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Sports Injury

Back Clinic Sports Injury Chiropractic and Physical Therapy Team. Sports injuries occur when an athlete’s participation associated with a specific sport or physical activity leads to an injury or causes an underlying condition. Frequent types of sports injuries include sprains and strains, knee injuries, shoulder injuries, Achilles tendonitis, and bone fractures.

Chiropractic can help with injury prevention. Athletes from all sports can benefit from chiropractic treatment. Adjustments can help treat injuries from high-impact sports i.e. wrestling, football, and hockey. Athletes that get routine adjustments may notice improved athletic performance, improved range of motion along with flexibility, and increased blood flow.

Because spinal adjustments will reduce the irritation of the nerve roots between the vertebrae, the healing time from minor injuries can be shortened, which improves performance. Both high-impact and low-impact athletes can benefit from routine spinal adjustments. For high-impact athletes, it increases performance and flexibility and lowers the risk for injury for low-impact athletes i.e. tennis players, bowlers, and golfers.

Chiropractic is a natural way to treat and prevent different injuries and conditions that impact athletes. According to Dr. Jimenez, excessive training or improper gear, among other factors, are common causes of injury. Dr. Jimenez summarizes the various causes and effects of sports injuries on the athlete as well as explaining the types of treatments and rehabilitation methods that can help improve an athlete’s condition. For more information, please feel free to contact us at (915) 850-0900 or text to call Dr. Jimenez personally at (915) 540-8444.


Leg Spasms and Cramping

Leg Spasms and Cramping

Leg spasms and cramps are common conditions where the muscles in the leg suddenly become tight and painful. They present with no warning and can cause excruciating and debilitating pain. They usually occur in the calf muscles but can affect any area of the leg, including the feet and thighs. After the cramping has passed, pain and tenderness can remain in the leg for several hours. Although many leg spasm episodes go away by themselves, they can disrupt normal activities, exercise regimens, and sleep if they continue and are left untreated.

Leg Spasms and Cramping

 

Leg Spasms and Symptoms

A leg spasm is a sudden, sharp contraction or tightening of a muscle in the leg. This can last a few seconds to a few minutes. Muscle cramps anywhere in the body cause sudden contraction of the muscle. This is an involuntary function and can include the following symptoms:

  • Soreness and discomfort can be mild to extreme.
  • Muscle tightening.
  • Hardening of the muscle.
  • Twitching of the muscle.
  • Pain.

Leg spasms are typically brief and go away on their own, but individuals are recommended to seek treatment if they are frequently experienced or last for extended periods.

Causes

Dehydration

  • Dehydration is a common cause of leg spasms and pain.
  • Lack of fluids can cause the nerve endings to become sensitized, triggering muscle contractions.

Peripheral Artery Disease

Mineral Deficiency

  • When the body sweats, it loses water and electrolytes.
  • When the body is low on electrolytes
  • Imbalances in:
  • Sodium
  • Calcium
  • Magnesium
  • Potassium
  • It can affect nerve transduction and lead to muscle spasms.

Hypothyroidism

  • If the body does not produce sufficient thyroid hormone, this is known as hypothyroidism.
  • Over time, this deficiency can damage the nerves that send signals from the brain and spine to the legs.
  • Tingling, numbness, and frequent cramping can result.

Spinal Misalignment

  • Spinal misalignment can compress nerve roots that run down the leg.
  • This can cause radiating leg pain and spasms, specifically in the back of the thigh.

Muscle and Connective Tissue Injuries

  • Injuries like tears, strains, and sprains can lead to leg spasms and frequent cramping.

Pregnancy

  • In the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, calcium and magnesium deficiency are common and can lead to leg spasms and cramps.

Treatment

The proper course of treatment for leg spasms depends on the severity and underlying cause/s. A chiropractor can identify the cause and develop a personalized treatment plan to relieve and eliminate leg cramps.

Chiropractic

  • Misalignments can compress the nerve roots radiating from the spine to the legs.
  • This can lead to radiating leg pain and/or leg spasms.
  • Realignment through chiropractic can relieve the pressure on compressed nerve roots, alleviating leg discomfort and pain.
  • A chiropractor will also recommend exercises and stretches to strengthen the legs and core muscles.

Physical Therapeutic Massage

  • A physical therapist will use various massage techniques to relax the leg muscles to prevent and reduce the severity of spasms.
  • Massage therapy will relieve any inflammation that accompanies leg spasms, decreasing pain and swelling in the area.

