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Injury Care

Back Clinic Injury Care Chiropractic and Physical Therapy Team. There are two approaches to injury care. They are active and passive treatment. While both can help get patients on the road toward recovery, only active treatment has a long-term impact and keeps patients moving.

We focus on treating injuries sustained in auto accidents, personal injuries, work injuries, and sports injuries and provide complete interventional pain management services and therapeutic programs. Everything from bumps and bruises to torn ligaments and back pain.

Passive Injury Care

A doctor or a physical therapist usually gives passive injury care. It includes:

  • Acupuncture
  • Applying heat/ice to sore muscles
  • Pain medication

It’s a good starting point to help reduce pain, but passive injury care isn’t the most effective treatment. While it helps an injured person feel better in the moment, the relief doesn’t last. A patient won’t fully recover from injury unless they actively work to return to their normal life.

Active Injury Care

Active treatment also provided by a physician or physical therapist relies on the injured person’s commitment to work. When patients take ownership of their health, the active injury care process becomes more meaningful and productive. A modified activity plan will help an injured person transition to full function and improve their overall physical and emotional wellness.

  • Spine, neck, and back
  • Headaches
  • Knees, shoulders, and wrists
  • Torn ligaments
  • Soft tissue injuries (muscle strains and sprains)

What does active injury care involve?

An active treatment plan keeps the body as strong and flexible as possible through a personalized work/transitional plan, which limits long-term impact and helps injured patients work toward a faster recovery. For example, in injury Medical & Chiropractic clinic’s injury care, a clinician will work with the patient to understand the cause of injury, then create a rehabilitation plan that keeps the patient active and brings them back to proper health in no time.

For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900


Thoracic Back Pain

Thoracic Back Pain

The thoracic spine, also known as the upper or middle back, is designed for stability to anchor the rib cage and protect the organs in the chest. It is highly resistant to injury and pain. However, when thoracic back pain does present, it is usually from long-term posture problems or an injury. Thoracic back pain is less common than lower back and neck pain, but it does affect up to 20% of the population, particularly women. Treatment options include chiropractic for quick and long-term pain relief.

Thoracic Back Pain

Thoracic Back Pain and Soreness

The thoracic area is vital for various functions related to:

Common reasons for experiencing thoracic back pain include:

  • A direct hit or high-impact injury from a fall.
  • Sports injury.
  • Automobile accident.
  • Unhealthy postures that put the spine in chronic misalignment, causing strain.
  • Repetitive overuse injury from bending, reaching, lifting, twisting.
  • Poor core or shoulder mechanics, causing muscle imbalance.
  • Muscular irritation, the large upper back muscles are prone to developing strains or tightness that can be painful and difficult to alleviate.
  • De-conditioning or lack of strength.
  • Joint dysfunction can come from a sudden injury or natural degeneration from aging. Examples include facet joint cartilage tear or joint capsule tear.

Upper back pain usually feels like a sharp, burning pain localized to one spot or a general achiness that can flare up and spread out to the shoulder, neck, and arms.

Types of Upper Back Pain

These include:

  • Myofascial pain
  • Spine degeneration
  • Joint dysfunction
  • Nerve dysfunction
  • General spinal misalignments

Depending on what specific tissues are affected, pain can occur with breathing or arm use. It is recommended to have a healthcare professional perform an examination and get an accurate diagnosis. A chiropractor understands the delicate balance and functions that the thoracic spine provides and can develop a proper treatment plan.

Chiropractic

Treatment options will depend on the symptoms, underlying dysfunctions, and individual preferences. ​Recommendations for treatment often include:

  • Spine adjustments to improve alignment and nerve integrity.
  • Posture training to maintain spinal alignment.
  • Therapeutic massage.
  • Exercise training to restore muscular balance.
  • Non-invasive pain-relieving techniques.
  • Health coaching.

Body Composition


Plant-Based Diets for Weight Loss

Individuals who follow vegan, vegetarian, and semivegetarian diets have reported and shown they are less likely to be overweight or obese. This can indicate that reducing intake of meat and animal products is beneficial for weight loss. Studies have found that individuals who follow a vegan diet may lose more weight than individuals on a more conventional weight loss diet, even with similar calories consumed, and often have significant improvements in blood sugar and inflammation markers.

Plant-Based Protein and Muscle Gain

Some plant-based proteins are just as effective as animal protein at promoting muscle gain. A study found that supplementing rice protein following resistance training had similar benefits to whey protein supplementation. Both groups had:

References

Briggs AM, Smith AJ, Straker LM, Bragge P. Thoracic spine pain in the general population: prevalence, incidence and associated factors in children, adolescents and adults. A systematic review. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2009;10:77.

Cichoń, Dorota et al. “Efficacy of Physiotherapy in Reducing Back Pain and Improve Joint Mobility in Older Women.” Ortopedia, traumatologia, rehabilitacja vol. 21,1 (2019): 45-55. doi:10.5604/01.3001.0013.1115

Fouquet N, Bodin J, Descatha A, et al. Prevalence of thoracic spine pain in a surveillance network. Occup Med (Lond). 2015;65(2):122-5.

Jäger, Ralf et al. “Comparison of rice and whey protein isolate digestion rate and amino acid absorption.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition vol. 10,Suppl 1 P12. 6 Dec. 2013, doi:10.1186/1550-2783-10-S1-P12

Joy, Jordan M et al. “The effects of 8 weeks of whey or rice protein supplementation on body composition and exercise performance.” Nutrition journal vol. 12 86. 20 Jun. 2013, doi:10.1186/1475-2891-12-86

Medawar, Evelyn et al. “The effects of plant-based diets on the body and the brain: a systematic review.” Translational psychiatry vol. 9,1 226. 12 Sep. 2019, doi:10.1038/s41398-019-0552-0

Newby, PK et al. “Risk of overweight and obesity among semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women.” The American journal of clinical nutrition vol. 81,6 (2005): 1267-74. doi:10.1093/ajcn/81.6.1267

Pope, Malcolm H et al. “Spine ergonomics.” Annual review of biomedical engineering vol. 4 (2002): 49-68. doi:10.1146/annurev.bioeng.4.092101.122107

Calf Muscle Tightness and Injury

Calf Muscle Tightness and Injury

Calf pain is common in individuals who spend a lot of time on their feet, whether standing at work, school, or training athletes. The calf muscle/s take on a tremendous amount of load throughout the day. Climbing stairs, jogging, running, and hiking increase strain on the muscles. In most cases, calf pain results from an overuse injury of the calf muscles. Improper footwear can also contribute to issues around the foot and ankle that include:

  • Tightness
  • Loss of strength of the foot
  • Decreased mobility

Short or tight calves can lead to dysfunctional movement, cramping symptoms, chronic pain, and stiffness. A combination of chiropractic active release treatment and physical therapy can help quickly eliminate calf pain.

Calf Muscle Tightness and Injury

Anatomy

The calves are comprised of two muscles, the gastrocnemius, and soleus.

  • The gastroc originates just above the knee.
  • The soleus is below the knee.

They both insert on the back of the ankle as they join to form the Achilles tendon. The gastrocnemius is the power muscle used for explosive movements like jumping. The soleus muscle is predominately a slow-twitch muscle. This means it is very active during extended activities, like standing, walking, exercising, and running. When dealing with calf and ankle issues, other muscles can also contribute. These include:

  • The posterior tibialis lies deep in the inner portion of the calf and plays a role in foot and ankle function.
  • The posterior tibialis is heavily involved with Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome or MTSS, also called shin splints.

Calf Muscle Pain

Most commonly, calf pain is caused by the overuse of the calf muscles. This is often the result of the consistent pounding of the feet and lower legs from standing, walking,  and working. Over time, the repetitive pounding can cause tiny tears in the muscles of the lower legs and calves. If detected, early rest and recovery are recommended to allow the muscles to relax, loosen, and heal. However, repeated use can lead to more severe injury without proper treatment, like compartment syndrome. Certain types of calf pain can signify a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Compartment Syndrome

A tough and fibrous covering surrounds the calf called the fascia. During physical activity or exercise, blood flows into these muscles, causing them to increase in size. If the fascia cannot stretch enough when these muscles enlarge, pain and tightness can develop. This is known as chronic posterior compartment syndrome. The discomfort typically goes away when the activity stops but is likely to return without proper treatment.

Calf Overuse Injury

Soreness, tightness, and pain are usually felt along the back or inside of the lower leg. The calf muscles are generally not painful to touch but maybe tender when deep pressure is applied. Calf pain and tightness often come with extended physical activity, exercise and disappear once the activity is stopped. If the injury becomes chronic, calf stiffness can present even when not active, along with numbness and/or tingling in the lower leg or foot.

Treatment

It is recommended not to ignore any discomfort, pain, and stiffness in the calves. Continued overuse can lead to scar tissue formation and chronic pain potential without proper care. Active Release – ART, and chiropractic effectively treat this type of injury. ART breaks up scar tissue, returning normal function to the calf muscles. And chiropractic loosens up stiff joints in the hips, ankles, and feet that may be contributing to wear and tear on the calves. Together they can quickly and eliminate calf pain. Part of a treatment plan includes:

  • Joint manipulation or mobilization
  • Soft tissue mobilization
  • Nutritional recommendations
  • Rehab-based exercises and stretches

Body Composition


Metabolic Adaptations

Aerobic exercise substantially impacts the body’s muscles’ energy production system and cardiovascular adaptation. The blood delivers oxygen to the muscle cells to produce energy that powers all the exercise being done. Aerobic exercise primarily relies on oxidative energy production, which takes place within the cells called mitochondria. Aerobic exercise also breaks down fat molecules for energy, which can only happen within mitochondria.

  • Aerobic exercise training improves the muscle cells’ ability to burn fat by generating more mitochondria and enhancing their functionality. Specifically, the body burns more fat than usual in the hours following each training session.
  • With more precise quality and quantity of fat-burning machinery, aerobic training can increase the resting metabolic rate, resulting in more calories burned.
  • High-intensity aerobic exercise also increases the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption – EPOC, resulting in increased calorie burn in addition to what was burned during the exercising.
References

Alfredson, H et al. “Heavy-load eccentric calf muscle training for the treatment of chronic Achilles tendinosis.” The American journal of sports medicine vol. 26,3 (1998): 360-6. doi:10.1177/03635465980260030301

Bright, Jacob Michael et al. “Ultrasound Diagnosis of Calf Injuries.” Sports health vol. 9,4 (2017): 352-355. doi:10.1177/1941738117696019

Campbell, John T. “Posterior calf injury.” Foot and ankle clinics vol. 14,4 (2009): 761-71. doi:10.1016/j.fcl.2009.07.005

Green, Brady, and Tania Pizzari. “Calf muscle strain injuries in sport: a systematic review of risk factors for injury.” British journal of sports medicine vol. 51,16 (2017): 1189-1194. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-097177

Ankle Instability

Ankle Instability

The ankles provide an essential role in total body function. They work as a complex system within the feet to carry the body’s weight and support movement. Any imbalance can cause ankle instability that can cause other areas of the body to go out of balance. This is most often caused by an injury, like an ankle sprain. If not properly addressed, it can lead to chronic instability and long-term health issues throughout the musculoskeletal system. Chiropractic treatment can rehabilitate ankle injuries, strengthen the muscles to prevent instability.

Ankle Instability

Ankle Instability

The entire body is an extensive, complicated, and interconnected system. Every part influences the next as individuals go about their everyday routines. Imbalances can occur in the spine, hips, legs, and knees, leading to limping, ankle pain, or injury. The most common causes of ankle instability include:

  • Poor foot or ankle mechanics
  • Knee or hip imbalances
  • Ankle sprains
  • Muscle strain
  • Tendonitis
  • Arthritis
  • Fractures
  • Chronic inflammation from illness or injury.

Finding The Imbalances

Understanding where the imbalances are and systematically addressing them is the recommended course of action. If an ankle injury is present, local symptoms and dysfunction need to be addressed. However, it is important to assess other body areas to ensure any other dysfunctions are also addressed. This prevents unnecessary re-injury, aggravation, and other problems.

Chiropractic

One or more treatment options will be utilized for proper recovery when dealing with ankle instability.

  • Joint adjustments of the lower body and spine to support nerve and blood circulation.
  • Foot and ankle compression wraps.
  • Ultrasound.
  • Electrical stimulation.
  • Therapeutic massage of the injured and sore tissues.
  • Recommendations for activity modification to prevent unnecessary aggravation and increase stability.
  • Exercise and stretch training.
  • Health coaching on an anti-inflammatory diet and foods to promote recovery.

Chiropractic is recommended for determining any body imbalances that need to be addressed with high-quality research-based care and can expedite the recovery process.


Body Composition


Compression Garments and Socks

These were only used to treat individuals with circulatory problems but are now available to the public. Recovery is about giving the body a chance to relax, recuperate, and recover from swelling, with the objective to resume physical activity. Compression garments come in shirts, pants, sleeves, and socks. The garments and socks are used for quicker recovery time, improved circulation and oxygen delivery to the muscles, and to reduce lactic acid build-up.

