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Supplements

Back Clinic Supplements. What is more fundamental to our existence than diet and nutrition? Most of us eat at least three times a day. This creates a cumulative effect, as either our diet help fuel our body or it harms it. Bad nutrition, diet, and obesity can lead to osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and chronic pain. Knowing dietary supplements such as vitamins and proper nutritional balance, and effective techniques to shed weight can help those striving to change their new healthy lives.

A dietary supplement is used to provide nutrients to increase their consumption or provide non-nutrient chemicals claimed to have biological/beneficial effects. Dietary supplements come in all shapes and sizes. There are capsules, drinks, energy bars, powders, and traditional tablets. The most popular are calcium, iron, vitamins D and E, herbs like echinacea and garlic, and specialty products like glucosamine, probiotics, and fish oils.


Whey Protein Powder For Healing and Recovery

Whey Protein Powder For Healing and Recovery

The body needs protein which is essential in building muscle, repairing tissue, producing enzymes and hormones and is a source of energy. Whey is a complete protein source that provides all the essential amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients that increase anabolism, also known as muscle growth. It is used for various reasons. Some individuals want to build muscle mass and gain strength, while others want to lose weight and achieve improved results from working out. Even individuals who don’t exercise can benefit from the supplement as it supports immune function, helps reduce blood pressure, and improves insulin response.

Whey Protein Powder: Musculoskeletal Health

Whey Protein

Whey protein is made from the liquid produced during the cheese-making process.

  • Milk comprises two forms of protein: casein (80%) and whey (20%).
  • It contains less than 0.5 g of fat and only 5 mg of cholesterol per serving.
  • Pure whey does not contain any gluten.
  • It is referred to as the most nutritious protein available.
  • It’s easy to digest.
  • Incorporating whey into a healthy diet can help lower the risk of diabetes.

Types

There are three primary types of whey protein in supplements.

Whey Protein Concentrate – WPC

  • The percentage of protein available in the concentrate can vary from 30 to 90 percent.
  • The concentrate generally contains low levels of carbohydrates and fat.

Whey Protein Isolate – WPI

  • Isolate contains more protein than concentrate.
  • They are almost always at least 90 percent protein.
  • This is because they’ve been further processed and thus have no fat or lactose.

Whey Protein Hydrolysate – WPH

  • Hydrolysate is a form that has already gone through partial hydrolysis, a process so the body can absorb protein.
  • It is considered pre-digested, so it gets absorbed quicker.

Concentration is the most popular and least expensive option that retains the most nutrients. However, some individuals can tolerate isolate and hydrolysate a lot better and are ideal for those trying to cut down on carbs and fats.

Benefits

Increased Strength and Muscle

  • Helps to increase protein consumption.
  • Most brands contain 80 to 90 percent without added carbs or fats.
  • Helps to build muscle and increase strength after physical activity/exercise recovery.

Can Help Burn Fat

  • A study found a group of adults that supplemented their diet with whey protein experienced a decrease in body fat and weight.
  • Combining whey protein and resistance training, participants found their weight and fat loss were even higher.

Can Help Stabilize Blood Sugar

  • Consuming whey protein with a high glycemic index before a meal can help stimulate insulin production while preventing spikes in blood sugar levels.
  • The protein naturally reduces blood sugar levels after meals when consumed before the meal.

Improves Heart Health

  • It can help reduce blood pressure and arterial stiffness.
  • It has been linked to improving individual lipid profiles.
  • Promotes heart health by building muscle and helping with weight loss.

Increased Immunity

  • It can help encourage glutathione synthesis, which increases immune system function.
  • It is also rich in vitamins and minerals that promote immune function.
  • It helps the body recover from oxidative stress and inflammation.

Improves Energy Levels

  • It helps to increase glycogen, a source of energy during exercise or other physical activities.
  • It also increases leptin which helps balance the body’s energy levels.
  • Whey is easily digested, which can be quickly converted to energy.

Factors to Consider When Choosing

Flavor

  • The flavor is crucial because nobody wants to drink a daily protein shake they cannot enjoy.
  • Options like chocolate and vanilla are usually safe.
  • If experimenting, get a small container to start.

Mixability

  • Not all supplements mix properly or thoroughly.
  • Find a brand that dissolves quickly and has little clumping.

Container Size

  • Most protein supplements are available in 1 lb, 2 lb, 5 lb, or 10 lb containers.
  • Larger sizes are more cost-effective.
  • One 5 lb package is cheaper than buying five 1 lb containers.

Everything You Need To Know


References

Ebaid, Hossam et al. “Whey protein enhances normal inflammatory responses during cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats.” Lipids in health and disease vol. 10 235. 14 Dec. 2011, doi:10.1186/1476-511X-10-235

Hashemilar, Mazyar, et al. “Effect of Whey Protein Supplementation on Inflammatory and Antioxidant Markers, and Clinical Prognosis in Acute Ischemic Stroke (TNS Trial): A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled, Clinical Trial.” Advanced pharmaceutical bulletin vol. 10,1 (2020): 135-140. doi:10.15171/apb.2020.018

Kim, Jooyoung, et al. “Effect of timing of whey protein supplement on muscle damage markers after eccentric exercise.” Journal of exercise rehabilitation vol. 13,4 436-440. 29 Aug. 2017, doi:10.12965/jer.1735034.517

Marshall K. Therapeutic applications of whey protein. Alternative Medicine Review. 2004;9(2):136-156.

Pradhan, Geetali, et al. “Ghrelin: much more than a hunger hormone.” Current opinion in clinical nutrition and metabolic care vol. 16,6 (2013): 619-24. doi:10.1097/MCO.0b013e328365b9be

Volek, Jeff S et al. “Whey protein supplementation during resistance training augments lean body mass.” Journal of the American College of Nutrition vol. 32,2 (2013): 122-35. doi:10.1080/07315724.2013.793580

How Diet and Nutritional Supplements Impact Chronic Pain

How Diet and Nutritional Supplements Impact Chronic Pain

Nutrition is how the body utilizes consumed food. Nutrition plays a role in chronic pain; lifestyle behaviors can influence how food contributes to illness/diseases. A common cause of chronic pain is chronic systemic inflammation. Inflammation plays a role in many chronic disease conditions, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Reducing inflammation can be achieved by adjusting diet to get individuals back to feeling better quickly and to aid them in maintaining and improving their overall health. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic offer diet and nutritional supplements guidance as part of a personalized treatment plan.

How Diet and Nutritional Supplements Effect Chronic Pain

Inflammation

The purpose of the inflammatory response includes:

  • Isolate the dangerous bacteria, viruses, or damaged cells.
  • Flush out the dead cells and other damaging substances.
  • Initiate the repair/healing process.

Types of inflammation

  • Localized inflammation occurs at the site of an injury or infection.
  • A sprained ankle that becomes swollen and painful or a cut that gets infected and becomes red and swollen are examples of localized inflammation.
  • Systemic inflammation occurs throughout the body. External factors can trigger this type of inflammation.
  • Viral and Bacterial infections.
  • Allergens or toxins in food and the environment.
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol consumption
  • It can also be triggered by internal factors, including:
  • Stress
  • Obesity
  • Autoimmune conditions
  • Genetic variations

Optimizing Diet and Nutritional Supplements Effect on Chronic Pain

The body needs protein, carbohydrates, fat, fiber, vitamins, and minerals for the health and the prevention of chronic disease.

  • Dietary intake can enhance the function of the nervous system, immune system, and endocrine system that directly affects pain symptoms and episodes.
  • Losing weight decreases the added pressure on joints and reduces inflammation.
  • Dietary intake and weight status impact the risk and/or severity of other chronic diseases that include:
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Diabetes
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Often occur simultaneously with chronic pain.

Prescribed diet modification, also known as diet therapy includes:

  • Modifying the entire diet.
  • Supplementing the diet with specific nutrients.
  • Changing dietary patterns to induce a fasting state.

Benefits include:

  • Calorie reduction
  • Increased antioxidants
  • Prebiotic supplementation for gastrointestinal health.

These approaches positively impact comorbidities of chronic pain and promote secondary gains, including:

  • Pain alleviation and management.
  • A positive promotion of health and well-being.
  • Reductions of comorbidities like obesity and cardiovascular disease.
  • Reducing healthcare costs.

Vitamin and Mineral Supplements

Diet and nutritional supplements provide added essential nutrients to a damaged, inflamed, or injured body. Dietary supplements improve overall health and wellness.

  • Vitamin D and calcium tablets help maintain optimal bone health, as low vitamin D levels can lead to back pain.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids help reduce inflammation.
  • Vitamins E and C, combined with copper, help with blood production, tissue repair, and brain and skin health.
  • Folic acid can help with joint pain and myofascial pain.
  • B Vitamins can help with pain and prevent liver dysfunction.

Nutritional supplements support the body until the body and/or organs have correctly healed. Recovery from an injury could cause body stress that can interfere with the healing process. Diet and nutritional supplements expedite the healing and recovery process by:

  • Helping overcome dietary deficiencies.
  • Improving immune system function.
  • Detoxifying toxins.
  • Contain antioxidants that help the body stay toxin-free.

Chiropractic restores and realigns the body by incorporating supplements to nourish the body tissues and recover optimally from injury.


InBody Nutrition


References

Dragan, Simona, et al. “Dietary Patterns and Interventions to Alleviate Chronic Pain.” Nutrients vol. 12,9 2510. 19 Aug. 2020, doi:10.3390/nu12092510

Lee, Mi Kyung, et al. “The use of nutritional guidance within chiropractic patient management: a survey of 333 chiropractors from the ACORN practice-based research network.” Chiropractic & manual therapies vol. 26 7. 20 Feb. 2018, doi:10.1186/s12998-018-0175-1

Li, Chuan, et al. “Macrophage polarization and meta-inflammation.” Translational research: the journal of laboratory and clinical medicine vol. 191 (2018): 29-44. doi:10.1016/j.trsl.2017.10.004

Nutrition and Chronic Pain www.iasp-pain.org/resources/fact-sheets/nutrition-and-chronic-pain/

Pahwa R, Goyal A, Jialal I. Chronic Inflammation. [Updated 2021 Sep 28]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493173/

Magnesium Might Help Combat Insulin Resistance

Magnesium Might Help Combat Insulin Resistance

Introduction

The body requires energy to move around and get to places as fast as possible. The primary energy source is the blood glucose in the body, which helps provide power for the body and the brainmuscle cell tissues, and the blood cells that travel to each body’s organs. When disruptive forces start to affect the body, like chronic stressendocrine disruptors, or lifestyle choices, it can cause the glucose levels to either increase or decrease depending on the severity. When glucose levels become too high, it can cause hyperglycemia or diabetes to develop. When they are too low, it can cause hypoglycemia. The body also suffers when there aren’t enough nutrients, minerals, or vitamins to provide energy to the body as symptoms of fatigue and insulin resistance begin to rise. Fortunately, there are ways to boost the body’s glucose levels naturally. Today’s article focus on a mineral known as magnesium, its benefits, and how it affects insulin resistance in the body. Refer patients to certified, skilled providers specializing in endocrine treatments for individuals with insulin resistance. We guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

01 LaValle Advanced Diagnostics in DM & Stress

What Is Magnesium?

Have you been feeling weird pins and needles sensations in certain parts of your body? Are you suffering from chronic fatigue and muscle cramps? Have you lost your sense of appetite? Or have you felt muscle spasms in your arms or legs? Many of these symptoms are signs that your body is suffering from low levels of magnesium in your body. Research studies have defined magnesium as the fourth most common mineral in the body that provides fundamental functions for regulation. Magnesium can be found in certain foods like leafy greens, chocolate, nuts, fruits, and meats that are riched with this mineral and can be regulated in homeostasis in the intestines, kidneys, and bones in the body. Additional research studies have shown that magnesium is essential for maintaining the body’s normal organ and cellular function. Magnesium also ensures that each organ functions normally and is transported through the entire body by the blood cells. Magnesium also plays a vital role in the body’s energy production as it helps regulate glycemic control.

 

What Are Its Benefits?

As the fourth common mineral in the body, magnesium helps the body in many ways as it provides energy to other organs and body systems. Some of the benefits that magnesium provides, as research has shown, include:

  • Reducing insomnia
  • Prevent metabolic syndrome
  • Reduce migraines and headaches
  • Helps with pregnancies
  • Reduce asthmatic symptoms
  • Relieve muscle cramps

Additional information has shown that magnesium can help those with anxiety by modulating the HPA (hypothalamic pituitary adrenal) axis and substrating the stress response system in the body. Magnesium also plays a role when it comes to glucose levels in the body and affects insulin resistance.

 


An Overview Of Magnesium & Insulin Resistance-Video

Are you feeling migraines and headaches popping up out of nowhere? Have your muscles started to ache and cramped? Have you been experiencing asthmatic symptoms more frequently? Or have your blood glucose levels begun to rise? If you have been suffering from any of these symptoms, you could suffer from magnesium deficiency. The video above explains what happens when the body is experiencing insulin resistance due to magnesium deficiency. Research studies have found that magnesium deficiency is not uncommon worldwide, as early signs of magnesium deficiency can cause nausea, vomiting, and weakness in the body while causing metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, diabetes is one of the most common causes of magnesium deficiency and insulin resistance.


How Does Magnesium Affect Insulin Resistance?

 

Research studies have found that magnesium deficiency in the body can increase the risk of insulin resistance and cause the body to become dysfunctional. When metabolic imbalances are associated with trending low or alert, low magnesium levels in the body, it can increase the serum CRP-hs, cause headaches, weight gain, and an increased risk for metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. The intestines will be impaired in intestinal absorption while the blood glucose levels will increase and cause type 2 diabetes to form. However, additional information has also been provided that when an individual begins to take magnesium regularly, it can help dampen the effects of insulin resistance by regulating the blood glucose levels in the body. Many individuals with pre-existing diabetes can take a bit of magnesium to improve their blood glucose levels and continue on their health journey.

 

Conclusion

Incorporating supplements and minerals like magnesium could help lower the risk of insulin resistance and manage type 2 diabetes. The body needs the energy to function normally and move around constantly. Magnesium is a common mineral that can help regulate the organ’s functions and helps regulate blood glucose levels. When the body starts to suffer from magnesium deficiency, it can cause various issues that can make a person miserable while the body starts to become dysfunctional. Incorporating magnesium as part of a healthy lifestyle for the body can provide the necessary energy that a person needs to function and help them along their health and wellness journey.

