/response that causes muscle irritation and damage. But in most cases, healthcare experts are not able to find the exact cause.

Symptoms

The condition can affect the muscles all over the body. Physical activities like walking, getting up from a chair, or lifting objects can become difficult to perform. It can also affect the muscles that allow for eating and breathing. The muscles at the center of the body tend to be affected the most. Common symptoms include:

  • Muscle pain.
  • Muscle stiffness.
  • Muscle weakness, specifically in the abdomen, shoulders, upper arms, and hips.
  • Joint pain and stiffness.
  • Breathing problems.
  • Problems swallowing.
  • Abnormal weight loss can become an issue if there are problems with swallowing.
  • Irregular heart rhythms if the heart muscle/myocardium becomes inflamed.
  • Individuals may notice they have trouble climbing stairs or lifting their arms.
  • The inflammation can worsen, causing pain and weakness that affects the wrists, lower arms, and ankles.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis begins with the individual’s medical history, family medical history if necessary, and a physical examination. The examination includes seeing and feeling the strength of the muscles. Tests will be required that include:

Blood Tests

  • Blood tests allow the doctor to see if there are signs of muscle inflammation.
  • They also show if there are abnormal proteins that form in autoimmune diseases.

Electromyogram EMG

  • This test can be used to find abnormal electrical activity in the affected muscles.

MRI

  • Magnets and computer graphic imagery are used to help the doctor inspect for inflammation in the body.

Muscle Biopsy

  • A small piece of muscle tissue is removed to be analyzed with a microscope.

Treatment

Treatment depends on how severe the condition is, individual symptoms, age, and overall health. Currently, there is no cure for polymyositis, but symptoms can be managed. Individuals are recommended to utilize more than one type of treatment because the treatment plan may also need to be changed as treatment progresses. Treatments include:

Anti-inflammatory Medication

Steroid medication can help manage the disease and reduce symptoms, and corticosteroids can help ease inflammation in the body. The symptoms improve within 4 to 6 weeks, and a healthcare provider can lower the dosage after the symptoms decrease to reduce and ease any side effects.

Immunosuppressive Medication

  • These medications block or slow down the body’s immune system responses.
  • Talk with a doctor about the risks, benefits, and side effects of all medications.

Chiropractic and Physical therapy

  • Chiropractic treatment and physical therapy can help:
  • Aligning the spine to provide optimal nerve energy and blood circulation.
  • Therapeutic massage to stimulate and keep the muscles loose.
  • Specific exercises to help stretch and strengthen the muscles.
  • These can help keep the muscles from shrinking.

Heat therapy and Rest

  • Heat therapy and allowing the body to rest thoroughly can help decrease pain symptoms.

Special Braces

  • Body, hip, and leg braces can help support the muscles and help with mobility.

Complications

Polymyositis left untreated can lead to severe complications. The muscles become weaker, increasing the risk of falling and limiting daily activities.

  • If the chest muscles are affected, there could be problems with breathing that can lead to respiratory failure.
  • If the digestive tract is affected, malnutrition and unintentional weight loss can result.
  • Polymyositis poorly managed well can cause severe disability.

Body Composition


Nutrition and Muscle Growth

Protein

  • Protein is the foundation for gaining muscle.
  • This essential component is for all of the body’s daily functions.
  • It is essential to balance protein increase with overall diet.

Complex Carbs

  • Carbs are the body’s fuel source.
  • Carbs should be a daily element of nutritional intake because they are the primary component.
  • Acquiring energy
  • Preventing muscle weakness and degradation

Consuming Carbs

  • Understanding how accurate results only happen when both sides work together.
  • Healthy consumption of protein and carbohydrates can help muscle growth and sustain optimal health for all body types.
References

Corrado, Bruno et al. “Supervised Physical Therapy and Polymyositis/Dermatomyositis-A Systematic Review of the Literature.” Neurology international vol. 12,3 77-88. 24 Nov. 2020, doi:10.3390/neurolint12030015

Findlay, Andrew R et al. “An overview of polymyositis and dermatomyositis.” Muscle & nerve vol. 51,5 (2015): 638-56. doi:10.1002/mus.24566

Sasaki, Hirokazu, and Hitoshi Kohsaka. “Current diagnosis and treatment of polymyositis and dermatomyositis.” Modern rheumatology vol. 28,6 (2018): 913-921. doi:10.1080/14397595.2018.1467257

Van Thillo, Anna et al. “Physical therapy in adult inflammatory myopathy patients: a systematic review.” Clinical rheumatology vol. 38,8 (2019): 2039-2051. doi:10.1007/s10067-019-04571-9

Calf Soreness, Pain and Chiropractic Treatment

Calf Soreness, Pain and Chiropractic Treatment

Calf pain is common in individuals that are on their feet for long periods. This could be standing, walking, as part of a job or jogging, and running. In most cases, calf soreness and/or pain result from repetitive/overuse strain/injury/tear of the calf muscles. Pain along with stiffness presents with physical activity, exercise, movement. Chiropractic treatment and Active Release can help alleviate and eliminate calf pain.

Calf Soreness, Pain and Chiropractic Treatment

Calf  Muscles

The calf muscle is in the back of the lower leg, behind the shin bone, and consists of three muscles. The calf muscle supports the body when standing and enables movement of the foot and lower leg. The calf muscles support the body when:

  • Walking
  • Running
  • Jumping
  • Standing on the toes.
  • Flexing the foot – lifting the toes toward the knee.
  • It helps push the body forward and allows jumping, ankle rotation, and flexing of the foot.

Causes, Conditions, and Disorders

The overuse of the calf muscles usually causes calf soreness, discomfort, and pain. Over time, tiny tears develop in the muscles of the lower legs and calves. Repeated use can lead to more severe injury or condition without proper treatment. Conditions include:

Strain

The most common injury is a strain. Strains happen when the muscle fibers are overused and get stretched too far and/or tear. However, the fibers may not tear in that instance, and so the tear could occur at a later time while doing a basic movement like slightly bending or kneeling to tie a shoe. This is when individuals wonder how a tear happened with a simple action. But the tear was already present, just not fully torn.