References

Anguish, Ben, and Michelle A Sandrey. “Two 4-Week Balance-Training Programs for Chronic Ankle Instability.” Journal of athletic training vol. 53,7 (2018): 662-671. doi:10.4085/1062-6050-555-16

Czajka, Cory M et al. “Ankle sprains and instability.” The Medical clinics of North America vol. 98,2 (2014): 313-29. doi:10.1016/j.mcna.2013.11.003

Gribble, Phillip A. “Evaluating and Differentiating Ankle Instability.” Journal of athletic training vol. 54,6 (2019): 617-627. doi:10.4085/1062-6050-484-17

Lubbe, Danella et al. “Manipulative therapy and rehabilitation for recurrent ankle sprain with functional instability: a short-term, assessor-blind, parallel-group randomized trial.” Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics vol. 38,1 (2015): 22-34. doi:10.1016/j.jmpt.2014.10.001

The Underlining Truth About Sciatica | El Paso, TX (2021)

Introduction

In today’s podcast, Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja discuss what sciatica does to the body and how it affects a person’s overall health and wellness.

 

What Causes Sciatica?

[00:00:06] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Hey Mario, we’re on a new podcast today. Today we’re going to be talking about sciatica and the complications with that. I got Mario here, and we’ve decided to chat and discuss the issues of sciatica.

 

[00:00:29] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It sounds excruciating.

 

[00:00:31] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know, let me ask you this. In your practice, Mario, in terms of working with sciatica, what have you learned over the years in terms of sciatica?

 

[00:00:41] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Sciatica will put you down, Alex. It will make you feel like a baby and make you remember how vital chiropractic is and maintenance. It’s like having that car. For example, if you are driving Buggati and do not do the maintenance, you just put gas. It’s just like, rip it and run it. And then one day, it leaves you hanging in the middle of I-10, and everyone’s passing you, and you’re embarrassed.

 

[00:01:15] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It is what sciatica is.

 

[00:01:18] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It isn’t very pleasant.

 

[00:01:20] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know, I believe it’s kind of funny that we’re laughing at it, but it is a scourge. I call it of the low back. It catches you off a surprise. It creeps up on you. It looms around, too. Yeah. And when they bite you, I mean it classically defined as pain going down the leg. There’s a lot of reasons why that happens. What do you get when your patients show up with that? What do they tell you? What kind of symptoms do they sort of present?

 

[00:01:45] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: You got to be kidding me. First of all, their wife drives them in. Does that tell you what it is? Yeah, it’s like a knife stabbing them in the back, and it radiates down their leg, and then they’re usually leaning to one side or another. And then they have this story. Alex, there is this crazy story like, ” Well, I was only…” the only part is ridiculous. “I was only picking up my child,” or “I was only throwing the football, and all of a sudden, my back went out. And then I try to stretch it, and I have my wife rub it. And all of that didn’t work the following day. I couldn’t get out of bed and had to crawl to the bathroom.” Now that is when your attention is on.

 

[00:02:43] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja Explain What Sciatica Does To The Body.

 

[00:02:44] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Our attention is on sciatica. This is a big topic, Alex.

 

[00:02:48] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: This is a vast topic, and let me just kind of throw this out there where we are going to begin the process of breaking down sciatica by no means are we going to be able even to know the breadth and width as this is like saying you can take down a sequoia with one bite. It’s not going to happen, and we’re going to have to chisel away from it. And as we go in there, we’re going to go deep. Are we going to get nasty with the science, Mario? 

 

[00:03:14] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: This is getting deep and nasty. Folks will have to strap on their seatbelts for this ride.

 

[00:03:21] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Absolutely. As we do that, we’re going to be able to kind of go deep into it. We’re going to touch on some subject matters, but follow us on this process because we’re going to be discussing real essential issues about sciatica that affects so many millions of people at any given point. I’d venture to say that one in every four people is suffering from chronic back pain, and half of those people are suffering from sciatica in some form or the other or some pain down the leg. So in that sense, we’re dealing with a huge issue that affects millions of patients and millions of people across the country with all different doctors and different types of protocols. And these protocols can be from really esoteric to invasive. And we all want to do it quickly, and we all want to do it a simple way. So I think modern medicine Mario has determined that we have to go basic and try everything before any surgical interventions.

 

[00:04:16] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I mean, it’s common sense, and I always used the car model as an example. Before you get a rebuilt transmission, why don’t you maintain it before you drop a new engine? Why don’t you change the oil and get a tune-up? Unfortunately, again, you mentioned the unbelievable impact of low back pain in our society. I believe I don’t know if I may be in the ballpark. It is the number two or three reasons for work injuries and is one of the biggest reasons for the military to get med boarded out of the military. I mean, this is a big issue that impacts people’s lives, and then you would get into chronic pain management, things like that. But again, if we look at the most critical solution in our life, how can we prevent it? Prevention is the natural utilization of therapeutic arts that decrease the misalignment in the spine. Again, that misalignment is that torque where your back is out of alignment and calibration, right? Which causes uneven wear and tear on the disc. Then the other one is constant compression of sitting down and repetitive motion. The other one is just the injuries from everyday sports activities. More and more young kids are getting injured in sports football, basketball, more intense pain, more torque, and you can see pro basketball players and football players, all of them suffer from sciatica.

 

[00:06:19] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah. Here’s the cascade. The cascade starts with a decalibration of the pelvis or the hips, or some injury trauma, some space-occupying lesion, or something on this path. I’m going to go ahead and demonstrate here on our pathway, and we’re going to show a little bit of what is in the nerves. 

 

[00:06:43] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I love this 3-D model you are showing here.

 

[00:06:43] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Thank you.

 

[00:06:44] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: This is good stuff.

 

The Sciatic Nerve

 

[00:06:46] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: This is the complete anatomy provided for us and what we can see is a three-dimensional aspect of how and why someone has sciatica. Now when you look at this, Mario, what’s your first take? Because for me, it says it’s a complicated structure when we’re looking at this. When you look at the back, where it comes out, you see this big old cable called the sciatic nerve, but you see so many proximal areas and so many regions that are getting weird.

 

[00:07:11] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: That is a lot of moving parts, Alex.

 

[00:07:15] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yes, it is. And you know what? One of the crazy things that I’m looking at here is the sacrum. 

 

[00:07:20] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: And that is the base.

 

[00:07:21] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: That’s the foundation. The way the creator created us was that this is where energy transmits this bone right here. The sacrum, right? But little to the front of it. You have the sacral nerve roots that come out as they form out. You can see on this particular area; you can see the nerve roots coming out as they come in posterior aspect, you can kind of turn this around and we kind of get this little area here and as we rotate this thing, we can see the sciatic nerve as it comes out of what we call the sacral notch. That sacral notches right there is enormous.

 

[00:08:03] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: That is crazy.

 

[00:08:04] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I know, right? So what happens is when you see it here, you can understand that this big ol’ nerve influences the entire creature. You take this thing out, and you have limited the creature’s ability to move. Please look at it as it comes out; you can look from the inferior border to the superior border. You can see why a woman is pregnant; you can determine why this baby could sit in this pelvic cavity here can cause a lot of damage to the sacral nerve. 

 

[00:08:31] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Many of them suffer from back pain and sciatica.

 

[00:08:34] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: This is one of the reasons why right here that baby sits and dances in this whole area here. So when we look at this kind of stuff, we can make sense of all the presentations. As you hurt a nerve in one area, you can see that you would hurt as you would do something like this. And the nerve will hurt a distal or pull towards away from it. Once you hurt that region, our goal is to determine the nerve roots going down on that particular area. If this affects all the way down the leg, it will cause pain. Now, you can see in this specific region what goes on.

 

[00:09:18] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: This is it now. Now you see that this is what I like, and this is a creation. If you believe in miracles, you stop believing and just realize that you’re one walking. Here’s the sacral sacrum right here, the sacred bone, and that’s why it’s called sacrum because it’s sacred.

 

[00:09:42] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I didn’t know that. I learned about the scared bone, and it is the base of the spine.

 

[00:09:48] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: This is where, as you mentioned, this is where the birth comes out. This is where the next legacy is created. So here is the ilium. OK, so that’s your hip bone. You have two of them. There is symmetry in our bodies, and that’s how God created us in symmetrical synergy. Then right here are pubic surfaces, and then you’ve got the operators right there, and then here is that L5 disc, and this is the one where I would say probably about 80 percent of disc herniations happened right there. So if you want to take a wild guess, this is it right here.

 

Intervertebral Foramen

 

[00:10:32] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Let me hone in on that right there so I can bring that in a little bit better. 

 

[00:10:42] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: This thing is dancing.

 

[00:10:43] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: As Dr. Ruja was explaining, he’s talking about in the disk space of the spine right here. 

 

[00:10:51] Dr. Mario Ruja: Right, so see, that is where you have the IVF.

 

[00:11:00] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Intervertebral foramen.

 

[00:11:01] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: IVF. Interverebral foramen. There it is, and all that is like a fancy word for it. There’s a hole where the right everything comes out.

 

[00:11:06] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*:  So here we start looking at the hole on the side, and as we look at it right there. You can see where the nerve roots come out right there.

 

[00:11:29] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So at that point, you see it here.

 

[00:11:35] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Exactly, and as you turn the model.

 

[00:11:38] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: OK, right there.

 

[00:11:41] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: That is the nerve right there.

 

[00:11:43] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So this is where how they sit on top of each other right there. Then you can see it from underneath right in there. Now at this point, these nerves, like the fiber optics, are traveling down through these canals and openings and everything. So there are so many places, Alex, that they can be entrapped, compressed, and they can be twisted again. Remember, the big word for us and in our talks is inflammation.

 

Does Inflammation Causes Problems In The Body?

 

[00:12:23] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*:  Inflammation yes.

 

[00:12:26] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Deep inflammation, yes. Now, these are all again if you’re looking like an electrician because I love how electricians work. You look at the fiber optics, and you have to trace it and find out where the issue is? Is it up here? Right here? Is it in the middle? Is it here in the canal? It is right there in that notch is the muscle compress.

 

[00:13:01] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Oh yeah, you can see it in the muscle compress.

 

[00:13:12] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: See where it’s pinched right there. That peraforma muscle is now critical. Again, that’s where you see a lot of times you need to release that muscle. Once it compresses, it just goes haywire right there.

 

[00:13:30] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah, why do they call the peraforma muscle Mario?

 

[00:13:35] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*:  Tell me, Alex.

 

[00:13:37] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Because it looks like a pear. When you take it, it’s a fat muscle when you look kind of flat here.

 

[00:13:43] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: And I visualize in the pear, Alex.

 

[00:13:44] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah. Here is the top of the pear, and that’s the wide part of the pear.

 

[00:13:49] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: That’s cute, Alex. I don’t know what kind of pear that is.

 

[00:13:52] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Exactly.

 

[00:13:52] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: But yeah, you’re right, it’s pear-shaped. Now I can see it.

 

[00:13:56] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: This is a crazy part. There’s a superior Escamilla right here in that area so that it can be trapped anywhere. As we look at this from the base point of view, you can see why people start having these symptoms.

 

[00:14:08] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, if we look at this pattern, we can also see an increased sedentary lifestyle, Alex. Can you see how all of these muscles are here? The glutes, gluteus minimus, Maximus, the hamstrings. Major squat muscles and the hips. Can you see all of these being deconditioned and compressing on a nerve?

 

The Lymphatic System

 

[00:14:40] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah, let me show you this, Mario because I wanted to show you this. When I first started seeing this, I thought this as you begin noticing that you have the venous system, but here’s what people don’t know about the venous system. Next to it is the lymphatic system. Now let me remove these muscles here, and you’re going to see the intricacies of the green lines. These green lines are in the circulatory system.

 

[00:15:02] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Wow, the green lines are the lymphatic system.

 

[00:15:05] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: The green is the lymphatic, and the red is arterial. When you start seeing red now, you can see that they have problems with their circulation when someone sits down a lot. And as you can see here, imagine sitting down all day on top of this thing? Can you see how the inflammation would happen in that region?

 

[00:15:25] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Alex, look at how much is happening in that pelvic area. I mean, this is like fiber optics just strapped, and this is like compress. Already, there is not that much space going on here, Alex. I mean, you’ve got nerves, arteries, veins, and lymph, all of those going through the same canal. So there is not a lot of what I call, you know, space and forgiveness. That’s why this radiating pain down the leg compresses that area that the flow down the leg is activated. That’s why your leg goes numb and your muscles to a large extent after a long time of having this problem. What happens, Alex, with a lot of my patients is they get muscle atrophy. You know, they gain muscle weakness, and that’s where your muscles shrink.

 

[00:16:40] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Let me show you the additional muscles here. You see, that’s why we train because all these muscles here are surrounding and covering up this area, and the muscle decalibrates.

 

[00:17:00] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Decalibrates.Is that like a fancy word for saying it just…

 

[00:17:05] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: De-conditions?

 

[00:17:06] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: That flops down?

 

[00:17:08] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: For me, I like the word calibration because it is a fine-tuned structure. Philosophically speaking, they got a bump at this ball that follows them everywhere when you look at humans. This power unit, right? This throttling system, it’s the glutes. Some have it more significant than others, right? But here’s where we propel from; it is the source of power. It is the way the creature creates its anchor. If the hips are gone, the beast doesn’t survive. So when we look at this, and we look at someone who was an athletic person when they were young and all of a sudden they get this job where they sit in front of a computer, they don’t go out. What happens to them? They decalibrated like a car. It doesn’t get used, and before you know it, it starts sinking and becoming flattered, and eventually, the inner workings that we just came from really start grinding. So when there’s congestion, the lymphatic system is responsible for the circulation. But the lymphatic system, unlike the arterial and venous system, which works primarily with the heart pumping, is functional by motion. So when you sit down, you are not moving.

 

[00:18:16] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: You know what, Alex? It is the sacral occipital pump; when you’re talking about the CSF cerebral spinal fluid, I can tell you right now when that sacrum is not pumping back and forth when you’re walking, you know what happens? It’s stagnating to flow to your brain.