 

References

Al Alawi, Abdullah M, et al. “Magnesium and Human Health: Perspectives and Research Directions.” International Journal of Endocrinology, Hindawi, 16 Apr. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5926493/.

Boyle, Neil Bernard, et al. “The Effects of Magnesium Supplementation on Subjective Anxiety and Stress-A Systematic Review.” Nutrients, MDPI, 26 Apr. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5452159/.

Gröber, Uwe, et al. “Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy.” Nutrients, MDPI, 23 Sept. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4586582/.

Kostov, Krasimir. “Effects of Magnesium Deficiency on Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes: Focusing on the Processes of Insulin Secretion and Signaling.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences, MDPI, 18 Mar. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6470576/.

Razzaque, Mohammed S. “Magnesium: Are We Consuming Enough?” Nutrients, MDPI, 2 Dec. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6316205/.

Schwalfenberg, Gerry K, and Stephen J Genuis. “The Importance of Magnesium in Clinical Healthcare.” Scientifica, Hindawi, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5637834/.

Wang, Jinsong, et al. “Dietary Magnesium Intake Improves Insulin Resistance among Non-Diabetic Individuals with Metabolic Syndrome Participating in a Dietary Trial.” Nutrients, MDPI, 27 Sept. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820051/.

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Relieving Gut Issues With Nutraceuticals

Relieving Gut Issues With Nutraceuticals

Introduction

The gut system is a massive ecosystem that helps modulate the body’s immune system and metabolic changes that the body itself is going through. The gut system provides the body with the necessary nutrients to function correctly and transports these nutrients to their respective sections like the endocrine system, the nervous system, and the musculoskeletal system to do their jobs. When gut disorders start to affect the intestinal walls, it can cause the inflammatory cytokines to attack the gut walls due to bacteria and nutrients leaking out of the tight junctions. Fortunately, there are therapeutic ways to help the gut system and prevent inflammation from causing more issues in the gut. Today’s article looks at gut metainflammation and how nutraceuticals can help many individuals with gut metainflammation. Referring patients to qualified, skilled providers who specialize in gastroenterology treatments. We provide guidance to our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

15 - LaValle GI Therapies

What Is Gut Metainflammation?

 

Does your gut system feel sore or tender to the touch? Do ordinary factors like stress, sleep problems, hormone imbalances, and cardiovascular issues affect you more than they should have? Have you experienced inflammatory gut issues like IBS or leaky gut? Having any gut disorder is no laughing matter for your health. When the gut system is experiencing chronic low‐grade inflammatory sequela, this is what gut metainflammation is in the body. Gut metainflammation is defined as an over‐activation of immunity in the gut that leads to increased production of inflammatory cytokines, thus referring to metabolism-induced inflammation. Research studies have shown that when the gut is experiencing metainflammation, it causes a disturbance to the neurometabolic pathways. This causes an increase in the aging processes and metabolic signaling issues the gut is trying to provide for the body. Other research studies have shown that metainflammation is one of the primary markers for metabolic disorders like obesity, type 2 diabetes, and NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease). Gut metainflammation also causes an increase in peripheral and central inflammation that can cause gut disorders like leaky gut to allow bacteria and toxins to enter the bloodstream, thus leading to peripheral and central inflammation of the body.


Treatments For GI Disorders-Video

Have you experienced a leaky gut? Do you feel tired throughout the entire day? Have you experienced any food sensitivities in your gut? These gut issues are due to gut metainflammation that can impact a person’s health and quality of life. When this occurs, the body will become dysfunctional, and other issues will arise unless it is treated right away. The video above shows how treatments are available for alleviating motility disorders and GI disorders affecting the gut system. Utilizing treatments beneficial to the gut system can help dampen the effects of metainflammation and other gut disorders from progressing in the body. Some treatments that can help with draining metainflammation in the gut system can be found by changing dietary lifestyles and incorporating nutraceuticals that are beneficial to the gut.


Controlling Gut Metainflammation Through Nutraceuticals

Research studies have shown that since trillions of microbial cells make up the gut microbiota when factors like obesity, metainflammation, and impaired insulin activity affect the gut, it can cause the immune cells to reactivate and reinforce the inflammatory process to attack the gut system. When the gut system becomes dysfunctional, many individuals try to find ways to alleviate gut inflammation. One of the treatments is by incorporating nutraceuticals to provide relief from gut metainflammation. Research studies have mentioned that combined with functional foods can help provide a positive influence on the body’s metabolism and the gut microbiota. Nutraceuticals help give the body the necessary nutrients it deserves and help dampen any effects from disorders affecting the body’s gut, immune, and metabolic components. Two nutraceuticals can help control gut metainflammation: curcumin and peptides.

 

Curcumin & Peptides For Gut Metainflammaion

From turmeric (Curcuma longa) root/rhizome and used traditionally for dyspeptic conditions, research studies have mentioned that curcumin and its anti-inflammatory metabolites can help influence the gut microbiota. What curcumin does to the gut is that it helps decrease the inflammasome signaling while decreasing oxidative stress via the Nrf2‐keap1 pathway. Curcumin can also help improve flexibility and mobility in the body while inhibiting the activation of a peroxisome proliferator‐activated receptor‐gamma pathway. Additional information has provided that curcumin can help not only reduce oxidative stress and even prevent neurodegeneration.

 

Peptides or BPC‐157 (Body Protection Compound) are derived from human gastric juice that is cytoprotective and anti‐inflammatory that helps support the gut mucosal lining. Research studies have shown that peptides play a critical role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis while being effective in decreasing metainflammatory signaling in the gut microbiota. When there is metainflammation in the gut, peptides can help improve cell survival under oxidative stress conditions by downregulating TNF‐alpha in the body. Incorporating peptides can help improve GI mucosal integrity from meta inflammation and help the gut function normally.

 

Conclusion

The gut is home to trillions of microorganisms that help keep the body’s functionality and regulate immunity from various diseases. When unwanted factors like metainflammation start to infiltrate the gut, it can lead to dysbiosis and wreck the intestinal walls. Nutraceuticals like curcumin and peptides have beneficial properties that help repair the intestinal walls while dampening inflammatory effects from progressing further in the gut system. Incorporating nutraceuticals is helpful for many individuals who suffer from gut disorders and improve their health by replenishing their nutrients in the body.

 

References

Boulangé, Claire L, et al. “Impact of the Gut Microbiota on Inflammation, Obesity, and Metabolic Disease.” Genome Medicine, BioMed Central, 20 Apr. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4839080/.

Di Meo, Francesco, et al. “Curcumin, Gut Microbiota, and Neuroprotection.” Nutrients, MDPI, 11 Oct. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6835970/.

Gubatan, John, et al. “Antimicrobial Peptides and the Gut Microbiome in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.” World Journal of Gastroenterology, Baishideng Publishing Group Inc, 21 Nov. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8613745/.

Laparra, J M, and Y Sanz. “Interactions of Gut Microbiota with Functional Food Components and Nutraceuticals.” Pharmacological Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 13 Nov. 2009, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19914380/.

Scazzocchio, Beatrice, et al. “Interaction between Gut Microbiota and Curcumin: A New Key of Understanding for the Health Effects of Curcumin.” Nutrients, MDPI, 19 Aug. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7551052/.

Scheithauer, Torsten P M, et al. “Gut Microbiota as a Trigger for Metabolic Inflammation in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.” Frontiers in Immunology, Frontiers Media S.A., 16 Oct. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7596417/.

Tilg, Herbert, et al. “The Intestinal Microbiota Fuelling Metabolic Inflammation.” Nature Reviews. Immunology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 6 Aug. 2019, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31388093/.

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Glutamine Beneficial Effects For Gut Issues

Glutamine Beneficial Effects For Gut Issues

Introduction

Inside the body lies the internal organs that provide the nutrients and energy for the body to stay in motion. The gut system helps the body energy by digesting the consumed food that gets turned into energy and nutrients beneficial for the vital organs, muscles, tissues, and growth that the body needs. The gut system also helps regulate the other body systems like the musculoskeletal system, the immune systemcentral nervous system, and the endocrine system. The gut system operates by transporting these nutrients to make the body operational, to name a few needs. When unwanted issues start to enter the gut system and cause havoc, it can lead to many chronic problems that will cause the body to be in constant pain while causing other issues that affect the entire body. Today’s article will look at how different gut issues start to affect the body and how an amino acid named glutamine can provide beneficial relief to various gut issues. Referring patients to qualified and skilled providers who specialize in gastroenterology treatments. We guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is essential for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

 

12 - Guilliams Supplements for GI

How Gut Issues Affect The Body

Have you been experiencing pain located in your gut? Does your gut seem to be extra sensitive after consuming food? Have you been anxious or stressed that it has been affecting your body? Experiencing these symptoms are signs that you might have some gut issues that are affecting your body. Research studies have found that gut issues or disorders usually develop when the gut has either underproduced or overproduced the beneficial gut bacteria that can influence harmful bacteria to attack the gut’s intestinal walls. Gut issues can also be influenced due to lifestyle choices or autoimmune disorders that affect the gut and the rest of the body and its systems. Additional information has found that when the microbiome is being challenged with factors that change the physiology of the gut microbiome. These changes will cause an increase in the intestinal permeability, which allows the harmful bacteria to leak out, causing the immune system to attack the exposed bacteria at the intestinal walls leading to inflammatory issues. 

 

Other research studies have found that gut bacteria provides an essential role in the body as it helps supply the vital nutrients beneficial for the body’s health. When abnormal changes affect gut bacteria, the gut ecosystem accelerates dysbiosis, causing many chronic issues. Many individuals will begin to lose their quality of life due to pain. Fortunately, there are ways to alleviate the chronic issues affecting the gut and even help lower the harmful bacteria by replenishing the beneficial bacteria while reducing inflammatory markers. 


An Overview About Glutamine-Video

Have you been experiencing issues that are affecting your gut? Has your torso area been feeling tender to the touch? How about random pain spots that are in your abdomen? You could be experiencing gut issues affecting your overall health and wellness. Why not incorporate glutamine into your daily supplementation. Research studies mentioned that glutamine is an amino acid with beneficial properties in replenishing the immune system and metabolizing in the gut and other vital organs that need glutamine to nourish the cellular structure for the body to feel better and provide energy for many individuals. The video above includes information about the benefits of glutamine and how it can help the body.


How Glutamine Helps The Gut

 

As stated earlier, glutamine is an amino acid with beneficial properties that are utilized to provide energy for the entire body. Research studies have shown that glutamine in the gut system can maintain the intestinal structure and function as the body ages while regulating the tight junction proteins. Glutamine has also helped modulate the gut intestinal permeability effects of HPA-axis stress that affects the gut and protects the cells from apoptosis and cellular stress. Additional research studies have provided that when individuals take glutamine as part of their daily regime, they will have a better inflammatory response and redox balance in the gut with the combination of physical activities. Utilizing glutamine for gut health can help improve the gut function and gastrointestinal permeability function for many athletic individuals.

 

Conclusion

Overall, the gut system utilizes glutamine for optimal gut health in dampening the effects of gut issues and disorders that will affect the body. The gut provides the transportation of the essential nutrients for the rest of the body systems that need them to function correctly. When unwanted factors or unhealthy lifestyles affect the gut system, it can increase the harmful bacteria in the gut and diminish the beneficial bacteria. This will cause the inflammatory cytokines to attack the intestinal permeability walls and cause more issues that will affect the body. Beneficial supplements and nutrients that help alleviate inflammatory factors or alleviate gut issues are there to provide relief by dampening these harmful effects and repairing the body. Incorporating glutamine into your gut will help the body recover over time and become pain-free.

 

References

Almeida, Ewin B, et al. “L-Glutamine Supplementation Improves the Benefits of Combined-Exercise Training on Oral Redox Balance and Inflammatory Status in Elderly Individuals.” Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, Hindawi, 22 Jan. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7204202/.

Clapp, Megan, et al. “Gut Microbiota’s Effect on Mental Health: The Gut-Brain Axis.” Clinics and Practice, PAGEPress Scientific Publications, Pavia, Italy, 15 Sept. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/.

Cruzat, Vinicius, et al. “Glutamine: Metabolism and Immune Function, Supplementation and Clinical Translation.” Nutrients, MDPI, 23 Oct. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6266414/.

Kim, Min-Hyun, and Hyeyoung Kim. “The Roles of Glutamine in the Intestine and Its Implication in Intestinal Diseases.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences, MDPI, 12 May 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5454963/.

Nouvenne, Antonio, et al. “Digestive Disorders and Intestinal Microbiota.” Acta Bio-Medica : Atenei Parmensis, Mattioli 1885, 17 Dec. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6502202/.

Zhang, Yu-Jie, et al. “Impacts of Gut Bacteria on Human Health and Diseases.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences, MDPI, 2 Apr. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425030/.

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Beneficial Micronutrients With Dr. Ruja | El Paso, TX (2021)

Introduction

In today’s podcast, Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja discuss the importance of the body’s genetic code and how micronutrients provide the necessary functional nutraceuticals that the body needs to promote overall health and wellness. 

 

What Is Personalized Medicine?

 

[00:00:00] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Welcome, guys. We’re Dr. Mario Ruja and me; we’re going to be discussing some essential topics for those athletes that want the advantage. We’re going to discuss fundamental necessary clinical technologies and information technologies that can make an athlete or even just the average person a little bit more aware of what’s happening in terms of their health. There’s a new word out there, and I have to give you a little heads up where we’re calling. We’re actually coming from the PUSH Fitness Center, and that people still work out late at night after going to church. So they’re working out, and they’re having a good time. So what we want to do is bring in these topics, and today we’re going to be talking about personalized medicine, Mario. Ever heard of that word?

 

[00:01:05] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, Alex, all the time. I dream about it. There you go, Mario.