Cramps

Muscle cramps and muscle spasms in the calves can be excruciating limiting mobility. Calf cramps can happen during the day or at night. They can result from several factors that include:

Tennis leg

Healthcare providers call this strain tennis leg because it happens when the leg extends and the foot flexes. Tennis players are in this position when they serve and push themselves off into motion; however, it can happen in any sport, job, chore that involves the same movement. This type of muscle strain injury affects the gastrocnemius muscle.

Compartment syndrome

Compartment syndrome happens when pressure builds up inside a muscle. The pressure significantly reduces the flow of blood and oxygen. It can result from trauma like a fracture or strenuous exercise/activity.

Symptoms

Calf muscle issues can cause calf muscle:

  • Pain
  • Tightness
  • Stiffness
  • Pain may be sharp or dull
  • Pain can start as mild pain and progressively worsen.
  • Limited mobility
  • Limited range of motion
  • Muscle weakness
  • A bump, bulge, or lump in the back of the lower leg.
  • Tenderness
  • Bruising
  • General leg cramps are common and are more likely to happen as the body ages.
  • Healthcare professionals estimate around 75% of individuals over 50 have had leg cramps and pain.

Calf Health

To prevent and avoid problems with the calf muscles, individuals are recommended to:

Maintain a healthy diet and weight

  • Individuals that are overweight are more likely to pull or strain a muscle.
  • Excess pounds add pressure on the legs placing individuals at a higher risk of an injury.
  • If obese or overweight, talk to a healthcare professional about healthy weight.

Stay hydrated

  • Drink the proper amount of water and other fluids
  • This decreases the chance of causing a cramp.

Stretch and warm-up

  • Warmed-up calf muscles are less likely to stretch too far or tear.
  • Before engaging in physical activity at work or school, do a few warm-up stretches to increase flexibility.
  • When exercising, gradually increase the intensity.

Stay aware of medications.


Body Composition


Nutrients of Protein

Protein is necessary for all of the body’s physiological functions. Protein and amino acids are the building blocks of the muscle tissue in the body. The body’s muscles are a house, protein is the bricks, and the amino acids that form protein are the building blocks of muscle. The body manufactures various amino acids, but nine are essential amino acids – EAA because they are not made in the body. Individuals have to consume EAAs from food sources like:

  • Meat
  • Beans
  • Nuts
  • Soy

A diet that consists of mixed amino acids can help maximize muscle protein synthesis. Protein is essential in building muscle because amino acids help repair and maintain muscle tissue. After a strenuous activity or a workout, protein helps the body repair muscles that are slightly torn. To build a healthy body, the body needs to have the right amount of protein. Protein is an essential component of:

  • Muscle development
  • Bone density
  • Muscle mass
  • Lean tissue
References

Binstead JT, Munjal A, Varacallo M. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis, and Lower Limb, Calf. [Updated 2020 Aug 22]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. . Accessed 6/4/2021.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459362/ (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459362/)

Bright JM, Fields KB, Draper R. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Calf Injuries. Sports Health. 2017 Jul-Aug;9(4):352-355. . Accessed
6/4/2021.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5496702/ (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5496702/)

Young G. Leg cramps. BMJ Clinical Evidence. 2015 May 13;2015:1113. . Accessed 6/4/2021.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4429847/ (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4429847/)

The Hands: Injuries, Symptoms, Causes, Medical Care

The Hands: Injuries, Symptoms, Causes, Medical Care

The hands are a magnificent piece of work. Its intricate design and functional form follow the hand. However, any injury to the underlying structures of the hand can overlap with other injuries/conditions. Even the smallest hand injuries require a proper medical examination. The objective is a quick and accurate initial evaluation along with treatment. Early treatment is done quickly to minimize short and long-term effects.

The Hands: Injuries, Symptoms, Causes, Medical Care

Anatomy

The hand consists of 27 bones that include 8 bones in the wrist. If the associated structures:

  • Nerves
  • Arteries
  • Veins
  • Muscles
  • Tendons
  • Ligaments
  • Joint cartilage
  • Fingernails
  • Get injured or damaged in some way; there is increased potential for various injuries.

Causes

The most common cause of injury/s is blunt trauma, followed by injury from a sharp object. Hand injuries are divided into categories:

Other hand injuries include:

  • Finger injuries
  • Wrist injuries
  • Broken hand
  • Nail injuries
  • Finger infection

Symptoms

Symptoms vary depending on the type of injury, how the injury occurred/mechanism, the depth, severity, and location. Common symptoms:

Lacerations

  • Tenderness
  • Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Numbness
  • Decreased range of motion
  • Difficulty moving
  • Weakness
  • Pale appearance

Fractures and Dislocations

  • Swelling
  • Discoloration
  • Tenderness
  • Deformity
  • Reduced range of motion
  • Numbness
  • Weakness
  • Bleeding

Soft Tissue Injuries and Amputations

  • Swelling
  • Discoloration
  • Tenderness
  • Deformity with or without tissue loss/bone loss
  • Bleeding
  • Weakness
  • Numbness

Infection

  • Tenderness
  • Swelling
  • Warmth/Heat around the area
  • Redness
  • Deformity
  • Reduced range of motion
  • Fever is rare in hand infections

Burns

  • Redness
  • Tenderness
  • Blistering
  • Complete numbness
  • Discoloration
  • Loss of tissue
  • The texture of the skin change
  • Areas of tissue blackened
  • Deformity

High-pressure Injection Injury

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Bleeding
  • Skin discoloration
  • Muscle, tendon, ligament tears
  • Cracked/Broken bones

Medical Care

Anyone with a hand injury is recommended to call a doctor or seek medical attention. When medical attention is delayed, the possibility of worsening or creating further injuries increases. Even the smallest cut or what looks like a minor injury could require advanced treatment to prevent infection or loss of function. Any cut or laceration that requires stitches to repair should also have a medical evaluation to make sure the musculoskeletal system of the hands is functioning properly. Injuries causing the following symptoms require emergency medical attention at an emergency clinic.

