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Back Clinic Supplements. What is more fundamental to our existence than diet and nutrition? Most of us eat at least three times a day. This creates a cumulative effect, as either our diet help fuel our body or it harms it. Bad nutrition, diet, and obesity can lead to osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and chronic pain. Knowing dietary supplements such as vitamins and proper nutritional balance, and effective techniques to shed weight can help those striving to change their new healthy lives.

A dietary supplement is used to provide nutrients to increase their consumption or provide non-nutrient chemicals claimed to have biological/beneficial effects. Dietary supplements come in all shapes and sizes. There are capsules, drinks, energy bars, powders, and traditional tablets. The most popular are calcium, iron, vitamins D and E, herbs like echinacea and garlic, and specialty products like glucosamine, probiotics, and fish oils.


Beneficial Micronutrients With Dr. Ruja | El Paso, TX (2021)

Introduction

In today’s podcast, Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja discuss the importance of the body’s genetic code and how micronutrients provide the necessary functional nutraceuticals that the body needs to promote overall health and wellness. 

 

What Is Personalized Medicine?

 

[00:00:00] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Welcome, guys. We’re Dr. Mario Ruja and me; we’re going to be discussing some essential topics for those athletes that want the advantage. We’re going to discuss fundamental necessary clinical technologies and information technologies that can make an athlete or even just the average person a little bit more aware of what’s happening in terms of their health. There’s a new word out there, and I have to give you a little heads up where we’re calling. We’re actually coming from the PUSH Fitness Center, and that people still work out late at night after going to church. So they’re working out, and they’re having a good time. So what we want to do is bring in these topics, and today we’re going to be talking about personalized medicine, Mario. Ever heard of that word?

 

[00:01:05] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, Alex, all the time. I dream about it. There you go, Mario.

 

[00:01:12] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: There you go, Mario. Always giving me a laugh. So we’re going to be talking about is the personalized arena of what we have now. We’ve come to a state where many people tell us, Hey, you know what? It would be best if you had some more proteins, fats, or they come up with some convoluted idea, and you’ll end up with your eyes crossed and, most of the time, more confused than anything else. And you’re pretty much a lab rat to all these different techniques, whether it’s the Mediterranean, low fat, high fat, all these kind of things. So the question is, what is it specific to you? And I think one of the frustrations that many of us have, Mario, is that we don’t know what to eat, what to take and what’s good exactly. What’s good for me doesn’t mean that it’s suitable for my friend. You know, Mario, I’d say it’s different. We come from a whole other type of genre. We live in a place, and we’ve gone through things that are different from two hundred years ago. What do people do? We’re going to be able to figure this out nowadays in today’s DNA dynamics; though we don’t treat with these, it gives us information and allows us to relate to the issues that are affecting us now. Today, we will be talking about personalized medicine, DNA testing, and micronutrient assessments. So we’re going to see what it is that how are our genes, the actual predisposing issues, or they’re the ones that give us the the the workings of our engine. And then also, if it’s good for that, we want to know what our level of nutrients is right now. I know Mario, and you had a very dear and near question the other day with one of your, I think, was your daughter. Yeah, so what was her question?

 

[00:02:52] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So Mia had had a well, excellent question. She was asking me about utilizing creatine, which is very predominant in athletes. You see, it’s the buzzword, you know? Use creatine to build more muscle and such. So the point that I talk to you about, Alex, is that this is something so important that we cannot let in terms of the sports environment and performance environment. It’s like taking a Bugatti, and you’re saying, “Well, you know what? Do you think about just putting synthetic oil in it?” And well, is it the synthetic oil necessary for that Bugatti? Well, it’s good because it’s synthetic. Well, no, there are lots of different synthetic forms, you know, it’s like five-thirty, five-fifteen, whatever it is, the viscosity level it has to match. So same thing for athletes and especially for Mia.

 

[00:04:06] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Let the audience know who Mia is, what does she do? What kind of things does she do?

 

[00:04:08] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Oh, yeah. Mia plays tennis, so her passion is tennis.

 

[00:04:13] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: And she’s nationally ranked?

 

[00:04:15] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Nationally, and she plays internationally on the international circuit ITF. And she’s right now in Austin with Karen and the rest of the Brady Bunch, as I call them. You know, she’s working hard and through all this COVID kind of disconnect. Now she’s getting back into the fitness mode, so she wants to optimize. She wants to do her very best to catch up and move forward. And the question about nutrition, a question about what she needed. I needed a specific answer, not just general. Well, I think it’s good. You know good is good and better is best. And the way we look at it in that conversation of sports performance and genetic, nutritional, and functional medicine, it’s like, let’s get really functional, let’s be on point instead of buckshot. You know, it’s like you can go in and say, you know, generalities. But in terms of this, there is not a lot of information out there for athletes. And that’s where the conversation is linking the genetic and linking the micronutrients. That is phenomenal because, as you mentioned, Alex, when we look at the markers, genetic markers, we see the strengths, the weaknesses, and what’s at risk and what is not. Is the body adaptive, or is the body weak? So then we have to address the micronutrients to support. Remember, we talked about that to support that weakness in that DNA, that genetic pattern with something that we can strengthen. I mean, you can’t go and change your genetics, but you surely can increase and be specific with your micronutrients to change that platform and strengthen it and decrease the risk factors.

 

[00:06:24] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It’s fair to say now that the technology is such that we can find the, I wouldn’t say weaknesses, but the variables that allow for us to improve an athlete at the genetic level. Now we can’t alter the genes. That’s not what we’re saying is that there’s a world of what they call SNPs or single nucleotide polymorphisms where we can figure out there’s a specific set of genes that can’t change. We can’t change like eye color. We can’t do those. Those are very coded in, right? But there are genes that we can influence through neutral genomics and neutral genetics. So what I mean by my neutral genomics is nutrition altering and affecting the genome to more adaptive or opportunistic dynamics? Now, wouldn’t you like to know what genes you have that are vulnerable? Wouldn’t she want to know where her vulnerability is as well?

 

Is My Body Receiving The Right Supplements?

 

[00:07:18] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: What do we all want to know? I mean, whether you’re a high-level athlete or you’re a high-level CEO, or you’re just a high-level mom and dad, that’s running around from tournament to tournament. You cannot afford to have low energy that, when we talked about the markers, you know that methylation within the body we want to know, are we processing or how are we doing in terms of the oxidative pattern within ourselves? Do we need that extra boost? Do we need to increase your knowledge of that green intake detoxified pattern? Or are we doing well? And this is where when we look at the patterns of genetic markers, we can see that we are well-prepared or we are not well prepared. Therefore, we have to look at the micronutrients. Again, those markers to say, “Are we meeting our needs, yes or no? Or are we just generalizing?” And I would say 90 percent of athletes and people out there are generalizing. They’re saying, Well, you know, taking vitamin C is good and taking vitamin D is good and selenium, you know, that’s good. But again, are you on point, or are we just guessing right now?

 

[00:08:36] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Exactly. That’s the thing when we’re in that store, and there’s a lot of great nutritional centers, Mario, that are out there, and we’re looking at a wall of a thousand products. Crazy. We don’t know where we have holes, and we don’t know where we need them. You know, there are certain deficiencies. You’ve got bleeding gums; most likely, you’ve got some scurvy or some kind of issue there. That unit may need a specialist, but let’s assume if we look at things like scurvy, right? Well, we know that gum starts bleeding. Well, it’s sometimes not that obvious, right, that we need certain things. There are hundreds and thousands of nutrients out there. One of the things that we call them, we call them, is cofactors. A cofactor is a thing that allows an enzyme to work right. So we are a machine of enzymes, and what codes those enzymes? Well, the DNA structure. Because it produces the proteins that code those enzymes, those enzymes have code factors like minerals like magnesium, iron, potassium, selenium, as you mentioned, and all different components. As we look at this, this hole that we’re we’re facing a wall. We would love to know exactly where our holes are because Bobby or my best friend says, you know, you should take protein, take whey protein, take iron, take what may be so, and we’re hit or miss. So today’s technology is allowing us to see precisely what it is, where we have the holes.

 

[00:10:00] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: And this point that you mentioned about the holes, again, the majority of the factors are not that extreme like scurvy, you know, bleeding gums. We’re not, I mean, we live in a society where we’re gosh, I mean, Alex, we have all the foods that we need. We’ve got too much food. It’s crazy. Again, the issues that we talk about are overeating, not starving, OK? Or we’re overeating and still starving because the nutritional pattern is very low. So that’s a real factor there. But overall, we are looking and addressing the component of what subclinical issues, you know, we don’t have the symptoms. We don’t have those significant marker symptoms. But we do have low energy, but we do have a low recovery pattern. But we do have that problem with sleep, that quality of sleep. So those are not huge things, but those are subclinical that erode our health and performance. For example, little by little, athletes cannot be just good. They need to be the tip of the spear top. They need to recover quickly because they do not have time to guess their performance pattern. And I see that they don’t.

 

[00:11:21] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know, as you mentioned that, I mean, most of these athletes, when they want to, they want to assess their bodies. They want to know where every weakness is. They’re like scientists and laboratory rats for themselves. They’re pushing their bodies to the extreme, from mental to physical to psycho-social. Everything is being affected, and put it in at full throttle. But they want to know. They want to see where that extra edge is. You know what? If I could make you a little bit better? If there was a little hole, what would that amount to? Will that amount to a two more second drop over a while, a microsecond drop? The point is that technology is there, and we have the ability to do these things for people, and the information is coming faster than we can even imagine. We have doctors worldwide and scientists around the world looking at the human genome and seeing these issues, specifically at SNPs, which are single nucleotide polymorphisms that can be changed or altered or assisted in dietary ways. Go ahead.

 

Body Composition

 

[00:12:21] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I’ll give you one: the Inbody. How about that? Yeah, that’s a tool right there that is critical for a conversation with an athlete.

 

[00:12:31] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: The Inbody is the body composition.

 

[00:12:32] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, the BMI. You’re looking at it in terms of your hydration pattern; you’re looking at in terms of like, yes, body fat, that that whole conversation everyone wants to know, you know, I’m overweight my belly fat again. We had discussions on metabolic syndrome. We talked about risk factors, high triglycerides, very low HDL, high LDL. I mean, those are risk factors that put you in a pattern in that line towards diabetes and that line towards cardiovascular disease in that line of dementia. But when you’re talking about an athlete, they’re not worried about diabetes; they’re concerned about, am I ready for the next tournament? And I’m going to make the cut going to the Olympics. That’s yes, I mean, they’re not what they want to do that Inbody. They’re the micronutrient, the combination of genome nutrition, that genomic nutrition conversation on point allows them to honor their work. Because I’m telling you, Alex, and you know, this here, I mean, everyone’s listening to us, again, the conversation I share with people is this, why are you training like a pro when you don’t want to be one? Why are you trained like a pro when you are not eating and have the data to support that pro-level workout? What you’re doing? If you don’t do that, you are destroying your body. So again, if you’re working as a pro, that means you’re grinding. I mean, you’re pushing your body to little miss neuromuscular. Furthermore, we’re chiropractors. We deal with inflammatory issues. If you’re doing that, you’re redlining that, but you are not turning around to recover through micronutrition-specific chiropractic work. Then you’re going to damn it; you’re not going to make it.

 

[00:14:26] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We’re going to show that we’ve been able to see in a lot of times cities come together for specific sports, such as like wrestling. Wrestling is one of those notorious sports that puts the body through massive emotional and physical stresses. But a lot of times, what happens is individuals have to lose weight. You’ve got a guy who’s 160 pounds; he’s got a drop-down 130 pounds. So what the city has done to avoid these things is to use body-specific weight and determine the molecular weight of the urine, right? So they can tell, are you too concentrated, right? So what they do is that they have all these kids line up all the way to UTEP, and they do a specific gravity test to determine if they’re able to lose any more weight or what weight they are allowed to lose. So someone who’s about 220 says, You know what? You can drop up to about, you know, x y z pounds based on this test. And if you violate this, then you do that. But that’s not good enough. We want to know what’s going to happen because when the kids are in a load and are fighting another person that is just as good of an athlete, and he’s pushing his body, that’s when the body collapses. The body can handle the load, but the supplementation that the person has had, maybe their calcium, has been so depleted that suddenly you got this kid who was 100 injuries; the injuries, the elbow snapped dislocated. That’s what we see. And we wonder how did he snap his elbow because his body has been depleted from these supplements?

 

[00:15:59] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: And Alex, on the same level, you’re talking about one on one like that pugilistic, that intense three minutes of your life on the other level, when it comes to tennis, that’s a three-hour conversation. Exactly. There are no subs there. There’s no coaching, no subs. You are in that gladiator arena. When I see Mia playing OK, I mean, it is intense. I mean, every ball that’s coming to you, it’s coming to you with power. It’s coming in like, can you take this? It’s like someone fighting across a net and looking at it. Are you going to quit? Are you going to chase this ball? Are you going to let it go? And that is where that definitive factor of optimal micronutrition connected with the conversation of what exactly you need in terms of genomic conversation will allow someone to scale up with a decreased risk factor of injuries where they know they can push themselves more and have the confidence. Alex, I’m telling you this is not just nutrition; this is about the confidence to know I got what I need, and I can redline this thing, and it’s going to hold. It’s not going to buckle.

 

[00:17:23] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know what? I’ve got little Bobby. He wants to wrestle, and he wants to be the biggest nightmare is the mom. Because you know what? They’re the ones that wish Bobby to thump the other Billy, right? And when their kids are getting thumped on, they want to provide for them. And moms are the best cooks. They’re the ones who take care of them, right? They’re the ones that make sure, and you could see it. The pressure on the child is immense when parents are watching, and sometimes it’s incredible to watch. But what can we give moms? What can we do for the parents to provide them with a better understanding of what’s going on? I got to tell you today with DNA tests. You know, all you have to do is get the kid in the morning, open his mouth, you know, do a swab, drag that stuff off the side of his cheek, put in a vial, and it is done within a couple of days. We can tell if Bobby’s got strong ligaments, if Bobby’s micronutrient levels are different to provide the parent with a better kind of a roadmap or a dashboard to understand the information that’s affecting Bobby, so to speak, correct?