 

[00:01:12] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: There you go, Mario. Always giving me a laugh. So we’re going to be talking about is the personalized arena of what we have now. We’ve come to a state where many people tell us, Hey, you know what? It would be best if you had some more proteins, fats, or they come up with some convoluted idea, and you’ll end up with your eyes crossed and, most of the time, more confused than anything else. And you’re pretty much a lab rat to all these different techniques, whether it’s the Mediterranean, low fat, high fat, all these kind of things. So the question is, what is it specific to you? And I think one of the frustrations that many of us have, Mario, is that we don’t know what to eat, what to take and what’s good exactly. What’s good for me doesn’t mean that it’s suitable for my friend. You know, Mario, I’d say it’s different. We come from a whole other type of genre. We live in a place, and we’ve gone through things that are different from two hundred years ago. What do people do? We’re going to be able to figure this out nowadays in today’s DNA dynamics; though we don’t treat with these, it gives us information and allows us to relate to the issues that are affecting us now. Today, we will be talking about personalized medicine, DNA testing, and micronutrient assessments. So we’re going to see what it is that how are our genes, the actual predisposing issues, or they’re the ones that give us the the the workings of our engine. And then also, if it’s good for that, we want to know what our level of nutrients is right now. I know Mario, and you had a very dear and near question the other day with one of your, I think, was your daughter. Yeah, so what was her question?

 

[00:02:52] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So Mia had had a well, excellent question. She was asking me about utilizing creatine, which is very predominant in athletes. You see, it’s the buzzword, you know? Use creatine to build more muscle and such. So the point that I talk to you about, Alex, is that this is something so important that we cannot let in terms of the sports environment and performance environment. It’s like taking a Bugatti, and you’re saying, “Well, you know what? Do you think about just putting synthetic oil in it?” And well, is it the synthetic oil necessary for that Bugatti? Well, it’s good because it’s synthetic. Well, no, there are lots of different synthetic forms, you know, it’s like five-thirty, five-fifteen, whatever it is, the viscosity level it has to match. So same thing for athletes and especially for Mia.

 

[00:04:06] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Let the audience know who Mia is, what does she do? What kind of things does she do?

 

[00:04:08] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Oh, yeah. Mia plays tennis, so her passion is tennis.

 

[00:04:13] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: And she’s nationally ranked?

 

[00:04:15] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Nationally, and she plays internationally on the international circuit ITF. And she’s right now in Austin with Karen and the rest of the Brady Bunch, as I call them. You know, she’s working hard and through all this COVID kind of disconnect. Now she’s getting back into the fitness mode, so she wants to optimize. She wants to do her very best to catch up and move forward. And the question about nutrition, a question about what she needed. I needed a specific answer, not just general. Well, I think it’s good. You know good is good and better is best. And the way we look at it in that conversation of sports performance and genetic, nutritional, and functional medicine, it’s like, let’s get really functional, let’s be on point instead of buckshot. You know, it’s like you can go in and say, you know, generalities. But in terms of this, there is not a lot of information out there for athletes. And that’s where the conversation is linking the genetic and linking the micronutrients. That is phenomenal because, as you mentioned, Alex, when we look at the markers, genetic markers, we see the strengths, the weaknesses, and what’s at risk and what is not. Is the body adaptive, or is the body weak? So then we have to address the micronutrients to support. Remember, we talked about that to support that weakness in that DNA, that genetic pattern with something that we can strengthen. I mean, you can’t go and change your genetics, but you surely can increase and be specific with your micronutrients to change that platform and strengthen it and decrease the risk factors.

 

[00:06:24] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It’s fair to say now that the technology is such that we can find the, I wouldn’t say weaknesses, but the variables that allow for us to improve an athlete at the genetic level. Now we can’t alter the genes. That’s not what we’re saying is that there’s a world of what they call SNPs or single nucleotide polymorphisms where we can figure out there’s a specific set of genes that can’t change. We can’t change like eye color. We can’t do those. Those are very coded in, right? But there are genes that we can influence through neutral genomics and neutral genetics. So what I mean by my neutral genomics is nutrition altering and affecting the genome to more adaptive or opportunistic dynamics? Now, wouldn’t you like to know what genes you have that are vulnerable? Wouldn’t she want to know where her vulnerability is as well?

 

Is My Body Receiving The Right Supplements?

 

[00:07:18] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: What do we all want to know? I mean, whether you’re a high-level athlete or you’re a high-level CEO, or you’re just a high-level mom and dad, that’s running around from tournament to tournament. You cannot afford to have low energy that, when we talked about the markers, you know that methylation within the body we want to know, are we processing or how are we doing in terms of the oxidative pattern within ourselves? Do we need that extra boost? Do we need to increase your knowledge of that green intake detoxified pattern? Or are we doing well? And this is where when we look at the patterns of genetic markers, we can see that we are well-prepared or we are not well prepared. Therefore, we have to look at the micronutrients. Again, those markers to say, “Are we meeting our needs, yes or no? Or are we just generalizing?” And I would say 90 percent of athletes and people out there are generalizing. They’re saying, Well, you know, taking vitamin C is good and taking vitamin D is good and selenium, you know, that’s good. But again, are you on point, or are we just guessing right now?

 

[00:08:36] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Exactly. That’s the thing when we’re in that store, and there’s a lot of great nutritional centers, Mario, that are out there, and we’re looking at a wall of a thousand products. Crazy. We don’t know where we have holes, and we don’t know where we need them. You know, there are certain deficiencies. You’ve got bleeding gums; most likely, you’ve got some scurvy or some kind of issue there. That unit may need a specialist, but let’s assume if we look at things like scurvy, right? Well, we know that gum starts bleeding. Well, it’s sometimes not that obvious, right, that we need certain things. There are hundreds and thousands of nutrients out there. One of the things that we call them, we call them, is cofactors. A cofactor is a thing that allows an enzyme to work right. So we are a machine of enzymes, and what codes those enzymes? Well, the DNA structure. Because it produces the proteins that code those enzymes, those enzymes have code factors like minerals like magnesium, iron, potassium, selenium, as you mentioned, and all different components. As we look at this, this hole that we’re we’re facing a wall. We would love to know exactly where our holes are because Bobby or my best friend says, you know, you should take protein, take whey protein, take iron, take what may be so, and we’re hit or miss. So today’s technology is allowing us to see precisely what it is, where we have the holes.

 

[00:10:00] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: And this point that you mentioned about the holes, again, the majority of the factors are not that extreme like scurvy, you know, bleeding gums. We’re not, I mean, we live in a society where we’re gosh, I mean, Alex, we have all the foods that we need. We’ve got too much food. It’s crazy. Again, the issues that we talk about are overeating, not starving, OK? Or we’re overeating and still starving because the nutritional pattern is very low. So that’s a real factor there. But overall, we are looking and addressing the component of what subclinical issues, you know, we don’t have the symptoms. We don’t have those significant marker symptoms. But we do have low energy, but we do have a low recovery pattern. But we do have that problem with sleep, that quality of sleep. So those are not huge things, but those are subclinical that erode our health and performance. For example, little by little, athletes cannot be just good. They need to be the tip of the spear top. They need to recover quickly because they do not have time to guess their performance pattern. And I see that they don’t.

 

[00:11:21] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know, as you mentioned that, I mean, most of these athletes, when they want to, they want to assess their bodies. They want to know where every weakness is. They’re like scientists and laboratory rats for themselves. They’re pushing their bodies to the extreme, from mental to physical to psycho-social. Everything is being affected, and put it in at full throttle. But they want to know. They want to see where that extra edge is. You know what? If I could make you a little bit better? If there was a little hole, what would that amount to? Will that amount to a two more second drop over a while, a microsecond drop? The point is that technology is there, and we have the ability to do these things for people, and the information is coming faster than we can even imagine. We have doctors worldwide and scientists around the world looking at the human genome and seeing these issues, specifically at SNPs, which are single nucleotide polymorphisms that can be changed or altered or assisted in dietary ways. Go ahead.

 

Body Composition

 

[00:12:21] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I’ll give you one: the Inbody. How about that? Yeah, that’s a tool right there that is critical for a conversation with an athlete.

 

[00:12:31] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: The Inbody is the body composition.

 

[00:12:32] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, the BMI. You’re looking at it in terms of your hydration pattern; you’re looking at in terms of like, yes, body fat, that that whole conversation everyone wants to know, you know, I’m overweight my belly fat again. We had discussions on metabolic syndrome. We talked about risk factors, high triglycerides, very low HDL, high LDL. I mean, those are risk factors that put you in a pattern in that line towards diabetes and that line towards cardiovascular disease in that line of dementia. But when you’re talking about an athlete, they’re not worried about diabetes; they’re concerned about, am I ready for the next tournament? And I’m going to make the cut going to the Olympics. That’s yes, I mean, they’re not what they want to do that Inbody. They’re the micronutrient, the combination of genome nutrition, that genomic nutrition conversation on point allows them to honor their work. Because I’m telling you, Alex, and you know, this here, I mean, everyone’s listening to us, again, the conversation I share with people is this, why are you training like a pro when you don’t want to be one? Why are you trained like a pro when you are not eating and have the data to support that pro-level workout? What you’re doing? If you don’t do that, you are destroying your body. So again, if you’re working as a pro, that means you’re grinding. I mean, you’re pushing your body to little miss neuromuscular. Furthermore, we’re chiropractors. We deal with inflammatory issues. If you’re doing that, you’re redlining that, but you are not turning around to recover through micronutrition-specific chiropractic work. Then you’re going to damn it; you’re not going to make it.

 

[00:14:26] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We’re going to show that we’ve been able to see in a lot of times cities come together for specific sports, such as like wrestling. Wrestling is one of those notorious sports that puts the body through massive emotional and physical stresses. But a lot of times, what happens is individuals have to lose weight. You’ve got a guy who’s 160 pounds; he’s got a drop-down 130 pounds. So what the city has done to avoid these things is to use body-specific weight and determine the molecular weight of the urine, right? So they can tell, are you too concentrated, right? So what they do is that they have all these kids line up all the way to UTEP, and they do a specific gravity test to determine if they’re able to lose any more weight or what weight they are allowed to lose. So someone who’s about 220 says, You know what? You can drop up to about, you know, x y z pounds based on this test. And if you violate this, then you do that. But that’s not good enough. We want to know what’s going to happen because when the kids are in a load and are fighting another person that is just as good of an athlete, and he’s pushing his body, that’s when the body collapses. The body can handle the load, but the supplementation that the person has had, maybe their calcium, has been so depleted that suddenly you got this kid who was 100 injuries; the injuries, the elbow snapped dislocated. That’s what we see. And we wonder how did he snap his elbow because his body has been depleted from these supplements?

 

[00:15:59] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: And Alex, on the same level, you’re talking about one on one like that pugilistic, that intense three minutes of your life on the other level, when it comes to tennis, that’s a three-hour conversation. Exactly. There are no subs there. There’s no coaching, no subs. You are in that gladiator arena. When I see Mia playing OK, I mean, it is intense. I mean, every ball that’s coming to you, it’s coming to you with power. It’s coming in like, can you take this? It’s like someone fighting across a net and looking at it. Are you going to quit? Are you going to chase this ball? Are you going to let it go? And that is where that definitive factor of optimal micronutrition connected with the conversation of what exactly you need in terms of genomic conversation will allow someone to scale up with a decreased risk factor of injuries where they know they can push themselves more and have the confidence. Alex, I’m telling you this is not just nutrition; this is about the confidence to know I got what I need, and I can redline this thing, and it’s going to hold. It’s not going to buckle.

 

[00:17:23] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know what? I’ve got little Bobby. He wants to wrestle, and he wants to be the biggest nightmare is the mom. Because you know what? They’re the ones that wish Bobby to thump the other Billy, right? And when their kids are getting thumped on, they want to provide for them. And moms are the best cooks. They’re the ones who take care of them, right? They’re the ones that make sure, and you could see it. The pressure on the child is immense when parents are watching, and sometimes it’s incredible to watch. But what can we give moms? What can we do for the parents to provide them with a better understanding of what’s going on? I got to tell you today with DNA tests. You know, all you have to do is get the kid in the morning, open his mouth, you know, do a swab, drag that stuff off the side of his cheek, put in a vial, and it is done within a couple of days. We can tell if Bobby’s got strong ligaments, if Bobby’s micronutrient levels are different to provide the parent with a better kind of a roadmap or a dashboard to understand the information that’s affecting Bobby, so to speak, correct?

 

[00:18:27] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Because and this is what we’ve come a long way. This is 2020, guys, and this is not 1975. That’s the year when Gatorade came over.

 

[00:18:42] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Come on; I got my tub. It’s got a lot of things on the side of it. I will have everything you look like Buddha when you develop diabetes with so much sugar from those protein shakes.

 

The Right Supplements For Kids

 

[00:18:52] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: We have come a long way, but we cannot just go in and go; oh, you need to hydrate here drink these electrolytes, Pedialyte and all that. That’s not good enough. I mean, that’s good, but it’s 2020, baby. You got to scale up and level up, and we can’t use old data and old instrumentation and diagnostics because the kids now start at three years old, Alex. Three years old. And I’m telling you right now at three, it is unbelievable. By the time they’re five and six, I mean, I’m telling you the kids that I see, they’re already in select teams.

 

[00:19:33] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Mario…

 

[00:19:34] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Six years old, they’re in a select team.

 

[00:19:36] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: The thing that determines if a child is ready is their attention span. Yeah, I got to tell you, you can watch this. You got to see a kid who’s at three years and six months, and he isn’t paying attention. Three years and eight-month, all of a sudden, he can focus.

 

[00:19:50] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It’s on like a light switch.

 

[00:19:52] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: In front of the coach, right? And you can tell because they wander and they’re not ready. So we’re bringing the kids and exposing them to loads of experiences. Then what we need to do is give moms and dads the ability to understand and athletes of the NCAA and see how I can see what’s happening in my bloodstream? Not a CBC, because the CBC is for basic stuff, like a red blood cell, white blood cell. We can do things. Metabolic panel tells us a generic thing, but now we know more profound information about the susceptibility of the gene markers and see this on the test. And these reports tell us precisely what it is and how it pertains now and progression.