  • Severe bleeding
  • Severe pain
  • Numbness
  • Loss of motion
  • Loss of strength
  • Deformity
  • Signs of infection – tenderness, warmth/heat, redness, swelling, pus, or fever
  • Exposure of structures – tendons, bones, joints, arteries, veins, or nerves

Diagnosis

A medical examination can include a medical history and physical examination.

Medical History

  • Past medical history
  • Does the patient have diabetes or arthritis?
  • Is the patient right or left-handed?
  • Occupation
  • Extracurricular activities and hobbies
  • How does the patient use their hands?
  • How did the injury occur, mechanism of injury?
  • Does the patient smoke?

Physical Exam

  • Visual inspection look at the injury
  • Sensory nerve exam feeling
  • Vascular exam circulation of blood supply
  • Muscular and tendon exam movement and strength
  • Bone exam broken bones or dislocated joints

Tests

A doctor will order X-rays after the history and physical exam if necessary. Certain injuries will require imaging to identify fractures/dislocations or to rule out foreign bodies. Many types of injuries can lead to compartment syndrome. Compartment syndrome is a condition in which there is swelling and an increase in pressure within a limited space or a compartment that presses on and compromises blood vessels, nerves, and/or tendons that run through that particular area. Once the immediate injury is addressed, a personalized treatment plan can be developed .to rehabilitate the hand/s to optimal function quickly


Body Composition


Artificial Sweeteners And Muscle Gain

Artificial sweeteners don’t individuals that are trying to build lean body mass. The body needs carbs after a workout for replenishing the depleted glycogen stores. Many commercially prepared protein supplements are made with artificial sweeteners that don’t provide an adequate source of carbohydrates. If an individual consumes only protein made with sugar substitutes after a workout, they are missing essential components of post-workout recovery. A study found that supplementing with carbohydrates before and during strength training can increase performance, compared to participants that were taking the artificial sweeteners saccharin and aspartame. To properly refuel after a workout, remove the artificially sweetened protein powders and replace them with a snack packed with protein and high-quality carbohydrates. These include:

  • Greek yogurt
  • Fruit with nuts or nut butter
  • Hummus with whole-grain crackers
  • Tuna
  • Hard-boiled eggs
References

Banting, Joshua, and Tony Meriano. “Hand Injuries.” Journal of special operations medicine: a peer-reviewed journal for SOF medical professionals vol. 17,4 (2017): 93-96.

Fuhrer, Reto et al. “Tipps und Tricks in der Behandlung offener Handverletzungen in der Notfallpraxis” [Treatment of acute injuries of the hand]. Therapeutische Umschau. Revue therapeutique vol. 77,5 (2020): 199-206. doi:10.1024/0040-5930/a001177

Harrison, BP, and M W Hilliard. “Emergency department evaluation and treatment of hand injuries.” Emergency medicine clinics of North America vol. 17,4 (1999): 793-822, v. doi:10.1016/s0733-8627(05)70098-5

MedscapeReference.com. High-Pressure Hand Injury.

MedscapeReference.com. Soft Tissue Hand Injury Differential Diagnoses.

Siotos, C et al. “Hand injuries in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of existing literature and call for greater attention.” Public health vol. 162 (2018): 135-146. doi:10.1016/j.puhe.2018.05.016

WebMD.com. Finger, Hand, and Wrist Injuries.

Quadriceps Thigh Strain: Chiropractic

Quadriceps Thigh Strain: Chiropractic

The quadriceps muscle consists of four muscles in front of the thigh that connects to the knee right below the knee cap. These muscles straighten the knee for walking, running, and jumping. They also help bend the knee for squatting. They move the leg forward when running and fire/transmit electrical impulses when the foot hits the ground to absorb shock. When jumping, the muscles provide stability coming down as well as when standing on one leg.

Quadriceps Thigh Strain: Chiropractic

Quadriceps Strain

Thigh strains are common in sports. Most players are sidelined because of this injury when compared to strains in the hamstrings or groin. Factors that can increase the risk of injury include:

  • Exhaustion
  • Muscle weakness
  • The strength of the quadriceps to the hamstrings is uneven, causing one set to get overused.
  • Consistent sprinting and/or kicking
  • Previous strain and/or injury

The quadriceps is made up of four muscles.  One is the rectus femoris, which gets injured the most. It’s the only muscle that crosses two joints – the hip joint and the knee joint.

Symptoms and Injury Grades

Individuals commonly report a pulling/stretching sensation in the front of the thigh. Common symptoms include:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Muscle tenderness
  • For minor quadriceps strains or tears, moderate to dull pain presents along with stiff movement.

Grades categorize the severity of the strain:

  • Grade 1 presents with mild discomfort in the thigh with no loss of strength.
  • Grade 2 presents with moderate pain, swelling, and some loss of strength.
  • Grade 3 is a complete rupture of the fibers. Individuals are in severe pain and unable to walk.
  • Grade 3 is where surgery is required.

Symptoms can vary depending on the type of injury that has been sustained and the severity. There is pain and localized swelling for both strains and contusions. If a muscle rupture has happened, there could be a bump/lump within the muscle or a gap in the muscle. If rupture of the Quadriceps Tendon has occurred, individuals often report hearing a pop when the injury happens. The swelling often makes straightening the leg difficult or impossible.

Injury causes

Thigh strains usually happen when slowing down/decelerating after a sprint. This can be because the individual takes too small or too large steps causing the muscles to overstretch, much like a rubber band that, if overstretched, tears, and if under stretched, it bunches up, which can cause spasms and tears.

Treatment

In the initial stages after a quadriceps strain, it is recommended to follow the RICE Procedure for 24 hours: This includes:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Compression
  • Elevate
  • The leg needs to be rested every 2-3 hours in 20-minute sessions.
  • A bandage can provide added support.
  • For slight tears and strains, it is recommended to stretch the quadriceps gently.
  • This helps prevent the muscles from experiencing shortening. This happens by the formation of scar tissue that pulls the muscle/s, making them shorter.
  • Gentle stretches allow the muscles to heal with minimal shortening. This helps prevent further and/or re-injury.

Chiropractic Physical Therapy Rehabilitation

After the acute stage of the injury, receiving regular chiropractic sports adjustments, physical therapy massage, coupled with strength training exercises will speed up recovery.