 

[00:18:36] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It does.

 

[00:18:37] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, all the way to your brain. Then the area that you talked about that I think is critical. You’ve got to keep the body moving. We are created as bipeds. We do not walk like gorillas who walk on all fours. I know sometimes you feel like one, but we’re not apes. That’s right; we’re not silverback apes. The thing is, we’re bipeds. So that means the whole body has to align and stand up. Alex, in every sport, I tell people I’m impressed with your biceps, but your core sucks. You know what? Your core determines your overall function. That is where you keep your body upright, and you create that calibration of your spine. Once that that lordosis, that curve into your back. Once that is lost, you’re degenerating; you’re aging. There it is, right there.

 

[00:19:41] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Let’s go ahead and take a look at that right there. Yeah, that’s the lordosis you’re talking about in the spine.

 

The Lordosis

 

[00:19:56] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Can you draw the lordosis out?

 

[00:19:59] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Of course.

 

[00:20:01] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Wow, that is crazy, Alex.

 

[00:20:06] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: That is crazy.

 

[00:20:10] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: OK, so let’s do the pink pen for pain on the lordosis.

 

[00:20:17] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: That curve along with this curve makes a big difference. So what happens is you end up understanding that this sacrum or this glute area influences a vast area. What I’ve learned in my practice is that when you have a person with a sciatic issue, there are upper back issues, and there are shoulder issues now if the lower back has problems…

 

[00:20:53] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It throws everything off, and it’s like a domino effect.

 

[00:20:56] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah. What do you think about when they tell you, Hey, the person only hurt their lower back, and this is a work-related job? And similarly, they say it’s only related to the back. Yet they come in with leg pain, arm pain, and it makes sense to us, but nobody wants to understand that.

 

[00:21:11] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, that’s because they don’t want to, Alex. That’s where they want to lie, and it’s a lie. Remember when your mama told you it is not OK to lie?

 

[00:21:34] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know what? Why don’t we just say for what it is? They’re lying. They understood why they don’t understand that the body is a biomechanical chain, and if it affects the hips, it starts affecting the lower back, which then affects the upper back. And everybody knows if you have a back that’s giving up, your shoulders will have issues. If you got shoulder problems, it is equally on the opposite side of the room; you’re going to have knee issues. So what happens is as we look at this dynamic model, we see that we can’t be telling a fib here.

 

The Trapezius

 

[00:22:06] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: The spine is one unit composed of many segments. OK, it’s not separate. So there is no way that you can have an injury to one part of the spine, and you can tell me 100 percent that it does not affect any other one. It’s impossible. I’m sorry, God didn’t create it. If you want to see it here, look at this ischium muscle as it goes all the way across. Look at this one. This one is amazing. I’m just going to do this. Here is here’s the muscle right here, trapezius. Now watch as it goes from here to where the shoulders are down, then go to the neck in the back of the neck.

 

[00:23:32] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Let me clear up the pen marks, OK?

 

[00:23:35] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Can you move the body down? 

 

[00:23:38] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yes, I can, and there you go.

 

[00:23:44] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So I want to show one example so you can see all the way to the base of the head.

 

[00:23:49] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: OK, I got you. 

 

[00:23:52] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Alright.

 

[00:23:57] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Well, here’s what you want to show. I think what you’re trying to show is that you’re trying to show the negative muscles and see all the good stuff in there. 

 

[00:24:06] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, but I want to show you just that top layer, the trapezius.

 

[00:24:10] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Oh, let’s go to the muscular portion.

 

[00:24:11] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So it goes all the way from the base. Can you zoom out so we can see the whole thing?

 

[00:24:16] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Sure can. 

 

[00:24:18] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: OK, lift the model.

 

[00:24:20] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I wish I could.

 

[00:24:23] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Now here it is, and this is how dynamic this is. When people say, Oh, you only hurt your neck, but not your mid-back. Here it is. Trapezius right here goes from the base of the skull down the shoulders, right there, all the way down to the mid-back. OK, and this is probably like T10 T11, right? Somewhere around there, right by the middle and all the way across. So this whole area right there, that’s one muscle, and if you have an injury here in this area, this will affect all the way here then if you go in deeper into the second and third layer of the muscle.

 

[00:25:50] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Let me click here for you to see it.

 

[00:25:53] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Now it gets crazy.

 

[00:25:55] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: When we start removing muscular layers or increasing muscle layers, you start looking at all the functions.

 

[00:26:02] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Oh, look at that, the super spinadeus, And look at this right here. Vader scapula and from the shoulder all the way to the head is scalenus calculus.

 

[00:26:24] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: OK, so what we’re looking at here, we’re looking at the unbelievable body, but let’s go back to the area of concern.

 

[00:26:33] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: All right, you see how connected it is, Alex.

 

What Are The Causes of Sciatica?

 

[00:26:36] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Here’s the deal, OK? You and I know that the whole darn thing is connected, right? We can determine what is going on after dealing with the many patients we’ve seen over the years. And we’re like violin instructors. We touch the violin, and we make this body move. Our job is to understand when someone comes in and physically to see where this problem is. Find out where the issues are; there are tons of issues, and we haven’t even begun. We’re just having a general conversation about sciatica and where the issues are. What we don’t want is we don’t wish to surgical intervention at any early state unless it’s really necessary. Now what we’re looking at is when we see this, nobody wants that. So how do we fix this? So there are tons of ways to do that.

 

[00:27:26] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Can we go back to the slides of the causation for sciatica? 

 

[00:27:34] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*:  Absolutely. I’m going to take you back to the causation when you get over there in a second. The causation is right here, and we are looking at it.

 

[00:27:51] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: The first one is compression.

 

[00:27:52] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Compression of the disc.

 

[00:27:54] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Compression due to the lack of calibration balance within the system. So you have uneven compression and then a lot of sitting down; we talked about that, right? And then inflammation again, inflammatory process. We spoke last week about metabolic syndrome, inflammation. Inflammation affects the whole body and the disc bulging. Number two right there is disc bulging. That one again is due to what? The spine is out of calibration, out of alignment, putting uneven pressure, and it’s just like squeezing a balloon or a donut. That’s a classic example. You put pressure on a donut on one side, and it will crack, then you go from this bulge to worse herniation. Herniation and then fractures. Of course, if you have trauma DDD, that’s a funny thing. Degenerative disc disease.

 

Degenerative Disc Disease

 

[00:28:58] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*:  Yes, early degenerative issues.

 

[00:29:00] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Right? And I love it because most people come into my clinic go, “Oh, I have degenerative disc diseases like I’m getting old,” and I say, “No. You had no maintenance on your back, and you’re not old. ” If you would have taken better care of your body, you wouldn’t have degeneration. They act as though this is normal; however, it is not normal; this is just a sign of the breakdown.

 

[00:29:23] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know, the magnitude of either of us uncovering or discovering where a person has an issue. All of these things have ways that we can help it. What’s crazy about it is that we have to go against the grain in our methods because you would not think exercise would be a helpful tool right for this. However, exercise is one of the best things for we have to calibrate that pelvis if it’s appropriate. It’s a herniated disc, and it’s a bad one. We have to go ahead and surgically remove that; if not, we do anti-inflammatories, do we do natural methods, and get that body working and calibrating. Sometimes what happens is these people come in. These individuals are patients who come in and suddenly have a pain that just crept up on them over the last couple of weeks. Sometimes they have a slipped injury, a slipped disc, or even a vertebra that’s been fractured for years and now presents with the issues. Sometimes it’s a neurological presentation. Sometimes it’s a metabolic disorder like metabolic syndrome, and they have an inflammatory condition. What I’ve noticed, and I’m sure you’ve seen it too, is that these people who have sciatica live with this looming monster. It’s almost like a snake that lives in their pants, and when it bites them, it gets their whole leg. It disrupts people’s lives. Figuring out where the cause is is very important. So as we go over these things, I mean, it’s essential to go over the regions. I’ve even seen patients where they come in thinking it was sciatica. And sure enough, it’s sad, but it’s a tumor. And in that situation, we move on too quickly. I got to tell you, in the situations where we’ve had it, we’ve had great teamwork and resolved many issues for a lot of patients.

 

[00:31:06] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: That’s the beauty of how we think, Alex. We think in terms of integration. So, just because you have a hammer, everything doesn’t look like a nail. We are chiropractors, but at the same time, we are physicians. And what that means is that we know about physiology, anatomy, neurology, all of that. So we can understand that the pain sensor is not the problem. The pain sciatica is not the problem. We look for the causation of the problem, Alex. And that is in many ways, the misalignment, the compression, the inflammation, the disc bulging again, bone spurs, and many times people will say, Well, I have bone spurs because I’m getting old. No, bone spurs are created because there is a misalignment and lack of calibration in your spine where the body is attempting to self-regulate, self align, and it’s called the wolf’s law. You know, its law is the same principle that deals with the fracture healing fracture where you have pressure, that’s where you have increased calcification. Alex, is that correct?

 

[00:32:22] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It’s the same thing when you work out; when you work out, you get calluses right because the body responds to stress by increasing and protecting the tissue. The same thing happens with the spine. Suppose it starts unloading improperly, then before you know it, the wolf’s law kicks in, the osteoclast start losing, which are the ones that take away bone, and the osteoblasts start winning. Then you have an increase of bone growth in a direction, usually in the direction of the force. So, in essence, the body tries to protect it, so you can imagine if someone’s going like in the leaning tower. Well, it’s on this side that the body protects it to prevent it from falling over. So, in essence, as we look at these degenerative diseases, we try to get them early on, and we try to mobilize. In most scenarios, we can help the individual by different methods and different techniques. And we use a lot of other methods and techniques to help individuals through this process.

 

Spinal Stenosis

 

[00:33:18] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I want to go through a couple of points. You know, we’re talking about spinal stenosis. Again, the start of spinal stenosis is the misalignment of your spine, which chiropractic has the beautiful art. This is the art and science of correcting that. So the more alignment, the more clarity, the more balance you have in your spine. The more maintenance you receive to your spine, the less spinal stenosis you will have later on in your life. Or again, spinal stenosis. You know, the other one that we’re looking at is degenerative disc disease or disc herniation. I believe that I look at the body in the 25+ years of my practice; the better maintenance you give your body, the fewer issues, and the less breakdown wear and tear you will have later on in your life. So I look at is that we are anti-aging doctors in terms of biomechanics, so we help the body maintain its optimal function for a more extended period. So that way, when you’re in your 60s and 70s, and 80s, you can walk by yourself without a cane, and you can function. You can do a squat. I love fitness calibration every time, you know. Danny is awesome. With PUSH, Danny is tremendous in terms of a fitness core. And this is where the synergy comes in. The more miles, the more wear and tear, the more pounding you put on your body. The more maintenance you need, the more recovery work. And too many people, Alex, have this idea like, Oh, my back hurts, I just need to squat more. I just need to do more weights. I just need to be in a gym, no. It’s like me telling you I don’t need count maintenance and tune-ups on my car. I just need to drive it more now. So the more miles you put on your bag, the more you squat, the more calibration you need. Why? Because eventually, your body is going to go out of alignment.

 

[00:35:32] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know, as we look at disorders, like you said, spinal stenosis. There are many reasons we can have spinal stenosis, from a disc to just arthritic issues. But when we have an individual who suddenly has issues, OK, this is not a sudden, you know, kind of thing that the spinal stenosis doesn’t happen unless it’s a massive disc herniation that occurs in one moment. Yeah, but these things and what we’re talking about spinal stenosis, there are different reasons. And in the treatments are many methods are just, you know, microanatomy. There’s also a laminectomy which is to remove the pressure. But the bottom line is very little wrong with the nerve. The issue is compressive forces. So what do we have to do in the situation where there is a biomechanical imbalance in the pelvic girdle most of the time. 

 

[00:36:20] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So it is structure impedes on the nerve.

 

[00:36:23] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yes. And as we do that, we evaluate that there are certain things like age, obesity, or even less of a life of activity. What are other things, Mario?

 

What Are The Occupations That Cause Sciatica?

 

[00:36:33] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Sedentary lifestyle, repetitive occupational motion? 

 

[00:36:36] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: What kind of occupations would have sciatica? 

 

[00:36:40] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Truck drivers. Why? By sedentary vibration. Eight to ten hours by sitting down. Secretaries, I mean, you can go on and on, people working in banks and teachers even.

 

[00:36:57] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We have patients that go to the Southern Union railroad, the engineers, the vibration, the bouncing over 30 years of vibrating. Eventually, the bone activates the spine clouds, or you have spinal stenosis, and they have back disc issues, and they have degenerative diseases.

 

[00:37:14] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Athletes have a repetitive toque like a golfer. How many golfers do you know that have no back pain? None. How about baseball players?

 

[00:37:25] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: How about our buddy, Tiger Woods?

 

[00:37:27] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, what happened to him?

 

[00:37:28] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah, what did people think? People thought he might have been having some issues with alcohol. Still, the reality is he’s taking medication after surgery, and suddenly, he’s driving, and he probably forgot to take medicine. You know, they took a pill and started to get addicted, and this is the issue. We got to figure out how to fix these issues calibrating. But I got to tell you; there are a lot of ways we can help people. The issue is that once we understand where the problem comes from, the plan of attack can take off. There are different issues and different types of diagnoses. We have here a little bit of a window where you can take a look at that. You can see that sciatica is a symptom. It’s a presentation of syndromes. It’s a pain down the leg, but there are tons of reasons.