 

[00:20:37] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So this is where I love. This is where I love everything in the world of performance is pre and post. So when you’re a sprinter, they time you. It’s electronic time; when you’re a wrestler, they look at you. Do you know what your winning ratio is? What’s your percentage? Anything, it’s all data. It’s data-driven. As a tennis player, a soccer player, they will track you. Computers will track how strong? How fast is your serve? Is it 100 miles an hour? I mean, it is crazy. So now, if you have that data, Alex, why is it that we do not have the same information for the most critical component, which is that biochemistry, that micro nutritional, the foundation of performance is what happens inside of us, not what happens outside. And this is where people get confused. They think, “Well, my kid works four hours a day, and he has a private trainer. Everything.” My question is that is good, but you’re putting that kid at risk if you are not supplementing on point, say precisely when it comes to the special needs of that child or that athlete, because if we don’t do that, Alex, we are not honoring the journey and the battle, that warrior, we’re not. We’re putting them at risk. And then, all of a sudden, you know what, two-three months before a tournament, BAM! Pulled a hamstring. Oh, you know what? They got fatigued, or all of a sudden, they had to pull out of a tournament. You see, I see tennis players doing all of that. And why? Oh, they’re dehydrated. Well, you should never have that problem. Before you go in exactly where you are, you should already know what you’re doing. And I love the combination and a platform that we have for all of our patients because, within two or three months, we can show pre and post, can we?

 

[00:22:39] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We can show body composition to the Inbody systems and the incredible systems we use. These DEXAS, we can do bodyweight fat analysis. We can do a lot of things. But when it comes down to predispositions and what’s unique to individuals, we go down to the molecular level, and we can go down to the level of the genes and understand what the susceptibilities are. We can go on once we have the genes. We can also understand the micronutrient level of each individual. So what’s pertaining to me? I may have more magnesium than you, and the other child may have depleted magnesium or calcium or selenium or his proteins or the amino acids or are shot. Maybe he’s got a digestive issue. Perhaps he’s got lactose intolerance. We need to be able to figure out these things that affect us.

 

[00:23:29] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: We can’t guess. And the bottom line is there’s no need for that. Everyone has that beautiful conversation, Alex, about, “Oh, you know what? I feel OK.” When I hear that, I cringe, go, and feel OK. So you mean to tell me that you are putting your health the most precious thing you have and your performance based on a feeling like, wow, that means that your urine receptors and turns the pain tolerance are dictating your health. That’s dangerous. That is completely dangerous. And also, so clinically, you’re not able to feel your deficiency in terms of vitamin D, your deficiency in terms of selenium, your deficiency in vitamin A, E. I mean, all of these markers, you can’t feel it.

 

[00:24:21] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We need to start presenting to the people out there, the information, it’s out there because what we want to let people know is that we’re going deep. We’re going down to these gene susceptibilities, the gene understanding as it is today; what we have learned is so powerful that it allows parents to understand a whole lot more of the issues pertaining to an athlete. Not only that, but the parents want to know what my susceptibility is? Do I have a risk of bone arthritis? Do we have issues with oxidative stress? Why am I always inflamed all the time, right? Well, believe it or not, if you got the genes for, let’s say you got the gene that makes you eat a lot, well, you’re likely going to gain weight. You can raise 10000 people’s hands who have that same gene marker, and you’re going to notice that their BIAs and BMI are way out of there because it’s the susceptibility to that now. Can they change it? Absolutely. That’s what we’re talking about. We’re talking about understanding the ability to adapt and change our lifestyle for the predispositions we may have.

 

[00:25:26] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, this is wonderful. And I see this quite frequently in terms of the conversation about losing weight, you know, and they go, “Oh, I did this program, and it works great.” And then you have 20 other people doing the same program, and it doesn’t even work, and it’s almost like hit and miss. So people are becoming disillusioned. They’re putting their bodies through this incredible roller coaster ride, which is like the worst thing you could do. You know, they’re doing these unnecessary things, but they cannot sustain it because why? At the end of the day, it’s not who you are. It wasn’t for you.

 

[00:26:05] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You may need a different type of diet.

 

[00:26:06] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yes. And so we, again, our conversation today is very general. We’re starting this platform together because we have to educate our community and share the latest in technology and science that addresses the needs.

 

[00:26:26] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Personalized medicine, Mario. It’s not general; it’s a personalized health and personalized fitness. We understand that we don’t have to guess if a diet is better for us, such as a low calorie, high-fat diet or a Mediterranean style food or a high protein diet. We won’t be able to see that these scientists are putting information together from the information we are continuously gathering and compiling. It’s here, and it’s a swab away, or blood works away. It’s crazy. You know what? And this information, of course, let me be mindful of before this starts. My little disclaimer comes in. This is not for treatment. Please do not take anything; we’re taking this for treatment or diagnosis. You got to talk to your doctors, and your doctors have to tell you exactly what’s up there and what’s appropriate for every individual we integrate.

 

[00:27:18] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: The point is that we integrate with all healthcare professionals and physicians. We are here to support and champion functional wellness. OK. And as you mentioned, we’re not here to treat these diseases. We’re here to optimize again when athletes come in and want to be better. They want to get healthier and help the recovery rate.

 

Can Stress Age You Faster?

 

[00:27:46] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know, that’s it. Do you know what the bottom line is? The testing is there. We can see Billy’s not been eating well. OK, Billy has not been eating well. I can tell you, well, he eats everything, but he hasn’t had this level of protein. Look at his protein depletion. So we’re going to present to you some of the studies out here because it’s information, though it’s a bit complex. But we want to make it simple. And one of the things that we were talking about here is the micronutrient test we were providing here. Now I’m going to present you guys to see a little bit here. And what we use in our office when a person comes in and says, I want to learn about my body. We present this micronutrient assessment to figure out what’s going on. Now, this one was, let’s say, just it was in a sample for me, but it tells you where the individual is. We want to be able to level the antioxidant level. Now everyone knows that, well, not everyone. But now we understand that if our genes are optimal and our food is optimal, but we live in an oxidative stress state…

 

[00:28:45] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Exactly

 

[00:28:46] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Our genes will not function. So it’s important to understand what the problem is.

 

[00:28:51] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It’s rust. I mean, when you’re looking at this, and I see two markers, I see the one for oxidative, and then the other one is the immune system. Yes, right? So again, they correlate together, but they are different. So the oxidative I talk about is like your system is rusting out. Yeah, that’s oxidation. You see apples turning brown. You see metals rusting. So inside, you want to absolutely be at your best, which is in the green in that 75 to 100 percent functional rate. That means you can handle the craziness of the world tomorrow, you know?

 

[00:29:31] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yes, we can look at the stress of the human body, Mario. What we can see actually what’s going on, and as I continue with this kind of presentation here, we can see what this individual is and what is his actual immune function age. So a lot of people want to know this stuff. I mean, I want to know where I lie in terms of the dynamics of the body, right? So when I look at that, I can see precisely where I lie, and my age is 52. OK. In this situation, OK, now as we look down, we want to know.

 

[00:30:02] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Hold on. Let’s get real. So you mean to tell me that we can get younger through this incredible system? Is that what you’re telling me?

 

[00:30:14] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It tells you if you’re aging quicker, OK, how does that sound, Mario? So if you can slow down, if you’re in that top 100, the green, you’re going to be looking like a 47-year-old man when you’re 55. Right? So from the structure, immune function, and oxidative stress in the body, what’s going to happen is that we’re going to be able to see exactly where we are in terms of our body.

 

[00:30:37] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So that is correct? Yes. So we could be our birth certificate could say 65, but our functional metabolic markers can say you’re 50.

 

[00:30:51] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yes. Let me make it real simple, OK? People often understand oxidative stress; yes, we hear about antioxidants and reactive oxygen species. Let me make it simple, OK, we’re a cell. You and I, we’re having a family meal right where we’re enjoying ourselves. We are normal cells. We’re happy, and we’re functioning where everything is appropriate. All of a sudden, there’s a wild-looking lady. She’s got blades and knives, and she’s greasy, and she’s slimy, and she comes on. She hits the table, boom, and she kind of walks away. You know, it’s going to unsettle us, right? It’s going to be, let’s call her an oxidant, OK? She’s called a reactive oxygen species. Now, if we got two of those walking around the restaurant, we kind of keep an eye on her, right? All of a sudden, a football player comes and takes her out. Boom knocks her out, right? In that situation, this greasy, slimy weapon-looking lady, correct, that’s scary. That was an antioxidant. That was vitamin C that wiped her out, right? There’s a balance between oxidants and antioxidants in the body. They have different purposes, right? We have to have antioxidants, and we have to have oxidants in order for our body to function. But if you got 800 of those ladies like zombies all of a sudden.

 

[00:32:02] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*:I could see them as zombies.

 

[00:32:07] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It is. You know what you’re going to want. Where are the football players? Where are the antioxidants, right? Take them out. The football players come in, but there are just too many of them, right? Anything that you and I do in a conversation could be healthy cells, and we’re having this conversation at the dinner table. We’re disrupted totally. We cannot function in an oxidative stress environment. No. So basically, we may have all the supplements, and we may have all the nutrients, and we may have the proper genetics. But if we’re in an oxidative state, right, an elevated level, we’re not going to be aged. It will not be a comfortable night, and we will not recover.

 

[00:32:46] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: We will be at a higher risk factor for injuries. Exactly. And the other thing is we also have the risk factor where we will age faster than we should.

 

[00:33:04] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: That night would be rough is there’s like a hundred of those people around. So we need to know the state of the balance in life, the antioxidants we see, and all the antioxidants foods like A, C, E. That is what this test does. It shows you the level of oxidants in the body.

 

[00:33:19] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Hey, Alex, let me ask you this. Everyone loves to work out. When you work out, does that increase or decrease your oxidative stress? Please tell me, because I want to know.

 

[00:33:30] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It increases your oxidative state.

 

[00:33:31] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: No, stop it.

 

[00:33:32] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It does because you’re breaking the body down. However, the body responds. And if we are healthy, Mario, right? In that sense, our body first has to break down, and it has to repair. OK? We want to have antioxidants because it helps us go through the process. Part of healing and part of inflammation is oxidative balance. So, in essence, when you’re working out too hard or running hard, you can overburn the bar, and those are the things that you and I have to kind of look at, and this is the balance.

 

[00:34:08] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Now this is like the paradox, right? You know what, if you overwork, you’re going to look fabulous. But you know what? You’re actually breaking down. And if you don’t work out, there goes your cardio. There go other risk factors. So this is where it is so critical that we need to balance and know precisely what each person needs to be at their best. And we can’t guess; you can’t take the same supplements as me and vice versa.

 

The Right Cofactors For Your Body

 

[00:34:41] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I can, we can. But it’s to me, I may not be a lot of waste of money, or maybe we’re just missing the whole process. So in this entire dynamics here, just looking at this test, Mario, just using it at this particular assessment, we want to see also what our cofactors are on. We talked about proteins; we talked about genetics. We talked about things that make these enzymes work, our body functions, and pure enzymes in this particular model that you’re seeing what the cofactors are and the metabolites are. Well, you see amino acids levels and where they are in your body. If you’re an extreme athlete, you want to know what those things are.

 

[00:35:14] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Oh yeah, I mean, look at that. Those aminos. Those are critical.

 

[00:35:20] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You think Mario?

 

[00:35:21] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, I mean it’s like every athlete I know, they’re like, Hey, I got to take my aminos. My question is, are you taking the right ones at the right level? Or do you even know, and they’re guessing. Ninety percent of the people are assuming you’re looking at antioxidants. Look at that. That’s the beast right there, glutathione. That’s like the granddaddy of antioxidants right there. And you want to know is, is that football players, that linebackers are going to crush those zombies, you know? And again, vitamin E, CoQ10. Everyone talks about CoQ10 and heart health.

 

[00:36:00] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Coenzyme Q, exactly. A lot of people take cardiac medications specifically to lower their cholesterol.

 

[00:36:10] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: What does CoQ10 do, Alex? I want to get you started.

 

[00:36:15] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Because you know what? Many documentation came out early on when they did many of these medications. Yeah, they knew they had to end it and put coenzyme Q in it. They knew, and they patented it because they knew that they had it. Because if you don’t give coenzyme Q right, you have inflammatory states and neuropathies. But these people have issues, and now they’re starting to understand. That’s why you see all the commercials with the coenzymes. But the point is that we need to know where our present state is right. So when we understand those things, we can look at the tests. And we can look at the dynamics of it. Wouldn’t you like to know which antioxidants? It’s so clear.

 

[00:36:52] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I love this. I mean, look at that. You know what? It’s red, green, black and that’s it. I mean, you can see it right away. This is your board. This is your command center. You know, I love the command center. It’s like, everything’s there.

 

[00:37:10] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I know Mario, you know, with those athletes, they want to be at the top level. Yes, it looks like this person’s floating somewhere in the middle, but they want to top it at 100 percent, right?

 

[00:37:19] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Alex, they’re on the bench.

 

[00:37:23] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah. And when they’re under a lot of stress, who knows what? Now, these tests are straightforward to do. They’re not complex to go in. Take a lab test sometimes are these are urine tests, something we can do.

 

[00:37:33] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: And we can do those in our offices in a matter of minutes, precisely in a matter of minutes. Crazy.

 

[00:37:38] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It’s crazy.

 

[00:37:40] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: This is why it’s so simple. It’s like my question is, what color is the red bus? I don’t know. It’s a trick question.

 

What Supplements Are Right For You?

 

[00:37:50] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Well, going back into our topic today was personalized medicine and personalized wellness and personalized fitness. Doctors around the country are starting to understand that they cannot just say, OK, you’re pregnant. Here’s a folic acid pill. OK, here are some nutrients, though every doctor has to be taking care of their own clients. They’re the ones that are doing this. But people have the ability to understand; where are the other holes? Wouldn’t you want to make sure you have suitable selenium?

 

[00:38:17] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Before you have symptoms. That’s the thing, and this is why we are not treating. We’re not saying that issues, diagnosis issues, what are you doing to optimize and decrease your risk factors?

 

[00:38:35] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: There’s the issue of longevity, too, because I mean, the issue of longevity is if you’re providing your body with the right substrates, the right cofactors, the right nutrition. Your body has a chance to make it to 100 years plus and actually function. And if you have a depleted life, well, you’re burning the engine, so the body starts having issues, you know, so as we look at those kinds of things…

 

[00:39:00] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Can you return to our two markers? Look at that immune system.