  • Physical therapy massage will remove scar tissue and keep the muscle/s loose and flexible.
  • Exercises for strengthening the muscles after injury will be recommended according to the individual’s condition/case.
  • Following correct post-injury-care, exercises, and physical therapy.
  • Healing time can be 4- 6 weeks.

Body Composition


Strength Training: The Inverted Row

This workout targets the back muscles, spine and scapular stabilizers, deep abdominals, and arms. Everyday activities that require various types of pulling motion, lifting, etc., become easier. To perform:

  • Lie flat on your back.
  • Grab a stable barbell or set of straps that are above you.
  • Pull your upper body up as high as possible while keeping the back straight.
  • Squeeze the shoulder blades together at the top.
  • Complete as many reps as possible.
  • Once enough strength and endurance have been built, try a pullup.
References

Kary, Joel M. “Diagnosis and management of quadriceps strains and contusions.” Current reviews in musculoskeletal medicine vol. 3,1-4 26-31. 30 Jul. 2010, doi:10.1007/s12178-010-9064-5

Hillermann, Bernd, et al. “A pilot study comparing the effects of spinal manipulative therapy with those of extra-spinal manipulative therapy on quadriceps muscle strength.” Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics vol. 29,2 (2006): 145-9. doi:10.1016/j.jmpt.2005.12.003

Wenban, Adrian B. “Influence of active release technique on quadriceps inhibition and strength: a pilot study.” Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics vol. 28,1 (2005): 73. doi:10.1016/j.jmpt.2004.12.015

Bursitis Types

Bursitis Types

Bursitis types: This is a condition that affects the bursae, which are the small, fluid-filled sacs that provide cushion for the:

  • Muscles
  • Tendons
  • Bones near joints

The bursae make it easier for tissues to slide over each other. The body has around one hundred and sixty bursae. However, only a few become clinically affected. These include the:

  • Wrist
  • Elbow
  • Shoulder
  • Hips
  • Knees
  • The base of the big toe and heel

The condition typically presents near joints constantly being used repetitively, like a job, sports, house/yard chores, etc. What happens is one or more of the bursae sacs become inflamed, resulting in pain.

Bursitis Types

Causes

  • Inflamed or irritated bursae typically cause it from overuse or intense/vigorous activity.
  • It can also be caused by bacterial infection.
  • Arthritis and gout can also cause bursitis.
  • Another cause is age.
  • As tendons age, they can tear easily, lose their elasticity, and can’t take too much stress.

Intense physical activities can lead to bursitis. These include:

  • Gardening
  • Typing
  • Working with a computer mouse
  • Throwing
  • Golf
  • Tennis
  • Manual tasks
  • Carpentry

These types of activities can lead to incorrect posture, overuse, and injury/damage.

Symptoms

The main symptom is pain in and around the affected area that worsens with movement. Depending on the severity of the strain and the length of time it has been going on, the pain can be intense with active and passive movements. Other symptoms include:

  • Tenderness
  • Stiffness
  • For some individuals, it can present as acute, with the intensity increasing.
  • This happens when movement aggravates the condition.

Bursitis Types

Four major types include:

  • Prepatellar
  • Trochanteric
  • Olecranon
  • Retrocalcaneal

Prepatellar Bursitis

Prepatellar is an inflammation of the sac situated between the skin and the patella/kneecap. The most common causes are trauma from a fall and direct pressure/friction from repetitive kneeling. This is one of the bursitis types that can get infected. Overproduction of liquid places pressure on the other areas of the knee, causing swelling. Most individuals report swelling and knee pain just over the front of the knee.

Trochanteric Bursitis

This bursitis type goes over the lateral area of the hip. There is a distinctive tenderness and aching pain. This type is more common for individuals with arthritis conditions and fibromyalgia. This condition is also seen after surgery, mainly osteotomies. The bursa can become inflamed in case of injury or overuse. It tends to affect middle-aged or older folks. Common causes include:

  • Muscle tears
  • Hip injuries
  • Tight hip or leg muscles
  • Disc disease of the low back
  • Leg-length inequality
  • Improper walking technique from a minor injury or strain
  • Overuse of the gluteal muscles
  • Flat feet
  • Improper footwear

Olecranon Bursitis

Olecranon is a common bursitis type. It is diagnosed by the appearance of swelling over the elbow. The swelling happens just behind the olecranon process of the ulna. The bursa can become infected. This bursitis does cause blood to rupture out, and fluid could be present. Individuals are advised to avoid leaning or resting on the elbows.

Retrocalcaneal Bursitis

This is characterized by pain in the Achilles tendon. Chronic inflammation of the bursa is brought on by friction, supination, and overpronation.  The flexibility of the calf muscles can be significantly reduced. Severe pain and swelling of the posterior soft tissue in front of the Achilles tendon are common symptoms. This bursitis type is often accompanied by mid-portion insertional tendinosis.

Risk Of Getting Bursitis

Anybody at any age can develop bursitis, but older individuals, specifically those in their forties and beyond, are more susceptible. This comes from all the wear and tear of the muscles and bones.

Risk Factors

  • Overpronation of the foot
  • Leg length deviation
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Obesity
  • Tight hamstring muscles
  • Incorrect physical training
  • Not stretching properly

Body Composition


When Inflammation Becomes Permanent

When white blood cells cause inflammation, it’s signaling that the body’s immune system works properly. The process works like this:

  • Inflammation activates
  • White blood cells attack the foreign invader
  • The invader is neutralized
  • The inflammation deactivates

This is how the body’s defense system naturally works. But, white blood cells are not the only type of cell that emit cytokines. Adipocytes or fat cells are another type of cell that can emit cytokines and cause inflammation. Scientists have learned that fat is an active endocrine organ that secretes various proteins and chemicals, including inflammatory cytokines. The body stores excess calories as fat to be used later for energy. When the body keeps adding more adipose tissue, cytokines are released by the fat cells, triggering inflammation. Obesity is characterized as a state of low-grade, chronic inflammation. Increased fat cells place the body in a constant state of stress activating immune responses. This means the body is in a constant state of inflammation with the immune system switch permanently on.