 

[00:38:14] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Now the causation is right there, right? 

 

[00:38:17] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Well, look at all of these things, and it is ridiculous.

 

[00:38:21] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Wow.

 

[00:38:22] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: The one people think about a lot is peraforma syndrome, and that’s only one component. Then when that doesn’t work, your little stretches, you try to figure out what’s causing it could be tendinopathy, it could be bursitis. Look at all these issues when we go in here; when we look at these particular issues, we can look at other subsequent areas causing problems. You mentioned it before the four sets; this degeneration redevelops the quadrant is formoral area.

 

[00:38:48] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So let’s make this simple. Otherwise, you know, people will listen to us and go; it’s a lot. It’s a lot, and this is like a fire hydrant, and I just have my mouth over it. Alex, this is what we got. Number one, it all comes down to foundation and function, right? If we go back on each of these things from, you know, four-set syndrome, this degeneration, ridiculous hip, you know, formoral impingement, quadrennial femoral, you know, abnormalities all of these. The root of all of these is the misalignment and lack of calibration of the neuromuscular system. I mean, when you go down to it, the majority, I’m not saying 100 percent, let’s not do that. Let’s not be silly tonight. No. The point is the majority, if we can do a better job for our community, if we can do a better job in terms of our athletes, is to create a maintenance calibration system for them, we would decrease a lot of these degenerative disc diseases and diagnoses, we would stop them before they blow up in their face.

 

Different Methods To Treat Sciatica

 

[00:40:19] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Let me ask you this. What kind of things in terms of our diagnostic abilities, what we use different methods to diagnose?

 

[00:40:26] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I love MRI.

 

[00:40:28] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: In terms of sciatica, X-rays are good, but MRIs can tell you what the problem is.

 

[00:40:34] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: That’s it, and we’re talking about like a Tesla ten. I don’t know if they have it, and I think it’s sorry about it. I just got crazy tonight. Nah, they didn’t make it. We’re going to get some calls. Tesla, what? 

 

[00:40:46] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We got a great radiologist, and they help us hone in on particular areas.

 

[00:40:54] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: They have a three-point-o or something?

 

A Relationship With Your Radiologist

 

[00:40:59] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: The whole idea is a relationship with our radiologists. Our radiologists are our eyes and ears on the deep tissues. I can tell you that we do have the best radiologists working with us. We do. I mean, the city has some top-end radiologists people, and when we send them to them, they communicate with us and tell us where the problem is that from there we go at it from once we know where it’s at. We use cat scans. We use ultrasound. We use bone scans.

 

[00:41:29] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*:  Why is it a question? OK, this is going to get a little crazy and a little nasty tonight. Why is it that most doctors, Alex order X-rays first? Why is it? I can never understand for myself. You know what I tried to go straight to the issue was to go to MRI. Why is it?

 

[00:41:51] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: The standard of care is many insurance carriers will want an X-ray first to see if it’s a degenerative bone structure to be able to bleed on that. But we all understand that the best possible option for actually assessing it is to kind of rule out some things. If you want to look at bone, you do a cat scan to do the soft tissues. Well, this is soft tissue. So then you do an MRI with contrast, and you can see the deep tissues and the separation and the inflammation for any prolonged issues occurring.

 

[00:42:21] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: That’s why, to me, Alex, that makes sense if we’re looking at diagnosing disk and nerve issues, right? Why is it that we use an instrument many times and I see this and agree with you. All of the insurances are going in and saying, Hey, you need to do an X-ray first. We won’t let you do the MRI, do they? I’m like, but X-rays don’t show any soft tissues.

 

[00:42:46] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I think it’s a common thing. It’s almost like when you go to a dentist, you know, they scan all the teeth. It’s pretty easy to generalize. You know, there are times when the standard of care is into that today? For the low back, the standard of care is an X-ray as an initial entry point. So from there, I’ve learned, and I have gotten this lately, that most insurance carriers are very open to allowing the individual based on a presentation to do whatever it takes. They don’t stop. That’s a real beautiful change that’s happened since I’d say for the last five years; it’s a whole different game. So we get to see that we do nerve conduction and nerve testing to see the speed at which the nerve pulses. So we can find that AMG’s electromyography and see how the muscles are. But you don’t need to be doing that stuff for sciatica when you know the person is in severe pain. Now, if you want to prove it, that’s when you do the NCBI. Other than that, the person will not come in telling you that they have pain. Now sciatica because I call it the scourge because it just annoys you. It stops you from doing, you don’t sleep, you get to lay down, and the darn thing just activates. And there you got this electric current preventing you sleep. People come in with their eyes bloodshot and unable to enjoy their lives. This changes the quality, and we need to fix these things. 

 

Does Sciatica Cause Inflammation?

 

[00:44:09] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It affects families. Alex, let’s get down to it. You know what? It affects your relationship with your spouse, with your children, at work. You know, you go to work, and you’re angry. Yes, you’re just mad at the world, and people are trying to figure out, like, what’s wrong, man? And it’s like, “You know what? I’m dealing with stuff.” And then that chronicity after a while, you’re like, “I don’t know what to do. I’m taking too many meds. I’m taking 800 milligrams every day for like five months.”

 

[00:44:39] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*:  Let’s give the people out there who may want some information a little bit of insight into the other options they have. Because what’s the name of the game here? What are sciatica and inflammation? It’s what it always has and always will be. So what we got to do is do what we can, and many people ask me, What are my options? Well, we have here a breakdown of certain things, and we’re going to discuss these things in real extensive detail over the next couple of months. And we’re going to hit this thing as we will be dealing with sciatica and vitamin C, D, calcium. We’re going deep all these things, you can take a screenshot of this, and you can say berberine. We got glucosamine, ACL, carnitine, alpha-lipoic acid, ashwagandha, soluble fiber, vitamin E, green tea, turmeric. A lot of these things have a lot to do with metabolic syndrome. But guess what? When you have metabolic syndrome, which is what?

 

[00:45:36] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Inflammation.

 

[00:45:37] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: So what we’ve noticed, Mario, and correct me if you see something different. 

 

Ashwagandha

 

[00:45:44] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*:  I love that word ashwagandha.

 

[00:45:47] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah, I love it too.

 

[00:45:55] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It’s like, we’re going to meditate pretty soon, Alex. 

 

[00:46:01] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: So, as we kind of look at these options, we really can discuss deep levels of biomedical science here, OK. Because everyone wants to know what we can do, but since we’re dealing with, let’s say, just on the angle of metabolic syndrome, again, we got to tie in another beast insulin. Insulin inflammation susceptibility. And here, we correlate. It may seem far away, but if you take a hundred people with metabolic syndrome, these people are susceptible to sciatica and the stuff we hold on to.

 

[00:46:46] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Let’s make it simple. How many people do you know with metabolic syndrome that don’t have back pain or sciatica? OK, let’s make it. Let’s make it simple.

 

[00:46:58] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We got to tie together, and this is where we do it. National in clinical practice, what we do is we make these connections. And the bottom line is we start changing people’s habits, you know, simple things like instead of having a pop or something else only option you should have as green tea. Green tea is an antioxidant anti-inflammatory. We start changing the metabolic processes, begin cutting the gut grease, and all that starts happening.

 

[00:47:27] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: OK. We’re mixing ashwagandha with gut grease. You know what? People are going to remember this forever, Alex.

 

[00:47:34] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: If you kind of see what we’re got, we’re saying it is complex. We can go down one rabbit hole and say we got the moment of truth or the thing that’s important. But the reality is that the low back causes neck pain. A lot of people will look at it and say, Why does that happen? Well, as Mario said, you know, God didn’t name it as neck pain. God didn’t call it lumbar spine. We named it the vertebral column. It’s the whole darn thing that is connected. From the moment you heal, strike your head feels the shockwave, right? So when we look at that, when we assess that, we can see that the body has a massive implication when some large nerve, late-deciding nerve, gets offset. So what we can do is first figure out, mitigate the issues, control them and come up with a treatment plan that works appropriately for the patients. So as we do these things, we will go over all those beautiful ideas that we have going on here. And I just wanted to let you know that we’re going to be discussing many more subject matters.

 

Vitamin D3

 

[00:48:35] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: There it is vitamin D3. That is why I love vitamin D3, and it’s everywhere.

 

[00:48:43] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Four hundred disorders. A 400 percent decrease in all risk mortality or times decreases disease mortality with vitamin D. This is like the magical thing? I mean, common sense. I mean, what’s our biggest organ, right? It’s the skin. So when we live in the sun city, right, what happens? 

 

[00:49:07] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: We absorb the sun’s rays.

 

[00:49:09] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: And that should be the healthiest.

 

[00:49:11] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Hey, I want to get crazy tonight. All right. Sun City vitamin D. We should be the healthiest on the planet.

 

[00:49:22] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: That’s it. I mean, it’s essential. So what did we get called about a couple of decades ago? Mario, you remember that we were named the fattest sweaty town in the country? 

 

[00:49:35] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: That angers me, and that should motivate and pump people up. That right there should be the wake-up call and the battle cry of El Paso and the whole region. Never again will you ever open your mouth and say that because we are the best.

 

Treatment Protocols

 

[00:50:00] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We are. We are very family-based and a location and a community, but we suffer from metabolic syndrome, which implicates issues. And one of them is sciatica. I got to tell you; there isn’t a day that half my patients coming in have sciatica, and you and I have been doing this between 25 and 30 years, right? So as we’ve been pounding and fixing these disorders. And you’ve got to tell you there are studies where we see that when doctors of all different sorts refer for a surgical consult, there’s a high tendency to have surgical, you know, focus when you go to a nonmusculoskeletal special like a physical therapist or chiropractor, we kind of filter out the situation when in our path or an available position to see the lower back pain. They throw it into the orthopedic surgeon, and only five to 10 percent of most studies show that those become surgical the ones we send. About 50 percent are surgical. That means we do a great job of filtering out before they have that issue. In other words, we fix the problem, and the ones we do refer to these.

 

[00:51:17] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yes, that’s right.

 

[00:51:19] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Game on. So we want to make sure you know that you know that we need that for your orthopedist out there. We require that option, that modality, but we don’t do that kind of procedure. But it’s necessary for terms of the common treatment protocol, you know, the mainstay of sciatica.

 

[00:51:38] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It’s gabapentin. Just adding on to that, we refer to real cases, you know? When someone comes in, they need it. It’s not like, Oh, you know what? We’re going to waste people’s time. They need it. Because again, the new model now for back problems and especially sciatica is noninvasive. OK, noninvasive care first for at least two to three months.

 

[00:52:10] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Well, you know, I’m on my point of view on those guidelines. You know, every person is different.

 

[00:52:17] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah. ODG guidelines, Alex.

 

[00:52:21] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: And what happens is that you can oversee the treatment protocols when we look at these dynamics. 

 

[00:52:31] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, there it is. The treatment protocols. You know, I look at treatment. Chiropractic care, a lifestyle change. Metabolic syndrome, we’re looking at physical therapy; we need everyone on board. Acupuncture, drugs again. Medication for pain. Anti-inflammatory muscle relaxers. Nutraceuticals, herbals, steroid injections. Yeah, those are what we call lying like the second you, even with a lot of the patients, it’s after conservative care by the time they get to that phase. And then, of course, you have surgery, surgical procedures. So yeah, you must go with our patients. We go from noninvasive to invasive care.

 

[00:53:36] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*:  These procedures are the ones we do.

 

[00:53:47] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Now with those. And that’s a foam roller right at the storm rolling, that means releasing the goods, the pure performance right there. And again, a lot of our viewers will think, hold on. I can’t even walk, and I can’t do that. But again, this is the secondary phase, Alex. This is the second phase. Furthermore, we’re not getting people out, and all of a sudden, they can’t walk in there. They’re, you know, doing box jumps. No, this is the secondary self first care correct release the pressure brake and the pain pattern and then stabilize and correct the muscle imbalance. So those are things because I think a lot of times, you know, many people ask me like, “Oh, you know what? I want to go work out.” I’m going on like, Hey, slow down, superstar, let’s not workout. You know, let’s not work out. Let’s correct the problem. Calibrate your back. Then you work out, and then you do a process of what I call periodicity. That means you scale it. You got to crawl before you walk and walk before you run. So let’s not be superheroes, and a lot of people just aren’t patient. 

[00:55:08] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I agree with you.

 

[00:55:09] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: They’re not patient. They want things now. You know this has been created. This sciatica and back problems have been created for years. No maintenance for like 10 20 years. And they expect to walk into the office and, in one visit, do jumping jacks. You know what? Sorry but it’s not going to happen. So that’s where people want again. We do our best, but we don’t look for quick fixes. If you wish for the symptoms to go away but are not corrected, then you’re going to deal with the problem. That’s going to be lingering for years and years, and it’s going to get worse, you know, and those pain sensors. This is what’s so important. God created a body such as such a miraculous system, and we can’t even duplicate this. The most potent technology developed to wear the sensors, the awareness, proprioception within our body, and pain is effective. I often tell people, don’t block the pain because it is healthy because it tells you to stop. That pain is that red light on your dash that says, don’t drive the car, don’t park it, and fix it. Please don’t unplug the light and keep driving it. And this is where our society and our, you know, immediate care. I want things now. I can’t wait. Just like fitness, you know, people want to get fit in like like a week.

[00:56:47] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Like, come on, it’s not going to happen.