 

[00:39:12] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah, there’s a reason they stop here at 100 because that’s the whole idea. The entire idea is to get you to live 100 Centennial. So if we can do this, if you’re a person who’s, let’s say, 38 years old, and you’re in the midst of your life, and let’s say you’re a business person and you’re a junkie for business. You’re a junkie for entrepreneurship. You want to throttle you against the world. You do not want a kind of Nicholas the worm weakness, so to speak, taking you out of your football run in life. Because otherwise, you can trip up on things. And what we want to be able to provide people through nutritionists who registered dietitians to doctors through the information out there to supplement your lives better. And it’s not just about little Bobby; it’s about me, it’s about you. It’s about our patients. It’s about every single one of them who wants to live a better quality of life. Because if there’s a depletion in certain things, it’s not now. But in the future, you may have a susceptibility that will bring out diseases. And that’s where those susceptibilities are. We can take it to the next level because we can see what’s going on. In terms of this, I’m going to go ahead and bring this back up here so you can just see what we’re looking at. You can see the B-complex is now we have a lot of B-complexes, and we got people texting all over the place here, and I’m getting zapped with messages.

 

[00:40:42] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Your oxidative stress is going up, Alex.

 

[00:40:45] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Well, it’s crazy that we’ve been here an hour, so we want to be able to bring information out for you guys as time goes on. I want to go through this and talk about the individual antioxidants now; those are your football players, man, those are the ones taking those people out. Making your whole life a lot better, right, Mario. This is the kind of stuff that we look at. You know your glutathione on your knees. Your coenzyme Q selenium is your vitamin E’s carbohydrate metabolism.

 

[00:41:10] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Look at that, I mean, glucose and insulin interaction called energy. The last time I checked, it was called turbo.

 

[00:41:21] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We got to listen; we got a lot of good doctors. We got like Dr. Castro out there. We got all the great doctors out there that are running over.

 

[00:41:30] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I mean, we’re going to get in trouble.

 

[00:41:32] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: All right. Facebook is going to knock us out.

 

[00:41:41] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It will put a time limit on this.

 

[00:41:43] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I think it’s our views. But the bottom line is to stay tuned. We’re coming. This can’t cover everything. Hey, Mario, when I went to school, we were terrorized by this machine called the psycho cycle.

 

[00:41:58] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*:How many ATP’s, Alex?

 

[00:42:00] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I mean, how many miles? Is it glycolysis or aerobic or anaerobic, right? So when we start looking at that, we start seeing how those coenzymes and those vitamins play a role in our energy metabolism, right? So in this individual, there were certain depletions. You can see where the yellow comes in. It affects the whole metabolic process, energy production. So the person is always tired. Well, we kind of understand the dynamics of what’s going on. So this is critical information as you and I kind of look at this, right? We can see what is it that we can offer? Can we provide information to change how the body works better dynamically? So this is crazy. So, in terms of it, we can go on and on, guys. So what we’re going to be doing is we’re probably going to be coming back because this is just fun. Do you think so? Yeah, I think we’re going to come back to what we’ve got to change the way that all El Paso is and not only for our community but also for those moms who want to know what is the best for their family members. What can we offer? The technology is not. We’re not going to allow ourselves in El Paso to be ever called the fattest sweaty town in the United States. We do have unbelievable talent out here that really can teach us about what’s going on. So I know that you’ve seen that, correct? Yeah.

 

[00:43:18] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Absolutely. And what I can say is this Alex? It’s about peak performance and peak ability. And also, getting the correct specific customized genomic nutrition pattern for each individual is the game-changer. That’s the game-changer from longevity to performance and just being happy and living the life that you were meant to live.

 

Conclusion

 

[00:43:51] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Mario, I can say that when we look at this stuff, we get excited about it, as you can tell, but it affects all our patients. People come in all depleted, tired, in pain, inflamed, and sometimes we need to find out what it is. And in our scope, we are mandated to be responsible and figure out where this relies upon and where this lies in our patients’ problems. Because what we’re doing, if we help their structure, the musculoskeletal, neurological system, their mind system through a proper diet and understanding through exercise, we can change people’s lives, and they want to be able to fulfill their lives and enjoy their lives the way it should be. So there’s a lot to be said. So we will come back sometime next week or this week. We’re going to continue this topic on personalized medicine, personalized wellness, and personalized fitness because working with many doctors through integrative health and integrative medicine allows us to be a part of a team. We have GI doctors, you know, cardiologists. There’s a reason we work as a team together because we all bring a different science level. No team is complete without a nephrologist, and that person will figure out precisely the implications of all the things we do. So that person is very important in the dynamics of integrative wellness. So for us to be able to be the best kind of providers, we have to expose and tell people about what’s out there because a lot of people don’t know. And what we need to do is bring it to them and let the cards lie and teach them that they had to tell their doctors, “Hey, Doc, I need you to talk to me about my health and sit down. Explain to me my labs.” And if they don’t, well, you know what? Say you need to do that. And if you don’t, well, time to find a new doctor. OK, it’s that simple because today’s information technology is such that our doctors cannot neglect nutrition. They cannot neglect wellness. They cannot overlook the integration of all the sciences put together to make people healthy. This is one of the most important things that we got to do. It’s a mandate. It’s our responsibility, and we’re going to do it, and we’re going to knock it out of the ballpark. So, Mario, it’s been a blessing today, and we’ll continue to do this in the next couple of days, and we’ll keep on hammering and giving people the insights as to what they can do in terms of their science. This is a Health Voice 360 channel, so we’re going to talk about many different things and bring a lot of other talents. Thanks, guys. And you got anything else, Mario?

 

[00:46:11] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I’m all in.

 

[00:46:12] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*:All right, brother, talk to you soon. Love you, man. Bye.

 

Disclaimer

Calcium and Vitamin D for Optimal Bone Health

Calcium and Vitamin D for Optimal Bone Health

Calcium and Vitamin D for optimal bone health. The body’s bones/skeletal system contains a huge amount of calcium. Close to 100% of the body’s total calcium is in the bones. Calcium is a nutrient that helps the body rebuild/repair bones. �

This means an individual needs enough calcium throughout their lifetime for healthy bones. Individuals with osteoporosis have an increase of fracture/s, which means it is even more important to have the proper amount of calcium.

However, the body also needs enough vitamin D to properly absorb the calcium. When the body does not have enough vitamin D, the body will not be able to utilize all the calcium being taking in. Maintaining bone health requires keeping track of calcium and vitamin D intake.

Calcium

How much calcium the body needs depends on various factors, that include age. Listed are basic recommendations of calcium intake by age, but individuals should talk with a doctor about how much calcium is best for them on a daily basis. �

Children and Young Adults

  • 1-3 years of age 500mg
  • 4-8 years of age 800mg
  • 9-18 years of age 1,300mg

Adult Men and Women

  • 19-49 years of age 1,000mg
  • 50+ years of age 1,200mg

Women Pregnant and Breastfeeding

  • Under 18 years of age 1,300mg
  • 19+ years of age 1,000mg
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Calcium and Vitamin D for Optimal Bone Health

This can help to get a general idea of how much calcium is needed every day. The best way to get enough calcium through what is eaten and drank regularly. Here are some foods that offer the proper amount of calcium:

  • Cooked Broccoli 60mg in 8 oz.
  • Fruit Juice with Added Calcium 200-260mg in 6 oz.
  • Low-fat and Skim Milk 300mg in 8 oz.
  • Low-fat Plain Yogurt 415mg in 8 oz.
  • Swiss Cheese 220-270mg in 1 oz.

These are estimates for the amount of calcium these foods offer. Always look at the food label to get an accurate number. These are also just examples of what foods can help meet the calcium requirement for the day. If unable to get enough calcium from the diet, supplements can be taken to make sure the appropriate amount is met.

An example of not being able to get the proper amount is individuals that are lactose intolerant. This can be a challenge to get the calcium needed. For individuals not getting enough calcium should talk with a doctor, nutritionist, or health coach about supplements. They will help figure out the best calcium supplement and how much to take. However, getting too much calcium can be detrimental to overall health. That’s why finding the best balance is key.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is what helps the body absorb calcium. The body makes vitamin D when outside in the sun. This is a perfect reason to go outside more often. 15 minutes of exposure to the sun every day will significantly increase vitamin D production. Some individuals are not able to make enough vitamin D, no matter how much sunlight exposure. However, Vitamin D is also found in various foods like:

For some individuals, it can also be a challenge to get enough vitamin D. There are vitamin D supplements that can help fill daily requirements. A doctor can tell if supplements are needed with various tests that can tell how much vitamin D the body is getting. There are two types of vitamin D supplements: They are D3 and D2. Research shows that D3 and D2 are both good for bones. And just like calcium, the amount of vitamin D needed depends on age: �

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Calcium and Vitamin D for Optimal Bone Health

Children and Young Adults

IU stands for international units which are how vitamin D is measured.

  • 1-18 years of age 400 IU

Adult Men and Women

  • 19-49 years of age 400-800 IU
  • 50+ years of age 800-1,000 IU

Women Pregnant and Breastfeeding

  • Any age 400-800 IU

Getting enough calcium and Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones and a healthy body. Our nutritionist and health coach can help get you back on track to optimal health.


Chiropractic Care and CrossFit Rehabilitation


Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*

References

Fischer, V et al. �Calcium and vitamin D in bone fracture healing and post-traumatic bone turnover.��European cells & materials�vol. 35 365-385. 22 Jun. 2018, doi:10.22203/eCM.v035a25

Does the Brain Need Carbohydrates?

Does the Brain Need Carbohydrates?

Our brain is constantly working to help us make decisions, speak, read, and perform many other important functions. It’s also responsible for several involuntary processes, including breathing, regulating body temperature, and secreting hormones. The brain needs a consistent supply of energy in order to perform these essential functions. It mainly uses glucose as fuel for energy, however, does the brain really need glucose from carbohydrates to function properly?

 

What Happens When You Don’t Eat Carbohydrates?

 

According to healthcare professionals, the brain needs between 110 to 145 grams of glucose per day to function properly. Most people who follow a high-carb diet provide their brains with an abundant supply of glucose. However, what happens when you eat less than 110 grams of carbohydrates per day or even no carbs at all? Does your brain starve? Absolutely not! Our muscles and liver store glucose in the form of glycogen, a polysaccharide of glucose.

 

When you don’t eat carbs, glycogen in the liver is broken down into glucose and released into the bloodstream to prevent low blood glucose levels. While more glycogen is stored in the muscles than in the liver, it stays in the muscles to meet their demand for energy and it can’t be broken down and released into the bloodstream to prevent low blood glucose levels. After about 24 to 48 hours without eating carbohydrates, glycogen in the liver is depleted and insulin decreases.

 

The liver will then produce ketones, water-soluble compounds produced by the breakdown of fatty acids. Ketones are produced from the fats you eat or the movement of stored body fat. Ketones can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter the bloodstream in order to reach the brain and provide additional energy. This ultimately means that ketones can also be used as fuel for energy when our body is running low on glucose from carbohydrates.

 

Can Your Brain Use Ketones Alone for Energy?

 

Our brain always needs some glucose for energy. However, healthcare professionals have shown that for several people following a ketogenic diet, ketones can be used to meet up to 70 percent of the brain�s energy needs. As for the rest of the brain�s energy needs, your liver can produce the glucose it needs through a process known as gluconeogenesis. Thus, the liver can meet the brain’s energy needs through stored glucose, the production of ketones, or gluconeogenesis.

 

Glucose Alone vs Glucose and Ketones for Energy

 

If you follow a moderate-carb to a high-carb diet, your brain may not be properly adapted to use ketones as fuel for energy. Therefore, glucose will be the main source of energy for your brain. However, when your body has adapted to following a low-carb or carb-free diet, the brain can easily use ketones to meet the brain’s energy needs and the liver can make as much glucose as it needs to meet the rest of the brain’s energy needs in order to function properly.

 

What are the Low-Carb and Ketogenic Diet?

 

While there is a lot of similarities between the low-carb and ketogenic diet, there are also several important differences. The differences between the low-carb and the ketogenic diet may include but are not limited to the following:

 

Ketogenic Diet

 

  • Carbohydrates are limited to 50 grams or less per day.
  • Protein is generally limited or restricted.
  • The main goal is to increase the production of ketones.

 

Low-Carb Diet

 

  • Carbohydrates can vary from 25 to 150 grams per day.
  • Protein is typically not limited or restricted.
  • Production of etones may or may not increase.

 

In conclusion, eating carbohydrates to use as fuel for the brain’s energy needs is an option, not a requirement. It�s true that the brain can�t depend on ketones alone as it always needs some glucose as well. It’s important to understand that your brain isn�t in any danger if you follow a low-carb or a ketogenic diet. However, before following any particular diet, always make sure to talk to a healthcare professional to determine if these nutritional guidelines are right for you.

 

For information regarding the effects of carbohydrates on the brain, please review the following article:

Effects of a Carbohydrate Supplement Upon Resting Brain Activity

 


 

 

Our brain is constantly working to perform many important functions. The brain needs a consistent supply of energy in order to perform these essential functions and while it mainly uses glucose as fuel for energy,� the brain doesn’t really need glucose from carbohydrates to function properly. Glycogen in the liver is broken down into glucose. The liver will then produce ketones, water-soluble compounds produced by the breakdown of fatty acids. Ketones are produced from the fats you eat or the movement of stored body fat. Ketones can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and provide additional energy for the brain. However, our brain always needs some glucose for energy. Your liver can also produce the glucose it needs through a process known as gluconeogenesis. Thus, the liver can meet the brain’s energy needs through stored glucose, the production of ketones, or gluconeogenesis. A low-carb or a ketogenic diet can provide a variety of benefits. Always make sure to talk to a healthcare professional to determine if these nutritional guidelines are right for you.�- Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 


 

Image of zesty beet juice.

 

 

Zesty Beet Juice

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1 grapefruit, peeled and sliced
� 1 apple, washed and sliced
� 1 whole beet, and leaves if you have them, washed and sliced
� 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped

Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of carrots.

 

Just one carrot gives you all of your daily vitamin A intake

 

Yes, eating just one boiled 80g (2�oz) carrot gives you enough beta carotene for your body to produce 1,480 micrograms (mcg) of vitamin A (necessary for skin cell renewal). That’s more than the recommended daily intake of vitamin A in the United States, which is about 900mcg. It’s best to eat carrots cooked, as this softens the cell walls allowing more beta carotene to be absorbed. Adding healthier foods into your diet is a great way to improve your overall health.