 

[00:18:27] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Because and this is what we’ve come a long way. This is 2020, guys, and this is not 1975. That’s the year when Gatorade came over.

 

[00:18:42] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Come on; I got my tub. It’s got a lot of things on the side of it. I will have everything you look like Buddha when you develop diabetes with so much sugar from those protein shakes.

 

The Right Supplements For Kids

 

[00:18:52] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: We have come a long way, but we cannot just go in and go; oh, you need to hydrate here drink these electrolytes, Pedialyte and all that. That’s not good enough. I mean, that’s good, but it’s 2020, baby. You got to scale up and level up, and we can’t use old data and old instrumentation and diagnostics because the kids now start at three years old, Alex. Three years old. And I’m telling you right now at three, it is unbelievable. By the time they’re five and six, I mean, I’m telling you the kids that I see, they’re already in select teams.

 

[00:19:33] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Mario…

 

[00:19:34] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Six years old, they’re in a select team.

 

[00:19:36] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: The thing that determines if a child is ready is their attention span. Yeah, I got to tell you, you can watch this. You got to see a kid who’s at three years and six months, and he isn’t paying attention. Three years and eight-month, all of a sudden, he can focus.

 

[00:19:50] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It’s on like a light switch.

 

[00:19:52] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: In front of the coach, right? And you can tell because they wander and they’re not ready. So we’re bringing the kids and exposing them to loads of experiences. Then what we need to do is give moms and dads the ability to understand and athletes of the NCAA and see how I can see what’s happening in my bloodstream? Not a CBC, because the CBC is for basic stuff, like a red blood cell, white blood cell. We can do things. Metabolic panel tells us a generic thing, but now we know more profound information about the susceptibility of the gene markers and see this on the test. And these reports tell us precisely what it is and how it pertains now and progression.

 

[00:20:37] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So this is where I love. This is where I love everything in the world of performance is pre and post. So when you’re a sprinter, they time you. It’s electronic time; when you’re a wrestler, they look at you. Do you know what your winning ratio is? What’s your percentage? Anything, it’s all data. It’s data-driven. As a tennis player, a soccer player, they will track you. Computers will track how strong? How fast is your serve? Is it 100 miles an hour? I mean, it is crazy. So now, if you have that data, Alex, why is it that we do not have the same information for the most critical component, which is that biochemistry, that micro nutritional, the foundation of performance is what happens inside of us, not what happens outside. And this is where people get confused. They think, “Well, my kid works four hours a day, and he has a private trainer. Everything.” My question is that is good, but you’re putting that kid at risk if you are not supplementing on point, say precisely when it comes to the special needs of that child or that athlete, because if we don’t do that, Alex, we are not honoring the journey and the battle, that warrior, we’re not. We’re putting them at risk. And then, all of a sudden, you know what, two-three months before a tournament, BAM! Pulled a hamstring. Oh, you know what? They got fatigued, or all of a sudden, they had to pull out of a tournament. You see, I see tennis players doing all of that. And why? Oh, they’re dehydrated. Well, you should never have that problem. Before you go in exactly where you are, you should already know what you’re doing. And I love the combination and a platform that we have for all of our patients because, within two or three months, we can show pre and post, can we?

 

[00:22:39] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We can show body composition to the Inbody systems and the incredible systems we use. These DEXAS, we can do bodyweight fat analysis. We can do a lot of things. But when it comes down to predispositions and what’s unique to individuals, we go down to the molecular level, and we can go down to the level of the genes and understand what the susceptibilities are. We can go on once we have the genes. We can also understand the micronutrient level of each individual. So what’s pertaining to me? I may have more magnesium than you, and the other child may have depleted magnesium or calcium or selenium or his proteins or the amino acids or are shot. Maybe he’s got a digestive issue. Perhaps he’s got lactose intolerance. We need to be able to figure out these things that affect us.

 

[00:23:29] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: We can’t guess. And the bottom line is there’s no need for that. Everyone has that beautiful conversation, Alex, about, “Oh, you know what? I feel OK.” When I hear that, I cringe, go, and feel OK. So you mean to tell me that you are putting your health the most precious thing you have and your performance based on a feeling like, wow, that means that your urine receptors and turns the pain tolerance are dictating your health. That’s dangerous. That is completely dangerous. And also, so clinically, you’re not able to feel your deficiency in terms of vitamin D, your deficiency in terms of selenium, your deficiency in vitamin A, E. I mean, all of these markers, you can’t feel it.

 

[00:24:21] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We need to start presenting to the people out there, the information, it’s out there because what we want to let people know is that we’re going deep. We’re going down to these gene susceptibilities, the gene understanding as it is today; what we have learned is so powerful that it allows parents to understand a whole lot more of the issues pertaining to an athlete. Not only that, but the parents want to know what my susceptibility is? Do I have a risk of bone arthritis? Do we have issues with oxidative stress? Why am I always inflamed all the time, right? Well, believe it or not, if you got the genes for, let’s say you got the gene that makes you eat a lot, well, you’re likely going to gain weight. You can raise 10000 people’s hands who have that same gene marker, and you’re going to notice that their BIAs and BMI are way out of there because it’s the susceptibility to that now. Can they change it? Absolutely. That’s what we’re talking about. We’re talking about understanding the ability to adapt and change our lifestyle for the predispositions we may have.

 

[00:25:26] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, this is wonderful. And I see this quite frequently in terms of the conversation about losing weight, you know, and they go, “Oh, I did this program, and it works great.” And then you have 20 other people doing the same program, and it doesn’t even work, and it’s almost like hit and miss. So people are becoming disillusioned. They’re putting their bodies through this incredible roller coaster ride, which is like the worst thing you could do. You know, they’re doing these unnecessary things, but they cannot sustain it because why? At the end of the day, it’s not who you are. It wasn’t for you.

 

[00:26:05] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You may need a different type of diet.

 

[00:26:06] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yes. And so we, again, our conversation today is very general. We’re starting this platform together because we have to educate our community and share the latest in technology and science that addresses the needs.

 

[00:26:26] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Personalized medicine, Mario. It’s not general; it’s a personalized health and personalized fitness. We understand that we don’t have to guess if a diet is better for us, such as a low calorie, high-fat diet or a Mediterranean style food or a high protein diet. We won’t be able to see that these scientists are putting information together from the information we are continuously gathering and compiling. It’s here, and it’s a swab away, or blood works away. It’s crazy. You know what? And this information, of course, let me be mindful of before this starts. My little disclaimer comes in. This is not for treatment. Please do not take anything; we’re taking this for treatment or diagnosis. You got to talk to your doctors, and your doctors have to tell you exactly what’s up there and what’s appropriate for every individual we integrate.

 

[00:27:18] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: The point is that we integrate with all healthcare professionals and physicians. We are here to support and champion functional wellness. OK. And as you mentioned, we’re not here to treat these diseases. We’re here to optimize again when athletes come in and want to be better. They want to get healthier and help the recovery rate.

 

Can Stress Age You Faster?

 

[00:27:46] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know, that’s it. Do you know what the bottom line is? The testing is there. We can see Billy’s not been eating well. OK, Billy has not been eating well. I can tell you, well, he eats everything, but he hasn’t had this level of protein. Look at his protein depletion. So we’re going to present to you some of the studies out here because it’s information, though it’s a bit complex. But we want to make it simple. And one of the things that we were talking about here is the micronutrient test we were providing here. Now I’m going to present you guys to see a little bit here. And what we use in our office when a person comes in and says, I want to learn about my body. We present this micronutrient assessment to figure out what’s going on. Now, this one was, let’s say, just it was in a sample for me, but it tells you where the individual is. We want to be able to level the antioxidant level. Now everyone knows that, well, not everyone. But now we understand that if our genes are optimal and our food is optimal, but we live in an oxidative stress state…

 

[00:28:45] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Exactly

 

[00:28:46] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Our genes will not function. So it’s important to understand what the problem is.

 

[00:28:51] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It’s rust. I mean, when you’re looking at this, and I see two markers, I see the one for oxidative, and then the other one is the immune system. Yes, right? So again, they correlate together, but they are different. So the oxidative I talk about is like your system is rusting out. Yeah, that’s oxidation. You see apples turning brown. You see metals rusting. So inside, you want to absolutely be at your best, which is in the green in that 75 to 100 percent functional rate. That means you can handle the craziness of the world tomorrow, you know?

 

[00:29:31] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yes, we can look at the stress of the human body, Mario. What we can see actually what’s going on, and as I continue with this kind of presentation here, we can see what this individual is and what is his actual immune function age. So a lot of people want to know this stuff. I mean, I want to know where I lie in terms of the dynamics of the body, right? So when I look at that, I can see precisely where I lie, and my age is 52. OK. In this situation, OK, now as we look down, we want to know.

 

[00:30:02] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Hold on. Let’s get real. So you mean to tell me that we can get younger through this incredible system? Is that what you’re telling me?

 

[00:30:14] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It tells you if you’re aging quicker, OK, how does that sound, Mario? So if you can slow down, if you’re in that top 100, the green, you’re going to be looking like a 47-year-old man when you’re 55. Right? So from the structure, immune function, and oxidative stress in the body, what’s going to happen is that we’re going to be able to see exactly where we are in terms of our body.

 

[00:30:37] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: So that is correct? Yes. So we could be our birth certificate could say 65, but our functional metabolic markers can say you’re 50.

 

[00:30:51] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yes. Let me make it real simple, OK? People often understand oxidative stress; yes, we hear about antioxidants and reactive oxygen species. Let me make it simple, OK, we’re a cell. You and I, we’re having a family meal right where we’re enjoying ourselves. We are normal cells. We’re happy, and we’re functioning where everything is appropriate. All of a sudden, there’s a wild-looking lady. She’s got blades and knives, and she’s greasy, and she’s slimy, and she comes on. She hits the table, boom, and she kind of walks away. You know, it’s going to unsettle us, right? It’s going to be, let’s call her an oxidant, OK? She’s called a reactive oxygen species. Now, if we got two of those walking around the restaurant, we kind of keep an eye on her, right? All of a sudden, a football player comes and takes her out. Boom knocks her out, right? In that situation, this greasy, slimy weapon-looking lady, correct, that’s scary. That was an antioxidant. That was vitamin C that wiped her out, right? There’s a balance between oxidants and antioxidants in the body. They have different purposes, right? We have to have antioxidants, and we have to have oxidants in order for our body to function. But if you got 800 of those ladies like zombies all of a sudden.

 

[00:32:02] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*:I could see them as zombies.

 

[00:32:07] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It is. You know what you’re going to want. Where are the football players? Where are the antioxidants, right? Take them out. The football players come in, but there are just too many of them, right? Anything that you and I do in a conversation could be healthy cells, and we’re having this conversation at the dinner table. We’re disrupted totally. We cannot function in an oxidative stress environment. No. So basically, we may have all the supplements, and we may have all the nutrients, and we may have the proper genetics. But if we’re in an oxidative state, right, an elevated level, we’re not going to be aged. It will not be a comfortable night, and we will not recover.

 

[00:32:46] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: We will be at a higher risk factor for injuries. Exactly. And the other thing is we also have the risk factor where we will age faster than we should.

 

[00:33:04] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: That night would be rough is there’s like a hundred of those people around. So we need to know the state of the balance in life, the antioxidants we see, and all the antioxidants foods like A, C, E. That is what this test does. It shows you the level of oxidants in the body.

 

[00:33:19] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Hey, Alex, let me ask you this. Everyone loves to work out. When you work out, does that increase or decrease your oxidative stress? Please tell me, because I want to know.

 

[00:33:30] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It increases your oxidative state.

 

[00:33:31] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: No, stop it.

 

[00:33:32] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It does because you’re breaking the body down. However, the body responds. And if we are healthy, Mario, right? In that sense, our body first has to break down, and it has to repair. OK? We want to have antioxidants because it helps us go through the process. Part of healing and part of inflammation is oxidative balance. So, in essence, when you’re working out too hard or running hard, you can overburn the bar, and those are the things that you and I have to kind of look at, and this is the balance.

 

[00:34:08] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Now this is like the paradox, right? You know what, if you overwork, you’re going to look fabulous. But you know what? You’re actually breaking down. And if you don’t work out, there goes your cardio. There go other risk factors. So this is where it is so critical that we need to balance and know precisely what each person needs to be at their best. And we can’t guess; you can’t take the same supplements as me and vice versa.

 

The Right Cofactors For Your Body

 

[00:34:41] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I can, we can. But it’s to me, I may not be a lot of waste of money, or maybe we’re just missing the whole process. So in this entire dynamics here, just looking at this test, Mario, just using it at this particular assessment, we want to see also what our cofactors are on. We talked about proteins; we talked about genetics. We talked about things that make these enzymes work, our body functions, and pure enzymes in this particular model that you’re seeing what the cofactors are and the metabolites are. Well, you see amino acids levels and where they are in your body. If you’re an extreme athlete, you want to know what those things are.

 

[00:35:14] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Oh yeah, I mean, look at that. Those aminos. Those are critical.

 

[00:35:20] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You think Mario?

 

[00:35:21] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Yeah, I mean it’s like every athlete I know, they’re like, Hey, I got to take my aminos. My question is, are you taking the right ones at the right level? Or do you even know, and they’re guessing. Ninety percent of the people are assuming you’re looking at antioxidants. Look at that. That’s the beast right there, glutathione. That’s like the granddaddy of antioxidants right there. And you want to know is, is that football players, that linebackers are going to crush those zombies, you know? And again, vitamin E, CoQ10. Everyone talks about CoQ10 and heart health.

 

[00:36:00] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Coenzyme Q, exactly. A lot of people take cardiac medications specifically to lower their cholesterol.

 

[00:36:10] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: What does CoQ10 do, Alex? I want to get you started.