Health Coaching

  • Leg spasms can be caused by nutritional deficiency.
  • As a part of the treatment plan, a health coach will evaluate the individual’s diet and suggest changes that will help address any nutritional deficiencies contributing to leg spasms and cramps.

Body Composition


Track Inflammation and Fluid Imbalances From Injury or Surgery

Inflammation can occur with little to no visible symptoms following surgery or injury. Precision measurement of body water can detect water retention and inflammation to aid rehabilitation treatment. InBody effectively distinguishes water in the following compartments that comprise total body water.

  • Intracellular-ICW-within the tissues.
  • Extracellular-ECW-within the blood and interstitial fluids.
  • The Edema Index can be used to detect fluid imbalances resulting from inflammation from injury or recovery after surgery.

Assessing fluid balance in the body and specific segments can help identify inflammation and guide treatment to reduce the risk of re-injury or post-surgery complications. These measurements are provided for the whole body and can determine where fluid imbalances may be occurring for more precise analysis.

References

Araújo, Carla Adriane Leal de et al. “Oral magnesium supplementation for leg cramps in pregnancy. An observational controlled trial.” PloS one vol. 15,1 e0227497. 10 Jan. 2020, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0227497

Garrison, Scott R et al. “Magnesium for skeletal muscle cramps.” The Cochrane database of systematic reviews vol. 2012,9 CD009402. 12 Sep. 2012, doi:10.1002/14651858.CD009402.pub2

Kang, Seok Hui et al. “Clinical Significance of the Edema Index in Incident Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.” PloS one vol. 11,1 e0147070. 19 Jan. 2016, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0147070

Luo, Li et al. “Interventions for leg cramps in pregnancy.” The Cochrane database of systematic reviews vol. 12,12 CD010655. 4 Dec. 2020, doi:10.1002/14651858.CD010655.pub3

Mekhail, Nagy et al. “Long-term safety and efficacy of closed-loop spinal cord stimulation to treat chronic back and leg pain (Evoke): a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial.” The Lancet. Neurology vol. 19,2 (2020): 123-134. doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(19)30414-4

Young, Gavin. “Leg cramps.” BMJ clinical evidence vol. 2015 1113. 13 May. 2015

Video Gaming Injuries

Video Gaming Injuries

Video gaming has grown to over 150 million individuals in the United States playing. Around 60% of Americans play video games every day, with the average gamer being 34 years old. Playing video games for an extended amount of time takes a toll on the body. Individuals are experiencing the same kind of pains and aches from sitting and standing all day at work or school. Sitting positions, holding the controllers, and the different accessories can impact the nerves, muscles, and Posture. E-sports professionals understand the physical toll their bodies take with constant practice, tournaments, clinics, etc. They do cardiovascular conditioning, strength train, and stretch to improve their gaming abilities and also take into account:

  • The correct sitting position.
  • Ergonomic chairs.
  • Screen height.
  • Ergonomic controllers.
  • Hand/wrist supports.
  • Take regular breaks.

Taking steps can prevent strain, injuries and minimize the risk of long-term damage. If strain and injuries are present, professional chiropractic treatment can help alleviate the pain, rehabilitate/strengthen the muscles, ligaments, tendons, and recommend exercises and stretches.

Video Gaming Injuries

Video Gaming Posture

Proper Posture is vital to maintaining spinal as well as overall health. Poor Posture is the most common cause of back and neck pain.

Video Gaming Positions

Common gaming positions include the couch slouch where the gamer is slumped back into the couch with their feet up. This can lead to low back pain and sciatica. The full-on position is where the individual leans forward, elbows on their knees, head tilted forward, and staring up at the screen. Hours in these positions cause the neck, back, and other body areas to stiffen, generating soreness from the restricted movement. Many gamers use ergonomic gaming chairs. They have found that using the gaming chair improves Posture, eliminating the forward head and rounded shoulders. Gaming chairs can provide the health benefit of sitting correctly, reducing and eliminating neck and back tension or strain.

Injuries and Health Issues

Common musculoskeletal issues caused by excessive gaming and lack of movement include:

  • Eyestrain
  • Headaches
  • Neck pain
  • Elbow, arm, wrist  pain
  • Thumb pain
  • General hand pain
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Postural stress
  • Back pain

Chiropractic Treatment

Shoulder Massage

The intensity of gaming can cause the shoulders to tense up and stiffen. When using the controller, the shoulders can slightly lift, building up lactic acid, interrupting blood circulation, causing an accumulation of unwanted toxins inflaming trigger points. A chiropractic massage will release tightened muscles, provide relaxation, and increase the blood flow.