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Spritzler, Franziska. �Food for Thought: Does the Brain Need Carbs?� Diet Doctor, Diet Doctor Media, 17 Jan. 2019, www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/does-the-brain-need-carbs.
  • Spritzler, Franziska. �How Low-Carb and Ketogenic Diets Boost Brain Health.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 26 Mar. 2016, www.healthline.com/nutrition/low-carb-ketogenic-diet-brain#section1.
  • Dowden, Angela. �Coffee Is a Fruit and Other Unbelievably True Food Facts.� MSN Lifestyle, 4 June 2020, www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/did-you-know/coffee-is-a-fruit-and-other-unbelievably-true-food-facts/ss-BB152Q5q?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=mailsignout#image=24.

 

The Importance of Folate and Folic Acid

The Importance of Folate and Folic Acid

Folate is a B vitamin naturally found in a variety of foods. The body can’t produce folate, that’s why it’s important to get it from folate-rich foods. Folate is naturally found in various plant and animal foods, including citrus fruits, avocado, spinach, kale, broccoli, eggs, and beef liver. Folate is also added to foods, such as bread, flours, and cereals, in the form of folic acid or the synthetic, water-soluble version of folate. Folate and folic acid have different effects on the body.

 

Our body utilizes folate for a variety of essential functions, including cell division, development of red blood cells, conversion of homocysteine to methionine, an amino acid used for protein synthesis, production of SAMe, and DNA methylation. Folic acid is also important for various metabolic processes. Folate deficiency has ultimately been associated with a variety of health issues, such as the increased risk of heart disease, birth defects, megaloblastic anemia, and cancer.

 

Daily Intake of Folate and Folic Acid

 

Our body stores between 10 to 30 mg of folate, most of which is stored in your liver while the remaining amount is stored in your blood and tissues. Normal blood folate levels range from 5 to 15 ng/mL. The main form of folate in the bloodstream is known as 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. Daily intake of this essential nutrient is different for people of different ages. The recommended daily allowance of folate for infants, children, teens, adults, and pregnant women are as follows:

 

  • 0 to 6 months: 65 mcg
  • 7 to 12 months: 80 mcg
  • 1 to 3 years: 150 mcg
  • 4 to 8 years: 200 mcg
  • 9 to 13 years: 300 mcg
  • over 14 years: 400 mcg
  • during pregnancy: 600 mcg
  • during lactation: 500 mcg

 

Folic acid supplements play an important role in making sure that people who are in greater need of folate are getting enough of their daily intake. Increasing the daily intake of folate-rich foods is also important because these foods generally offer plenty of other nutrients that all act together to support overall health. Recommended folate daily intake increases during pregnancy and breastfeeding to promote rapid growth and help prevent neural tube defects in the fetus.

 

Folic acid is available in dietary supplements and fortified foods, including bread, flours, cereals, and several types of grains. It is also added to B-complex vitamins. Folate is also naturally found in a variety of foods, including:

 

  • oranges
  • orange juice
  • grapefruit
  • bananas
  • cantaloupe
  • papaya
  • canned tomato juice
  • avocado
  • boiled spinach
  • mustard greens
  • lettuce
  • asparagus
  • Brussels sprouts
  • broccoli
  • green peas
  • black-eyed peas
  • dry-roasted peanuts
  • kidney beans
  • eggs
  • Dungeness crab
  • beef liver

 

Uses of Folate and Folic Acid

 

Both folate and folic acid are frequently utilized for a variety of reasons. Although folate and folic acid supplements are generally used to treat similar health issues, they do offer different effects in the body and, therefore, it may affect our overall health in different ways. Moreover, getting the proper daily intake of folate and folic acid can improve overall health. The following are several of the most common uses of folate and folic acid supplements, including:

 

  • folate deficiency
  • inflammation
  • diabetes
  • brain health
  • heart disease
  • kidney disease
  • mental health issues
  • fertility problems
  • birth defects and pregnancy complications

 

For information regarding the importance of folate and folic acid, please review the following article:

The Importance of Folic Acid

 


 

 

Folate is a B vitamin that is naturally found in many different types of food. Because we can’t produce folate, it’s important to get it from foods that are high in folate. Various folate-rich foods include citrus fruits, avocado, spinach, kale, broccoli, eggs, and beef liver. Folate is also added to foods like bread, flours, and cereals, in the form of folic acid, the synthetic version of this essential nutrient. Folate and folic acid have different effects on the body. Our body uses folate for many important functions, including cell division, development of red blood cells, conversion of homocysteine to methionine, an amino acid used for protein synthesis, production of SAMe, and DNA methylation. Folic acid is also essential for many metabolic processes. Folate deficiency has ultimately been associated with a variety of health issues, such as heart disease, birth defects, megaloblastic anemia, and even cancer. Daily intake of this essential nutrient is different for people of different ages. Furthermore, folate is also naturally found in a variety of foods, such as bananas, avocado, boiled spinach, and eggs. Both folate and folic acid supplements have a variety of uses and they can help improve various health issues, including inflammation, diabetes, heart disease, birth defects, and pregnancy complications. Adding healthy foods to a smoothie is a fast and easy way to get your daily intake of folate. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 


 

Image of ginger greens juice.

 

Ginger Greens Juice

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1 cup pineapple cubes
� 1 apples, sliced
� 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled, and chopped
� 3 cups kale, rinsed, and roughly chopped or ripped
� 5 cups Swiss chard, rinsed, and roughly chopped or ripped

Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of soft-boiled and hard-boiled eggs.

 

Eating cholesterol-rich foods doesn�t increase your cholesterol

 

According to research studies, eating foods with HDL cholesterol or “good” cholesterol doesn’t increase your overall blood cholesterol levels. When you eat healthy cholesterol-rich foods, such as prawns and eggs, your blood cholesterol levels decrease, so your blood cholesterol levels stay balanced, or they’re only raised minimally. It’s actually saturated fats that you have to look out for when it comes to high blood cholesterol levels. Simply choose healthier food options.

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Kubala, Jillian. �Folic Acid: Everything You Need to Know.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 18 May 2020, www.healthline.com/nutrition/folic-acid#What-is-folic-acid?
  • Ware, Megan. �Folate: Health Benefits and Recommended Intake.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 26 June 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/287677#recommended-intake.
  • Felman, Adam. �Folic Acid: Importance, Deficiencies, and Side Effects.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 11 Mar. 2020, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/219853#natural-sources.
  • Berg, M J. �The Importance of Folic Acid.� The Journal of Gender-Specific Medicine: JGSM: the Official Journal of the Partnership for Women’s Health at Columbia, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 1999, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11252849/.
  • Dowden, Angela. �Coffee Is a Fruit and Other Unbelievably True Food Facts.� MSN Lifestyle, 4 June 2020, www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/did-you-know/coffee-is-a-fruit-and-other-unbelievably-true-food-facts/ss-BB152Q5q?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=mailsignout#image=23.

 

Is Fructose Bad for Your Health?

Is Fructose Bad for Your Health?

Fructose is one of the main components of added sugar. It is a simple type of sugar that makes up about 50 percent of table sugar or sucrose. Table sugar is also made up of glucose or the main energy source of the human body. However, fructose needs to be turned into glucose by the liver before it can be used as fuel for energy by our cells. Fructose, sucrose, and glucose are all naturally found in fruits, vegetables, dairy products, and whole grains as well as in many processed foods. The effects of this simple sugar on our health have been a controversial topic for many years. Research studies are starting to demonstrate the connection between fructose and obesity, diabetes, and even cancer.

 

What is Fructose?

 

Fructose, also referred to as fruit sugar, is a monosaccharide or simple sugar like glucose. It’s naturally found in fruits, most root vegetables, agave, and honey. Moreover, it’s commonly added to processed foods as high-fructose corn syrup. The fructose used in high-fructose corn syrup mainly comes from corn, sugar beets, and sugar cane. High-fructose corn syrup is made from cornstarch and it has more of this simple sugar than glucose, compared to regular corn syrup. Fructose has the sweetest taste of the three sugars. It is digested and absorbed differently by the human body. Because monosaccharides are simple sugars, they don’t need to be broken down to be used as fuel for energy by our cells.

 

Natural foods that are high in fructose can include:

 

  • apples
  • apple juice
  • pears
  • prunes
  • dry figs
  • sorghum
  • asparagus
  • Jerusalem artichokes
  • chicory roots
  • leeks
  • onions
  • caramel
  • licorice
  • molasses
  • agave syrup
  • honey

 

Similar to glucose, fructose is absorbed directly into the bloodstream through the small intestine. Healthcare professionals have found that fructose has the least impact on blood sugar levels. It increases blood sugar levels much more gradually than glucose does and it doesn’t seem to immediately affect insulin levels. However, although this simple sugar has the least impact on blood sugar levels than any of the other simple types of sugars, it may ultimately cause more long-term negative effects on the human body. Fructose needs to be turned into glucose by the liver before it can be used as fuel for energy by our cells. Eating excess fructose can increase triglycerides and lead to metabolic syndrome.

 

Why is Fructose Bad for You?

 

When people eat a diet that is high in calories and processed foods with lots of high-fructose corn syrup, the liver can become overwhelmed and start turning fructose into fat. Research studies are starting to demonstrate the connection between this simple sugar and an increased risk of developing a variety of health issues, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and even cancer. Many healthcare professionals also believe that eating excess fructose is one of the main causes of metabolic disorders. However, there currently isn’t enough evidence to demonstrate the full extent to which fructose can contribute to these health issues. Nevertheless, numerous research studies have justified these controversial concerns.

 

Research studies have demonstrated that eating excess fructose can increase LDL or bad cholesterol which may lead to fat accumulation around the organs and heart disease. As a result, evidence showed that the deposition of fat in the liver due to the negative effects of this simple sugar can also result in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Eating excess fructose may also affect body fat regulation. Other research studies have demonstrated that because fructose doesn’t suppress appetite as much as other types of sugars do, it can promote overeating which may lead to obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, evidence has demonstrated that fructose can increase uric acid levels and cause gout.

 

For information regarding if fructose is bad for your health, please review the following article:

Health implications of fructose consumption: A review of recent data

 


 

AS PREVIOUSLY MENTIONED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE, FRUCTOSE IS ONE OF THE MAIN COMPONENTS OF ADDED SUGAR. IT IS A SIMPLE SUGAR THAT MAKES UP APPROXIMATELY 50 PERCENT OF TABLE SUGAR OR SUCROSE. TABLE SUGAR ALSO CONSISTS OF GLUCOSE OR THE MAIN ENERGY SOURCE OF THE HUMAN BODY. HOWEVER, FRUCTOSE NEEDS TO BE CONVERTED INTO GLUCOSE BY THE LIVER BEFORE IT CAN BE UTILIZED AS FUEL FOR ENERGY BY OUR CELLS. FRUCTOSE, SUCROSE, AND GLUCOSE ARE ALL NATURALLY FOUND IN SEVERAL FRUITS, VEGETABLES, DAIRY PRODUCTS, AND WHOLE GRAINS AS WELL AS IN MANY PROCESSED FOODS. THE EFFECTS OF THIS SIMPLE SUGAR ON OUR HEALTH HAVE BEEN A CONTROVERSIAL TOPIC FOR MANY YEARS. RESEARCH STUDIES ARE STARTING TO DEMONSTRATE THE CONNECTION BETWEEN FRUCTOSE AND OBESITY, DIABETES, AND EVEN CANCER. IN THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE, WE DISCUSS IF FRUCTOSE IS BAD FOR YOUR HEALTH. DRINKING SMOOTHIES ADD A HEALTHY NUTRITIONAL BOOST.� -�DR. ALEX JIMENEZ D.C., C.C.S.T. INSIGHTS

 


 

Image of sweet and spicy juice recipe.

 

 

Sweet and Spicy Juice

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1 cup honeydew melons
� 3 cups spinach, rinsed
� 3 cups Swiss chard, rinsed
� 1 bunch cilantro (leaves and stems), rinsed
� 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled, and chopped
� 2-3 knobs whole turmeric root (optional), rinsed, peeled, and chopped

Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of red peppers.

 

 

Red peppers have almost 2.5 times more vitamin C than oranges

 

Citrus fruits like oranges are a great source of vitamin C, however, there are other fruits and vegetables that offer an even better boost of this essential nutrient. Just half a red pepper, eaten raw, offers more than your requirement of vitamin C for the day, according to healthcare professionals. Cut it into crudit�s for a healthy mid-morning or afternoon snack. Red peppers are also rich in a variety of other essential nutrients, including vitamin A, B6, folate, and antioxidants!

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Gunnars, Kris. �Is Fructose Bad for You? The Surprising Truth.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 23 Apr. 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/why-is-fructose-bad-for-you#section1.
  • Nall, Rachel. �Is Fructose Bad for You? Benefits, Risks, and Other Sugars.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 28 Nov. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323818.
  • Groves, Melissa. �Sucrose vs Glucose vs Fructose: What’s the Difference?� Healthline, Healthline Media, 8 June 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/sucrose-glucose-fructose.
  • Rizkalla, Salwa W. �Health Implications of Fructose Consumption: A Review of Recent Data.� National Center for Biotechnology Information, BioMed Central, 4 Nov. 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2991323/.
  • Daniluk, Julie. �5 Health Benefits of Red Peppers. Plus, Our World’s Healthiest Pizza Recipe.� Chatelaine, 26 Feb. 2016, www.chatelaine.com/health/healthy-recipes-health/five-health-benefits-of-red-peppers/.

 

What is Folate Metabolism?

What is Folate Metabolism?

Folate, and its synthetic form folic acid, is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays a fundamental role in a variety of functions in the human body. Folate is essential for cell division and homeostasis because it acts as a coenzyme in many biological pathways, including amino acid metabolism, methionine production, and DNA methylation. Folate metabolism happens together with the methionine cycle and the choline pathway. Most folate coenzymes are found in the liver.