 

[00:36:15] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Because you know what? Many documentation came out early on when they did many of these medications. Yeah, they knew they had to end it and put coenzyme Q in it. They knew, and they patented it because they knew that they had it. Because if you don’t give coenzyme Q right, you have inflammatory states and neuropathies. But these people have issues, and now they’re starting to understand. That’s why you see all the commercials with the coenzymes. But the point is that we need to know where our present state is right. So when we understand those things, we can look at the tests. And we can look at the dynamics of it. Wouldn’t you like to know which antioxidants? It’s so clear.

 

[00:36:52] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I love this. I mean, look at that. You know what? It’s red, green, black and that’s it. I mean, you can see it right away. This is your board. This is your command center. You know, I love the command center. It’s like, everything’s there.

 

[00:37:10] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I know Mario, you know, with those athletes, they want to be at the top level. Yes, it looks like this person’s floating somewhere in the middle, but they want to top it at 100 percent, right?

 

[00:37:19] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Alex, they’re on the bench.

 

[00:37:23] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah. And when they’re under a lot of stress, who knows what? Now, these tests are straightforward to do. They’re not complex to go in. Take a lab test sometimes are these are urine tests, something we can do.

 

[00:37:33] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: And we can do those in our offices in a matter of minutes, precisely in a matter of minutes. Crazy.

 

[00:37:38] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It’s crazy.

 

[00:37:40] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: This is why it’s so simple. It’s like my question is, what color is the red bus? I don’t know. It’s a trick question.

 

What Supplements Are Right For You?

 

[00:37:50] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Well, going back into our topic today was personalized medicine and personalized wellness and personalized fitness. Doctors around the country are starting to understand that they cannot just say, OK, you’re pregnant. Here’s a folic acid pill. OK, here are some nutrients, though every doctor has to be taking care of their own clients. They’re the ones that are doing this. But people have the ability to understand; where are the other holes? Wouldn’t you want to make sure you have suitable selenium?

 

[00:38:17] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Before you have symptoms. That’s the thing, and this is why we are not treating. We’re not saying that issues, diagnosis issues, what are you doing to optimize and decrease your risk factors?

 

[00:38:35] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: There’s the issue of longevity, too, because I mean, the issue of longevity is if you’re providing your body with the right substrates, the right cofactors, the right nutrition. Your body has a chance to make it to 100 years plus and actually function. And if you have a depleted life, well, you’re burning the engine, so the body starts having issues, you know, so as we look at those kinds of things…

 

[00:39:00] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Can you return to our two markers? Look at that immune system.

 

[00:39:12] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah, there’s a reason they stop here at 100 because that’s the whole idea. The entire idea is to get you to live 100 Centennial. So if we can do this, if you’re a person who’s, let’s say, 38 years old, and you’re in the midst of your life, and let’s say you’re a business person and you’re a junkie for business. You’re a junkie for entrepreneurship. You want to throttle you against the world. You do not want a kind of Nicholas the worm weakness, so to speak, taking you out of your football run in life. Because otherwise, you can trip up on things. And what we want to be able to provide people through nutritionists who registered dietitians to doctors through the information out there to supplement your lives better. And it’s not just about little Bobby; it’s about me, it’s about you. It’s about our patients. It’s about every single one of them who wants to live a better quality of life. Because if there’s a depletion in certain things, it’s not now. But in the future, you may have a susceptibility that will bring out diseases. And that’s where those susceptibilities are. We can take it to the next level because we can see what’s going on. In terms of this, I’m going to go ahead and bring this back up here so you can just see what we’re looking at. You can see the B-complex is now we have a lot of B-complexes, and we got people texting all over the place here, and I’m getting zapped with messages.

 

[00:40:42] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Your oxidative stress is going up, Alex.

 

[00:40:45] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Well, it’s crazy that we’ve been here an hour, so we want to be able to bring information out for you guys as time goes on. I want to go through this and talk about the individual antioxidants now; those are your football players, man, those are the ones taking those people out. Making your whole life a lot better, right, Mario. This is the kind of stuff that we look at. You know your glutathione on your knees. Your coenzyme Q selenium is your vitamin E’s carbohydrate metabolism.

 

[00:41:10] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Look at that, I mean, glucose and insulin interaction called energy. The last time I checked, it was called turbo.

 

[00:41:21] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: We got to listen; we got a lot of good doctors. We got like Dr. Castro out there. We got all the great doctors out there that are running over.

 

[00:41:30] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I mean, we’re going to get in trouble.

 

[00:41:32] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: All right. Facebook is going to knock us out.

 

[00:41:41] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: It will put a time limit on this.

 

[00:41:43] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I think it’s our views. But the bottom line is to stay tuned. We’re coming. This can’t cover everything. Hey, Mario, when I went to school, we were terrorized by this machine called the psycho cycle.

 

[00:41:58] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*:How many ATP’s, Alex?

 

[00:42:00] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I mean, how many miles? Is it glycolysis or aerobic or anaerobic, right? So when we start looking at that, we start seeing how those coenzymes and those vitamins play a role in our energy metabolism, right? So in this individual, there were certain depletions. You can see where the yellow comes in. It affects the whole metabolic process, energy production. So the person is always tired. Well, we kind of understand the dynamics of what’s going on. So this is critical information as you and I kind of look at this, right? We can see what is it that we can offer? Can we provide information to change how the body works better dynamically? So this is crazy. So, in terms of it, we can go on and on, guys. So what we’re going to be doing is we’re probably going to be coming back because this is just fun. Do you think so? Yeah, I think we’re going to come back to what we’ve got to change the way that all El Paso is and not only for our community but also for those moms who want to know what is the best for their family members. What can we offer? The technology is not. We’re not going to allow ourselves in El Paso to be ever called the fattest sweaty town in the United States. We do have unbelievable talent out here that really can teach us about what’s going on. So I know that you’ve seen that, correct? Yeah.

 

[00:43:18] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: Absolutely. And what I can say is this Alex? It’s about peak performance and peak ability. And also, getting the correct specific customized genomic nutrition pattern for each individual is the game-changer. That’s the game-changer from longevity to performance and just being happy and living the life that you were meant to live.

 

Conclusion

 

[00:43:51] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Mario, I can say that when we look at this stuff, we get excited about it, as you can tell, but it affects all our patients. People come in all depleted, tired, in pain, inflamed, and sometimes we need to find out what it is. And in our scope, we are mandated to be responsible and figure out where this relies upon and where this lies in our patients’ problems. Because what we’re doing, if we help their structure, the musculoskeletal, neurological system, their mind system through a proper diet and understanding through exercise, we can change people’s lives, and they want to be able to fulfill their lives and enjoy their lives the way it should be. So there’s a lot to be said. So we will come back sometime next week or this week. We’re going to continue this topic on personalized medicine, personalized wellness, and personalized fitness because working with many doctors through integrative health and integrative medicine allows us to be a part of a team. We have GI doctors, you know, cardiologists. There’s a reason we work as a team together because we all bring a different science level. No team is complete without a nephrologist, and that person will figure out precisely the implications of all the things we do. So that person is very important in the dynamics of integrative wellness. So for us to be able to be the best kind of providers, we have to expose and tell people about what’s out there because a lot of people don’t know. And what we need to do is bring it to them and let the cards lie and teach them that they had to tell their doctors, “Hey, Doc, I need you to talk to me about my health and sit down. Explain to me my labs.” And if they don’t, well, you know what? Say you need to do that. And if you don’t, well, time to find a new doctor. OK, it’s that simple because today’s information technology is such that our doctors cannot neglect nutrition. They cannot neglect wellness. They cannot overlook the integration of all the sciences put together to make people healthy. This is one of the most important things that we got to do. It’s a mandate. It’s our responsibility, and we’re going to do it, and we’re going to knock it out of the ballpark. So, Mario, it’s been a blessing today, and we’ll continue to do this in the next couple of days, and we’ll keep on hammering and giving people the insights as to what they can do in terms of their science. This is a Health Voice 360 channel, so we’re going to talk about many different things and bring a lot of other talents. Thanks, guys. And you got anything else, Mario?

 

[00:46:11] Dr. Mario Ruja DC*: I’m all in.

 

[00:46:12] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*:All right, brother, talk to you soon. Love you, man. Bye.

 

Disclaimer

Calcium and Vitamin D for Optimal Bone Health

Calcium and Vitamin D for Optimal Bone Health

Calcium and Vitamin D for optimal bone health. The body’s bones/skeletal system contains a huge amount of calcium. Close to 100% of the body’s total calcium is in the bones. Calcium is a nutrient that helps the body rebuild/repair bones. �

This means an individual needs enough calcium throughout their lifetime for healthy bones. Individuals with osteoporosis have an increase of fracture/s, which means it is even more important to have the proper amount of calcium.

However, the body also needs enough vitamin D to properly absorb the calcium. When the body does not have enough vitamin D, the body will not be able to utilize all the calcium being taking in. Maintaining bone health requires keeping track of calcium and vitamin D intake.

Calcium

How much calcium the body needs depends on various factors, that include age. Listed are basic recommendations of calcium intake by age, but individuals should talk with a doctor about how much calcium is best for them on a daily basis. �

Children and Young Adults

  • 1-3 years of age 500mg
  • 4-8 years of age 800mg
  • 9-18 years of age 1,300mg

Adult Men and Women

  • 19-49 years of age 1,000mg
  • 50+ years of age 1,200mg

Women Pregnant and Breastfeeding

  • Under 18 years of age 1,300mg
  • 19+ years of age 1,000mg
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Calcium and Vitamin D for Optimal Bone Health

This can help to get a general idea of how much calcium is needed every day. The best way to get enough calcium through what is eaten and drank regularly. Here are some foods that offer the proper amount of calcium:

  • Cooked Broccoli 60mg in 8 oz.
  • Fruit Juice with Added Calcium 200-260mg in 6 oz.
  • Low-fat and Skim Milk 300mg in 8 oz.
  • Low-fat Plain Yogurt 415mg in 8 oz.
  • Swiss Cheese 220-270mg in 1 oz.

These are estimates for the amount of calcium these foods offer. Always look at the food label to get an accurate number. These are also just examples of what foods can help meet the calcium requirement for the day. If unable to get enough calcium from the diet, supplements can be taken to make sure the appropriate amount is met.

An example of not being able to get the proper amount is individuals that are lactose intolerant. This can be a challenge to get the calcium needed. For individuals not getting enough calcium should talk with a doctor, nutritionist, or health coach about supplements. They will help figure out the best calcium supplement and how much to take. However, getting too much calcium can be detrimental to overall health. That’s why finding the best balance is key.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is what helps the body absorb calcium. The body makes vitamin D when outside in the sun. This is a perfect reason to go outside more often. 15 minutes of exposure to the sun every day will significantly increase vitamin D production. Some individuals are not able to make enough vitamin D, no matter how much sunlight exposure. However, Vitamin D is also found in various foods like:

For some individuals, it can also be a challenge to get enough vitamin D. There are vitamin D supplements that can help fill daily requirements. A doctor can tell if supplements are needed with various tests that can tell how much vitamin D the body is getting. There are two types of vitamin D supplements: They are D3 and D2. Research shows that D3 and D2 are both good for bones. And just like calcium, the amount of vitamin D needed depends on age: �

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Calcium and Vitamin D for Optimal Bone Health

Children and Young Adults

IU stands for international units which are how vitamin D is measured.

  • 1-18 years of age 400 IU

Adult Men and Women

  • 19-49 years of age 400-800 IU
  • 50+ years of age 800-1,000 IU

Women Pregnant and Breastfeeding

  • Any age 400-800 IU

Getting enough calcium and Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones and a healthy body. Our nutritionist and health coach can help get you back on track to optimal health.


Chiropractic Care and CrossFit Rehabilitation


Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*

References

Fischer, V et al. �Calcium and vitamin D in bone fracture healing and post-traumatic bone turnover.��European cells & materials�vol. 35 365-385. 22 Jun. 2018, doi:10.22203/eCM.v035a25

What is Folate Metabolism?

What is Folate Metabolism?

Folate, and its synthetic form folic acid, is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays a fundamental role in a variety of functions in the human body. Folate is essential for cell division and homeostasis because it acts as a coenzyme in many biological pathways, including amino acid metabolism, methionine production, and DNA methylation. Folate metabolism happens together with the methionine cycle and the choline pathway. Most folate coenzymes are found in the liver.

 

Folate is also used as a coenzyme to convert methionine into homocysteine. Vitamin B6 and B12, together with folate, are also essential for DNA synthesis. Proper dietary intake of folate is fundamental for normal cell growth and DNA repair. Folate or vitamin B12 deficiency can ultimately cause a variety of health issues, including anemia. Oral supplementation may be necessary. In the following article, we will discuss folate metabolism and foods that are high in folate.

 

Folate Metabolism Overview

 

Several of the most important functions of folate metabolism are methylation and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) production, one of the most essential methyl donors in the cell. In the following diagram, we will explain folate metabolism.�

 

Image of a folate metabolism diagram.

 

Figure 1: One carbon metabolism. ATP: adenosyl triphosphate, B6: vitamin B6, B12: vitamin B12, BHMT: betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, CBS: cystathionine-?-synthase, DHF: dihydrofolate, DMG: dimethylglycine, dTMP: deoxythymidine monophosphate, dUMP: deoxyuridine monophosphate, Gly: glycine, Hcy: homocysteine, MAT: methionine adenosyltransferase, Met: methionine, MCM: L-methylmalonyl CoA mutase, MM-CoA: L-methylmalonyl CoA, MMA: methylmalonic acid, MS: methionine synthase, MTHFR: 5,10-methyltetrahydrofolate reductase, SAH: S-adenosyl homocysteine, SAHH: S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase, SAM: S-adenosyl methionine, Ser: serine, SHMT, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, THF: tetrahydrofolate, TS: thymidylate synthase. Adapted from: Hypo- and hypervitaminosis of B and D vitamins � Diagnosis and clinical consequences. Herrmann W. et al. 2013. Uni-Med Verlag AG.

 

Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a component that converts folate to dihydrofolate (DHF) and DHF to the active form, THF. Folate metabolism consists of three cycles. One cycle starts with a component known as 10-formylTHF which is associated with purine production and two cycles utilize 5, 10-methyleneTHF in deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP) and methionine production. 5-MethylTHF is one of the most predominant forms of folate found in the human body.