Hand and Wrist Treatment

The most used body parts for video games include the hands and wrist. Individuals grip the controllers or constantly use the keyboard and mouse. No matter what form of input is used, prolonged use can cause hand and wrist injuries. Injuries include:

  • Inflammation
  • Hand muscle aches

Chiropractic focuses on specific areas to help treat the body through a hand and wrist massage. Advanced techniques include electrical muscle stimulation to help stimulate and loosen the muscles. A chiropractor will recommend stretches and exercises, and hand/wrist supports, guards, or special gloves to alleviate muscle pains while still playing.

Neck and Back Adjustments

Poor posture can result in a misaligned spine or back muscle spasms. During extended game sessions, pain and fatigue can begin to present. A chiropractic adjustment can realign the muscles and set them back in place. The tissue surrounding the neck may thicken and focus on a specific area. Leaning too far forward or using a heavy gaming headset can result in a forward head posture placing a constant strain on the neck. Chiropractic adjustments will loosen the tissue and release any tension. Stretches and exercises will be recommended as well.

Recommendations

  • Set up the gaming station correctly.
  • The monitor or TV should be directly in front and around eye level, taking the strain off the neck.
  • Support the low back by maintaining the normal curve known as lordosis.
  • Use a lumbar support pillow or a small pillow behind the low back to prevent strain and pain.
  • Take frequent breaks every hour, take 10 minutes to get up, walk around, and stretch.
  • Physical activity/exercise 30-60 minutes a day to improve health.
  • Healthy diet

Body Composition


Body Composition

Body composition refers to how various substances in the body are proportioned. A few examples of the components that make up the body include:

  • Water
  • Protein
  • Fat
  • Minerals

All of these components generate balance in the body. When individuals exercise, they begin to notice changes in their body composition. For individuals that exercise regularly, it is vital to track weight gain, weight loss, and changes in body composition. This is to ensure that they aren’t losing muscle mass. As individuals exercise, muscle fibers are torn. During the recovery process, muscles are rebuilt. Overtraining can lead to muscle mass reduction because the body cannot catch up and rebuild the number of muscle fibers, eventually leading to lost muscle.

References

Emara, Ahmed K et al. “Gamer’s Health Guide: Optimizing Performance, Recognizing Hazards, and Promoting Wellness in Esports.” Current sports medicine reports vol. 19,12 (2020): 537-545. doi:10.1249/JSR.0000000000000787

Geoghegan, Luke, and Justin C R Wormald. “Sport-related hand injury: a new perspective of e-sports.” The Journal of hand surgery, European volume vol. 44,2 (2019): 219-220. doi:10.1177/1753193418799607

McGee, Caitlin, et al. “More Than a Game: Musculoskeletal Injuries and a Key Role for the Physical Therapist in Esports.” The Journal of orthopedic and sports physical therapy vol. 51,9 (2021): 415-417. doi:10.2519/jospt.2021.0109

McGee, Caitlin, and Kevin Ho. “Tendinopathies in Video Gaming and Esports.” Frontiers in sports and active living vol. 3 689371. 28 May. 2021, doi:10.3389/fspor.2021.689371

Zwibel, Hallie et al. “An Osteopathic Physician’s Approach to the Esports Athlete.” The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association vol. 119,11 (2019): 756-762. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2019.125

Acute and Chronic Sports Injuries

Acute and Chronic Sports Injuries

Acute and chronic sports injuries. Individuals that participate in sports or physical activities have an increased risk of experiencing an injury. These types of damages range from minor to severe and could require medical attention. Acute sports injuries happen suddenly and are usually the result of trauma to the area. A specific, identifiable incident is what causes an acute injury. Chronic sports injuries, also known as repetitive/overuse injuries, happen with time and are not caused by a single incident.