 

Folate is also used as a coenzyme to convert methionine into homocysteine. Vitamin B6 and B12, together with folate, are also essential for DNA synthesis. Proper dietary intake of folate is fundamental for normal cell growth and DNA repair. Folate or vitamin B12 deficiency can ultimately cause a variety of health issues, including anemia. Oral supplementation may be necessary. In the following article, we will discuss folate metabolism and foods that are high in folate.

 

Folate Metabolism Overview

 

Several of the most important functions of folate metabolism are methylation and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) production, one of the most essential methyl donors in the cell. In the following diagram, we will explain folate metabolism.�

 

Image of a folate metabolism diagram.

 

Figure 1: One carbon metabolism. ATP: adenosyl triphosphate, B6: vitamin B6, B12: vitamin B12, BHMT: betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, CBS: cystathionine-?-synthase, DHF: dihydrofolate, DMG: dimethylglycine, dTMP: deoxythymidine monophosphate, dUMP: deoxyuridine monophosphate, Gly: glycine, Hcy: homocysteine, MAT: methionine adenosyltransferase, Met: methionine, MCM: L-methylmalonyl CoA mutase, MM-CoA: L-methylmalonyl CoA, MMA: methylmalonic acid, MS: methionine synthase, MTHFR: 5,10-methyltetrahydrofolate reductase, SAH: S-adenosyl homocysteine, SAHH: S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase, SAM: S-adenosyl methionine, Ser: serine, SHMT, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, THF: tetrahydrofolate, TS: thymidylate synthase. Adapted from: Hypo- and hypervitaminosis of B and D vitamins � Diagnosis and clinical consequences. Herrmann W. et al. 2013. Uni-Med Verlag AG.

 

Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a component that converts folate to dihydrofolate (DHF) and DHF to the active form, THF. Folate metabolism consists of three cycles. One cycle starts with a component known as 10-formylTHF which is associated with purine production and two cycles utilize 5, 10-methyleneTHF in deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP) and methionine production. 5-MethylTHF is one of the most predominant forms of folate found in the human body.

 

After cellular uptake, 5-methylTHF is converted into THF through the use of vitamin B12 in methionine synthase (MS). The methionine cycle is a fundamental pathway in SAM production. As previously mentioned above, B vitamin deficiencies, including folate, vitamin B6, and B12, as well as genetic birth defects can ultimately cause a variety of health issues. 5,10-MethyleneTHF is finally converted to 5-methylTHF by 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR).

 

Several of the most important functions of folate metabolism are methylation and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) production, one of the most essential methyl donors in the cell. In the following diagram, we will simplify folate metabolism.�

 

Image of a second folate metabolism diagram.

 

15 Foods That Are High in Folate

 

Folate, and its synthetic form folic acid, is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays a fundamental role in a variety of functions in the human body. It�supports cell division and promotes fetal growth and development to reduce the risk of genetic birth defects. Folate is naturally found in many different types of foods. Doctors recommend 400 mcg of folate every day for adults to prevent deficiency. Here are 15 healthy foods that are high in folate or folic acid, including:

 

  • avocado
  • bananas
  • citrus fruits
  • papaya
  • beets
  • leafy greens
  • asparagus
  • Brussels sprouts
  • broccoli
  • nuts and seeds
  • legumes
  • eggs
  • beef liver
  • wheat germ
  • fortified grains

 

In conclusion, folate, and its synthetic form folic acid, is an important micronutrient that can be naturally found in many different types of foods. Eating many different types of healthy foods, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds, as well as fortified foods, is an easy way to increase your folate intake. These foods are not only high in folate but these are also high in other essential nutrients that can ultimately improve other aspects of your overall health.

 

For information regarding the nutritional role of folate, please review the following article:

Nutritional Role of Folate

 


 

Folate or folic acid is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays a fundamental role in a variety of functions in the human body, including cell division and homeostasis. Folate also helps with amino acid metabolism, methionine production, and DNA methylation.�Folate or vitamin B12 deficiency can ultimately cause a variety of health issues. Oral supplementation may be necessary. In the diagrams above, we explain the process of folate metabolism.�Folate is naturally found in many different types of foods, including avocado, citrus fruits, leafy greens, broccoli, nuts and seeds, legumes, eggs, and fortified grains.�Eating many different types of healthy foods is an easy way to increase your folate intake. These foods are not only high in folate but these are also high in other essential nutrients that can ultimately improve other aspects of your overall health.�- Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

Image of the Berry Bliss Smoothie

 

Berry Bliss Smoothie

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1/2 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen, preferably wild)
� 1 medium carrot, roughly chopped
� 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed or chia seed
� 1 tablespoons almonds
� Water (to desired consistency)
� Ice cubes (optional, may omit if using frozen blueberries)

Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth and creamy. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of Almonds.

 

Almonds have twice as much calcium as milk

 

Gram for gram this is absolutely true! According to McCance and Widdowson’s Composition of Foods (the official guide to the nutrients in food used in the UK), about 100g of almonds have 240mg of bone-building calcium while semi-skimmed (2%) milk has 120mg per 100g (3.5oz). With that being said, however, we tend to drink milk in bigger quantities than we eat almonds (and the calcium from milk is easily absorbed), so the dairy option may be a better source day-to-day.

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Almas, Saneea. �Folic Acid: An Overview of Metabolism, Dosages, and Benefits of Optimal Periconception Supplementation: InfantRisk Center.� Infant Risk Center, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, www.infantrisk.com/content/folic-acid-overview-metabolism-dosages-and-benefits-optimal-periconception-supplementation.
  • Homocysteine Expert Panel Staff. �Folate Metabolism.� Homocysteine Expert Panel, Homocysteine Expert Panel Media, www.homocysteine-panel.org/en/folatefolic-acid/basics/folate-metabolism/.
  • Link, Rachael. �15 Healthy Foods That Are High in Folate (Folic Acid).� Healthline, Healthline Media, 27 Feb. 2020, www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods-high-in-folate-folic-acid.
  • Shuhei, Ebara. �Nutritional Role of Folate.� Congenital Anomalies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 11 June 2017, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28603928/?from_term=folate%2Bmetabolism&from_pos=3.
  • MSN Lifestyle Staff. �Coffee Is a Fruit and Other Unbelievably True Food Facts.� MSN Lifestyle, MSN Lifestyle Media, 4 June 2020, www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/did-you-know/coffee-is-a-fruit-and-other-unbelievably-true-food-facts/ss-BB152Q5q?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=mailsignout#image=5.

 

Excess Sugar and Chronic Inflammation

Excess Sugar and Chronic Inflammation

Our diet can significantly affect inflammation in our bodies. Several foods can increase inflammation while other foods can reduce inflammation. According to healthcare professionals, a diet that is high in sugar may be associated with chronic inflammation. A systematic review in 2018 demonstrated that eating excess sugar can ultimately cause inflammation and a variety of other health issues, such as diabetes. Another 2014 research study showed that people who decreased their consumption of sugary or sweetened drinks had reduced inflammation. These research findings support the theory that eating excess sugar can cause chronic inflammation and various other diseases, including diabetes.

 

How Sugar Can Cause Inflammation

 

Healthcare professionals have tried to understand how eating excess sugar can cause chronic inflammation. Sugar triggers the production of free fatty acids in the liver. When the human body digests these free fatty acids, the resulting compounds can trigger inflammation. Different types of sugar may also cause more inflammation. By way of instance, one research study found that fructose can cause more inflammation than glucose. However, a systematic review found that fructose didn’t cause more inflammation than glucose. Therefore, further research studies are still required to determine which types of sugar may cause more inflammation. Symptoms associated with chronic inflammation can include:

 

  • pain and fatigue
  • sleeping problems or insomnia
  • anxiety, depression, and other mood disorders
  • digestive problems like acid reflux, constipation, and/or diarrhea
  • weight gain or obesity
  • constant infections

 

People with chronic inflammation may also have an increased risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including diabetes and dementia. Chronic inflammation in older adults may also be associated with an increased risk of death.

 

Health Issues Caused by Chronic Inflammation

 

Observational research studies in humans have associated diets with high added sugar and refined carbohydrates to the increased risk of developing a variety of health issues, including diabetes, IBD, liver disease, dementia, and arthritis.

 

Diabetes

 

Research studies showed a connection between the increased consumption of added sugar and type 2 diabetes. A large analysis that included over 38,000 participants found that simply consuming one serving of sweetened drinks or beverages on a regular basis was associated with an 18 percent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Another research study found that increasing the consumption of high-fructose corn syrup was also associated with diabetes.

 

Other Diseases

 

Increased consumption of added sugar and refined carbohydrates has also been associated with the development of other diseases, such as arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease, and dementia. Furthermore, excess fructose consumption has been associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Healthcare professionals believe this may be due to a combination of ongoing low-grade inflammation, increased gut permeability, and bacterial overgrowth in the gut.

 

Other Foods That Can Cause Inflammation

 

  • sugary foods like pastries, desserts, and chocolate
  • saturated fats from processed meats and dairy products
  • trans fats found in fast, fried, foods
  • vegetable and seed oils
  • refined carbohydrates
  • excessive alcohol
  • MSG in prepared Asian foods and deli meats

 

For information regarding how excess sugar can cause chronic inflammation and various other health issues like diabetes, please review this article:

 


 

Diet can affect inflammation in our bodies. Several foods can increase inflammation while other foods can reduce inflammation. A diet that is high in sugar may be associated with inflammation. Numerous research studies have demonstrated that eating excess sugar can ultimately cause chronic inflammation and various other diseases, including diabetes. Because sugar triggers the production of free fatty acids in the liver, it can also trigger inflammation. Excess sugar can cause chronic inflammation. Different types of sugar may also cause different amounts of inflammation. There are many symptoms associated with chronic inflammation, including pain, fatigue, obesity, anxiety, and depression, among others. Inflammation can lead to a variety of health issues, such as diabetes and arthritis. Although excess sugar is associated with chronic inflammation, other foods like saturated fats and refined carbohydrates can also cause health issues. In the following article, we discuss how sugar can cause inflammation and a variety of other health issues, such as diabetes, in the human body. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

Image of sea green smoothie.

 

 

Sea Green Smoothie

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1/2 cup cantaloupe, cubed
� 1/2 banana
� 1 handful of kale or spinach
� 1 handful of Swiss chard
� 1/4 avocado
� 2 teaspoons spirulina powder
� 1 cup of water
� 3 or more ice cubes

Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender until completely smooth and enjoy!

 


 

Image of leafy greens smoothie.

 

Leafy Greens Hold the Key to Gut Health

 

A unique type of sugar found in leafy greens can help feed our beneficial gut bacteria. Sulfoquinovose (SQ) is the only known sugar molecule to be made up of sulfur, an extremely essential mineral in the human body. The human body uses sulfur to produce enzymes, proteins, and a variety of hormones as well as antibodies for our cells. A fast and easy way to get leafy greens into your diet is to toss a couple of handfuls of them into a delicious smoothie!

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Spritzler, Franziska. �6 Foods That Cause Inflammation.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 12 Nov. 2019, www.healthline.com/nutrition/6-foods-that-cause-inflammation#1.
  • Caporuscio, Jessica. �Does Sugar Cause Inflammation? What the Research Says.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 19 Sept. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326386.
  • Brown, Mary Jane. �Does Sugar Cause Inflammation in the Body?� Healthline, Healthline Media, 12 Nov. 2017, www.healthline.com/nutrition/sugar-and-inflammation.

 

MTHFR Gene Mutation and Health

MTHFR Gene Mutation and Health

The MTHFR or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene is well-known due to a genetic mutation that may cause high homocysteine levels and low folate levels in the bloodstream, among other essential nutrients. Healthcare professionals believe that a variety of health issues, such as inflammation, may be associated with an MTHFR gene mutation. In the following article, we will discuss the MTHFR gene mutation and how it can ultimately affect your overall health.

 

What is an MTHFR Gene Mutation?

 

People can have single or multiple mutations, as well as neither, on the MTHFR gene. The different mutations are often referred to as “variants”. A variant occurs when the DNA of a specific part of a gene is different or varies from person to person. People that have a heterozygous or single variant of the MTHFR gene mutation have a decreased risk of developing health issues like inflammation and chronic pain, among other diseases. Moreover, healthcare professionals also believe that people that have homozygous or multiple variants of the MTHFR gene mutation may ultimately have an increased risk of disease. There are two MTHFR gene mutation variants. These specific variants include:

 

  • C677T. Approximately 30 to 40 percent of people in the United States have a mutation at gene position C677T. About 25 percent of Hispanics and about 10 to 15 percent of Caucasians are homozygous for this variant.
  • A1298C. There are limited research studies for this variant. A 2004 study focused on 120 blood donors of Irish heritage. Of the donors, 56 or 46.7 percent were heterozygous for this variant and 11 or 14.2 percent were homozygous.
  • Both C677T and A1298C. It�s also possible for people to have both C677T and A1298C MTHFR gene mutation variations, which includes one copy of each.

 

What are the Symptoms of an MTHFR Gene Mutation?

 

Symptoms of an MTHFR gene mutation can be different from person to person and from variant to variant. It’s important to remember that further research around MTHFR gene mutation variants and their effects on health are still needed. Evidence regarding how MTHFR gene mutation variants are associated with a variety of other health issues is currently lacking or it has been disproven. Conditions that have been suggested to be associated with MTHFR variants include:

 

  • anxiety
  • depression
  • bipolar disorder
  • schizophrenia
  • migraines
  • chronic pain and fatigue
  • nerve pain
  • recurrent miscarriages in women of child-bearing age
  • pregnancies with neural tube defects, like spina bifida and anencephaly
  • cardiovascular and thromboembolic diseases (blood clots, stroke, embolism, and heart attacks)
  • acute leukemia
  • colon cancer

What is the MTHFR Diet?

 

According to healthcare professionals, eating foods with high amounts of folate may help naturally support low folate levels in the bloodstream associated with MTHFR gene mutation variants.�Good food choices can include:

 

  • fruits, such as strawberries, raspberries, grapefruit, cantaloupe, honeydew, banana.
  • juices like orange, canned pineapple, grapefruit, tomato, or other vegetable juice
  • veggies, such as spinach, asparagus, lettuce, beets, broccoli, corn, Brussels sprouts, and bok choy
  • proteins, including cooked beans, peas, and lentils
  • peanut butter
  • sunflower seeds

 

People with MTHFR gene mutations may also want to avoid eating foods that have the synthetic form of folate, folic acid, however, the evidence is not clear if that�s beneficial or necessary. Supplementation may still be recommended for people with MTHFR gene mutation variants. Furthermore, always make sure to check the labels of the foods you buy, as this vitamin is added to many enriched grains like pasta, cereals, bread, and commercially produced flours.