 

After cellular uptake, 5-methylTHF is converted into THF through the use of vitamin B12 in methionine synthase (MS). The methionine cycle is a fundamental pathway in SAM production. As previously mentioned above, B vitamin deficiencies, including folate, vitamin B6, and B12, as well as genetic birth defects can ultimately cause a variety of health issues. 5,10-MethyleneTHF is finally converted to 5-methylTHF by 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR).

 

Several of the most important functions of folate metabolism are methylation and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) production, one of the most essential methyl donors in the cell. In the following diagram, we will simplify folate metabolism.�

 

Image of a second folate metabolism diagram.

 

15 Foods That Are High in Folate

 

Folate, and its synthetic form folic acid, is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays a fundamental role in a variety of functions in the human body. It�supports cell division and promotes fetal growth and development to reduce the risk of genetic birth defects. Folate is naturally found in many different types of foods. Doctors recommend 400 mcg of folate every day for adults to prevent deficiency. Here are 15 healthy foods that are high in folate or folic acid, including:

 

  • avocado
  • bananas
  • citrus fruits
  • papaya
  • beets
  • leafy greens
  • asparagus
  • Brussels sprouts
  • broccoli
  • nuts and seeds
  • legumes
  • eggs
  • beef liver
  • wheat germ
  • fortified grains

 

In conclusion, folate, and its synthetic form folic acid, is an important micronutrient that can be naturally found in many different types of foods. Eating many different types of healthy foods, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds, as well as fortified foods, is an easy way to increase your folate intake. These foods are not only high in folate but these are also high in other essential nutrients that can ultimately improve other aspects of your overall health.

 

For information regarding the nutritional role of folate, please review the following article:

Nutritional Role of Folate

 


 

Folate or folic acid is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays a fundamental role in a variety of functions in the human body, including cell division and homeostasis. Folate also helps with amino acid metabolism, methionine production, and DNA methylation.�Folate or vitamin B12 deficiency can ultimately cause a variety of health issues. Oral supplementation may be necessary. In the diagrams above, we explain the process of folate metabolism.�Folate is naturally found in many different types of foods, including avocado, citrus fruits, leafy greens, broccoli, nuts and seeds, legumes, eggs, and fortified grains.�Eating many different types of healthy foods is an easy way to increase your folate intake. These foods are not only high in folate but these are also high in other essential nutrients that can ultimately improve other aspects of your overall health.�- Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

Image of the Berry Bliss Smoothie

 

Berry Bliss Smoothie

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1/2 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen, preferably wild)
� 1 medium carrot, roughly chopped
� 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed or chia seed
� 1 tablespoons almonds
� Water (to desired consistency)
� Ice cubes (optional, may omit if using frozen blueberries)

Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth and creamy. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of Almonds.

 

Almonds have twice as much calcium as milk

 

Gram for gram this is absolutely true! According to McCance and Widdowson’s Composition of Foods (the official guide to the nutrients in food used in the UK), about 100g of almonds have 240mg of bone-building calcium while semi-skimmed (2%) milk has 120mg per 100g (3.5oz). With that being said, however, we tend to drink milk in bigger quantities than we eat almonds (and the calcium from milk is easily absorbed), so the dairy option may be a better source day-to-day.

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Almas, Saneea. �Folic Acid: An Overview of Metabolism, Dosages, and Benefits of Optimal Periconception Supplementation: InfantRisk Center.� Infant Risk Center, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, www.infantrisk.com/content/folic-acid-overview-metabolism-dosages-and-benefits-optimal-periconception-supplementation.
  • Homocysteine Expert Panel Staff. �Folate Metabolism.� Homocysteine Expert Panel, Homocysteine Expert Panel Media, www.homocysteine-panel.org/en/folatefolic-acid/basics/folate-metabolism/.
  • Link, Rachael. �15 Healthy Foods That Are High in Folate (Folic Acid).� Healthline, Healthline Media, 27 Feb. 2020, www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods-high-in-folate-folic-acid.
  • Shuhei, Ebara. �Nutritional Role of Folate.� Congenital Anomalies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 11 June 2017, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28603928/?from_term=folate%2Bmetabolism&from_pos=3.
  • MSN Lifestyle Staff. �Coffee Is a Fruit and Other Unbelievably True Food Facts.� MSN Lifestyle, MSN Lifestyle Media, 4 June 2020, www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/did-you-know/coffee-is-a-fruit-and-other-unbelievably-true-food-facts/ss-BB152Q5q?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=mailsignout#image=5.

 

MTHFR Gene Mutation and Health

MTHFR Gene Mutation and Health

The MTHFR or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene is well-known due to a genetic mutation that may cause high homocysteine levels and low folate levels in the bloodstream, among other essential nutrients. Healthcare professionals believe that a variety of health issues, such as inflammation, may be associated with an MTHFR gene mutation. In the following article, we will discuss the MTHFR gene mutation and how it can ultimately affect your overall health.

 

What is an MTHFR Gene Mutation?

 

People can have single or multiple mutations, as well as neither, on the MTHFR gene. The different mutations are often referred to as “variants”. A variant occurs when the DNA of a specific part of a gene is different or varies from person to person. People that have a heterozygous or single variant of the MTHFR gene mutation have a decreased risk of developing health issues like inflammation and chronic pain, among other diseases. Moreover, healthcare professionals also believe that people that have homozygous or multiple variants of the MTHFR gene mutation may ultimately have an increased risk of disease. There are two MTHFR gene mutation variants. These specific variants include:

 

  • C677T. Approximately 30 to 40 percent of people in the United States have a mutation at gene position C677T. About 25 percent of Hispanics and about 10 to 15 percent of Caucasians are homozygous for this variant.
  • A1298C. There are limited research studies for this variant. A 2004 study focused on 120 blood donors of Irish heritage. Of the donors, 56 or 46.7 percent were heterozygous for this variant and 11 or 14.2 percent were homozygous.
  • Both C677T and A1298C. It�s also possible for people to have both C677T and A1298C MTHFR gene mutation variations, which includes one copy of each.

 

What are the Symptoms of an MTHFR Gene Mutation?

 

Symptoms of an MTHFR gene mutation can be different from person to person and from variant to variant. It’s important to remember that further research around MTHFR gene mutation variants and their effects on health are still needed. Evidence regarding how MTHFR gene mutation variants are associated with a variety of other health issues is currently lacking or it has been disproven. Conditions that have been suggested to be associated with MTHFR variants include:

 

  • anxiety
  • depression
  • bipolar disorder
  • schizophrenia
  • migraines
  • chronic pain and fatigue
  • nerve pain
  • recurrent miscarriages in women of child-bearing age
  • pregnancies with neural tube defects, like spina bifida and anencephaly
  • cardiovascular and thromboembolic diseases (blood clots, stroke, embolism, and heart attacks)
  • acute leukemia
  • colon cancer

What is the MTHFR Diet?

 

According to healthcare professionals, eating foods with high amounts of folate may help naturally support low folate levels in the bloodstream associated with MTHFR gene mutation variants.�Good food choices can include:

 

  • fruits, such as strawberries, raspberries, grapefruit, cantaloupe, honeydew, banana.
  • juices like orange, canned pineapple, grapefruit, tomato, or other vegetable juice
  • veggies, such as spinach, asparagus, lettuce, beets, broccoli, corn, Brussels sprouts, and bok choy
  • proteins, including cooked beans, peas, and lentils
  • peanut butter
  • sunflower seeds

 

People with MTHFR gene mutations may also want to avoid eating foods that have the synthetic form of folate, folic acid, however, the evidence is not clear if that�s beneficial or necessary. Supplementation may still be recommended for people with MTHFR gene mutation variants. Furthermore, always make sure to check the labels of the foods you buy, as this vitamin is added to many enriched grains like pasta, cereals, bread, and commercially produced flours.

 

For information regarding the MTHFR and its effects on health issues like cancer, please review this article:

Folate, Methyl-Related Nutrients, Alcohol, and the MTHFR 677C >T Polymorphism Affect Cancer Risk: Intake Recommendations

 


 

MTHFR, or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, gene mutations may cause high homocysteine levels and low folate levels in the bloodstream. We believe that a variety of health issues, such as inflammation, may be associated with an MTHFR gene mutation. People can have single or multiple MTHFR gene mutations, as well as neither. The different mutations are often referred to as “variants”. People that have a heterozygous or single variant of the MTHFR gene mutation have a decreased risk of developing health issues like inflammation and chronic pain. Moreover, doctors also believe that people that have homozygous or multiple variants of the MTHFR gene mutation may ultimately have an increased risk of disease. The two MTHFR gene mutation variants are�C677T, A1298C, or both C677T and A1298C. Symptoms of an MTHFR gene mutation can be different from person to person and from variant to variant. Following what is referred to as the MTHFR diet can ultimately help improve overall health in people with MTHFR gene mutation variants. Also, adding these foods into a smoothie can be an easy way to add them into your diet. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

 

Image of protein power smoothie.

 

Protein Power Smoothie

Serving: 1
Cook time: 5 minutes

� 1 scoop protein powder
� 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed
� 1/2 banana
� 1 kiwi, peeled
� 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
� Pinch of cardamom
� Non-dairy milk or water, enough to achieve desired consistency

Blend all ingredients in a high-powered blender until completely smooth. Best served immediately!

 


 

Image of leafy greens smoothie.

 

Leafy Greens Hold the Key to Gut Health

 

A unique type of sugar found in leafy greens can help feed our beneficial gut bacteria. Sulfoquinovose (SQ) is the only known sugar molecule to be made up of sulfur, an extremely essential mineral in the human body. The human body uses sulfur to produce enzymes, proteins, and a variety of hormones as well as antibodies for our cells. A fast and easy way to get leafy greens into your diet is to toss a couple of handfuls of them into a delicious smoothie!

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require additional explanation as how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Marcin, Ashley. �What You Need to Know About the MTHFR Gene.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 6 Sept. 2019, www.healthline.com/health/mthfr-gene#variants.

 

Good Calories vs Bad Calories Overview

Good Calories vs Bad Calories Overview

Calories are defined as a measurement of the energy our body produces from the foods we eat. However, not all calories are created equal. If we were to eat nothing but spoonfuls of sugar all-day, by way of instance, our health would tremendously deteriorate because there simply aren’t enough nutrients in those calories from sugar. The human body needs a variety of nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and many other compounds in order to function properly.

 

The foods we eat are made up of calories as well as complex mixtures of nutrients, fiber, and additives. This can ultimately affect the hormones that regulate our hunger, known as leptin, and those that manage how we burn or store calories to be used for energy, known as insulin. Our bodies are naturally programmed to protect us against long-term starvation by storing excess calories as fat. Eating “bad” calories in excess amounts can ultimately lead to obesity.

 

In a research study, a group of people was given the same amount of calories but from different food sources. The participants had no significant weight gain, regardless of whether the calories were from carbohydrates, proteins, fats, or any other combination of nutrients. However, environmental factors, such as an individual’s hormonal balance, emotions, and cravings were not taken into consideration. It’s important to understand how calories can affect your health.

 

Good Calories vs Bad Calories

 

Excess calories from processed foods are stored as fat which can lead to obesity. In the United States, obesity is the main cause of health issues like insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. It is naturally produced in the pancreas and helps move excess glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. When the pancreas recognizes high blood sugar levels, it creates more insulin to reduce glucose.

 

However, this can diminish the pancreas of insulin-producing cells which can eventually cause insulin resistance or impaired insulin sensitivity. If the pancreas can’t produce enough insulin, it can lead to prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Excess calories from sugar and processed foods can also cause inflammation which may also lead to chronic pain. So what can we do to prevent these health issues? The answer is simple: eat complex carbohydrates, lean protein, and healthy fats.

 

Replace highly processed carbohydrates that can increase blood sugar levels and insulin, with vegetables, beans, and whole grains. When it comes to eating complex carbohydrates like whole grains, the less processed the better! Consider eating stone-ground whole wheat, quinoa, oats, and brown rice. Then, choose lean proteins, such as fish and chicken. as well as healthy fats that come from plant sources, such as nuts, olive oil, and avocado, among others.

 

Below, we will compare the calories in common foods and drinks to demonstrate the differences and similarities in good calories vs bad calories:�

 

 

Can you tell which are the good calories and which are the bad calories? It�s important to follow the principle of �clean eating� and choose unprocessed foods in the purest forms instead of processed foods. This includes foods like fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, or eggs. You can eat these foods without worrying too much about your daily caloric intake limit. Eating a variety of these is essential in order to provide your body with the nutrients it needs to function properly.

 

Bad calories include processed foods which follow exactly the opposite principle of “clean eating”. Foods with high amounts of sugar and fast food offers you almost no nutrients but a lot of what we call “empty calories”. If you�re trying to lose weight to manage insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes, you�ll have to pay attention to your �bad� calorie intake.

 

For more information regarding the effects of good calories vs bad calories on obesity, please review this article:

Is the calorie concept a real solution to the obesity epidemic?

 


 

Our body needs nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and many other compounds from calories in order to function properly. Calories are a measurement of the energy our body produces from the foods we eat. But, not all calories are created equal. Eating bad calories vs good calories can affect the hormones that regulate our hunger and those that manage how we burn or store calories to be used for energy. Moreover, eating “bad” calories in excess amounts can cause obesity. It’s important to understand how calories can affect your health. In the United States, obesity is the main cause of health issues like insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Excess bad calories can also cause inflammation which may cause chronic pain. Eating complex carbohydrates, lean protein, and healthy fats can help people lose weight and prevent as well as control health issues like insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Learning to identify good calories and bad calories is a helpful strategy for people who want to improve their overall health. Adding healthy foods to a smoothie can also be a fast and easy way to include good calories into your diet. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insights

 


 

 

Image of zesty beet juice.

 

Zesty Beet Juice

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1 grapefruit, peeled and sliced
� 1 apple, washed and sliced
� 1 whole beet, and leaves if you have them, washed and sliced
� 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped

Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of smoothie with nasturtium flower and leaves.