Acute and Chronic Sports Injuries

Acute and Chronic Sports Injuries Identification

Acute injuries can be identified by their cause. This could be a falling down during a run, sharp pain that presents in the shoulder after a throw, or a sprained ankle. The ability to focus on one cause usually means it’s acute. Acute injuries are characterized by:

  • Sudden pain in an area where there was none.
  • Swelling
  • Redness
  • Tenderness
  • Limited range of motion.
  • The inability of the injured area to support its weight.
  • A broken bone.
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Chronic injuries are different but are usually easy to identify. The pain begins gradually, usually over weeks or months. Repetitive activities like running, throwing, swinging can exacerbate the pain. However, it is difficult to point to a specific issue that first caused the discomfort or pain. Chronic sports injuries are characterized by:

  • Pain and tenderness in the area, especially during and immediately after activity.
  • Minor swelling and limited range of motion.
  • Dull pain when resting.

These two types of injuries have different causes – trauma for acute and wear-and-tear for chronic – they can both result in similar issues. For example, shoulder rotator cuff injuries are common, especially those that repeatedly use their shoulder to swing, throw, swim, etc. The individual needs to undergo a rotator cuff injury test to diagnose the injury correctly, whether the damage is acute or chronic. Chronic injuries can cause acute injuries, and acute injuries can lead to chronic injuries if left untreated.

Examples of Acute and Chronic Sports Injuries

Chronic and acute injuries are common in every type of sport. There’s an opportunity for both types of injuries. The most common include:

Acute Injuries:

  • Sprain and Strains
  • Burners and Stingers
  • A.C.L. Tears
  • Rotator Cuff Tear
  • Dislocated Shoulder
  • Broken Bones or Fractures
  • Concussion
  • Whiplash

Chronic Injuries:

  • Runner’s Knee
  • Achilles Tendon Issues
  • Shin Splints
  • Swimmer’s Shoulder
  • Lateral epicondylitis tennis elbow
  • Stress Fractures

Other injuries from trauma, overuse, or both include:

  • Nonspecific Back Pain
  • Herniated Disc/s
  • Spondylolysis

Treatment

Minor acute injuries can be treated with rest, ice, compression, and elevation, aka R.I.C.E. Overuse injuries, are different as the injury has been gradually increasing in its severity, possibly causing scar tissue and ganglion cysts to develop. To prevent the injury from worsening, it’s recommended to see a sports injury chiropractor or physical therapist. These professionals can help heal the body and educate the individual on self-care and prevention.

Chiropractic

The musculoskeletal system takes a beating. Chronic injuries usually affect the bones, joints, muscles, or a combination. Chiropractic helps keep the musculoskeletal system limber and in proper alignment. Adjustments include:

  • Neck adjustments
  • Arm and hand adjustments
  • Shoulder adjustments
  • Knee adjustments
  • Hip adjustments
  • Foot adjustments

Physical Therapy

Physical therapy for a chronic injury can help prevent future injuries. A physical therapist helps:

  • Improve range of motion
  • Reduces pain and swelling
  • Increases strength

Whether an athlete or are just staying active and having some fun with sports, acute and chronic injuries can sneak up and worsen if they are not treated properly. Healing with the help of a professional can quicken recovery time and prevent future injuries.


Body Composition


Maintain Muscle Mass While Losing Fat

Individuals that want to lose weight should focus on losing excess fat tissue, not muscle mass. Studies have shown that diet and exercise are crucial to preserving Skeletal Muscle Mass while losing weight. Losing weight healthily includes:

  • A healthy balance of cardio and resistance training to burn calories and build muscle.
  • A caloric deficit diet to burn through extra fat stores.
  • Get enough protein to support and maintain healthy muscle mass.
References

Cava, Edda et al. “Preserving Healthy Muscle during Weight Loss.” Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.) vol. 8,3 511-519. 15 May. 2017, doi:10.3945/an.116.014506

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/sports-injuries

https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00007256-199418030-00004

https://journals.lww.com/acsm-csmr/FullText/2010/09000/An_Overview_of_Strength_Training_Injuries__Acute.14.aspx?casa_token=8sCDJWxhcOMAAAAA:CDEFNkTlCxFkl-77MtALBQAkttW0PqWwCj4masQzEcYOJNuwFKyZgHZ9npQoHhWgMKOPSbnkLyfcQACYGpuu7gg

Wörtler, K, and C Schäffeler. “Akute Sportverletzungen und chronische Überlastungsschäden an Vor- und Mittelfuß” [Acute sports injuries and chronic overuse stress damage to the forefoot and midfoot]. Der Radiologe vol. 55,5 (2015): 417-32. doi:10.1007/s00117-015-2855-3

Yang, Jingzhen et al. “Epidemiology of overuse and acute injuries among competitive collegiate athletes.” Journal of athletic training vol. 47,2 (2012): 198-204. doi:10.4085/1062-6050-47.2.198

The Stinger A Cervical Sports Injury El Paso, Texas

The Stinger A Cervical Sports Injury El Paso, Texas

A look at what a stinger or burner injury is and what they can do to the neck and shoulders. We will look at:

  • Symptoms
  • Treatment
  • Prevention

Contact sports, like:

  • Football
  • Hockey
  • Soccer
  • Basketball

This is a very common cervical injury that affects the neck and upper body. This is known as a stinger.