References

Aaron, Daniel L et al. “Four common types of bursitis: diagnosis and management.” The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons vol. 19,6 (2011): 359-67. doi:10.5435/00124635-201106000-00006

Coelho, Marisa et al. “Biochemistry of adipose tissue: an endocrine organ.” Archives of medical science: AMS vol. 9,2 (2013): 191-200. doi:10.5114/aoms.2013.33181

Khodaee, Morteza. “Common Superficial Bursitis.” American family physician vol. 95,4 (2017): 224-231.

Summer Heat Can Affect Joints and Movement

Summer Heat Can Affect Joints and Movement

Although it is not officially summer, the past few weeks sure feels like it. Especially for those with joint discomfort and pain. As the body ages, individuals may notice their joints have some mobility/flexibility issues in the summer heat. Again, the heat and humidity are the culprits. The hotter it is, the more the body is susceptible to inflammation and swelling. The more prone an individual’s body is to swelling, the more pain can present. Barometric pressure can also have some form of impact on joint health. The pressure changes can cause the joints to become more sensitive. When the pressure changes, individuals often speak of their joints feeling tighter combined with stiffness, leading to a cycle of swelling and pain.

Summer Heat Can Affect Joints and Movement

Joint Anatomy

Whether it’s the hip, knee, elbow, or hand, all of the body’s joints have fluid in them. It is a gel-like substance known as synovial fluid. This is what lubricates the joints and keeps them functioning smoothly. However, the temperature and humidity levels can change the thickness of the fluid in the joints. This means that the synovial fluid can become inflamed with the weather changes. This is a symptom when the joints begin to feel like they cannot move and/or are becoming stiff. Joint inflammation can become more common and chronic as the body gets older.

Weather and the joints

The summer heat and humidity can affect the joint because:

  • The tendons, ligaments, and muscles expand in this type of weather
  • The heat can restrict individuals from moving around. Non-use stiffens the joints
  • Joints that have worn down cartilage could have exposed nerves that are reacting to the temperature changes
  • Humidity causes the body to lose water by sweating. This can reduce the fluid around the joints leading to stiffness, immobility, and pain.

 

However, not everyone has joint problems in the summer heat. Many have joint issues when it’s cold, damp, or raining. Other’s are at their best in cool, dry weather. It depends on an individual’s body and how their joints react when the temperature changes.

Maintaining joint health for the summer heat

When joint discomfort or pain presents in the summer, there are a few easy ways to gain relief.

Properly Hydrate the Body

Water and sports drinks maintain the fluid levels in the body, specifically, it keeps the joints moving. One way to hydrate the body can be achieved by eating healthy fruits and vegetables. Water-rich fruits and vegetables include:

  • Watermelon
  • Oranges
  • Strawberries
  • Tomatoes
  • Cucumbers
  • Spinach
  • Celery

Over-The-Counter pain ointments and creams

Arthritis and anti-inflammatory creams/ointments can ease joint pain by allowing more blood circulation in the affected areas.

Dressing for the heat

Wear loose, natural fiber, breathable clothing that allows the body to move freely while maintaining a cool temperature.

Relax in the air conditioning

Get into the air conditioning. The cool air can help reduce joint inflammation.

Get in the Water

Swimming or just wading through doing some light exercise in the water cools the body’s core. In addition, the buoyancy of the water relieves pressure on the joints.


Body Composition Testing


Body Water

The body is made up of as much as 2/3’s water. Even though much of the body is made up of water, the percentage of body composition changes based on functional needs. Essential functions of water include:

  • Water is the building block to almost every cell in the body
  • It regulates the body’s temperature through sweating and respiration
  • Carbohydrates and proteins for energy are transported via the water in the blood
  • Water assists in the removal of metabolic waste through urination
  • It is part of the shock-absorbing system that protects the brain and spinal cord
  • Water is part of the saliva and fluid that lubricates the joints

The amount of water in the body depends on various factors. This includes:

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Physical activity
  • It is referred to as Total Body Water or TBW.

TBW is constantly changing with gains and losses of fluid in healthy adults. The body can detect irregularities and compensate for losses and/or gains to make sure that the systems are balanced.

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. In addition, we provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Morton, Darren, and Robin Callister. “Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP).” Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.) vol. 45,1 (2015): 23-35. doi:10.1007/s40279-014-0245-z

Peeler, Jason et al. “Managing Knee Osteoarthritis: The Effects of Body Weight Supported Physical Activity on Joint Pain, Function, and Thigh Muscle Strength.” Clinical journal of sports medicine: official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sports Medicine vol. 25,6 (2015): 518-23. doi:10.1097/JSM.0000000000000173

Quick, D C. “Joint pain and weather. A critical review of the literature.” Minnesota medicine vol. 80,3 (1997): 25-9.

Timmermans, Erik J et al. “The Influence of Weather Conditions on Joint Pain in Older People with Osteoarthritis: Results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis.” The Journal of rheumatology vol. 42,10 (2015): 1885-92. doi:10.3899/jrheum.141594

Knee Injuries, Surgeries, and Vitamin D Status

Knee Injuries, Surgeries, and Vitamin D Status

Knee Injuries, Surgeries, and Vitamin D Status. The knee joint is one of the largest and complex joints. It connects the thigh bone to the shinbone, which has a very important role in:

  • Supporting the body’s weight
  • Facilitating movement
  • Allowing the ability to bend the knee

Because of the complexity of the knee joint, it is highly susceptible to injuries. The most common injuries include tears in the:

  • Ligaments
  • Tendons
  • Cartilage
  • The kneecap itself can be fractured and/or dislocated.

Knee Injuries, Surgeries, and Vitamin D Status

Tears

Meniscal Tears

The meniscus is the cartilage between the knee joint that absorbs the impact/shock when running, playing sports, yard work, hiking, bicycling, etc. It cushions the joint and maintains stability.

Meniscus tears are common in sports that have a lot of jumping, starting/stopping quickly, changing direction suddenly, like volleyball, basketball, tennis, soccer, football. This is when the meniscus tears. Surgery can be required, depending on the severity/extent of the injury and tear.