 

Add Nasturtium to Your Smoothies

 

Adding nasturtium flowers and leaves to any smoothie can add extra nutrients. These lovely plants are easy to grow and the entire plant is edible. Nasturtium leaves are high in vitamin C, which is essential for a healthy immune system, and they also contain calcium, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and iron. According to healthcare professionals, the extract from the flowers and leaves have antimicrobial, antifungal, hypotensive, expectorant, and anticancer effects. Antioxidants in garden nasturtium occur due to its high content of compounds such as anthocyanins, polyphenols, and vitamin C. Due to its rich phytochemical content and unique elemental composition, the garden nasturtium may be used in the treatment of a variety of health issues, including respiratory and digestive problems. Not to mention, the flowers and leaves look absolutely lovely in smoothies.

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require additional explanation as how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Glassman, Keri. �The Difference Between Good and Bad Calories.� Women’s Health, Women’s Health Media, 11 June 2019, www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a19930112/the-difference-between-good-and-bad-calories/.
  • Denner, Julia. �Good Calories Vs. Bad Calories >> The Difference Matters.� Adidas Runtastic Blog, Adidas Runtastic Blog Media, 9 Sept. 2019, www.runtastic.com/blog/en/good-calories-vs-bad-calories/.
  • Taubes, Gary. �Good Calories Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health.� CrossFit, CrossFit Media, 31 Jan. 2020, www.crossfit.com/health/good-calories-bad-calories.

 

Dietary and Herbal Supplements for Back Pain El Paso

Dietary and Herbal Supplements for Back Pain El Paso

Be sure to talk with your provider before taking or combining dietary and herbal supplements with prescription meds or over the counter medications. Individuals with chronic back/neck pain but want to get away from medication/s, and pain relievers, dietary and herbal supplements could be an option. There are dietary supplements as well as, herbal supplements that although used in nutrition, also have added benefits for pain and inflammation relief.

Individuals have found herbs and supplements to be helpful in reducing and alleviating their pain. It is important to understand that these are not a cure-all that will take the pain away or the depression that accompanies chronic spine-related conditions. These are made to help to manage back pain symptoms.

 

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Dietary and Herbal Supplements for Back Pain El Paso, Texas

Nutrition and Dietary

A healthy diet includes plenty of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains which keeps the body in top form. Antioxidant foods like green leafy vegetables and berries help in fighting inflammation. Dietary and herbal supplements that research has found helpful in reducing inflammation and pain are listed. However, we must point out that several of these supplements can increase the risk of bleeding. Therefore have a discussion with your health care provider before taking any type of supplement.

Supplements

Omega-3 fatty acids

  • Flaxseed and Fish Oils
  • Omega-3 fatty acids can increase the risk of bleeding and conflict with blood-thinning medications like warfarin coumadin and aspirin.

 

Glucosamine/Chondroitin

  • Studies show these supplements can help relieve arthritis pain but have not been studied as a treatment for back pain.
  • Glucosamine and chondroitin can interfere with blood-thinning medications like warfarin coumadin and aspirin.

 

Methylsulfonylmethane MSM

  • MSM can help relieve arthritis pain.

Bromelain

  • This is an enzyme that can reduce inflammation
  • It can increase the risk of bleeding, so do not take this without consulting a health care provider
  • It can interact/interfere with antibiotic meds
  • Do not take if have a peptic ulcer

Herbal Supplements

Herbal supplements have been used by many cultures for health and dietary benefits for a very long time. These supplements are literally made from herbs/plants valued for their flavor, scent, and medicinal qualities. Examples of herbal supplements for pain include:

  • Cayenne reduces pain signal intensity
  • Devil’s claw relieves inflammation
  • Eucalyptus clears chest congestion

 

 

Benefits of Herbs

People prefer dietary and herbal supplements instead of standard/traditional drugs and medications for a variety of reasons.

  • Some because they provide pain relief without the side effects associated with medications. An example is white willow bark, that has been used for years for its anti-inflammatory benefits. And it doesn’t upset the stomach the way medications the way aspirin does.
  • Some prefer herbal supplements because they are natural.

Herbs come in pill, capsule, tablets, teas, and liquid extracts.

Turmeric

  • Reduces inflammation and pain
  • Turmeric can increase the risk of bleeding, especially for those taking blood-thinning medication

Devil’s claw

  • Reduces pain
  • Can increase the risk of bleeding and interact with diabetes meds
  • Can affect the heart and can cause issues for those with gallstones

 

Willow bark

  • Relieves pain
  • Do not take if taking aspirin or blood-thinning meds
  • Do not take if are allergic to aspirin or salicylates
  • Do not give to children under eighteen

Capsaicin cream

  • Reduces pain and inflammation
  • It is one of the main components in chili peppers

Things to Remember

  • Dietary and herbal supplements do not have to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration before they are sold.
  • Herbs can have medication-like effects on the body
  • Products sold as dietary supplements and promoted as a treatment, prevention, and/or cure for a disease or condition is considered an unapproved and illegal drug

While dietary supplements and herbal supplements are primarily used to help nutritional needs, these supplements can serve medicinal purposes. Explore alternatives from conventional medications with herbal supplements, as this could be an option. Check with your health care provider before taking supplements if you are pregnant, nursing a baby, or have a chronic medical condition like diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease.


 

The FASTING MIMICKING DIET & STRESS HORMONES


 

NCBI Resources

Beta-Glucan: The Modulator of Immune Health

Beta-Glucan: The Modulator of Immune Health

Do you feel:

  • Tired or sluggish?
  • Difficult, infrequent bowel movement?
  • Mental sluggish?
  • Alteration in the bowel regularity?
  • Edema and swelling in ankles and wrist?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then it might be something that may be attacking your immune system. Why not try to add some beta-glucan into your diet and overall health.

Throughout the last several years, beta-glucans have been gaining much attention due to the emergence of medicinal mushrooms in Western cultures. Across the country, studies have found that beta-glucans have been ubiquitous in the health food stores due to their immunomodulatory properties and cancer-protective effects. Since edible fungi have been known as the main source for beta-glucans, surprisingly though beta-glucan can be presented in a variety of foods like oats, barley, seaweeds, and yeast. Beta-glucan can also be found in dietary supplements for the body to consume.

Beta-glucans

beta-glucan structure

Beta-glucan is technically a non-starch polysaccharide, a prebiotic fiber that is formed by ?-1,3 and 1,6 glycosidic bonds. With beta-glucan, it can possess numerous health benefits depending on the molecular structure of each type of bond. Studies have shown that beta-glucans that are found in cereal grains can help lower cholesterol levels and can effectively bind serum cholesterol. Beta-glucans can even play a beneficial role in obesity, metabolic disorders, and other chronic non-communicable diseases. Since beta-glucans are a prebiotic fiber, research shows that they can play a significant role in promoting a healthy microbiome in the body. It means that beta-glucan can stimulate the growth of beneficial bacteria species, mitigating pathogenic ones, and even modulating inflammation to optimize the gut environment in the body.

Beta-glucans for Immune Support

In a 2019 study, it stated that �the relationship between immunity and nutrition is considered to be completely interconnected.� More studies have shown that beta-glucan can act on several immune receptors that can stimulate immune cell activity. This includes T-cells, macrophages, neutrophils, monocytes, natural killer (NK) cells, and dendritic cells. One of the studies showed how beta-glucans could pose modulatory effects on both the innate and adaptable branches of the immune system. One of the protein receptors is known as dectin-1; this protein receptor is on the surface of macrophages and dendritic cells.

What dectin-1 can do is that they can initiate and regulate the innate immune response by insoluble binding ?-1,3, and 1,6 glucans, plus it has become essential for controlling infections in the body. While water-soluble ?-glucan can bind to the CR3 receptors, thus triggering the adaptive immune response to the body. With ?-glucans, they can enhance phagocytosis while also triggering the release of various interleukins and cytokines, thus possessing cytotoxic anti-cancer properties. Studies have shown that TNF-?, IFN-?, and NF-??, can help to support the regulation of the T-helper cell 1 and Th-2 balance for immunological homeostasis for the body. Surprisingly in other articles, they talked about how yeast-derived ?-1,3/1,6 glucan can be delivered as an oral supplement for the winter months. The article study showed how it demonstrates its protective effects against upper respiratory tract infections in the body. The study even showed how it could reduce the upper respiratory tract infection symptoms that are already in older adults that have been infected. Another study showed that ?-glucan have cytoprotective abilities from viral infections and provide immunomodulatory properties to the body and the immune system.

With the population of many individuals, it turns out that the elderly population can benefit from the ?-glucan compound. With this compound, everyone can have a healthy immune system, especially during the cold and flu season. Having a healthy immune system is important because that way, the body can protect itself from harmful pathogens through functional medicine, healthy nutritious food, and supplements. By using these options, the body can heal itself and can dampen the effects of cold and flu symptoms.

More Research on Beta-glucan

Research studies have shown that ?-1,3 glucan from the fungal cell wall is one of the key ingredients for vaccines. The research shows as well that ?-glucan can produce robust humoral and cellular immune responses for the body when it is exposed to antigens. What is interesting is that ?-glucan is known to exert antioxidant activities in the body. With their reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging abilities, they can exert the antioxidants into the circulatory system and the mucosal immune system. There is a study that shows that ?-glucan in barley can possess a higher total of antioxidants significantly at a better capacity than oats and yeast. The study showed that ?-glucan could be subdivided into two groups depending on whether specific receptors are involved or not. It also stated that ?-glucan could be validated as a functional food ingredient.

Conclusion

All in all, ?-glucan is an amazing non-starch polysaccharide prebiotic fiber that has amazing properties that can help the body. ?-glucan can be found in mushrooms and a variety of other foods like seaweed and oats. This compound can help boost up the body’s immune system and can dampen any harmful pathogens effects that the body has come in contact with. This compound�s beneficial properties are amazing for anyone that consumes it and even added it to their daily diet. Some products combined with ?-glucan can support the immune system with hypoallergenic nutrients and targets amino acids.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Bacha, Umar, et al. �Nutraceutical, Anti-Inflammatory, and Immune Modulatory Effects of ?-Glucan Isolated from Yeast.� BioMed Research International, Hindawi, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5587958/.

Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung, et al. �The Effects of Beta-Glucan on Human Immune and Cancer Cells.� Journal of Hematology & Oncology, BioMed Central, 10 June 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2704234/.

Fuller, Richard, et al. �Yeast-Derived ?-1,3/1,6 Glucan, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection and Innate Immunity in Older Adults.� Nutrition, Elsevier, 23 Mar. 2017, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0899900717300539.

Jurgelewicz, Michael. �New Study Demonstrates Novel Yeast-Derived Beta-Glucan Provides Immunomodulatory Effects in Older Adults.� Designs for Health, 21 Oct. 2018, blog.designsforhealth.com/si-42214/new-study-demonstrates-zinc-supplementation-improves-clinical-outcomes-from-traumatic-brain-injury.

Levitz, Stuart M, et al. �Exploiting Fungal Cell Wall Components in Vaccines.� Seminars in Immunopathology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Mar. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4329074/.

Nakashima, Ayaka, et al. �?-Glucan in Foods and Its Physiological Functions.� Euglena, Co., Ltd., 14 Aug. 2017.

Nakashima, Ayaka, et al. �?-Glucan in Foods and Its Physiological Functions.� Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29491277.

Team, DFH. �Modulators of Immune Health: Beta-Glucans.� Designs for Health, 26 Mar. 2020, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1219.

Team, DFH. �Mushrooms for Nutritional Medicine.� Designs for Health, 14 Feb. 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/952.

Vetvicka, Vaclav, et al. �Beta Glucan: Supplement or Drug? From Laboratory to Clinical Trials.� Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 30 Mar. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6479769/.


Modern Integrative Wellness- Esse Quam Videri

The University offers a wide variety of medical professions for functional and integrative medicine. Their goal is to inform individuals who want to make a difference in the functional medical fields with knowledgeable information that they can provide.

Supplement Smart for Spine Health El Paso

Supplement Smart for Spine Health El Paso

Smart supplementation along with proper nutrition is one of the biggest factors and plays a large role in an individual’s health. You are what you eat is true. Feeding the body with vital vitamins and minerals promotes growth and healing. Filling up on processed, fatty foods does the opposite. The bones in the spine and throughout the body need nutrients to continue to rebuild and maintain strength throughout life.

A balanced diet rich in:

  • �Calcium
  • Vitamin D
  • Magnesium

This is the best way to nourish the body’s bones and ward off spinal problems, like spinal fractures, and osteoporosis. Inadequate diets or medical issues can create nutritional gaps. This is where vitamins or mineral supplements come in. Supplements are not a cure-all, but they can create a safety health net when taken properly.

 

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Supplement Smart for Spine Health El Paso, Texas

 

Supplement Smart

These supplements for bone health, fill in nutritional gaps. They are not necessary if the key nutrients the body needs from a proper diet are already there. However, individuals use supplements as a replacement for certain foods, this is not how they should be used. Actual food supplies multiple nutrients, along with minerals, and vitamins that are beneficial for health and are not found in supplements.

 

Taking a Supplement to Strengthen the Spine

The body’s dietary needs change throughout life, so adding supplements as you age or during pregnancy can help maintain health. Calcium and vitamin D requirements vary based on age and sex. When it comes to protecting spine bone health, certain individuals may need supplements to ensure their bodies are processing calcium and vitamin D properly.

This includes:

  • Individuals who had intestinal bypass procedure
  • Those with food absorption conditions, like Celiac or Crohn�s disease
  • People who eat few or no dairy products, like vegans or those that are lactose intolerant

Is a calcium supplement right for you?

The only way to definitively know is by having a conversation with your doctor. Then you can supplement smart.

 

Supplement Safety

Because nutritional supplements can be purchased over the counter, individuals assume�incorrectlythat they are completely safe. Dietary supplements can interfere with absorption, other supplements, medications, and can be toxic if taken in high doses.