A stinger can also be called a burner and is an injury that happens when the head or neck gets hit to one side, which causes the shoulder to be pulled in the opposite direction.

Stingers/burners often happen at the high school level but can occur at all levels of play.

 

11860 Vista Del Sol Ste. 128 The Stinger A Cervical Sports Injury El Paso, Texas

 

Stinger/Burner neck injury cause

A stinger is caused by stretching the brachial plexus nerves.

These peripheral nerves that come out of:

  • Spinal cord
  • Run across the shoulders
  • Under the collarbone
  • Into the arms

The brachial plexus nerves give the arms their strength and sensation.

When a sideways hit to the head or hit to the shoulder occurs, the nerves can become:

  • Compressed
  • Stretched
  • Irritated

 

11860 Vista Del Sol Ste. 128 The Stinger A Cervical Sports Injury El Paso, Texas

 

Symptoms of a cervical stinger

This type of sideways collision causes immediate and intense pain, tingling or burning sensations that can run down the arm into the fingers.

Weakness in the affected arm or hand is common.

The weakness, numbness, and tingling sensations can last a few minutes or for a few weeks.

 

Stinger/burner injury treatment

Fortunately, most stinger injuries heal on their own with rest and relaxation of the neck muscles.

Athletes are placed on the disabled list until symptoms are gone and a doctor has cleared the athlete.

  1. Ice pack on the neck or shoulders
  2. Anti-inflammatory medication
  3. Chiropractic
  4. Massage
  5. Neck strength exercises

Players can return to sport once the pain is gone and they’ve regained:

  • Full range of motion
  • Strength
  • Normal sensation in neck and arms

Constant or recurring symptoms could indicate a more serious injury.

Cervical x-rays, a CT scan, or MRI could be used to rule out other conditions with similar symptoms.

Can stinger/burner injuries be prevented?

  • Strengthening exercises for the neck muscles are an important way for athletes and beginners to help prevent these injuries.
  • Using the proper and correct technique in contact sports to avoid spearing/spear tackles and head down tackling.
  • Safety equipment, like neck rolls, can help limit the backward movement of the neck.

Players who experience stinger symptoms should immediately report it to their coaches or team/personal physician.

Ignoring or playing through a stinger injury can lead to more severe injuries.


 

*Neck* Pain Chiropractic Care | El Paso, Tx

 

 

Following a balanced diet along with healthy lifestyle habits can help promote optimal health and wellness.

People with neck pain realize how much their symptoms affect their ability to engage in everyday activities.

Dr. Alex Jimenez helps patients achieve neck pain relief through chiropractic care, an alternative treatment option that carefully corrects any spinal misalignments or subluxations.�


 

NCBI Resources

  • Stretching is an outstanding complement to chiropractic care.
  • Blood flow to the muscles is increased, helps lower the risk of injury and improves performance.
  • Stretching is good for the joints, it helps them function through their full range of motion.
  • The benefits of stretching make it a great practice to do regularly.

 

Your *SPORTS* Injury Chiropractor | El Paso, Tx

Your *SPORTS* Injury Chiropractor | El Paso, Tx

Athletes participate in a variety of exercises and physical activities on a regular basis, however, this can increase the risk of injury. Proper sports injury therapy depends on the correct diagnosis in order for them to be able to return-to-play quickly. Dr. Alexander Jimenez, a chiropractor, helps many athletes recover to optimal performance through the use of chiropractic treatment.

Chiropractic utilizes adjustments and manual manipulations to restore the integrity of the spine. And this is to decrease injury symptoms and promote healing. Patients describe how Dr. Jimenez and his team helped them recover their life, health, and wellness. These patients highly recommend Dr. Jimenez as your sports injury chiropractor.

El Paso Back Clinic

 


We are blessed to present to you�El Paso�s Premier Wellness & Injury Care Clinic.