Tendon Tears

The patellar tendon works with the knee muscles in the front of the thigh to straighten the leg. Tears in the patellar tendon are common among middle-aged individuals and those that participate in running or jumping sports.

  • A complete tear is considered a disabling injury that requires surgery for full functional recovery.
  • Fortunately, most tears are partial and require rest and chiropractic/physical therapy to heal.

Dislocation

Knee dislocations happen when the knee bones shift out of position. This can happen after a fall, car crash, or high-speed impact. It can also be caused by twisting the knee while the foot stays planted. Dislocations require relocation. However, sometimes a dislocated kneecap corrects itself and returns to the proper position. Other cases can require a mild sedative to allow a doctor to relocate the knee. Dislocations generally take around six weeks to fully heal.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament – ACL Injury

The anterior cruciate ligament or ACL is knee tissue that joins the upper and lower leg bones and maintains the knees’ stability. The ACL can be torn if the lower leg over-extends forward or if the leg gets twisted. ACL injuries are common knee injuries and account for around 40% of sports-related injuries. These injuries can range from a small tear in the ligament to a severe injury where the ligament tears completely or gets separated from the bone. Treatment depends on the severity of the injury. Depending on various factors including the severity of the tear, surgery could be required.

Knee Surgery

For most cases, surgery is done using arthroscopy technology. This procedure uses small incisions to insert a camera and surgical instruments into the joint. Usually, two or three incisions are needed with recovery time being quicker than large incision surgery where the whole knee is opened. Minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery is preferred by sports medicine experts. With this procedure:

  • There is no need to cut the tendons or muscles
  • Bleeding is reduced
  • Small incisions decrease scarring
  • Recovery time is shorter

However, sometimes a large incision is required for complex surgical techniques. Common knee surgery procedures include:

Arthroscopy Surgery

This method allows the ability to see inside the knee joint. The procedure is often recommended for:

  • Diagnosis
  • Minor repairs to ligaments and/or tendons
  • Cartilage or bone that needs to be removed

Total Knee Replacement

A full knee replacement is known as arthroplasty. When the joint is damaged beyond repair from injury or disease, an implant is placed in the knee joint restoring function. A small amount of cartilage and bone from the shinbone and thigh bone gets removed for perfect placement of the new knee joint.

Revision Knee Replacement

Most knee replacements last around 15 – 20 years. For individuals that have knee replacement early, then a new operation for new implants could be required. Here, the surgeon removes the original prosthesis and replaces it with a new one.

Partial Knee Replacement

Some knee injuries do not require complete replacement. Here, only the worn-out portion of the joint is replaced. As an example, the cartilage that has been lost in an area of the knee can be repaired with a partial replacement.

Vitamin D Status

A study on athletes that underwent ACL surgery looked at their vitamin d status and how it affected their recovery.

  • The research concluded that vitamin D status had no effect on surgery outcomes.
  • However, those with the lowest vitamin D status had three times the failure rate than those with higher vitamin D
  • The average age of the individuals was around twenty-four and were healthy athletes.

Each of the patients in this study had their vitamin levels measured  before the operation and were grouped based on their vitamin D status:

  • Group 1 vitamin D below 20 ng/mL – considered deficient
  • Group 2 vitamin D between 20-30 ng/mL – considered low but in a technical range
  • Group 3 vitamin D above 30 ng/mL – considered sufficient, but not optimal

All were followed for two years with their surgery recovery being measured with two systems.

The Lysholm score, which is a 100 point scoring system that looks at an individual’s knee functions that include:

  • Mechanical locking
  • Instability
  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Stair climbing
  • Squatting

The WOMAC score is a scoring system that measures:

  • Physical function
  • Pain
  • Stiffness
  • This can be for knee and hip replacement

After 2 years, the Lysholm score and the WOMAC scores were similar.

However, there was a difference in the graft failure rate which was about 6% in group 1 with the lowest vitamin D and around 2% in groups 2 and 3. This shows that the lowest vitamin D status has three times the failure rate compared with those that had increased vitamin D levels. Vitamin D is a known anti-inflammatory with metabolic functions that are documented. Therefore, vitamin D does improve surgical success and recovery in healthy athletes.


Body Composition


Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, CTG*
email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com
phone: 915-850-0900
Licensed in Texas & New Mexico

References

Brambilla, Lorenzo, et al. “Outcome of total hip and total knee arthroplasty and vitamin D homeostasis.” British medical bulletin vol. 135,1 (2020): 50-61. doi:10.1093/bmb/ldaa018

European Journal of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, January 2021

Zhang, Hao et al. “Vitamin D Status and Patient Outcomes after Knee or Hip Surgery: A Meta-Analysis.” Annals of nutrition & metabolism vol. 73,2 (2018): 121-130. doi:10.1159/000490670

Chiropractic Treatment or Physical Therapy: What Are My Options?

Chiropractic Treatment or Physical Therapy: What Are My Options?

Chiropractic treatment and physical therapy are treatment methods/approaches that are conservative, non-invasive, and are both practical options. Both address health concerns, like various types of pain, automobile, work, sports, and personal injuries. Both are focused on helping individuals achieve long-term results and maintain health.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Chiropractic Treatment or Physical Therapy: What Are My Options?

Chiropractic and physical therapy are usually done in combination, as they complement one another. There are benefits and similarities between the two treatment options. Here are some general guidelines to decide which treatment option is best for your needs.

Primary symptoms

Chiropractors are known for the ability to provide quick relief to individuals dealing with pain and stiffness in the joints, particularly the spine. They are experts in spinal realignment and proper posture. If flexibility is limited or the joints are locking up, a chiropractor is the recommended choice.

Physical therapists or PTs are the experts in body biomechanics and soft tissue injuries. If an individual finds themselves moving differently because of pain or injury, training and exercise will help movement and maximum recovery.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Chiropractic Treatment or Physical Therapy: What Are My Options?