For example:

  • Calcium and iron supplements can prevent each other from being fully absorbed when taken together. This is true of many minerals, including magnesium, because they get into�absorptioncompetition with each other and so are best taken separately.
  • Supplements taken together can cause too much of either one to be absorbed. This is the case with high-dose vitamin D supplements, which can cause too much calcium absorption.
  • Too much calcium can increase raise the risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Taking more than 1,000-1,200 mg of calcium per day is pointless because the body cannot process that much calcium at once.

Are your supplements helping or hurting you? The best way to know is to talk to your doctor whenever you change medication or a supplement program, even when just adding a new vitamin to the mix. An underused resource for supplement advice is a pharmacist. They will know whether the mix of supplements and medicines being taken pose any risk of negative interaction. And a pharmacist can help recommend a trustworthy product.

 

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Supplement Smart for Spine Health El Paso, Texas

Supplement Success

Here are a few tips to get the most benefits if you and your doctor think a calcium supplement can help support spinal bone health.

  • Buy supplements with the USP symbol. This indicates that the supplement has been independently evaluated and certified.
  • Take your supplement as directed, ideally with a meal.
  • Take doses no higher than 500-600 mg, no more than 2-3 times a day, for a maximum of 1,000-1,200 mg.
  • Drink plenty of water as some supplements can cause constipation.
  • Do not take calcium supplements with a high-fiber meal or laxative. This can interfere with calcium absorption.

Supplements Support Spine Health

Remember that supplements are exactly that supplements. Eating foods rich in calcium, vitamin D, and magnesium is the best way to build/maintain strong healthy spinal bones and prevent debilitating health problems. If you are concerned about your diet, talk with your doctor or a health coach about a smart supplementation regimen to meet your nutritional needs.


 

Chiropractic Massage Therapy

 


NCBI Resources

 

The Amazing Benefits That Aloe Vera Has

The Amazing Benefits That Aloe Vera Has

Do you feel:

  • A sense of fullness during and after meals?
  • Digestive problems subside with rest and relaxation?
  • Crave sweets during the day?
  • Eating sweets does not relieve the craving for sugar?
  • Stomach pains, burning, or aching 1-4 hours?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then something is disrupting your gut system. Why not try some aloe vera to dampen the symptoms.

Aloe Vera

Whenever someone thinks of aloe vera or aloe itself, the mind goes to sunburns and inflamed redden skin in general. Aloe vera has claimed its way to fame by soothing sunburnt skin; however, this long-celebrated medicinal plant has many properties and potential applications that go way beyond soothing inflamed skin.

aloe-vera-cgdeaw_ss_full_width

Throughout the recent years, there was a surge in research about the gut microbiome and how it both affects and is affected by various diseases. The various research showed that SCFAs (short-chain fatty acids) producing a byproduct of colonic bacteria and fermenting dietary fibers, thus having critical signaling functions and playing a role in the gut-associated immune response. Studies have shown that butyric acid or butyrate may be beneficial for brain health in the body. Furthermore, the study also mentioned how SCFAs could contribute to reducing the inflammation in the gut while also associating between high-fiber diets and reducing the risk of colon cancer.

Aloe Vera�s Prebiotic Effects

Other studies showed that aloe vera has impressive prebiotic effects when it is being incubated within the human gut bacteria cultures. When a culture of mixed bacteria is being incubated with aloe vera, it shows a linear increase in butyric acid and an increase production of acetic acid when Bifidobacterium infantis is incubated with aloe vera. Studies show that when people have an increased intake of their dietary fibers, it can bring negative consequences to their bodies. The research talks about how having an increase in fiber is an obvious way to help support SCFAs, but for people who want to increase their fiber intake, they should consume aloe vera.

Aloe’s prebiotic effects are fantastic due to the chemical structure of some of its components. Surprisingly the aloe vera gel is about 55% polysaccharides and contains a compound called acemannan. With acemannan and the other polysaccharides in the aloe plant, many researchers have believed that these components are a significant contributor to aloe’s prebiotic and gut supportive effects. Since acemannan contains sugar molecules that are being linked to glycosidic bonds, they cannot be digested by human enzymes. However, with the body�s intestinal bacteria, studies have found that it can cleave the bond that acemannan has created and making acemannan digestible for the colonic flora. Another compound that aloe has is known as barbaloin. This compound contains other bonds that are inaccessible to the human digestive enzymes but is cleavable by the GI flora in the body.

Aloe Helping with Insulin

Aloe supplements can provide beneficial properties to battle against diabetes. A study from India stated that individuals who tale aloe vera gel powder for three months showed a substantial improvement in their glycemic control and cardiometabolic health.

Earlier studies have found out that aloe supplementation can improve the biomarkers of cardiometabolic health in the body as well. The study found that individuals who are pre-diabetic or have metabolic syndrome were given the standardized aloe extract for about eight weeks, and the results were astounding. The results showed that the consumed aloe supplement leads to a significant reduction in total cholesterol and LDL-C in the body as well as fasting glucose and fructosamine. Consuming aloe can cause a reduction in insulin in the body so people can start feeling better.

There is a more recent study that confirmed that aloe supplementation helps improve glycemic control and lipid profiles for pre-diabetic individuals. The results showed a decrease in triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL-C, as well as an increase in HDL in the body. Research found out that low-carbohydrate and the ketogenic diets are highly effective for improving blood glucose and insulin, especially for anyone who has type 2 diabetes. By adding aloe supplementation, it can be a powerful adjunct, especially for those who have a difficult time sticking to a strict low-carb regimen when a person’s dietary change is absent.

Conclusion

Aloe vera is an exotic plant that has many beneficial properties that can not only reduce red, inflamed skin but can provide support to the gut system and help individuals who may be pre-diabetic. Aloe vera can help the body’s gut system by making sure that no disruption and inflammation can affect the intestinal barrier, causing leaky gut. By consuming aloe vera in plant form or even using it as a supplement can provide fantastic health benefits for the body. Some products can be taken with aloe vera in order to make sure the gastrointestinal is being healthy by supporting the metabolic system and the gastrointestinal. These products offer hypoallergenic nutrients, enzymatic cofactors, and phytonutrients for overall health and wellness.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Quezada, Maria Paz, et al. �Acemannan and Fructans from Aloe Vera (Aloe Barbadensis Miller) Plants as Novel Prebiotics.� Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 26 Oct. 2017, pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jafc.7b04100.

Alinejad-Mofrad, Samaneh, et al. �Improvement of Glucose and Lipid Profile Status with Aloe Vera in Pre-Diabetic Subjects: a Randomized Controlled-Trial.� Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders, BioMed Central, 9 Apr. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4399423/.

Bourassa, Megan W, et al. �Butyrate, Neuroepigenetics, and the Gut Microbiome: Can a High Fiber Diet Improve Brain Health?” Neuroscience Letters, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 20 June 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4903954/.

Choudhary, Monika, et al. �Hypoglycemic and Hypolipidemic Effect of Aloe Vera L. in Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetics.� Journal of Food Science and Technology, Springer India, Jan. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3857397/.

Devaraj, Sridevi, et al. “Effects of Aloe vera supplementation in subjects with prediabetes/metabolic syndrome.” Metabolic syndrome and related disorders�vol. 11,1 (2013): 35-40. doi:10.1089/met.2012.0066

Jurgelewicz, Michael. �Diversity Is the Key to a Healthy Gut.� Designs for Health, 5 Apr. 2018, blog.designsforhealth.com/diversity-is-the-key-to-a-healthy-gut.

Pogribna, M., et al. �Effect of Aloe Vera Whole Leaf Extract on Short Chain Fatty Acids Production by Bacteroides Fragilis, Bifidobacterium Infantis, and Eubacterium Limosum.� Society for Applied Microbiology, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 19 Mar. 2008, sfamjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1472-765X.2008.02346.x.

Sivaprakasam, Sathish, et al. �Benefits of Short-Chain Fatty Acids and Their Receptors in Inflammation and Carcinogenesis.� Pharmacology & Therapeutics, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4942363/.

Team, DFH. �Alternative Applications for Aloe.� Designs for Health, 5 Mar. 2020, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1209.

Team, DFH. �Could Increased Fiber Worsen Constipation?� Designs for Health, 10 Oct. 2018, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/759.

Team, DFH. �Influence of Ketogenic Diets on Blood Glucose and Insulin.� Designs for Health, 8 May 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1014.


Modern Integrative Wellness- Esse Quam Videri

The University offers a wide variety of medical professions for functional and integrative medicine. Their goal is to inform individuals who want to make a difference in the functional medical fields with knowledgeable information that they can provide.

Astaxanthin and Its Benefits

Astaxanthin and Its Benefits

Do you feel:

  • Inflammation?
  • Unpredictable body swelling?
  • Tired or sluggish?
  • Weight gain?
  • Gastrointestinal digestive issues?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might want to try astaxanthin.

The body needs specific vitamins, minerals, and supplements from food, in order to function correctly. The variety of these nutrients can be found in healthy foods like fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and whole grains are precisely what the body needs. One of the essential nutrients that the body needs is antioxidants. Antioxidants help the body get rid of free radicals that can cause the body to become overly stressed and leading it to develop chronic illnesses. There is an antioxidant that can help the body and can be found in berries and pomegranates, and it is called astaxanthin.

Astaxanthin

astaxanthin

Astaxanthin is a xanthophyll carotenoid that can be found in various microorganisms and marine animals. Astaxanthin is common for humans to apply and consume into the body while also being different. This red, fat-soluble pigment is quite different from the other kinds of food that contain carotenoids. Astaxanthin surprising does not contain vitamin A like all the other food containing carotenoids, and astaxanthin is an impressive antioxidant. Studies have shown that astaxanthin can not only be beneficial for the eyes but can provide nutritional support as well as having potential health-promoting effects in preventing and treating various diseases that can harm the body. Some of the various diseases that can harm the body when there is an excessive amount of free radicals can include:

  • Various cancers
  • Chronic inflammatory diseases
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Diabetes
  • Gastrointestinal diseases

Another study found that astaxanthin was superior to fish oil due to astaxanthin having the ability to enhance the body’s immune response and thus lowering the risk of vascular and infectious diseases that can harm the body, causing it to dysfunction.

A Powerful Antioxidant

There are some fantastic beneficial properties that astaxanthin can provide for the body and help improve the body�s systems as well.

Astaxanthin is a powerful antioxidant since various chronic diseases are rooted in a disproportionate balance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to antioxidants. Studies have shown�that astaxanthin has been known to scavenge free radicals more effectively out of the body than beta-carotene. There was another study showing how the body�s DNA was damage due to low plasma 8 -OHdG (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine) levels.

Boosts the Immune System

The publication of the immunomodulatory effects of astaxanthin is not getting enough attention as they should be. A test study has reported that dietary astaxanthin was able to stimulate mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation. This will help increase the natural killer cell cytotoxicity and even delay the hypersensitivity response in the body while also increasing the numbers of total T and B cells in the peripheral blood in the body. Another study showed how astaxanthin could help significantly enhanced lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. The studies also found that astaxanthin can be consumed in high concentrations without the risk of cytotoxicity.

Controls Glucose and Lipids

Surprisingly there has been new research that has been revealing about another unique but vital role that astaxanthin has. The studies show that it can modulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors or PPARs. What this function does is that it may have various applications in human health, including producing glucose and lipid homeostasis. Since PPARs are members of the nuclear hormone receptors in the body, they are a superfamily that plays roles in the expression of many genes that are regulating cellular differentiation and many other functions in the body.

There are at least three subtypes of PPARs that helps the major organs and help the metabolism of glucose and lipids. PPAR? can primarily be expressed in the liver, kidney, heart, and skeletal muscle, where it can be involved in lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity to the body. Another subtype of PPARs is PPAR?, which plays a role in glucose and lipid homeostasis but also is the site of action in the adipose tissue in the body. When astaxanthin is being involved, astaxanthin is a PPAR? agonist but can act as either an agonist or antagonist to PPAR? receptors. Studies have found that PPAR? agonist and PPAR? antagonist in astaxanthin can decrease cholesterol and triglycerides in loaded HepG2 cells, while changing several enzymes expressions that are being involved in lipid and glucose metabolism pathways, thus resulting in a hypolipidemic effect in the body.

Exercise Enhancement

Surprisingly astaxanthin can be used to prevent exercise-induced free radical production and is a lesser-known application. Astaxanthin can enhance exercise performance and even improve the recovery process. The increase in the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species or RONS are being produced during an exercise regime is deleterious to the health. It is often combated with a matching increase in the endogenous antioxidant enzymes. However, when a person is doing excessive exercises, it can cause RONS to rise above the body’s natural capacity to eliminate them. This will cause an increased risk of oxidative damage in lipids, protein, and DNA molecules. In a review study, it showed the ability of astaxanthin to squelch the RONS generating during exercising. It reported that the antioxidant effects of astaxanthin could provide a variety of benefits to athletes.

Conclusion

Astaxanthin is a powerful immunomodulatory antioxidant that can support numerous biological pathways that are in the body. It can dampen the effects of a variety of chronic diseases and illnesses that can harm the body. Astaxanthin is useful for being a therapeutic and powerful nutraceutical while also being an excellent addition for someone who needs supplements to support their general health and well-being. Some of the products here are beneficial to the body as they help support the immune system while providing more excellent stability.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Ambati, Ranga Rao, et al. �Astaxanthin: Sources, Extraction, Stability, Biological Activities and Its Commercial Applications–a Review.� Marine Drugs, MDPI, 7 Jan. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3917265/.

Brown, Daniel R, et al. �Astaxanthin in Exercise Metabolism, Performance and Recovery: A Review.� Frontiers in Nutrition, Frontiers Media S.A., 18 Jan. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5778137/.

Brown, Daniel R, et al. �Astaxanthin in Exercise Metabolism, Performance and Recovery: A Review.� Frontiers in Nutrition, Frontiers Media S.A., 18 Jan. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5778137/.

Choi, Chang-Ik. �Astaxanthin as a Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Modulator: Its Therapeutic Implications.� Marine Drugs, MDPI, 23 Apr. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6521084/.