Our services are specialized and focused on injuries and the complete recovery process.�Our areas of practice includeWellness & Nutrition, Chronic Pain,�Personal Injury,�Auto Accident Care, Work Injuries, Back Injury, Low�Back Pain, Neck Pain,�Migraine�Treatment, Sports Injuries,�Severe Sciatica, Scoliosis, Complex Herniated Discs,�Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain, Stress Management, and Complex Injuries.

As El Paso�s Chiropractic Rehabilitation Clinic & Integrated Medicine Center,�we passionately are focused on treating patients after frustrating injuries and chronic pain syndromes. We focus on improving your ability through flexibility, mobility and agility programs tailored for all age groups and disabilities.

We want you to live a life filled with more energy, positive attitude, better sleep, less pain, proper body weight and educated on how to maintain this way of life.


We Are Ready To Help Get You Back To Optimal Performance!

 

11860 Vista Del Sol Ste. 128 Your *SPORTS* Injury Chiropractor | El Paso, Tx


The Foot Levelers Kiosk

The Kiosk helps guide patients in selecting the best custom-made orthotics for their condition and lifestyle. It’s�

  • Fast: Push the Start button and the scanner begins.
  • Easy to use: User-friendly easy touch screen.
  • Engaging: Videos explain the importance of healthy feet and the benefits of custom-made orthotics.
  • Cloud-based: Results can be securely accessed from anywhere.
  • Comprehensive: Easily retrieve previous scans to compare them to new scans and see the difference.

The Foot Levelers Kiosk helps you. It saves time so you can spend more time living your life.

 


 

11860 Vista Del Sol Ste. 128 Your *SPORTS* Injury Chiropractor | El Paso, Tx

 


Workouts & Working

Our uplifting southwest community surrounded by it infinite beauty is a fantastic place to live and enjoy our families; it is, therefore, our mission to help each of our patients to�live,�to�love,�to�matter�and�to�thrivepain-free�in this beautiful special place.

 

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Health Grades: http://www.healthgrades.com/review/3SDJ4

Facebook Clinical Page:�https://www.facebook.com/dralexjimene…

Facebook Sports Page:�https://www.facebook.com/pushasrx/

Facebook Injuries Page:�https://www.facebook.com/elpasochirop…

Facebook Neuropathy Page:�https://www.facebook.com/ElPasoNeurop…

Yelp: El Paso Rehabilitation Center:�http://goo.gl/pwY2n2

Yelp: El Paso Clinical Center: Treatment:�https://goo.gl/r2QPuZ

Clinical Testimonies:�https://www.dralexjimenez.com/categor…


 

Information: Dr. Alex Jimenez � Chiropractor

Clinical Site:�https://www.dralexjimenez.com

Injury Site:�https://personalinjurydoctorgroup.com

Sports Injury Site:�https://chiropracticscientist.com

Back Injury Site:�https://elpasobackclinic.com

Pinterest:�https://www.pinterest.com/dralexjimenez/

Twitter:�https://twitter.com/dralexjimenez

Twitter:�https://twitter.com/crossfitdoctor


 

Recommend: PUSH-as-Rx ��

Rehabilitation Center:�https://www.pushasrx.com

Facebook:�https://www.facebook.com/PUSHftinessa…

PUSH-as-Rx:�http://www.push4fitness.com/team/


 

NCBI Resources

When your body is truly healthy, you will arrive at your optimal fitness level proper physiological fitness state. �We want to help you live a new and improved lifestyle. Over the last two decades, while researching and testing methods with thousands of patients, we have learned what works effectively at decreasing pain while increasing human vitality.

 

What Patients of Chiropractic Want To Know About ACL Injuries

What Patients of Chiropractic Want To Know About ACL Injuries

ACL injuries are some of the most common sports-related injuries that doctors and chiropractors see. It occurs when one of the ligaments in the knee, the ACL, is torn. If left untreated, it can cause the person to have difficulty moving their knee or controlling its movements because of the breakdown of knee support. When this happens, the bones of the joint often rub against each other. Over time this can cause a condition called chronic ACL deficiency. Osteoarthritis can also occur due to the bones rubbing against each other, eroding the cartilage and meniscus. A chiropractor can help reduce the pain of an ACL injury and help prevent further damage.

What is an ACL Injury?