 

Conclusion

 

[00:56:50] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Same thing with your health. It takes time, and you have to get the proper diagnosis. You know, the intense lab work, the genomics, the inflammatory. I mean, this is like I tell people, you’ve got to invest in your health or your sickness. Either way, you’re going to spend the money, either way, but once, you’re going to enjoy the fruits of that investment. The other one, you’re just going to drag. So the process of diagnostics from MRI’s, the process of diagnostics to look at metabolic syndrome, to look at your inflammatory process, that’s an investment. And then with those tools with that information, you got to have created baselines, Alex. If you don’t know where you’re at, you don’t know where you’re going. Now that’s what I would say is I want to motivate and empower people to invest in that process because it’s not an overnight thing and people want it. I tell them that they have got to understand. Be disciplined, be relentless and see the results for life instead of patching up your health.

 

[00:58:15] Dr.Alex Jimenez DC*: This is very dear and near to all of us here because sciatica affects so many individuals. We’re going to be discussing all these issues one section at a time. We’re going to bring an explanation. We’re going to give you an answer. We’re going to provide you with options. We’re going to provide you with treatments. We’re going to come up with a way that we’re going to find the best possible treatment protocol for you. And if not, we’re going to give you at least a basis to ask your doctors exactly what the best approach is, and you’re going to at least know the different directions you can take because we must understand this disorder. It may be simple to many people, but it debilitates you. You integrate way when you have it. We’re going to bring this to you. If you ever want to ask us personal questions and call us personally, Mario makes himself available 24-7 via phone number (915)494-4468. Always has been, and you get called all the time as he is right now. My phone number is(915)850-0900. And here we have, Mario, and I want to thank you all for allowing us to go over these things. This is also Mario’s website at: rujahealth.com. It’s easy, and it’s a fantastic site. We got me over here. This is my address and my phone, and then there’s Daniel Alvarado, where he works from the PUSH Fitness center. So we welcome you guys to see what’s cooking here and seeing what’s happening, and we wish you the best of everything that’s happening. So as we go through that. Mario, it’s been a blessing, brother and I look forward to going over more details with you in the next couple of days, and we will start recording more and more as time goes on. God bless.

 

Disclaimer

Video Gaming Injuries

Video Gaming Injuries

Video gaming has grown to over 150 million individuals in the United States playing. Around 60% of Americans play video games every day, with the average gamer being 34 years old. Playing video games for an extended amount of time takes a toll on the body. Individuals are experiencing the same kind of pains and aches from sitting and standing all day at work or school. Sitting positions, holding the controllers, and the different accessories can impact the nerves, muscles, and Posture. E-sports professionals understand the physical toll their bodies take with constant practice, tournaments, clinics, etc. They do cardiovascular conditioning, strength train, and stretch to improve their gaming abilities and also take into account:

  • The correct sitting position.
  • Ergonomic chairs.
  • Screen height.
  • Ergonomic controllers.
  • Hand/wrist supports.
  • Take regular breaks.

Taking steps can prevent strain, injuries and minimize the risk of long-term damage. If strain and injuries are present, professional chiropractic treatment can help alleviate the pain, rehabilitate/strengthen the muscles, ligaments, tendons, and recommend exercises and stretches.

Video Gaming Injuries

Video Gaming Posture

Proper Posture is vital to maintaining spinal as well as overall health. Poor Posture is the most common cause of back and neck pain.

Video Gaming Positions

Common gaming positions include the couch slouch where the gamer is slumped back into the couch with their feet up. This can lead to low back pain and sciatica. The full-on position is where the individual leans forward, elbows on their knees, head tilted forward, and staring up at the screen. Hours in these positions cause the neck, back, and other body areas to stiffen, generating soreness from the restricted movement. Many gamers use ergonomic gaming chairs. They have found that using the gaming chair improves Posture, eliminating the forward head and rounded shoulders. Gaming chairs can provide the health benefit of sitting correctly, reducing and eliminating neck and back tension or strain.

Injuries and Health Issues

Common musculoskeletal issues caused by excessive gaming and lack of movement include:

  • Eyestrain
  • Headaches
  • Neck pain
  • Elbow, arm, wrist  pain
  • Thumb pain
  • General hand pain
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Postural stress
  • Back pain

Chiropractic Treatment

Shoulder Massage

The intensity of gaming can cause the shoulders to tense up and stiffen. When using the controller, the shoulders can slightly lift, building up lactic acid, interrupting blood circulation, causing an accumulation of unwanted toxins inflaming trigger points. A chiropractic massage will release tightened muscles, provide relaxation, and increase the blood flow.

Hand and Wrist Treatment

The most used body parts for video games include the hands and wrist. Individuals grip the controllers or constantly use the keyboard and mouse. No matter what form of input is used, prolonged use can cause hand and wrist injuries. Injuries include:

  • Inflammation
  • Hand muscle aches

Chiropractic focuses on specific areas to help treat the body through a hand and wrist massage. Advanced techniques include electrical muscle stimulation to help stimulate and loosen the muscles. A chiropractor will recommend stretches and exercises, and hand/wrist supports, guards, or special gloves to alleviate muscle pains while still playing.

Neck and Back Adjustments

Poor posture can result in a misaligned spine or back muscle spasms. During extended game sessions, pain and fatigue can begin to present. A chiropractic adjustment can realign the muscles and set them back in place. The tissue surrounding the neck may thicken and focus on a specific area. Leaning too far forward or using a heavy gaming headset can result in a forward head posture placing a constant strain on the neck. Chiropractic adjustments will loosen the tissue and release any tension. Stretches and exercises will be recommended as well.

Recommendations

  • Set up the gaming station correctly.
  • The monitor or TV should be directly in front and around eye level, taking the strain off the neck.
  • Support the low back by maintaining the normal curve known as lordosis.
  • Use a lumbar support pillow or a small pillow behind the low back to prevent strain and pain.
  • Take frequent breaks every hour, take 10 minutes to get up, walk around, and stretch.
  • Physical activity/exercise 30-60 minutes a day to improve health.
  • Healthy diet

Body Composition


Body Composition

Body composition refers to how various substances in the body are proportioned. A few examples of the components that make up the body include:

  • Water
  • Protein
  • Fat
  • Minerals

All of these components generate balance in the body. When individuals exercise, they begin to notice changes in their body composition. For individuals that exercise regularly, it is vital to track weight gain, weight loss, and changes in body composition. This is to ensure that they aren’t losing muscle mass. As individuals exercise, muscle fibers are torn. During the recovery process, muscles are rebuilt. Overtraining can lead to muscle mass reduction because the body cannot catch up and rebuild the number of muscle fibers, eventually leading to lost muscle.

References

Emara, Ahmed K et al. “Gamer’s Health Guide: Optimizing Performance, Recognizing Hazards, and Promoting Wellness in Esports.” Current sports medicine reports vol. 19,12 (2020): 537-545. doi:10.1249/JSR.0000000000000787

Geoghegan, Luke, and Justin C R Wormald. “Sport-related hand injury: a new perspective of e-sports.” The Journal of hand surgery, European volume vol. 44,2 (2019): 219-220. doi:10.1177/1753193418799607

McGee, Caitlin, et al. “More Than a Game: Musculoskeletal Injuries and a Key Role for the Physical Therapist in Esports.” The Journal of orthopedic and sports physical therapy vol. 51,9 (2021): 415-417. doi:10.2519/jospt.2021.0109

McGee, Caitlin, and Kevin Ho. “Tendinopathies in Video Gaming and Esports.” Frontiers in sports and active living vol. 3 689371. 28 May. 2021, doi:10.3389/fspor.2021.689371

Zwibel, Hallie et al. “An Osteopathic Physician’s Approach to the Esports Athlete.” The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association vol. 119,11 (2019): 756-762. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2019.125

The Efficacy of Low Laser Therapy | El Paso, TX (2021)

The Efficacy of Low Laser Therapy | El Paso, TX (2021)

Around the world, pain, especially chronic pain, is widespread to an individual. When the body goes through a tremendous amount of activity, the muscle tissues will rip and tear to strengthen the body for the next activity it overcomes. But when the muscle tissues tear and cause pain to the body, it can take a week or even months for the tissue to recover. Many recovery treatments can help alleviate the pain that a person is in, and one of the recovery treatments that most physicians use is low laser therapy.

 

Low Laser Therapy & Musculoskeletal Pain

 

Doctors have used low laser therapy to help patients alleviate pain and repair muscle tissue in the affected area of the body. Studies have found that the effects of low laser therapy had a positive impact on the treated area. The study showed that the low laser treatment has helped with relieving pain and has promoted tissue repair. The effects of the low laser wavelength have enhanced the healing process by promoting cell proliferation, causing pain relief. One of the efficient ways that low laser therapy is beneficial to the body is to alleviate musculoskeletal pain. 

 

 

Musculoskeletal pain is a variety of issues in the body. From muscle pain to fibromyalgia, it can render a person miss out on everyday activities, causing them to miss work or school. Studies have shown that when a patient is going in for low laser therapy, the effects from the laser wavelength can reduce inflammation and edema in the affected area. The studies even show that the laser light effects are photochemical and not thermal. The laser light will trigger a biochemical change in the body, causing the photons from the affected area to be absorbed, thus triggering a chemical change in the area.

 

Efficient Uses of Low Laser Therapy

 

 

Other studies even show that the low laser wavelength triggers chemical alterations and potential biochemical benefits to the human body. This means that if a person is suffering from chronic pain when going for low laser treatment, the laser can relieve chronic pain symptoms and even osteoarthritic conditions. Another efficient use of low laser therapy is that it can suppress the MMP or mitochondrial membrane potential in the DRG neutron while reducing adenosine triphosphate or ATP production in the body. In other words, the effects of low laser therapy can suppress and reduce inflammation receptors in the body, thus causing long-term results that last for years, improving tissue healing.

 

Another efficient way low laser therapy is beneficial is that it can be combined with light exercises as a staple of rehabilitation. Studies have found that the combination of low laser therapy and exercise has merit. When an individual combines stretches and low laser therapy as part of their rehabilitation, the data shows a reduction in pain symptoms and fatigue in the body.

 

Conclusion

 

All in all, the efficient effects of low laser therapy are beneficial by reducing inflammation and damping the pain receptors in the body. Since chronic pain is worldwide and can cause harmful effects to the body, using low laser therapy can dampen the pain receptors. Having low laser therapy treatments as part of their daily regime and light exercises for anyone with chronic pain can get their body moving pain-free. Since the body goes through so much, having low laser therapy is one of the many recovery treatments that can provide long-lasting results and promote overall wellness. 

 

References:

Cotler, Howard B., et al. “The Use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for Musculoskeletal Pain.” MOJ Orthopedics & Rheumatology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 9 June 2015, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4743666/.

 

Dima, Robert, et al. “Review of Literature on Low-Level Laser Therapy Benefits for Nonpharmacological Pain Control in Chronic Pain and Osteoarthritis.” Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 24 Sept. 2018, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28987080/.

 

Enwemeka, Chukuka S., et al. “The Efficacy of Low-Power Lasers in Tissue … – Medical Laser.” Medical Summus Laser, 2004, http://medical.summuslaser.com/data/files/77/1585165534_SpHfd8kFyVara63.pdf.

 

Kingsley, J. Derek, et al. “Low-Level Laser Therapy as a Treatment for Chronic Pain.” Frontiers, Frontiers, 19 Aug. 2014, https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphys.2014.00306/full.

Slip and Fall Injuries

Slip and Fall Injuries

Individuals involved in slip and fall accidents lead to around 9 million emergency room visits a year. Recovering from a severe injury suffered in a slip and fall accident requires extensive medical care and physical rehabilitation. Older adults are susceptible to slip and fall injuries. According to the CDC, falls are the leading cause of nonfatal injuries of older adults and are a common hazard in nursing homes, where between half of the residents fall each year. The most common injuries sustained include:

Slip and Fall Accidents and Injuries

Cuts and Abrasions

Cuts and abrasions can be minor to severe. Leg and arm abrasions are the most common, followed by wounds to the head and hips. These injuries require superficial treatment and possibly stitches. However, if the impact of the fall is severe, cuts and abrasions can overlap more severe injuries like concussions and broken bones.

Soft Tissue Injuries

Soft tissue injuries often do not get noticed, so individuals don’t realize they have a mild tissue injury until days or weeks after the fall. Soft tissue injuries can range from minor ankle and/or wrist sprains to severe tears in tendons and ligaments. Left untreated, these injuries can lead to chronic pain conditions making the body more vulnerable to further injuries. Even when individuals feel fine after a slip and fall accident, they are recommended to seek medical care or consult an injury specialist as soft tissue injuries don’t often produce immediate symptoms.

Sprains and Strains

A slip and fall accidents often happen as a result of taking an uneven or awkward step. Individuals also often react with their hands in front to try to cushion the fall. Both the awkward step and pushing the hands out can cause the wrist or ankle to tear, causing a sprain or a strain. The ligaments do not circulate a lot of blood, meaning that healing and recovery can take a significant amount of time.

Broken Bones

A fall can result in stressful forces on the bones of the body. In slip and fall accidents, hip, wrist, and ankle fractures are the most common bones that get broken. The older an individual is, the more likely they will break a bone from a slip and fall accident.

Hip Fractures

More than 95% of broken hips are caused by falls, according to the CDC. Hip fractures often require surgery that can include implantation of an artificial hip and hospitalization for about a week, followed by extensive physical therapy and rehabilitation.

Knee Injuries

Knee injuries can result from a slip and fall, especially if the knee gets rotated the wrong way or twisted. Knees are made up of bone and ligaments, meaning it could take a long to heal and recover. Dislocation of the patella is also a possibility that could require knee reconstruction.