Treatment style

Chiropractors follow a meticulous expert-based protocol for achieving the best results. They provide a hands-on approach to treatment that requires regular follow-ups and maintenance. This is an approach that some individuals prefer. Physical therapy treatment/rehabilitation programs are typically short-term. The average treatment usually lasts only 12 weeks. A physical therapist’s primary objective is to provide a fundamental understanding of how to move properly and self-manage symptoms for the long term. This usually includes a balanced exercise program.

Insurance coverage

Insurance plans vary in what is covered. The first step is to see what an individual’s insurance will cover. Benefits can be found online or by calling a representative to see how to get the care/treatment needed. Most plans cover some form of physical therapy. Chiropractic is also usually covered by insurance providers. Skipping the insurance can also be done with chiropractic clinics providing affordable options.

Options

There is no clear-cut answer as to which to see. A physical therapist or chiropractor. Individuals should follow a doctor’s recommendations as to which treatment type would benefit them. If no recommendations have been given then take a look at a clinic’s website to see what they are about. Fortunately, many chiropractic clinics include physical therapists as part of their medical team. Both chiropractic and physical therapists provide dynamic benefits for increasing and maintaining overall health.

Body Composition

Hydration Guidelines

Drink according to thirst

The body knows when it needs water. Therefore drink when you are thirsty, not before. An adequate fluid intake should be timed according to feelings of thirst.

Estimate hourly sweat loss

Those that exercise or engage in regular physical activities for prolonged periods should weigh themselves before engaging in the exercise/activity. Then drink according to thirst as the event goes on, then weigh yourself after the activity. The goal is to maintain the same weight or be slightly less. If an individual weighs more than what they drank, then they drank too much.

Excess water consumption

If an individual is not thirsty, the recommendation is to not drink water in excess. Nausea and even vomiting could ensue. A simple indicator to determine if enough water is being consumed is to check urine color. If it is colorless or slightly yellow then an individual is drinking enough water.

Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP, CIFM, CTG*
email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com
phone: 915-850-0900
Licensed in Texas & New Mexico

References

American Association of Physical Therapists. www.apta.org

Cherkin, D C et al. “A comparison of physical therapy, chiropractic manipulation, and provision of an educational booklet for the treatment of patients with low back pain.” The New England journal of medicine vol. 339,15 (1998): 1021-9. doi:10.1056/NEJM199810083391502

Fritz, Julie M. “Physical therapy in a value-based healthcare world.” The Journal of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy vol. 42,1 (2012): 1-2. doi:10.2519/jospt.2012.0101

Shrier I. Does stretching help prevent injuries? Evidence-based Sports Medicine. Williston, VT: BMJ Books; 2002.

Recovering From A Deadlift Lower Back Injury

Recovering From A Deadlift Lower Back Injury

The deadlift is a weight training exercise that helps build muscle, strength, and stamina. It works legs, core, buttocks, and the back when performed correctly. Using an improper form or overdoing it can cause injury to the lower back. Recovering from a deadlifting injury usually takes a couple of days or a week. However, this depends on the severity of the injury. Recovery can be helped through:

  • Home remedies
  • Chiropractic treatment
  • Massage
  • Natural back pain relief tips

Back Injury After Deadlifting

Most individuals will feel sore after a strenuous workout. But there is a difference between soreness and injury. Most of the time injuries from deadlifts are caused by not using proper form. Getting the form right is not easy, it does take practice, so do not feel bad if an injury presents.

Soreness vs Injury

Most of the time telling the difference between natural soreness from a workout and pain from an injury is pretty straightforward. But sometimes it is not as easy to tell the difference. Soreness is typically characterized by:

  • Stiffness
  • Tightness
  • Muscle ache
  • Fades after two or three days

Muscle soreness tends to be shallow and spread out over a muscle group. Pain from an injury causes sharp and persistent pain, especially with certain movements. Injury pain is deeper and can be described as stabbing or sharp.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Recovering From A Deadlift Lower Back Injury

Common Deadlifting Injuries

The deadlift has a wide range of motion and incorporates several different joints. Most injuries sustained during a deadlift are low-back injuries. Usually a sprain or a strain. But it is possible to sustain a more serious injury like a herniated disc.

Sprains vs Strains

Sprains and strains are different although many use the terms interchangeably.

  • A sprain happens when the ligaments that hold a joint together tear.
  • A strain happens when the muscles tear or are overworked to the point of injury.

Herniated Disc

A herniated disc happens when the gel-like fluid cushion between the vertebrae begins to protrude out. This can cause pain from the disc pressing on surrounding nerves or go unnoticed. Fortunately, sprains, strains, and herniated discs can all be treated conservatively. Seeing a medical professional is recommended to rule out serious conditions.

Injury Lower Back Pop

Some individuals experience an audible pop in the spine during a deadlift. For those that experience a pop but no pain accompanying it, it is likely gas escaping from a joint in the back. Those that experience discomfort or pain with the popping are encouraged to seek out medical attention.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Recovering From A Deadlift Lower Back Injury

Healing a Back Injury

Healing a back injury depends on the severity. The more severe, the longer it will take to heal. Most injuries can be addressed at home. Individuals that cannot stand up straight or there is debilitating pain with normal movements should see a medical professional like a:

  • Physical therapist
  • Chiropractor
  • Physician

Rest and let the body recover

It can be tempting to get back to the gym as soon as possible, but this is not recommended until the back truly feels normal. It is recommended to rest for a few days, allowing any swelling, inflammation to go down.

Ice and heat

Applying ice to the back every few hours for 15 to 20 minutes is recommended for the first three days, then heat can be incorporated. After three days if there is still pain, incorporate heat to get more blood flowing in and around the area. Use the ice for 15 to 20 minutes, wait 30 minutes, then apply the heat for 15 minutes.

Chiropractor

Seeing a chiropractor during any stage of recovery can be beneficial. As chiropractors are musculoskeletal specialists that can realign the body back to its proper form. If four days or more have passed and the pain is not going away, make an appointment with a certified chiropractor or spine specialist.

Time of Recovery

Most individuals recover within a week or two. For more severe injuries, like a herniated disc can take 6 to 8 weeks. Seeing a medical professional can help speed the process and promote healing. Additional tips include:

Safety

Deadlifting can be done safely and properly without sustaining an injury. A personal trainer or a sports chiropractor can analyze an individual’s lifting form and offer recommendations to prevent injury.