The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is a major ligament in the knee that connects the femur (thighbone) to the tibia (shinbone) in the knee joint and provides stability for the knee. An ACL injury does not occur gradually, but instead usually happens suddenly. Most often they happen when a person is playing sports and jumps, stops suddenly, or makes a sudden change in direction. Soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, downhill skiing, gymnastics, and football.

acl injuries chiropractic treatment el paso tx.

What causes an ACL injury?

Sports and fitness activities, typically ones that place stress on the knee, are the most common causes of ACL injury. Specific actions that can lead to the tears include:

  • Pivoting when the foot is planted firmly
  • Sudden stops
  • Cutting or slowing and changing direction suddenly
  • Landing incorrectly from a jump
  • Being involved in a collision where the knee is hit or it causes any of the other listed actions
  • Receiving a direct, sudden, hard hit to the knee

The resulting tear can be minor and small or it can be severe, including a complete tear. In very mild cases, the ligament may be overextended but still intact.

What are the symptoms of an ACL injury?

People who experience an ACL injury will often hear a loud POP when it occurs. Other symptoms of an ACL injury include:

  • Severe or intense pain
  • Swelling (begins in the first few hours after the injury)
  • A feeling that the knee is unstable
  • A popping sensation in the knee
  • The knee feels like it �gives away� when bearing weight
  • Unable to continue the activity they were doing when the injury occurred
  • Loss of or decreased range of motion

Who is most at risk of having an ACL injury?

Statistically, when both men and women are participating in the same sports, women are more likely to sustain an ACL injury. Research shows that, generally speaking, women have a tendency to have an imbalance of strength in their thighs. Specifically, the quadriceps, the muscles in the front are typically stronger that the hamstrings, the muscles in the back. It�s the hamstrings that work to keep the shinbone from extending too far forward � the type of movement that overextends the ACL. Additionally, men and women athlete jump differently with women more likely to land in a manner that places extra stress on the knees.

How is an ACL injury treated?

There are several treatments for an ACL injury. Immediate treatment can help reduce swelling and pain that the injury causes. The R.I.C.E. model is the recommended self-care that the patient can do at home:

  • Rice
  • Ice
  • Compression
  • Elevation

In some cases, surgery may be recommended, but usually the best course of treatment includes physical therapy and chiropractic care. The knee may be braced and the patient may have to rest for a while before beginning physical therapy. A chiropractor can help not only treat the ACL injury, but also help correct any muscular imbalances that the patient may have.

Best Knee Injury Rehabilitation Therapy (2019)

Rehabilitation for Sports Injuries | Video | El Paso, TX.

Rehabilitation for Sports Injuries | Video | El Paso, TX.

Being involved in strenuous physical activities and exercises as an athlete can often result in a variety of sports injuries. For several of Dr. Alex Jimenez’s patients, their painful symptoms tremendously affected their overall athletic performance. Chiropractic care is a safe and effective, alternative treatment option which focuses on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of a variety of injuries and/or conditions associated with the musculoskeletal and nervous system. Several patients describe how Dr. Alex Jimenez’s sports injuries rehabilitation has helped them find pain relief from their symptoms and allowed them to return-to-play faster than with other treatments. Dr. Alex Jimenez is highly recommended as the non-surgical choice for sports injuries, among other common health issues.

Chiro Rehab

We are blessed to present to you�El Paso�s Premier Wellness & Injury Care Clinic.

Our services are specialized and focused on injuries and the complete recovery process.�Our areas of practice includeWellness & Nutrition, Chronic Pain,�Personal Injury,�Auto Accident Care, Work Injuries, Back Injury, Low�Back Pain, Neck Pain, Migraine Treatment, Sports Injuries,�Severe Sciatica, Scoliosis, Complex Herniated Discs,�Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain, Stress Management, and Complex Injuries.

As El Paso�s Chiropractic Rehabilitation Clinic & Integrated Medicine Center,�we passionately are focused on treating patients after frustrating injuries and chronic pain syndromes. We focus on improving your ability through flexibility, mobility and agility programs tailored for all age groups and disabilities.

We want you to live a life that is fulfilled with more energy, positive attitude, better sleep, less pain, proper body weight and educated on how to maintain this way of life. I have made a life of taking care of every one of my patients.

I assure you, I will only accept the best for you�

If you have enjoyed this video and we have helped you in any way, please feel free to subscribe and recommend�us. Recommend: Dr. Alex Jimenez � Chiropractor

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Sports Injuries | Video | El Paso, TX.