Neck and Shoulder Injuries

Shoulder and neck injuries can be the result of landing on the shoulder or neck. They can also occur from overexertion when trying to right oneself during a fall. Neck injuries can range from:

  • Muscle sprains
  • Spinal injuries
  • Paralysis

Shoulder injuries can result in:

  • Shoulder dislocation
  • Torn nerves
  • Collarbone breaks

Even the most minor neck and shoulder injuries can require surgery and rehabilitation.

Back and Spinal Cord Injuries

Severe impact on the body in a slip and fall accident can cause slipped or herniated discs and fractured vertebrae, causing significant pain and limiting mobility. An injury to the spinal cord can lead to temporary paralysis, permanent paralysis, neurologic and sensory impairments. According to the Mayo Clinic, falls cause more than a quarter of spinal cord injuries and the majority of spinal injuries among adults 65 and older.

Traumatic Brain Injuries

Traumatic brain injuries occur when an individual hits their head on a hard surface during a fall. Traumatic brain injuries can range from:

  • Minor injuries like:
  • Minor concussions
  • Bumps
  • Bruises
  • To major injuries like:
  • Skull fractures
  • Hematomas
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • Severe traumatic brain injuries like:
  • Brain function issues
  • Seizures
  • Loss of bodily control

Chiropractic Care

A chiropractor will review imaging scans, medical history, and current symptoms to determine the best form of treatment. Inflammation is common and is the body’s defense to protect the injured area by slowing down the blood flow in that area to allow the body’s internal defenses to repair the injury. Sometimes the body overreacts to the problem and produces far more inflammation than is needed. Depending on the severity of the injury, various massage, manipulation techniques, and tools will be utilized to help the body heal itself.


Body Composition


Recovery and Swelling

Recovery is an essential part of individuals involved in physical training programs and after injury. A significant sign that the body has undergone intense physical exertion and requires recovery is swelling. Swelling occurs for several reasons and is the body’s response to tiny, microscopic muscle tears that arise from intense use. It is possible to see this swelling in body composition results. Recovery is about giving the body a chance to:

  • Relax
  • Recuperate
  • Recover from the swelling to resume normal physical activities.
References

Courtney, T K et al. “Occupational slip, trip, and fall-related injuries–can the contribution of slipperiness be isolated?.” Ergonomics vol. 44,13 (2001): 1118-37. doi:10.1080/00140130110085538

Kannus, Pekka et al. “Prevention of falls and consequent injuries in elderly people.” Lancet (London, England) vol. 366,9500 (2005): 1885-93. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(05)67604-0

Reuben, David B et al. “The Strategies to Reduce Injuries and Develop Confidence in Elders Intervention: Falls Risk Factor Assessment and Management, Patient Engagement, and Nurse Co-management.” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society vol. 65,12 (2017): 2733-2739. doi:10.1111/jgs.15121

Rosen, Tony et al. “Slipping and tripping: fall injuries in adults associated with rugs and carpets.” Journal of injury & violence research vol. 5,1 (2013): 61-9. doi:10.5249/jivr.v5i1.177

The Effects of Low Laser Therapy on Repairing The Calcaneal Tendon | El Paso, TX

The Effects of Low Laser Therapy on Repairing The Calcaneal Tendon | El Paso, TX

The body is a well-working machine that can endure anything that is thrown in its way. However, when it gets an injury, the body’s natural healing process will ensure that the body can get back to its daily activities. The healing process of an injured muscle varies throughout the body. Depending on how severe the damage is and how long the healing process will take, the body can recover to a mere few days to a few months. One of the most gruelly healing processes that the body has to endure is a ruptured calcaneal tendon.

The Calcaneal Tendon

The calcaneal tendon or the Achilles tendon is a thick tendon that is located in the back of the leg. This muscle-tendon is what makes the body move while walking, running, or even jumping. Not only that, the calcaneal tendon is the strongest tendon in the body, and it connects the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles at the heel bone. When the calcaneal tendon is ruptured, the healing process can last from weeks to months until it is fully healed. 

 

 

The Healing Effects of Low Laser Therapy

One of the ways that can help the damaged calcaneal tendons’ healing process is low laser therapy. Studies have shown that low laser therapy can speed up the damaged tendon repair after a partial lesion. Not only that but the combination of ultrasound and low laser therapy has been studied to be the physical agents for treating tendon injuries. The studies showed that the combination of low laser therapy and ultrasound has beneficial properties during the recovery process of treating calcaneal tendon injuries.

 

 

The study found that when patients are being treated for their calcaneal tendons, their hydroxyproline levels around the treated area are significantly increased with ultrasound and low laser therapy. The body’s natural biochemical and biomechanical structures on the injured tendon increase, thus affecting the healing process. Another study has shown that low laser therapy can help reduce fibrosis and prevent oxidative stress in the traumatized calcaneal tendon. The study even showed that after the calcaneal tendon is traumatized, inflammation, angiogenesis, vasodilation, and the extracellular matrix are formed in the affected area. So when patients are being treated with low laser therapy for about fourteen to twenty-one days, their histological abnormalities are alleviated, reducing collagen concentration and fibrosis; preventing oxidative stress from increasing in the body.

 

Conclusion

Overall, it is said that the effects of low laser therapy can help speed up the healing process of repairing the calcaneal tendon. The promising results have been proven since low laser therapy can help repair the damaged tendon, reducing oxidative stress and preventing fibrosis from escalating, causing more problems on the injured tendon. And with the combination of ultrasound, the calcaneal tendon can recover faster so the body can continue its everyday activities without any prolonged injuries.

 

References:

Demir, Huseyin, et al. “Comparison of the Effects of Laser, Ultrasound, and Combined Laser + Ultrasound Treatments in Experimental Tendon Healing.” Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2004, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15278933/.

Fillipin, Lidiane Isabel, et al. “Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) Prevents Oxidative Stress and Reduces Fibrosis in Rat Traumatized Achilles Tendon.” Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2005, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16196040/.

Oliveira, Fla’via Schlittler, et al. Effect of Low Level Laser Therapy (830 Nm … – Medical Laser. 2009, http://medical.summuslaser.com/data/files/86/1585171501_uLg8u2FrJP7ZHcA.pdf.

Wood, Viviane T, et al. “Collagen Changes and Realignment Induced by Low-Level Laser Therapy and Low-Intensity Ultrasound in the Calcaneal Tendon.” Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2010, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20662033/.

Reading The Body’s Warning Signs

Reading The Body’s Warning Signs

Individuals don’t like to read the warning signs of their spinal health, saying to themselves the pain will go away. Individuals will feel their back seize up or sting for a moment and then goes back to normal. The body is doing its job to warn you that something is not right. This is where choices come into play:

  • Ignore the warning because the tingling or pain went away.
  • Pay attention to the warning before more damage is done.

This is where waiting, hoping that it will resolve on its own, is not recommended. This is because something did happen but did not fully present, like a loose part that is still functioning. However, time, movement, or action, can throw the body off balance and create all kinds of health issues.

Reading The Body's Warning Signs

Paying attention to the Warning Signs

The body is always adapting to the internal and external environments. For example, external adaptation is sweating during a hot summer day. The body adapts to the heat by sweating to cool down and bring down the temperature. An example of internal adaptation is the spine has been slowly shifting out of alignment. The muscles that support the spine have been adapting to this shifting. However, it is not the ideal adaptation situation as some muscles over/under stretch while others under/over-contract to compensate, causing pain. The body gets stressed out physically, with possible damage occurring. This is where an individual knows something is not right and needs to listen to their body.

The Impact

A spine that is misaligned/subluxated does not move properly or function correctly. Improper movement damages the spinal:

  • Bones
  • Discs
  • Cord
  • Nerves

The spinal cord and nerves transmit and receive all the vital information the body needs to function. These include:

  • Heart function
  • Intestinal function
  • Lung function

A misaligned spine can hurt or cause symptoms for a split second. The effects of an untreated misaligned spine can affect an individual for life. If you have experienced any of these or other warning signs, contact a chiropractor. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic will help assess your symptoms and develop a personalized treatment plan.


Body Composition


Work On Goals One at A Time

To reach goals faster, it’s best to target one goal at a time. How to decide which goal to begin with:

Fat Loss First

This goal is best for individuals whose body compositions have a high body fat percentage and high overall weight.

Lean Body Mass First

Individuals may want to begin by increasing Lean Body Mass if they are skinny fat. Skinny fat means the individual is not overweight but has low amounts of  Lean Body Mass and high amounts of Fat Mass.

Resistance training to build muscle will likely bring down Fat Mass as well. Increasing Lean Body Mass will increase the calorie needed by the body to maintain itself. This increased calorie need can lead to the body acquiring energy by burning extra fat. The calories burned in resistance training also speed up fat loss. Everyone is different in how the body responds to programs targeting fat and those designed to build muscle. Consult with our health coach, nutritionist, and fitness chiropractic team with any questions you may have.

References

Bruehl, Stephen. “Complex regional pain syndrome.” BMJ (Clinical research ed.) vol. 351 h2730. 29 Jul. 2015, doi:10.1136/bmj.h2730

Flynn, Diane M. “Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Nonpharmacologic, Noninvasive Treatments.” American family physician vol. 102,8 (2020): 465-477.

Sanzarello, Ilaria et al. “Central sensitization in chronic low back pain: A narrative review.” Journal of back and musculoskeletal rehabilitation vol. 29,4 (2016): 625-633. doi:10.3233/BMR-160685

Straining, Spasming, Injuring The Lat Muscles

Straining, Spasming, Injuring The Lat Muscles

The latissimus dorsi or lats are the large flat muscles on each side covering the width of the middle and lower back. They connect the bone of the upper arm to the spine and the hip. When pain presents in these muscles, it is typically caused by:

  • Repetitive overuse in a job or doing a task/chore that requires constant
  • Bending
  • Pulling
  • Pushing
  • Reaching
  • Twisting
  • Kneeling
  • A result of poor technique in sports or similar physical activities.

Chiropractic treatment, along with exercises, can help prevent and relieve this pain.

Straining, Spasming, Injuring The Lat Muscles

Symptoms of lat pain

The objective is to diagnose whether the pain is located in the latissimus dorsi or other muscles in the shoulders or back. If the latissimus dorsi is injured, an individual might feel pain in several areas, these include:

  • Lower, middle, and upper back
  • Back of the shoulders
  • The base of the shoulder blade
  • Lower arms
  • Inside of the arms, extending down to the fingers

In certain cases, the pain will present without warning and can be felt in the surrounding muscles. This type of pain often gets worse when the individual:

  • Extends their hands forward and out in front
  • Raises their hands above their head
  • Tosses or throws an object

Damage or injury to the latissimus dorsi

Tissue damage or injury can cause other symptoms to present. These include:

  • Tingling in the lower arms
  • Breathing causes aching and/or pain
  • Tendonitis in the middle and/or lower back

If the source of the back pain cannot be identified, or if it is accompanied by:

  • Fever
  • Breathing problems
  • Abdominal pain
  • Consult a doctor as these could be symptoms of a more serious condition.

Uses and Causes

The lat muscles are used in everyday activities. These include:

  • Picking up objects like grocery bags
  • Opening heavy doors
  • Chest expansion for breathing
  • Pushing against the armrests of a chair to stand up
  • Using handrails to climb stairs

For sports or working out, the lats are used in:

  • Weightlifting exercises using the upper body
  • Bench-presses
  • Rowing
  • Swimming
  • Throwing

Common causes of pain include:

  • Overusing the muscles
  • Using poor techniques
  • Exercising without warming up

Risk of injury

Individuals that are at risk of developing this injury include those that:

  • Are continually reaching overhead
  • Regularly chop wood
  • Perform regular shoveling
  • Move furniture or other heavy objects
  • Regularly practice poor posture

Tearing the latissimus dorsi is possible, especially for athletes. Some athletes with increased risk include:

  • Golfers
  • Baseball pitchers
  • Gymnasts
  • Swimmers
  • Tennis players

Exercises that can help bring relief

Certain exercises can alleviate the aches, pain, and strengthen the lat muscles to prevent and/or worsen the injury. It is recommended to consult a doctor, sports chiropractor, or personal trainer before beginning a therapeutic exercise regimen. This is to ensure that the exercises are right for the individual and their condition and that they use the correct form. Here are two exercises that can help reduce the pain. The doctor, chiropractor, or trainer will recommend the frequency the individual should perform the exercises.

Back bow

This pose is known as the superman pose. To perform:

  • Lay facedown on the floor
  • Extend the legs so they are straight
  • Stretch arms away from the body, so they are in front of the head
  • Use the back to raise the shoulders
  • Extend the arms and legs upward
  • Hold the position for 10 seconds

Pelvic raise/lift

To perform this exercise:

  • Lay flat on your back with the arms at the sides
  • Bend the knees like for a sit-up with the heels close to the buttocks
  • Keeping the hands and feet in place
  • Lift the pelvis upward
  • Slowly lower back to the floor

Prevention

Individuals can prevent lat pain with lifestyle adjustments. These include:

  • Using proper technique and posture during work, sports, and exercise
  • Staying aware to not overuse the muscles
  • Staying hydrated
  • Warming up and cooling down thoroughly before and after a workout, sports, physical activities
  • Regular stretching
  • Applying ice and heat before and after work, sports, and physical activities
  • Chiropractic care
  • Physical therapy massage

Body Composition


Nutrition and Recovery Advantage

Two important steps to achieve optimal health include:

Nutrition

Having a proper protein intake is important for muscle adaptability or the way muscles adapt to stress during exercise and/or strength training. This is also important to stimulate muscle protein synthesis after exercising and/or strength training. To ensure the body is getting the strength and hypertrophy improvement from exercise and strength training, it is recommended to eat around 25g of high-quality protein after workout sessions.