Body Composition

Foods Good for Collagen Production

Healthy nutrition can facilitate optimal collagen synthesis without supplementation. Protein sources that work with non-essential amino acids contribute to increased collagen production. High-quality protein sources support this process. Vegetarian protein sources include legumes or tofu are good alternatives. Collagen synthesis requires vitamin C, copper, and zinc.

  • Vitamin C regulates the synthesis pathway
  • Zinc stimulates the body to produce more collagen
  • Copper activates an enzyme that helps mature/strengthen the collagen
  • Sources of copper include nuts, seeds, whole grains, and chocolate

Most importantly is plenty of vitamin C-rich foods like:

  • Bell peppers
  • Broccoli
  • Citrus fruits
  • Leafy greens
  • Tomatoes

Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP, CIFM, CTG*
email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com
phone: 915-850-0900
Licensed in Texas & New Mexico

References

Bengtsson, Victor et al. “Narrative review of injuries in powerlifting with special reference to their association to the squat, bench press and deadlift.” BMJ open sport & exercise medicine vol. 4,1 e000382. 17 Jul. 2018, doi:10.1136/bmjsem-2018-000382

Core strength training helps manage back painJournal of Physical Therapy Science (March 2015) “Core strength training for patients with chronic low back pain.” https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jpts/27/3/27_jpts-2014-564/_article/-char/ja/

Millions of Americans experience back pain each day: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2020) “Acute Low Back Pain.” https://www.cdc.gov/acute-pain/low-back-pain/

Free weights come with a greater risk of injury, compared to machines: National Strength and Conditioning Association (December 2000) “Roundtable Discussion: Machines Versus Free Weights.” http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.451.9285&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Seeing A Chiropractor Regularly for Injury Prevention

Seeing A Chiropractor Regularly for Injury Prevention

Seeing A Chiropractor Regularly for Injury Prevention and Maintenance. A common question that comes up is how often is it necessary to visit a chiropractor? Everyone is different and the frequency of treatment depends on each individual’s specific situation/condition, health goals, and needs. Here are a few guidelines to keep in mind that can help get an idea of what to expect.
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Seeing A Chiropractor Regularly for Injury Prevention and Maintenance

Seeing a Chiropractor

Chiropractors are the top experts in addressing underlying issues concerning the spine and musculoskeletal system. The most common reasons for seeking chiropractic treatment are musculoskeletal:
  • Conditions
  • Injuries – work, sports, automobile, personal
  • Rehabilitation
  • Pain relief
  • Fitness
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • Sleep problems
As an example, back pain is one of the top causes of disability. The workforce and medical community are seeing the effectiveness of chiropractic in reducing medical costs and loss of productivity. Spinal misalignment is an overlooked problem that can lead to a variety of health issues, including chronic pain and poor blood and nerve circulation. Restoring alignment is the first step in building sustainable health and achieving optimal quality of life.

Effective Treatment

Chiropractic treatment follows three stages. There is an emphasis on each stage and a specific focus for working toward long-lasting optimal health. Each phase is also associated with a different range of treatment protocols to achieve the best results.

Stage 1 Pain Relief

Starting treatment when the pain is at its most intense means the first step is bringing relief as quickly as possible. This is accomplished through:
  • Adjustments
  • Ultrasound
  • Heat and Ice
  • Massage
  • T.E.N.S
  • Stretching
  • Exercise
  • Other techniques to stabilize the individual

Stage 2 Restorative Care

Once the pain is relieved, the focus turns to long-term healing of affected tissues like the:
  • Muscles
  • Ligaments
  • Neural tissues
This helps with long-term recovery while reducing the risk of worsening or creating further injury/s.
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Seeing A Chiropractor Regularly for Injury Prevention and Maintenance

Stage 3 Maintenance Care

This final stage is the monitoring stage. The chiropractic provider understands how important it is to regularly monitor an individual’s health and alignment to address any issues that come up and deal with them before they worsen or lead to other problems. Monitoring prevents unnecessary distress and helps the individual get back to their normal life.

Optimal Results

Achieving lasting results for symptoms cannot be done with a quick one size fits all treatment. With the guidance of a chiropractor, the individual will learn to recognize subtle changes in their body to alert them to adjusting lifestyle habits. Contact Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic to determine what treatment and frequency offer the best results.

Body Composition


Inflammation That Can Become Permanent

When white blood cells cause inflammation, this is a sign that the body’s immune system is properly functioning. Inflammation starts, the white blood cells attack the invader, it is neutralized, and the inflammation recedes. This is how the body’s defense system works naturally. But the white blood cells are not the only type of cell that has the ability to release cytokines. A second type of cell that can release cytokines and cause inflammation are adipocytes/fat cells. The body stores excess calories as fat so that the body can use it later for energy. Scientists have learned that fat is an active endocrine organ. It can secrete a host of proteins and chemicals, including inflammatory cytokines. When the body keeps adding more and more adipose tissue cytokines are released by the fat cells, triggering inflammation. Obesity is characterized as a state of low-grade, chronic inflammation. This means that increased fat cells put the body in a constant state of stress and immune response. This means that the body is always in a state of inflammation and the immune system is permanently switched on. Perpetual, never-ending inflammation is not healthy for the body.

Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP, CIFM, CTG* email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com phone: 915-850-0900 Licensed in Texas & New Mexico
References
Hadler, N M. “Chiropractic.” Rheumatic diseases clinics of North America vol. 26,1 (2000): 97-102, ix. doi:10.1016/s0889-857x(05)70123-x Iben, Axén, et al. “Chiropractic maintenance care – what’s new? A systematic review of the literature.” Chiropractic & manual therapies vol. 27 63. 21 Nov. 2019, doi:10.1186/s12998-019-0283-6 Goertz, Christine M et al. “Effect of Usual Medical Care Plus Chiropractic Care vs Usual Medical Care Alone on Pain and Disability Among US Service Members With Low Back Pain: A Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Trial.” JAMA network open vol. 1,1 e180105. 18 May. 2018, doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.0105