Lin, Kuan-Hung, et al. �Astaxanthin, a Carotenoid, Stimulates Immune Responses by Enhancing IFN-? and IL-2 Secretion in Primary Cultured Lymphocytes in Vitro and Ex Vivo.� International Journal of Molecular Sciences, MDPI, 29 Dec. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4730289/.

Park, Jean Soon, et al. �Astaxanthin Decreased Oxidative Stress and Inflammation and Enhanced Immune Response in Humans.� Nutrition & Metabolism, BioMed Central, 5 Mar. 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2845588/?report=reader.

Team, DFH. �Applications of the Antioxidant, Astaxanthin.� Designs for Health, 27 June 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1047.

Yuan, Jian-Ping, et al. �Potential Health-Promoting Effects of Astaxanthin: a High-Value Carotenoid Mostly from Microalgae.� Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21207519.


Modern Integrative Wellness- Esse Quam Videri

The University offers a wide variety of medical professions for functional and integrative medicine. Their goal is to inform individuals who want to make a difference in the functional medical fields with knowledgeable information that they can provide.

Astragalus and The Immune System

Astragalus and The Immune System

Do you feel:

  • Dizziness when standing up quickly?
  • A slow start in the morning?
  • Edema and swelling in ankles and wrist?
  • Muscle cramping?
  • Tired or sluggish?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then there might be some dysfunction in your body�s system, including the immune system. Why not try the Chinese herb, astragalus to help alleviate the symptoms.

Astragalus

In traditional Chinese medicine, the herb astragalus has been used for thousands of years and has been known to strengthen chi or qi life force in the body. This herb has been known to be typically employed in conditions that are related to general weakness in the body like fatigue, anemia, a poor appetite, cardiovascular diseases, and other conditions that can weaken the body. Surprisingly though, astragalus can be used to optimize kidney health and, with the combination of ginseng and echinacea, can boost up the body’s immune system. There is a variety of astragalus that are native to Northeast Asia, and its roots need to be dried and powdered to be transformed to be consumed as a capsule or as a tea.

Astragalus Beneficial Properties

Studies have found that astragalus�s beneficial pharmacological effects might contain phytochemical components, which include a host of saponins polysaccharides and flavonoids that the body’s immune system needs to function correctly. Another study found that astragalus contains about twenty trace minerals that are highly important for the body. With astragalus extract, it has immune-modulating properties in vivo and in vitro in both animals and humans, and research shows that the herb stimulates and influences on the immune response cytokines while also leaving the inflammatory cytokines unaffected.

Some of the beneficial properties that astragalus can have on the body are still being researched; however, this Chinese herb can help the body to function correctly and are effective.

Improving the Immune System

493ss_thinkstock_rf_Immune_system_concept

Studies have shown that astragalus contains some beneficial plant compounds that may enhance the body’s immune system. Studies show that the primary role for the immune system is that it helps protect the body from foreign pathogens like harmful bacteria and viruses that can cause a person to be ill. Research has found out that there is some evidence that astragalus can increase the body�s production of white blood cells, which will help prevent illnesses from entering the body. In other research studies, it has been found that astragalus root has been known to help the body kill bacteria and viruses caused by infections. Even though the research may be limited, there are still studies that show that astragalus can fight off viral infections like the common cold and liver infections in the human body.

Improving the Heart Function

Research shows that astragalus may be able to improve heart function by widening the blood vessels and increasing the amount of blood that is being pumped from the heart. In a clinical research study, it showed that patients were given at least 2.25 grams of astragalus for two weeks and have experienced a more significant improvement in their heart function. In another study, it shows that astragalus may help reduce the symptoms of myocarditis, which is an inflammatory condition in the heart.

Improving Kidney Function

Astragalus can help support kidney health in the body by improving the blood flow to the kidneys and measuring the protein in the urine. A study has shown that proteinuria is a condition where there is an abnormal amount of protein that is found in urine, and it can be a sign that the kidneys are not functioning normally or may be damaged. Surprisingly, there was another study that showed that astragalus could improve proteinuria symptoms in individuals that have kidney disease. Studies have even found that astragalus may also help prevent infections for anyone who has a reduce kidney function and reducing the risk of a kidney disorder known as nephrotic syndrome.

Conclusion

Astragalus is a unique herb that can help the body’s immune system to function correctly. Even though there is a limited amount of research on this herb, but the beneficial properties it provides in the body are truly amazing. Astragalus can be consumed by capsules or even be brewed as a tea, so that way, people can enjoy the beneficial properties and that their body is performing excellently in health and wellness. Some products offer support to the body’s immune system and help target the amino acids that are intended to support the intestines while offering more support to the metabolic system.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Block, Keith I, and Mark N Mead. �Immune System Effects of Echinacea, Ginseng, and Astragalus: a Review.� Integrative Cancer Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2003, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15035888.

Fu, Juan, et al. �Review of the Botanical Characteristics, Phytochemistry, and Pharmacology of Astragalus Membranaceus (Huangqi).� Phytotherapy Research: PTR, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25087616.

Gao, Xing-hua, et al. �Saponin Fraction from Astragalus Membranaceus Roots Protects Mice against Polymicrobial Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation and Puncture by Inhibiting Inflammation and Upregulating Protein C Pathway.� Journal of Natural Medicines, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19548065.

Meixner, Makayla. �Astragalus: An Ancient Root With Health Benefits.� Healthline, 31 Oct. 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/astragalus.

Nalbantsoy, Ay?e, et al. �Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties in Mice and in Vitro Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Cycloartane Type Saponins from Astragalus Species.� Journal of Ethnopharmacology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 31 Jan. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22155389.

Peng, T Q, et al. �Effect and Mechanism of Astragalus Membranaceus on Coxsackie B3 Virus RNA in Mice.� Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi Zhongguo Zhongxiyi Jiehe Zazhi = Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Nov. 1994, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7703635.

Piao, Yuan-lin, and Xiao-chun Liang. �Astragalus Membranaceus Injection Combined with Conventional Treatment for Viral Myocarditis: a Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.� Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25098261.

Team, DFH. �Astragalus: Funny Name Serious Results.� Designs for Health, 9 Oct. 2018, blog.designsforhealth.com/astragalus-funny-name-serious-results.

Team, NCBI. �Astragalus Membranaceus. Monograph.� Alternative Medicine Review: a Journal of Clinical Therapeutic, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2003, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12611564.

Wang, Deqing, et al. �Study of the Effects of Total Flavonoids of Astragalus on Atherosclerosis Formation and Potential Mechanisms.� Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3306992/.

Wu, Hong Mei, et al. �Interventions for Preventing Infection in Nephrotic Syndrome.� The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 18 Apr. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22513919.

Yang, Qing-you, et al. �Effects of Astragalus on Cardiac Function and Serum Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Level in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.� Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi Zhongguo Zhongxiyi Jiehe Zazhi = Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20929124.

Zhang, Hong Wei, et al. �Astragalus (a Traditional Chinese Medicine) for Treating Chronic Kidney Disease.� The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 22 Oct. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25335553.


Modern Integrative Wellness- Esse Quam Videri

The University offers a wide variety of medical professions for functional and integrative medicine. Their goal is to inform individuals who want to make a difference in the functional medical fields with knowledgeable information that they can provide.

The Role Of Nrf2 and Inflammation

The Role Of Nrf2 and Inflammation

If there is one thing we are learning more and more about, it is that everything can be related back to inflammation and what we put inside our bodies. Point blank. The food you consume affects your genetics and your inflammatory response in the body. Headaches, achy joints, and overall fatigue have been directly linked to inflammation.

Inflammation

Inflammation was once thought to just be something that occurs when the body has an infection or we hurt ourselves as the body’s natural response. That fact is still true to this day. However, we now know more. Now, we are able to recognize inflammation occurring inside our organs and down to the cellular level.

Just as you roll your ankle and it becomes inflamed, if you eat the wrong foods your gut becomes inflamed. This can then be traced back to leaky gut and in some cases, autoimmune diseases.

So what can we do about it? What is actually happening in our bodies?

The human body is an amazing machine that we are still finding more about each and every day. Let’s first take a look at where this inflammation is coming from. Inflammation can enter the gut barrier as a toxin, protein, pathogen, LPS, or alcohol.

If our body is continuously exposed to these triggers, it can result in our immune system becoming dysregulated. Now that our body has these triggers, things like allergies, asthma, autoimmunity, and poor immune tolerance and regulation become our bodies new regular.

Amplifying Loop

These triggers then signal something called cytokines. Cytokines are tiny and dance around inside of the cell. These cytokines increase NF-kB activity.

NF-kB is then used to transcribe DNA and express an inflammatory state!

Now, our bodies are promoting inflammation, all because we let the toxins in. What we put into our mouth and our bodies matter. The foods we eat have the ability to provide nutrients to our cells, rather than facilitating in this ongoing inflammatory response chain.

How Do I Regain Control?

Nrf2 is a key protein in the body that has the function of regulating the genome. This helps the body balance gene expressions and the regulation of our genes. Another thing Nrf2 does is upregulate genes that encode antioxidant enzymes and antiinflammatory genes.

Essentially, Nrf2 helps to fight off inflammation and reduce oxidative stress. Nrf2 activity is part of the detoxification system our bodies naturally have. It helps us to not get sick from every single bacteria we come into contact with. However, Nrf2 is a pathway, not a supplement. So now the question becomes, How do we active Nrf2?

From The Kitchen to The Genes

As mentioned earlier, everything can be traced back to the kitchen and what we put into our mouth to nourish our body. A great way to ensure you are feeding your body what it needs is to make a smoothie in the morning. Smoothies can contain so many nutrient-dense foods to aid in Nfr2 activation.

First, start off with flaxseed in the blender. Blend it up so the flax seeds get broken up and open. Next, add in blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, acai berry powder, broccoli sprouts, and almond milk!

By providing your body and your cells with the nourishment they need, they will flourish. In addition to a smoothie, there are supplements that can aid in Nrf2 activation as well. These supplements include curcumin, fish oil, wormwood, and CoQ10.

It’s clear that the “American Diet” has been causing problems for us. The world is so busy and fast-paced that we are not taking the time or giving our bodies the consideration to shop and make nutritious home-cooked meals. We need to increase our vegetables, fruits, fibers, whole grains and decrease the carbs. Everyone has some degree of inflammation in their body, and many of us do not even realize it! I challenge us to give up fast food for an entire month, cut the soda, increase the lemon water and eat at least one salad a day during this month. By increasing our vegetables and creating plates that are more colorful, our bodies will thank us! – Kenna Vaughn, Senior Health Coach�

References:
Gordon, Jacob. �Recipes for NRF2 – MyBioHack: Unlock Your Maximum Potential.� MyBioHack, MyBioHack | Unlock Your Maximum Potential, 7 Nov. 2017, mybiohack.com/blog/recipes-for-nrf2.
Gordon, Jacob. �Why NRF2 Activation Can Make You More Sick – MyBioHack: Unlock Your Maximum Potential.� MyBioHack, MyBioHack | Unlock Your Maximum Potential, 2 Feb. 2020, mybiohack.com/blog/nrf2-cirs-sensitivities.
Lawrence, T. �The Nuclear Factor NF-�B Pathway in Inflammation.� Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology, vol. 1, no. 6, 2009, doi:10.1101/cshperspect.a001651.
Ma, Qiang. �Role of Nrf2 in Oxidative Stress and Toxicity.� Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology, vol. 53, no. 1, 2013, pp. 401�426., doi:10.1146/annurev-pharmtox-011112-140320.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal,and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at915-850-0900.

Stubborn Weight: Genetics or Diet?

Stubborn Weight: Genetics or Diet?

Today, there can be a lot of confusion when it comes to diet. The information received can be contradicting, confusing, and leave individuals feeling lost. This can often result in giving up on the diet and being left with joint pain, inflammation, discomfort, headaches and more.

The reason why there is more than one diet out there is because the research is always advancing. We have come to realize that everyone’s body reacts to different food sources and diets differently.

Genetic Code

As more and more research is being done, the more we are realizing how the genetic factor of individual cells directly correlate to a patient’s weight, diet, and changes as they age. For years, as one would get older and start gaining weight, we would attribute it to age. Although age is a factor, what we are finding now is that the genes are actually changing as we age and that is what creates this weight gain.

Sure enough, there are also genes that will tell us if you are susceptible to snacking. These genes can detect if you have a predisposition for heightened snacking or satiety. Satiety is the feeling of fullness after a meal. If you have reduced satiety, you tend to snack more because you do not feel as full after the meals you eat.

Getting your genes tested will allow the treatment plans created to be more personal and more geared to see results! Believe it or not, your genes can tell us if you are genetically prone to obesity,� if you have weight loss resistance when it comes to carbohydrates, and how your body responds to exercise! Using the genes, we can see how many hours per week you will need for weight loss or to maintain your current weight.

Proven Methods

The best option is to know your genes so the diet plan can be geared more towards you directly. However, if that is not a possibility right away, there has been one diet that has been proven time and time again to work for almost everyone. This diet is referred to as the Ketogenic Diet.

In simple terms, the ketogenic diet is a low carb, high-fat diet. This diet works by sending the body into a state of ketosis which burns fat as fuel.

Research shows that those using a ketogenic diet demonstrated a higher percentage of weight loss and kept the weight off longer when compared to those who did a low-fat diet.

Available Resources

Considering the fact that there is misinformation about diets out there, proper education is going to be the key. As someone who has gone through dietary changes myself and figuring out what works best with my body with type 1 diabetes for optimal health, the right team is what made me successful.

Surround yourself with those who are continuously educating themselves and have a system in place. For example, we make sure our patients get one on one time with the doctor and a health coach. From here, the health coach and patient become connected through a virtual database allowing the patient’s food, weight, supplements, hydration, BMI, BIA, and activity to be tracked by the health coach. The health coach can then instant message or video chat the patient throughout the week to ensure they are staying on track, staying motivated, and answer any questions they may have!

Do not be left confused over diets anymore! Remember that your genetic code holds the key to the right diet for you.