Recovery

For those doing aerobic and strength training, maximize recovery time between workout sessions. This is because strength and aerobic fitness health gains are low when the two only have a separation of 6 hours or less. Twenty-four hours between sessions is recommended especially if the priority is endurance performance.

References

Anderson, S. E., Hertel, R., Johnston, J. O., Stauffer, E., Leinweber, E., & Steinbach, L. S. (2005, November). Latissimus dorsi tendinosis and tear: imaging features of a pseudotumor of the upper limb in five patients. American Journal of Roentgenology, 185(5), 1145–1151
https://www.ajronline.org/doi/abs/10.2214/AJR.04.1247

Donohue, Benjamin F et al. “Sports Injuries to the Latissimus Dorsi and Teres Major.” The American journal of sports medicine vol. 45,10 (2017): 2428-2435. doi:10.1177/0363546516676062http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0363546516676062?journalCode=ajsb

Henseler, J. F., Nagels, J., Nelissen, R. G. H. H., & de Groot, J. H. (2014, April). Does the latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for massive rotator cuff tears remain active postoperatively and restore active external rotation? Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 23(4), 553–560
http://www.jshoulderelbow.org/article/S1058-2746(13)00399-6/fulltext%20

George, Michael S, and Michael Khazzam. “Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Rupture.” The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons vol. 27,4 (2019): 113-118. doi:10.5435/JAAOS-D-17-00581

Lehman, Gregory J et al. “Variations in muscle activation levels during traditional latissimus dorsi weight training exercises: An experimental study.” Dynamic medicine: DM vol. 3,1 4. 30 Jun. 2004, doi:10.1186/1476-5918-3-4

Chiropractic Wrist and Hand Adjustments

Chiropractic Wrist and Hand Adjustments

The hands are used for all kinds of tasks/chores day and night. Using the hands requires the wrists. When wrist pain presents, it can make life unbearable, causing individuals to make all kinds of awkward and unhealthy habits that can worsen and cause further injury. Chiropractic wrist and hand adjustments are recommended for this type of injury. A majority of wrist injuries are the result of micro-stress/repetitive tearing use. Repetitive stress injuries often require a multifaceted treatment approach. This is why chiropractic is so effective, in that it treats the symptoms and the causes to get back to work, school, and normal life quickly.

Chiropractic Wrist and Hand Adjustments

Wrist Tendonitis

Wrist tendonitis happens when a tendon becomes inflamed. This is common among athletes, store workers, clerks, warehouse workers, hair stylists/barbers, etc. Individuals that are constantly using their hands, wrists, and arms have an increased risk of developing tendonitis. And without proper treatment and rest, the inflammation continues and worsens. Chiropractic wrist adjustments for wrist tendonitis include:

  • Diagnosis and assessment.
  • Swelling and pain are alleviated using ice, bracing, ultrasound, laser therapy, and other inflammation-reducing techniques.
  • Once the inflammation has been brought down, massage therapy is incorporated to keep the tendons loose and relaxed.
  • Physical therapy and manual manipulation will restore mobility and flexibility to the wrist.
  • When the pain is completely reduced and mobility is restored, chiropractic wrist adjustments will break down the scar tissue to prevent future injury.
  • The chiropractor will recommend ergonomic tips and exercises to prevent flare-ups.

Wrist Crepitus

Another common issue that can be painful is crepitus, which is a popping, clicking, and/or cracking in the wrist when moving the hand. Different causes depend on the type the popping/clicking/cracking. If it occurs without pain, more than likely, it is the gases escaping from the wrist joint. This is normal and is not something to worry about. However, a chiropractor can help if it becomes burdensome. Another cause is when a tendon extends or contracts over the bone with certain types of movements. This type of popping often results in pain and should be addressed by a professional to prevent further damage. Both issues are commonly treated with wrist adjustments.

Dislocated Wrist

A dislocated wrist needs immediate medical care from the emergency room. The wrist needs to be reset and given time to recover/heal before a chiropractor can work on it to repair any issues that the dislocation caused. There are benefits from chiropractic after a serious wrist injury that includes:

  • Pain relief
  • Function restored
  • Mobility restoration
  • Proper wrist alignment
  • Scar tissue removal
  • Strength training
  • Aching, popping, and cracking relief

Chiropractic Wrist Adjustment

Wrist adjustments depend on the injury/condition that the individual is going through. A chiropractor uses different approaches and techniques that return the joints to the proper alignment. Wrist adjustments are usually done by hand and are gentle. This is because the bones and tendons do not need major force to correct. Chiropractors focus on the wrist the same way they focus on the whole body.

  • They relieve pain and swelling first.
  • They determine what caused the injury.
  • Then focus on strengthening the joint.
  • Develop a prevention regimen to keep it from recurring.

Body Composition


Complete Body Measurement

Getting body composition tested will help progress to optimal health by the results, not the weight scale. Determining progress with metrics like this and lean body mass equips individuals with the knowledge needed to get the results faster and smarter. The quickest and easiest way to determine body composition is to use the InBody. This means focusing on body fat percentage instead of weight. The devices being used today are extremely accurate at giving reliable body fat percentage results. Get a complete readout of your body that includes:

  • Muscle mass
  • Fat mass
  • Body water
  • Body fat percentage

Getting as much information as possible using optimal tests will help with goal planning and achieving optimal health.

References

Hulbert, James R et al. “Chiropractic treatment of hand and wrist pain in older people: systematic protocol development Part 2: cohort natural-history treatment trial.” Journal of chiropractic medicine vol. 6,1 (2007): 32-41. doi:10.1016/j.jcme.2007.02.011

Prasad, Ganesh, and Mustafa J Bhalli. “Assessing wrist pain: a simple guide.” British journal of hospital medicine (London, England: 2005) vol. 81,5 (2020): 1-7. doi:10.12968/hmed.2019.0051

Sadowski, M, and D Della Santa. “Les syndromes douloureux du poignet” [Wrist pain]. Revue medicale suisse vol. 2,92 (2006): 2919-23.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0161475408002947

I Threw Out My Back, What That Means

I Threw Out My Back, What That Means

I threw my back out. Most of us have heard and possibly experienced throwing our backs out. But, what does throwing out your back really mean? Find out from our experts. When talking about throwing one’s back out, it’s usually a result of twisting, turning, coughing, sneezing, or lifting incorrectly. The medical equivalent to this injury is an ankle sprain. It can be excruciating, individuals might not see or feel a tear, but the ligaments have been injured, causing inflammation and pain. The same thing can happen to the spine.

I Threw Out My Back, What That Means

What it means when you throw out your back.

Most experience acute pain in the lower region of their backs. Individuals can throw out their back at any age doing all kinds of activities. These can range from:

  • Changing a tire
  • Moving lifting boxes, going upstairs, etc
  • House chores/tasks
  • Gardening
  • Sports
  • Working out
  • Bending over to pick up an object

It is more common as individuals age. This is when individuals notice how they could take a serious injury and walk away when they were young. However, with age, something like a cough or sneeze could cause the back to become sprained. When the ankle is sprained, it is immobilized to allow it to rest and heal.

However, it is not as easy to immobilize the spine as large muscles in the back around the spine. Any time tissue is injured, the muscles automatically spasm to act as a splint. These spasms usually tend to be the worst part when back pain presents. This is because the back muscles are large; they cause intense inflammation and pain when they spasm. Combined with this, the back can feel like it is stuck, significantly decreasing the range of motion. This type of injury can take a couple of days to reduce and up to two to six weeks to return to normal function.

This is what is really happening

The majority of the time, what has happened is there is a small ligament strain or an annular tear, which is a tear in the ligament that connects the vertebra to the disc. When standing upright and lifting properly, the disc/s work like hydraulics.

When individuals bend over not using their legs, the back part of the spine widens/opens up, and instead of a hydraulic effect, it becomes a cantilever structure. Bending and twisting compound the pressure across the disc. Prevention is key and by using the legs and keeping the back straight, let the hydraulic system do its natural job.

Misconceptions

Chiropractors specialize in difficult to treat musculoskeletal pain conditions. The term threw out one’s back is similar to the knee, arm, shoulder being blown out. The terminology can create fear associated with the idea of throwing something out of place, especially when it comes to the spine. When individuals come in with back pain, they can become fearful of what will be found. These include:

  • What has happened to my spine?
  • Is it going to get better?
  • Is this going to be a life-long injury?
  • Will I be able to walk normally?

Through research, doctors now know that fear is an inflammatory response. Therefore, when individuals become fearful, their immune system kicks in, causing the pain to worsen.

Treatment

A few things have been proven to work well, along with seeing a doctor, spine specialist, or chiropractor.

Ice and heat

It depends on individual preference. Ice reduces inflammation and pain, and the heat helps to get the blood flowing in and around the area to help heal the injury.

Abdominal support

An abdominal corset is a stretchy band that is worn around the lower mid-section. The abdominal muscles supply support for the lower body. The corset can help take some of the weight off of the spine to help ease discomfort and pain.

Anti-inflammatories

Advil or a prescription Ibuprophen from a physician is better than narcotics. However, if narcotic medications are necessary, they should be short-term, a few days to a week. In addition, individuals need to show caution as they can cause constipation, making back pain even worse.

Chiropractic and Physical Therapy

Seeing a chiropractor and physical therapist can help heal the injury faster. They will strengthen the spinal muscles and educate the individual on stretches, exercise, posture, anti-inflammatory diet for optimal spinal health. Individuals usually take two to six weeks to heal completely. However, individuals should still be able to do most physical activities once the spine injury heals. Maintaining the back muscles can be achieved with regular exercise, lifting correctly with the legs, and not over-twisting and over-reaching are important elements to prevent back injuries.


Body Composition Analysis


Summer Heat and The Body

How the body reacts to extreme heat. It is a process known as thermoregulation, where the body strives to maintain a temperature between 97.7 to 99.5 degrees Fahrenheit. The hypothalamus, a gland in the brain, is in charge of managing the core temperature. If outside weather is extreme, causing a change in the body’s core temperature, the hypothalamus triggers a specific process to heat or cool the body back to the normal range. When the hypothalamus registers that the body’s core temperature is rising because it’s sweltering outside, it kicks in.

To remove the extra heat, the hypothalamus increases circulation, moving the blood toward the surface, dilating blood vessels so that the heat can dissipate through the skin. When this happens, the veins can protrude, and the skin flushes. Along with increased circulation, the hypothalamus also activates the sweat glands. The evaporation of the water released onto the skin cools the body down, reducing temperature. Finally, the thyroid is activated to lower heat created through the metabolic processes.

References

Disc tears: Stat Pearls. (11/17/2020).” Annular Disc Tear.” ”https://www.statpearls.com/ArticleLibrary/viewarticle/17615

Fear and Pain: Journal of Pain Research. (2018). “Assessments of Pain-Related Fear in Individual with Chronic Pain Conditions.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280906/

Mittinty, Manasi M et al. “Assessment of pain-related fear in individuals with chronic painful conditions.” Journal of pain research vol. 11 3071-3077. 30 Nov. 2018, doi:10.2147/JPR.S163751

Lower Back Muscle Knots Can Be Broken Down With Chiropractic

Lower Back Muscle Knots Can Be Broken Down With Chiropractic

Muscle knots are common and can occur anywhere on the body. They can cause aching and pain in the muscles and joints. When examining a muscle knot also known as myofascial trigger points, it can feel swollen, tense, or like a bump. A particular area where these knots present is in the low back. This happens from excessive wear-and-tear on the lower spine from work, school, daily tasks, and chores. This causes the muscle fibers to tear, and with restricted or no time to rest the area and let it heal properly leads to the fibers bunching/clumping together forming a painful knot.11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Lower Back Muscle Knots Can Be Broken Down With Chiropractic

Muscle Knots In The Lower Back

A muscle knot in the lower back causes aching, soreness, and full-on pain. They tighten and contract even when the muscle is resting. The affected area often becomes inflamed or swollen causing pain and aches to radiate/spread to the gluteal muscles, as well.

Development

These knots develop when the tissue fibers pull apart and bunch up together. They start to stick together and with time the area becomes thicker. This results in the muscle knot. They can be caused by:

  • Stress
  • Tension
  • Poor posture
  • Muscle overuse
  • Muscle strain
  • Sedentary habits

Body dehydration and an unhealthy diet can also contribute to muscle knots. They look like a small bump under the skin. The bump can be red and is usually tender/sore when touched. However, not all muscle knots are visible, but when touched there is soreness and/or pain.

Do They Go Away?

They can go away on their own, but this comes from proper rest and recovery time. However, muscle knots should not be ignored, as even the smallest knot can compress surrounding nerves and muscle tissues. This can cause irritation and weakness. Larger muscle knots could cause movement/mobility issues.

Therapies

Stretching

Stretching will help stretch out and release tight muscle knots. Stretching loosens the muscle fibers and prevents them from becoming attached. Stretches to release a muscle knot include:

Start with these simple stretches/exercises and slowly work up to more vigorous ones.

Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic care can break down muscle knots through various adjustments. They are experts on the musculoskeletal system and understand where the problem is occurring along with the connected muscles.