 

For information regarding the MTHFR and its effects on health issues like cancer, please review this article:

Folate, Methyl-Related Nutrients, Alcohol, and the MTHFR 677C >T Polymorphism Affect Cancer Risk: Intake Recommendations

 


 

MTHFR, or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, gene mutations may cause high homocysteine levels and low folate levels in the bloodstream. We believe that a variety of health issues, such as inflammation, may be associated with an MTHFR gene mutation. People can have single or multiple MTHFR gene mutations, as well as neither. The different mutations are often referred to as “variants”. People that have a heterozygous or single variant of the MTHFR gene mutation have a decreased risk of developing health issues like inflammation and chronic pain. Moreover, doctors also believe that people that have homozygous or multiple variants of the MTHFR gene mutation may ultimately have an increased risk of disease. The two MTHFR gene mutation variants are�C677T, A1298C, or both C677T and A1298C. Symptoms of an MTHFR gene mutation can be different from person to person and from variant to variant. Following what is referred to as the MTHFR diet can ultimately help improve overall health in people with MTHFR gene mutation variants. Also, adding these foods into a smoothie can be an easy way to add them into your diet. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

 

Image of protein power smoothie.

 

Protein Power Smoothie

Serving: 1
Cook time: 5 minutes

� 1 scoop protein powder
� 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed
� 1/2 banana
� 1 kiwi, peeled
� 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
� Pinch of cardamom
� Non-dairy milk or water, enough to achieve desired consistency

Blend all ingredients in a high-powered blender until completely smooth. Best served immediately!

 


 

Image of leafy greens smoothie.

 

Leafy Greens Hold the Key to Gut Health

 

A unique type of sugar found in leafy greens can help feed our beneficial gut bacteria. Sulfoquinovose (SQ) is the only known sugar molecule to be made up of sulfur, an extremely essential mineral in the human body. The human body uses sulfur to produce enzymes, proteins, and a variety of hormones as well as antibodies for our cells. A fast and easy way to get leafy greens into your diet is to toss a couple of handfuls of them into a delicious smoothie!

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require additional explanation as how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Marcin, Ashley. �What You Need to Know About the MTHFR Gene.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 6 Sept. 2019, www.healthline.com/health/mthfr-gene#variants.

 

Good Calories vs Bad Calories Overview

Good Calories vs Bad Calories Overview

Calories are defined as a measurement of the energy our body produces from the foods we eat. However, not all calories are created equal. If we were to eat nothing but spoonfuls of sugar all-day, by way of instance, our health would tremendously deteriorate because there simply aren’t enough nutrients in those calories from sugar. The human body needs a variety of nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and many other compounds in order to function properly.

 

The foods we eat are made up of calories as well as complex mixtures of nutrients, fiber, and additives. This can ultimately affect the hormones that regulate our hunger, known as leptin, and those that manage how we burn or store calories to be used for energy, known as insulin. Our bodies are naturally programmed to protect us against long-term starvation by storing excess calories as fat. Eating “bad” calories in excess amounts can ultimately lead to obesity.

 

In a research study, a group of people was given the same amount of calories but from different food sources. The participants had no significant weight gain, regardless of whether the calories were from carbohydrates, proteins, fats, or any other combination of nutrients. However, environmental factors, such as an individual’s hormonal balance, emotions, and cravings were not taken into consideration. It’s important to understand how calories can affect your health.

 

Good Calories vs Bad Calories

 

Excess calories from processed foods are stored as fat which can lead to obesity. In the United States, obesity is the main cause of health issues like insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. It is naturally produced in the pancreas and helps move excess glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. When the pancreas recognizes high blood sugar levels, it creates more insulin to reduce glucose.

 

However, this can diminish the pancreas of insulin-producing cells which can eventually cause insulin resistance or impaired insulin sensitivity. If the pancreas can’t produce enough insulin, it can lead to prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Excess calories from sugar and processed foods can also cause inflammation which may also lead to chronic pain. So what can we do to prevent these health issues? The answer is simple: eat complex carbohydrates, lean protein, and healthy fats.

 

Replace highly processed carbohydrates that can increase blood sugar levels and insulin, with vegetables, beans, and whole grains. When it comes to eating complex carbohydrates like whole grains, the less processed the better! Consider eating stone-ground whole wheat, quinoa, oats, and brown rice. Then, choose lean proteins, such as fish and chicken. as well as healthy fats that come from plant sources, such as nuts, olive oil, and avocado, among others.

 

Below, we will compare the calories in common foods and drinks to demonstrate the differences and similarities in good calories vs bad calories:�

 

 

Can you tell which are the good calories and which are the bad calories? It�s important to follow the principle of �clean eating� and choose unprocessed foods in the purest forms instead of processed foods. This includes foods like fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, or eggs. You can eat these foods without worrying too much about your daily caloric intake limit. Eating a variety of these is essential in order to provide your body with the nutrients it needs to function properly.

 

Bad calories include processed foods which follow exactly the opposite principle of “clean eating”. Foods with high amounts of sugar and fast food offers you almost no nutrients but a lot of what we call “empty calories”. If you�re trying to lose weight to manage insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes, you�ll have to pay attention to your �bad� calorie intake.

 

For more information regarding the effects of good calories vs bad calories on obesity, please review this article:

Is the calorie concept a real solution to the obesity epidemic?

 


 

Our body needs nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and many other compounds from calories in order to function properly. Calories are a measurement of the energy our body produces from the foods we eat. But, not all calories are created equal. Eating bad calories vs good calories can affect the hormones that regulate our hunger and those that manage how we burn or store calories to be used for energy. Moreover, eating “bad” calories in excess amounts can cause obesity. It’s important to understand how calories can affect your health. In the United States, obesity is the main cause of health issues like insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Excess bad calories can also cause inflammation which may cause chronic pain. Eating complex carbohydrates, lean protein, and healthy fats can help people lose weight and prevent as well as control health issues like insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Learning to identify good calories and bad calories is a helpful strategy for people who want to improve their overall health. Adding healthy foods to a smoothie can also be a fast and easy way to include good calories into your diet. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

 

Image of zesty beet juice.

 

Zesty Beet Juice

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1 grapefruit, peeled and sliced
� 1 apple, washed and sliced
� 1 whole beet, and leaves if you have them, washed and sliced
� 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped

Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of smoothie with nasturtium flower and leaves.

 

Add Nasturtium to Your Smoothies

 

Adding nasturtium flowers and leaves to any smoothie can add extra nutrients. These lovely plants are easy to grow and the entire plant is edible. Nasturtium leaves are high in vitamin C, which is essential for a healthy immune system, and they also contain calcium, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and iron. According to healthcare professionals, the extract from the flowers and leaves have antimicrobial, antifungal, hypotensive, expectorant, and anticancer effects. Antioxidants in garden nasturtium occur due to its high content of compounds such as anthocyanins, polyphenols, and vitamin C. Due to its rich phytochemical content and unique elemental composition, the garden nasturtium may be used in the treatment of a variety of health issues, including respiratory and digestive problems. Not to mention, the flowers and leaves look absolutely lovely in smoothies.

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require additional explanation as how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Glassman, Keri. �The Difference Between Good and Bad Calories.� Women’s Health, Women’s Health Media, 11 June 2019, www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a19930112/the-difference-between-good-and-bad-calories/.
  • Denner, Julia. �Good Calories Vs. Bad Calories >> The Difference Matters.� Adidas Runtastic Blog, Adidas Runtastic Blog Media, 9 Sept. 2019, www.runtastic.com/blog/en/good-calories-vs-bad-calories/.
  • Taubes, Gary. �Good Calories Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health.� CrossFit, CrossFit Media, 31 Jan. 2020, www.crossfit.com/health/good-calories-bad-calories.

 

The Connection Between Nutrition & the Epigenome

The Connection Between Nutrition & the Epigenome

Nutrition is considered to be one of the most well-understood environmental factors associated with changes in the epigenome. Nutrients in the foods we eat are processed by our metabolism and turned into energy. One metabolic pathway, however, is responsible for producing methyl groups or fundamental epigenetic marks that regulate our gene expression. Essential nutrients, such as B vitamins, SAM-e (S-Adenosyl methionine), and folic acid are important components in this methylation process. Diets with high amounts of these essential nutrients can quickly change gene expression, especially during early development. In the following article, we will discuss the connection between nutrition and the epigenome.

 

Nutrigenomics and Health

 

Healthcare professionals discuss that when it comes to dealing with health issues like inflammation and chronic pain, understanding how nutrigenomics affects our overall health is important. Nutritional genomics, or nutrigenomics, is a science that studies the relationship between nutrition, health, and the genome. Researchers in the nutrigenomics field believe that changes in epigenetic marks may be associated with a variety of health issues, including inflammation or the development of diseases like obesity, heart problems, and cancer. Studies have demonstrated that we may be able to control the effects of the nutrients we eat in order to change gene expression associated with various health issues.

 

Approximately more than 1 out of 3 adults in the United States have been diagnosed with obesity which ultimately increases the risk of a variety of health issues, including prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, among other diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that changes in epigenetic marks during early development may even predispose individuals to obesity. Moreover, changes in epigenetic marks were also demonstrated to affect metabolic pathways that may increase the risk of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Healthcare professionals in the nutrigenomics field have created new ways to be able to better find balance through a wholesome understanding of nutrition and the epigenome.

 

“An epigenetic test can provide data that is useful for healthcare professionals. It may also offer information about how certain metabolic pathways are affected by essential nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals”.

 

What is the Epigenetics Diet?

 

The term “epigenetics diet” was first coined by Dr. Trygve Tollefsbol in 2011. It is medically defined as a group of compounds, such as resveratrol in red grapes, genistein in soybeans, isothiocyanates in broccoli, and many other well-known types of foods, which have been demonstrated to help change epigenomic marks and gene expression. According to researchers, the epigenetics diet can prevent the progression of tumors by regulating enzymes that control these epigenomic marks and gene expression, including DNA methyltransferases, histone deacetylases, and certain non-coding RNAs. Several types of foods included in the epigenetics diet are demonstrated in the following infographic:

 

Image of the epigenetic diet.

 

Researchers used recently advanced technologies that demonstrated how several bioactive compounds may aggravate damage to the epigenome caused by environmental pollutions. By way of instance, dietary supplementation with methyl donors, such as vitamin B12, choline, and folate, among others, as well as the isoflavone genistein, can regulate changes to epigenome marks and gene expression caused by bisphenol A, a hormone-disrupting chemical. B vitamins may also prevent the loss of DNA methylation caused by air pollution. According to these same studies, dietary supplementation with folic acid has also been demonstrated to help prevent the negative side-effects caused by heavy metals.

 

We believe that foods in the epigenetics diet could be used to counteract changes to gene expression and epigenomic marks caused by environmental pollution. Environmental pollutants in several types of foods, such as pesticides in fruits like strawberries and leafy greens like spinach, bisphenol A in the plastic containers of foods and drinks, dioxins in fatty foods, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons produced when meat is grilled or smoked at high temperatures, and mercury in several types of seafood like king mackerel and swordfish, have been associated with changes to epigenomic marks and gene expression. Those exposures, especially during early development, may cause various health issues.

 

For more information regarding the connection between nutrition and the epigenome, please review this article:

Nutrition and the Epigenome

 


 

Nutrition is one of the most understood environmental factors associated with changes in epigenomic marks and gene expression. Essential nutrients found in the different types of foods we eat are metabolized and turned into molecules in order to be used for energy by the human body. One metabolic pathway is responsible for creating methyl groups, important epigenetic marks that regulate our gene expression and epigenomic marks. Essential nutrients, including B vitamins, SAM-e (S-Adenosyl methionine), and folic acid are fundamental components in DNA methylation. Diets that are rich in these essential nutrients can quickly change epigenetic marks and gene expression, especially during early development. Furthermore, adding a variety of good foods to a smoothie can be a fast and easy way to add essential nutrients to your diet. Below is a fast and easy smoothie recipe to help feed your genes. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

Image of ginger greens juice.

 

Ginger Greens Juice

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1 cup pineapple cubes
� 1 apples, sliced
� 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped
� 3 cups kale, rinsed and roughly chopped or ripped
� 5 cups Swiss chard, rinsed and roughly chopped or ripped

Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of smoothie with nasturtium flower and leaves.

 

Add Nasturtium to Your Smoothies

 

Adding nasturtium flowers and leaves to any smoothie can add extra nutrients. These lovely plants are easy to grow and the entire plant is edible. Nasturtium leaves are high in vitamin C, which is essential for a healthy immune system, and they also contain calcium, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and iron. According to healthcare professionals, the extract from the flowers and leaves have antimicrobial, antifungal, hypotensive, expectorant, and anticancer effects. Antioxidants in garden nasturtium occur due to its high content of compounds such as anthocyanins, polyphenols, and vitamin C. Due to its rich phytochemical content and unique elemental composition, the garden nasturtium may be used in the treatment of a variety of health issues, including respiratory and digestive problems. Not to mention, the flowers and leaves look absolutely lovely in smoothies.

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask�Dr. Alex Jimenez�or contact us at�915-850-0900.

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Kirkpatrick, Bailey. �Epigenetics, Nutrition, and Our Health: How What We Eat Could Affect Tags on Our DNA.� What Is Epigenetics?, What Is Epigenetics? Media, 11 May 2018, www.whatisepigenetics.com/epigenetics-nutrition-health-eat-affect-tags-dna/.
  • Li, Shizhao, et al. �The Epigenetics Diet: A Barrier against Environmental Pollution.� On Biology, BMC Media, 23 May 2019, blogs.biomedcentral.com/on-biology/2019/05/20/the-epigenetics-diet-a-barrier-against-environmental-pollution/.
  • Learn. Genetics Staff. �Nutrition & the Epigenome.� Learn. Genetics, Learn. Genetics Media, learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/epigenetics/nutrition/.