The right diet has the ability to make individuals see the results they have been waiting for. It all comes down to the genes. As mentioned, genes change over time but they hold the code. If you are someone who has struggled with diets, feeling good, or are stuck at a certain weight, I highly recommend getting tested! The information you gain from this is so beneficial! I have seen the results first hand, and they are eye-opening. They let you know if you have the genetics that will hold onto fat. This knowledge can help us prevent health issues such as metabolic syndrome! – Kenna Vaughn, Senior Health Coach�

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post DisclaimerThe scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

REFERENCES
Bueno, Nassib Bezerra, et al. �Very-Low-Carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet v. Low-Fat Diet for Long-Term Weight Loss: a Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials.� British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 110, no. 7, 2013, pp. 1178�1187., doi:10.1017/s0007114513000548.

 

Arabinogalactan The Immune and Gut Enhancer

Arabinogalactan The Immune and Gut Enhancer

Do you feel:

  • Excessive belching, burping, or bloating?
  • Stomach pain, burning, or aching 1-4 hours after eating?
  • An overall sense of bloating?
  • Difficulty digesting roughage and fiber?
  • A sense of fullness during and after meals?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then there might be some problems with your gut system or immune system. How about adding some arabinogalactan into your diet.

Around eighty-eight percent of Americans are living with compromised metabolic health and becoming overweight or obese. Some people are typically healthy and take active measures to stay that way through a healthy diet, which consists of eating the right nutritional food and exercising regularly. While with others, they are consuming high sugar and fatty processed foods and are being inactive and not exercising. When people fall behind on trying to achieve a healthy lifestyle, they need some reliable backup evidence to help them get back on track.

With the constant flood of information about the latest trendy diet or superfood airs on television, the radio waves, or being adversities on the online web and newspapers, it might be challenging for patients to find the right help that they need amongst all the media outlets. Two things can help influence a person’s overall health by supporting a person’s immune system function and even maintaining a healthy gut microbiome. The supplement, arabinogalactan, which is sourced from the larch trees, is a compound that can fill both roles to support a healthy, functional body.

Arabinogalactan

Arabinogalactan

Arabinogalactan is a fiber that is found in many plants; however, it is mostly found commonly in the wood from the larch tree, and the larch tree wood comes out larch arabinogalactan. Larch arabinogalactan is highly branched polysaccharides that have a galactan backbone with side chain acids of galactose and arabinose, which are both monosaccharides. Surprisingly though, arabinogalactan falls into the carbohydrate category known as hemicelluloses. Research shows that hemicelluloses are non-starch polysaccharides that can occur abundantly in the primary and secondary cells walls from plant cells. With arabinogalactan being found in all plant life from the seeds, roots, leaves, fruit, and sap, it is traditionally used to treat specific ailments.

Arabinogalactan Beneficial Properties

There are many beneficial properties that larch arabinogalactan can provide as this supplement can help stimulate the body’s immune system and even prevent viral and bacterial infections that enter the body. Arabinogalactan has been used as traditional medicine for centuries as people have been taking advantage of its medicinal properties. Some of the beneficial properties that arabinogalactan can prevent or even treat the following health conditions like:

  • Asthma
  • The common cold
  • High cholesterol
  • Liver cancer
  • Pneumonia

Studies even have shown that arabinogalactan can even promote a healthy gut flora in the body. The research shows that arabinogalactan can help resist digestion from the salivary enzymes and even the enzymes in the small intestines. When this happens, arabinogalactan allows itself to arrive at the large intestines. It transforms to be a prebiotic fiber, where it has high fermentability and can be used for beneficial colonic microorganisms. The research even shows how there is a unique chemical bond that forms the arabinogalactan molecules and making them resistant to digestion.

Arabinogalactan is a product of microbial fermentation known as short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and is with butyrate, propionate, and acetate. Since research shows that SCFAs play an essential role in the body’s gut health, especially butyrate, it has become the primary fuel source for colonic epithelial cells. Since butyrate helps increase mucin production in the gut system, it can even help contribute even better health by reducing the likelihood of pathogenic bacterial adhesion to the colon. With the combination of arabinogalactan, the gut system and the intestinal walls are well protected.

Butyrate and arabinogalactan can help each other improve the integrity of cellular tight junction. When the gut starts having obvious implications, butyrate and arabinogalactan can help maintain a proper intestinal permeability and limiting the passage of incomplete digested peptides into the body�s systemic circulation. Studies have shown that the immune response to these errant peptides can be a significant etiological and causal factor in numerous chronic illnesses, especially in autoimmune conditions. When a person consumes arabinogalactan, the supplement has been known to increase the colonic population of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. Studies have found that these two organisms have a potent antimicrobial effect against pathogenic bacteria that is affecting the gut flora.

Conclusion

Arabinogalactan is a carbohydrate that is found in the larch tree and can provide support to the immune system and the gut system. This supplement is a powerhouse when it is consumed and can fight off pathogenic bacteria that can harm not only the body but also cause intestinal permeability to the gut, thus creating leaky gut. With arabinogalactan having these fantastic beneficial properties, the body will thank this carbohydrate for protecting the immune system and the gut system. Some products are used to help support the immune system and the gastrointestinal system by using advance formulas to provide more excellent stability to the body by offering hypoallergenic nutrients and enzymatic cofactors that the body much needs.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Dion, Carine, et al. �Does Larch Arabinogalactan Enhance Immune Function? A Review of Mechanistic and Clinical Trials.� Nutrition & Metabolism, BioMed Central, 12 Apr. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4828828/.

Fasano, Alessio. �Zonulin, Regulation of Tight Junctions, and Autoimmune Diseases.� Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384703/.

H�tt, P, et al. �Antagonistic Activity of Probiotic Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria against Entero- and Uropathogens.� Journal of Applied Microbiology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16696680.

R�os-Covi�n, David, et al. �Intestinal Short Chain Fatty Acids and Their Link with Diet and Human Health.� Frontiers in Microbiology, Frontiers Media S.A., 17 Feb. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4756104/.

Team, DFH. �Arabinogalactan � Immune Function Enhancer.� Designs for Health, 1 Oct. 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1117.

Team, UNCCH. �Only 12 Percent of American Adults Are Metabolically Healthy, Carolina Study Finds: UNC-Chapel Hill.� The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 29 Nov. 2018, www.unc.edu/posts/2018/11/28/only-12-percent-of-american-adults-are-metabolically-healthy-carolina-study-finds/.

Wong, Cathy. �Can Larch Arabinogalactan Prevent Colds and Flu?� Verywell Health, Verywell Health, 12 Jan. 2020, www.verywellhealth.com/the-benefits-of-larch-arabinogalactan-89473.


Modern Integrative Wellness- Esse Quam Videri

The University offers a wide variety of medical professions for functional and integrative medicine. Their goal is to inform individuals who want to make a difference in the functional medical fields with knowledgeable information that they can provide.

Important Facts to Know About Metabolic Syndrome

Important Facts to Know About Metabolic Syndrome

According to healthcare professionals, metabolic syndrome is a collection of conditions or disorders that can increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. A combination of several of these risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, and excess waist fat, can ultimately increase the risk of a patient being diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and its associated health issues.

 

Metabolic syndrome affects approximately 23 percent of adults and the most common underlying causes of this collection of conditions or disorders include, excess weight and obesity, sedentary lifestyle, genetic factors, and age. As previously mentioned above, having 3 or more metabolic syndrome risk factors can increase the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease, among other health issues.

 

Metabolic syndrome is characterized by three or more of the following metabolic measurements, including:

 

  • Excess waist fat (> 40 inches in men, and > 35 inches in women)
  • High blood pressure (130/85 mm Hg)
  • Hight blood sugar or glucose levels (100 mg/dL or greater)
  • High triglyceride levels (150 mg/dL or greater)
  • Low HDL cholesterol (< 40 mg/dL in men or < 50 mg/dL in women)

 

Diet and lifestyle modifications can help prevent, manage, or even reverse metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome can increase the risk of developing various health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease if left untreated. Below, are important facts to know about metabolic syndrome.

 

Genetics Cause Metabolic Syndrome

If a close family member has diabetes or heart disease, you may already be genetically predisposed to metabolic syndrome. Getting a complete family health record generally includes information from three generations of relatives. Although it may seem challenging to collect this much information from your family, knowing what genetic predisposition you may have for developing metabolic syndrome and its associated health issues is important.

 

Body-Shape Influences Metabolic Syndrome

People with apple body-shapes have a much higher chance of developing metabolic syndrome than people with pear body-shapes. “Reducing your waist circumference can help prevent and manage health issues more than drugs and/or medication,� stated Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of Belly Fat Diet for Dummies. Excess waist fat is a key risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, stroke, and heart disease, as well as cancer.

 

Plant-Based Diets Control Metabolic Syndrome

The current dietary guidelines for adults in the United States encourage plant-based diets. Julie Upton, RD, of San Francisco and co-founder of Appetite for Health, encourages following a Mediterranean diet. The Mediterranean diet includes eating more fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and seafood but involves eating less cheese, meat, and sweets. Plant-based diets and the Mediterranean diet can help lower the risks of developing metabolic syndrome.

 

Fiber Lowers Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Include more foods that are rich in soluble fiber, such as beans and oats, into your diet. Insoluble fibers, such as whole grains, help transport foods through your gastrointestinal (GI) tract while keeping you feeling more satisfied. Fill at least half your plate with fruits and vegetables as well as whole-grain carbohydrates to make less room for less-beneficial food choices. Eating more fiber can ultimately help reduce the risk of developing metabolic syndrome.

 

Beverages & Drinks Also Affect Metabolic Syndrome

Several drinks and beverages, such as fruit juices and sodas, can increase blood sugar and triglyceride levels. Alcoholic beverages and drinks may also cause hypoglycemia and an initial drop in blood sugar. Water is recommended for healthy hydration. According to healthcare professionals, other healthy alternatives which provide water or hydration without extra calories can also include tea, coffee, skim or low-fat milk, fruits, and vegetables.

 

Exercise & Physical Activity Combats Metabolic Syndrome

Joey Gochnour, RDN and exercise physiologist in Austin, Texas discusses that moderate aerobic exercise can improve cholesterol levels. He recommends exercising regularly, preferably at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week to help combat metabolic syndrome. According to Gochnour, �Strength training and intense aerobic exercise may improve your blood sugar and insulin sensitivity.� Exercise boosts metabolism and burns calories for weight loss.

 

Sitting Increases Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

According to several research studies, sitting is associated with the increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome even when you include moderate amounts of regular exercise and physical activity into your day. One research study published in June 2015 in Diabetologia closely associated sitting time with an increased risk of developing diabetes, demonstrated that for every hour of daily TV viewing, increased a person�s risk for diabetes by 3.4 percent.

 

Test Fasting Insulin Levels to Evaluate Risk for Metabolic Syndrome

A test for fasting insulin levels determines the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Insulin plays a key role in metabolism. High insulin levels promote obesity, stimulate hunger, and increase fat storage. Sugary foods increase blood sugar and cause the pancreas to release insulin. But if the body is continuously exposed to high levels of insulin, the cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. Insulin resistance ultimately promotes high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and high cholesterol which are associated with metabolic syndrome, also known as insulin resistance syndrome.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Insights Image

Approximately 23 percent of adults in the United States have metabolic syndrome. Although the risk factors for developing the cluster of conditions or diseases are significant, there are good news. Many of the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome can be addressed through diet and lifestyle modifications, such exercise and physical activity. By making these changes, people can ultimately significantly reduce their risks of developing a variety of other health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. Although metabolic syndrome can be a serious health issue, people can significantly reduce their risks by reducing their weight; increasing exercise and physical activity; eating a heart-healthy diet that’s rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fish; as well as working with a healthcare professional to regulate blood pressure, blood sugar, blood cholesterol. In the following article, we will discuss several important facts to know about metabolic syndrome. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 

According to healthcare professionals, metabolic syndrome is a collection of conditions or disorders that can increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. A combination of several of these risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, and excess waist fat, can ultimately increase the risk of a patient being diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and its associated health issues.

 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

References:

  1. Heart Staff. �About Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/about-metabolic-syndrome.
  2. Heart Staff. �Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/why-metabolic-syndrome-matters.
  3. Heart Staff. �Your Risk for Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/your-risk-for-metabolic-syndrome.
  4. Heart Staff. �Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/symptoms-and-diagnosis-of-metabolic-syndrome.
  5. Heart Staff. �Prevention and Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome.� Www.heart.org, Heart Media, 31 July 2016, www.heart.org/en/health-topics/metabolic-syndrome/prevention-and-treatment-of-metabolic-syndrome.
  6. Taub-Dix, Bonnie. �Metabolic Syndrome: 10 Things You Need to Know About Your Risk: Everyday Health.� Everyday Health, Everyday Health Media, 31 Oct. 2017, www.everydayhealth.com/news/10-things-your-doctor-wont-tell-you-about-metabolic-syndrome/.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Podcast: Metabolic Syndrome

 

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that can ultimately increase the risk of developing a variety of health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, among other problems. Central obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high triglycerides, and low HDL or good cholesterol levels are the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. Having at least three of the five risk factors may suggest the presence of metabolic syndrome. Dr. Alex Jimenez, Alexander Jimenez, Truide Torres, Kenna Vaughn, and Astrid Ornelas explain the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, in further detail, as they recommend diet and lifestyle modification advice and guidelines, such as the ketogenic diet or the keto diet, as well as demonstrate the biochemical and chemical pathways that the body goes through during ketosis to help people with metabolic syndrome improve their overall health and wellness. From eating good fats and staying hydrated to exercise and better sleep, Dr. Alex Jimenez, Alexander Jimenez, Truide Torres, Kenna Vaughn, and Astrid Ornelas discuss how diet and lifestyle modifications, such as the ketogenic diet or keto diet, can help improve the 5 risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome to prevent the risk of developing a variety of other health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. – Podcast Insight

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with a variety of food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs.

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine and it has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). It is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.

 


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

 

Proudly,�Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

 

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

 

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

 

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

 


 

 


 

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders in the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.