  • A chiropractor will palpate the spot where the most pain presents and the surrounding area.
  • They will begin with a soft massage. This warms up the area getting the blood circulating. The blood circulation helps prevent pain making the adjustment/s far more effective.
  • Then pressing on nearby joints that the muscle knot is connected to breaks up the tight fibers.
  • Then the section/area is stretched out. This extends the fibers and prevents them from winding back into a knot.
  • They will recommend stretches and exercises

Therapeutic Massage

A massage helps to release tension and encourages muscle knots to loosen up and break down. A massage therapist will perform a deep tissue massage or a Swedish massage. Massage helps to release endorphins, which are the body’s natural painkiller. These calm the body and reduce pain. They will also recommend simple massages at home. These can include:

  • Rolling a massage ball/roller on the muscle knot
  • Self-massage using the fingers in circular motions on the affected area

Heat and Ice

Hot and cold therapy can calm and prevent inflammation. Heating pads are best if the area has stiffness or is painful. The heat relaxes tight muscles and increases blood flow. Cold therapy stops the swelling. If the muscle knot gets bigger or begins turning red, icing the area is recommended. Alternating between the two can eliminate symptoms and assist with quicker healing.


Body Composition


Building Functional Strength

There are exercises to improve functional strength. Functional training targets specific areas:

These types of exercises should be incorporated into a workout routine. One exercise is:

Pushup to Arm and Hip Raise

The muscles worked include:

  • Pectoralis major/minor
  • Rectus abdominus
  • Obliques
  • Deep abdominals
  • Hip abductors and rotators
  • Scapula stabilizers

To do the exercise

  • Start with doing a normal pushup.
  • When the top of the movement is reached
  • Lift one arm up, turn the shoulder, and reach up
  • Then lift the outside leg up as high as possible and hold for 10 seconds
  • Repeat on the other side
  • Do 6-10 repetitions on each side

This exercise builds shoulder, arm, and hip strength. It engages the core and abdominal muscles and improves flexibility in the shoulders, back, and hips.

Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, CTG*
email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com
phone: 915-850-0900
Licensed in Texas & New Mexico

References

Cramer, Holger et al. “Postural awareness and its relation to pain: validation of an innovative instrument measuring awareness of body posture in patients with chronic pain.” BMC musculoskeletal disorders vol. 19,1 109. 6 Apr. 2018, doi:10.1186/s12891-018-2031-9

Malanga, Gerard A et al. “Mechanisms and efficacy of heat and cold therapies for musculoskeletal injury.” Postgraduate medicine vol. 127,1 (2015): 57-65. doi:10.1080/00325481.2015.992719

Problems/Issues With The Feet Can Affect The Entire Body

Problems/Issues With The Feet Can Affect The Entire Body

The feet are the foundation of the body. The feet carry the body’s entire weight allowing for movement with ease. The feet are a complex structure that consists of:
  • Bones
  • Joints
  • Muscles
  • Ligaments
  • Tendons
  • Nerve endings
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Problems/Issues With The Feet Can Affect The Entire Body
 
Because of this, the feet are a high-impact area taking the everyday forces that come from:
  • Balancing
  • Walking
  • Running
  • Stopping
  • Twisting
  • Shifting positions
  • Tiptoe reaching

Common Symptoms

Symptoms commonly caused by foot issues include:
  • Soreness
  • Stiffness
  • Leg pain
  • Muscle Weakness
  • Poor balance
Flat feet, fallen arches, injuries, bone spurs, and other issues can cause problems with the rest of the body. The most common are:

Back Problems

When foot issues are present it’s common to change walking postures to avoid pain and discomfort. Individuals often do not realize they are doing it until the awkward postures begin to present with pain and discomfort. Overcompensation combined with unhealthy walking patterns can cause back pain. This is because the spine is becoming misaligned. Balance of the body is crucial. When something shifts the proper balance, the whole spine can shift out of alignment. This is especially true for individuals with flat feet. Flat feet can cause the ankle/s to lose alignment. This leads to problems up the body, from the knees to the hips to the spine and neck.  

Joint Pain

Imbalances cause the feet and spine to not absorb shocks from everyday activity properly. This means the rest of the body, especially the joints, have an added job of absorbing the shock/impact. As time goes on the stress and shock can lead to severe ankle, knee, hip discomfort/pain, and malfunctions.  

Posture Imbalance

These misalignments cause imbalance and posture problems. When the feet have lost the proper anchoring and alignment, overall posture and balance become affected. This increases the risk for dangerous slip and fall accidents that can exacerbate or cause new injuries. Posture problems are usually the result of the body trying to redistribute weight to reduce the pain and because it works then becomes a bad habit.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Problems/Issues With The Feet Can Affect The Entire Body
 

Referred and Radiating Pain

The muscles, tendons, and ligaments of the feet connect to the rest of the body. Any pain/issues like calf pain or weakness in the feet can begin to present in the lower leg since that is where the soft tissue is most closely connected.  
 

Foot Problems/Issues

The most common foot problems podiatrists see that lead to the aforementioned ailments.  

Flat Feet

Flat feet also known as fallen arches. This is a condition where the feet lack or have lost the arch when standing. This can be quite uncomfortable and creates weight distribution problems. It can be a genetic condition but is also be the result of wearing shoes without arch support for a prolonged time.  

Corns and Bunions

Corns are round circles of thick skin on the toes, or on the soles of the feet. The body forms them naturally to prevent blisters, but they could be the result of poorly fitting shoes. Typically they are not painful when they form, but can become irritated over time. Bunions are bumps on the side of the big toe that can cause a bending inward toward the other toes, creating a painful angle. This can cause severe irritation and inflammation in the bump and toes. These can be genetic or caused by structural problems. But they can be caused by tight-fitting shoes or excess pressure on the feet for prolonged periods.  

Hammertoe

Hammertoe, also known as mallet toe, is a condition that makes one or more of the toes pointing down rather than straight. Walking can cause pain, and movement of the toe can reduce or stop completely. This is caused by arthritis or an injury, it can be genetic, or the result of poor footwear.  

Plantar Fasciitis

This condition causes pain that goes from the bottom of the heel to the middle of the foot. It is caused by inflammation of the plantar fascia ligament also located in this area. There is a wide range of pain levels that can range from dull to stabbing. It is often caused by poor footwear with no arch support that has been worn for long periods when walking, standing, and running. Weight gain is another cause, as the added weight could be too much for the foot to manage, causing strain.  

Shoes

Individuals that wear high heels, shoes that are the wrong size, or other uncomfortable footwear consistently will more likely develop the aforementioned issues. Shoes with proper support are essential to optimal foot and body health because they evenly distribute the weight of the body lessening the impact from everyday activities.  

Foot Orthotics

Another recommended option for alleviating foot issues is custom foot orthotic inserts. These can be fit into any shoe, and are customized to an individual’s feet. They’re affordable, and allow individuals to wear their shoes without pain.  

Chiropractic & Physical Therapy

Chiropractic and physical therapy can help alleviate the pain that is resultant from foot problems. Seeing a podiatrist can treat the root cause of the condition, but the rest of the body could need chiropractic readjusting from the misalignment/s.

Custom Orthotics


  Heat-related illnesses vary in their severity, but even light symptoms need immediate action to correct the problem before it does become severe.  

Heat cramps

When exercising in the heat painful cramps can present. The affected muscle/s might feel hard, spasm, or generate sharp pain. The body temperature could still be within normal limits.  

Heat syncope

Syncope is a loss of consciousness, that is usually recognized as exercise-related collapse. However, before this happens, there may be a feeling of lightheadedness or fainting. This happens when temperatures are high and the individual has been standing or exercising for a long time. The same can occur when standing up quickly after sitting for a long time.  

Heat exhaustion

Heat exhaustion happens when the body temperature exceeds normal limits and rises as high as 104. This can cause nausea, weakness, cold, fainting, headaches, and vomiting. The body continues to sweat, but the skin may feel cold and clammy.  

Heatstroke and Sunstroke

Heat exhaustion untreated leads to heatstroke or sunstroke. The body’s core temperature is greater than 104 degrees and in a life-threatening emergency. The skin is no longer capable of sweating and can feel dry or moist. Individuals can become confused, irritable, and experience heart arrhythmias. Immediate medical emergency treatment is necessary to stop brain damage, organ failure, and death.  

Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP, CIFM, CTG* email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com phone: 915-850-0900 Licensed in Texas & New Mexico  
References
Joint Bone Spine. (December 2014) “Effects of unstable shoes on chronic low back pain in health professionals: A randomized controlled trial” https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1297319X14001456 Your Foot Type Matters: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. (July 2018) “Association between the hyper-pronated foot and the degree of severity of disability in patients with non-specific low back pain” https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1360859217303388 How to Find the Right Shoes: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics. (December 2001) “Biomechanical effects of wearing high-heeled shoes” https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0169814101000385
Avoiding and Preventing Spinal Compression Fractures

Avoiding and Preventing Spinal Compression Fractures

Spinal vertebral compression fractures are a common injury in older individuals brought on from a lowered bone density. Hip and wrist fractures get most of the attention when it comes to osteoporosis. However, spinal fractures happen almost twice as often and affect around 700,000 individuals yearly. This is according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons or the AAOS. These types of fractures are also known as:

  • Fragility fractures
  • Vertebral compression fractures
  • Osteoporotic compression fractures. These usually happen as a result of thinning and weakening bones caused by osteoporosis.

The Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons notes that changes in the body’s musculoskeletal bone structure can go unnoticed for years. This leads to the vertebrae narrowing and flattening, rounding the spine as a result, creating compression. Because of the weakened bone, the pressure, even from everyday low-impact movements like reaching, bending or twisting. There are strategies that can help prevent osteoporosis and osteoporotic compression fractures.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Avoiding and Preventing Spinal Compression Fractures

More Movement and Physical Activity

One prevention strategy that is highly recommended is more movement and physical activity. This does not include occasional gentle movements like taking a break from sitting. Improving the spine’s health means using the full range of motion and loading the bones so they can get build strength. This could be walking more, which creates spinal resistance. Also using light weights with high repetitions with five to ten pounds of a load is enough to challenge the spine without generating muscle stress.

Individuals think they need to rest more as they get older, but to build and maintain bone density to prevent osteoporotic compression fractures more physical activity is needed. Moving around for 10 to 15 minutes every hour is a good way to start. Incorporating more activity, and focusing on healthy diet changes will help shed excess weight. This will decrease pressure on the spine, reducing the risk of fractures. For individuals with osteoporosis of the spine, it is important to review any exercise plans with a physician or doctor of chiropractic to ensure that they are safe. The wrong types of movement or too much stress on a fragile spine can definitely cause a fracture.

Medications and Other Conditions

There are medications that can help build bone density, but there are also medications for conditions that can actually cause faster bone density loss. Individuals could be taking a medication that’s good for one issue/condition, but not realize it may be associated with a reduction in bone density. This is why it is important to review prescriptions with a doctor with bone density loss side effects in mind. Medications that can cause bone loss include:

  • Glucocorticoids
  • Aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer
  • Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer
  • Proton pump inhibitors
  • Depo-Provera for contraception
  • Anti-seizure drugs like carbamazepine and phenytoin
  • Diuretics like furosemide

Also, review any underlying conditions that could affect osteoporosis. As an example, the National Institutes of Health or NIH note that individuals with diabetes, specifically type 1, can have poor bone quality increasing their risk of fractures.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Avoiding and Preventing Spinal Compression Fractures

Adding Calcium To The Diet

An adequate intake of calcium is essential for osteoporosis prevention and helps lower the risk of fragility fractures. A low calcium intake contributes significantly to lower bone density and faster bone loss with age. Vitamin D also helps in bone injury prevention.

Treatment

Compression fracture/s diagnosis are confirmed through imaging tests like:

  • X-rays
  • Magnetic resonance imaging MRI scan
  • Bone scan
  • Computed tomography CT scan

Bone density testing with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry DEXA will determine bone mineral density. If a scan reveals there is a vertebral compression fracture, the most common approach is no treatment. According to the Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, most individuals with this type of injury improve within three months with a combined rest period and limited pain medication use.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Avoiding and Preventing Spinal Compression Fractures

Some individuals are recommended to wear braces to restrict movement so the fracture can heal without any added compression or stress. For those that do not respond to non-surgical treatment, minimally invasive surgery could become an option. In both cases, a doctor will suggest similar aforementioned strategies to help strengthen the bones and prevent worsening or creating new issues.

Body Composition

Changes in an individual’s 30’s

As an individual enters their 30’s and up, new challenges begin to emerge with greater demands at work and home. A few things that can begin to present:

  • More flab on the middle that gets harder to burn off
  • Performance at work, the gym, or on the road slows down or begins to reverse
  • Workouts, sporting events, physical activity that the body was able to bounce back from quite easily now take twice as long to recover from

Things start to change when the body enters its 30’s. Whether light exercise, playing weekend games, local sports, etc, the key is to just stay active. By paying close attention to nutrition and making minor adjustments, individuals can maintain and improve body composition, stay strong and healthy in their 30s and be ready for the future.

Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP, CIFM, CTG*
email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com
phone: 915-850-0900
Licensed in Texas & New Mexico

References

OrthoInfo/spine fracture prevalence: https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases–conditions/osteoporosis-and-spinal-fractures

Medications that affect bone density: https://osteoporosis.ca/about-the-disease/what-is-osteoporosis/secondary-osteoporosis/medications-that-can-cause-bone-loss-falls-andor-fractures/#:~:text=The%20anti%2Dseizure%20drugs%20carbamazepine,decreased%20intestinal%20absorption%20of%20calcium.

NIH: osteoarthritis and diabetes: https://www.bones.nih.gov/health-info/bone/osteoporosis/conditions-behaviors/diabetes