Sports Injuries | Video | El Paso, TX.

Louie Martinez has been a Wrestling trainer, coaching athletes ranging from 8 to 15 years, for about 15 years. Louie Martinez shares how he met Dr. Alex Jimenez 10 years ago after he experienced an initial injury. Coach Martinez has suffered a variety of accidents throughout his training career, from shoulder injuries to spine injuries, and every moment, Dr. Alex Jimenez has assisted Coach Martinez to�regain his health. Before meeting Dr. Jimenez, Louie Martinez did not comprehend the significance of seeing a chiropractor. Louie Martinez urges Dr. Alex Jimenez as the non-invasive choice for sports injuries.

Sports Injuries

When visiting a chiropractor for sports injuries, a physical exam will help pinpoint the health problem to produce an individualized treatment plan to treat it. Chiropractic care has been observed to decrease the healing time of sports accidents, as well as help stop future sports accidents. It’s important to understand your chiropractor. The healthcare professional may have useful suggestions that can keep you healthy as you work to reach your objectives.

sports injuries el paso tx.

We are blessed to present to you�El Paso�s Premier Wellness & Injury Care Clinic.

Our services are specialized and focused on injuries and the complete recovery process.�Our areas of practice includeWellness & Nutrition, Chronic Pain,�Personal Injury,�Auto Accident Care, Work Injuries, Back Injury, Low�Back Pain, Neck Pain, Migraine Treatment, Sports Injuries,�Severe Sciatica, Scoliosis, Complex Herniated Discs,�Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain, Stress Management, and Complex Injuries.

As El Paso�s Chiropractic Rehabilitation Clinic & Integrated Medicine Center,�we passionately are focused on treating patients after frustrating injuries and chronic pain syndromes. We focus on improving your ability through flexibility, mobility and agility programs tailored for all age groups and disabilities.

If you have enjoyed this video and we have helped you in any way, please feel free to subscribe and recommend�us.

Recommend: Dr. Alex Jimenez � Chiropractor

Health Grades: http://www.healthgrades.com/review/3SDJ4

Facebook Clinical Page: https://www.facebook.com/dralexjimene…

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Information: Dr. Alex Jimenez � Chiropractor

Clinical Site: https://www.dralexjimenez.com

Injury Site: https://personalinjurydoctorgroup.com

Sports Injury Site: https://chiropracticscientist.com

Back Injury Site: https://elpasobackclinic.com

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How Arthritis Can Affect the Knee

How Arthritis Can Affect the Knee

Arthritis is characterized as the inflammation of one or multiple joints. The most common symptoms of arthritis include pain and discomfort, swelling, inflammation, and stiffness, among others. Arthritis may affect�any joint in the human body, however, it commonly develops in the knee. � Knee arthritis can make everyday�physical activities difficult. The most prevalent types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, although there are well over 100 distinct forms of arthritis, affecting children and adults alike. While there is no cure for arthritis, many treatment approaches can help treat the symptoms of knee arthritis.

 

Anatomy of the Knee

� The knee is the largest and strongest joint in the human body. It is made up of the lower end of the thigh bone,�or femur, the top end of the shin bone, or tibia, and the kneecap, or patella. The ends of the three bones are covered with articular cartilage, a smooth, slippery structure which protects and cushions the bones when bending and straightening the knee.

� Two wedge-shaped parts of cartilage, known as the meniscus, function as shock absorbers between the bones of the knee to help cushion the joint and provide stability. The knee joint is also surrounded by a thin lining known as the synovial membrane. This membrane releases a fluid which lubricates the cartilage and also helps reduce friction in the knee. The significant kinds of arthritis that affect the knee�include osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and post-traumatic arthritis.

 

Osteoarthritis

� Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis which affects the knee joint. This form of arthritis is a degenerative, wear-and-tear health issue which occurs most commonly in people 50 years of age and older, however, it may also develop in younger people.

� In osteoarthritis, the cartilage in the knee joint gradually wears away. As the cartilage wears away, the distance between the bones decreases. This can result in bone rubbing and it can�create painful bone spurs. Osteoarthritis generally develops slowly but the pain may worsen over time.

 

Rheumatoid Arthritis

� Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic health issue which affects multiple joints throughout the body, especially the knee joint. RA is also symmetrical, meaning it often affects the same joint on each side of the human body.

� In rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial membrane that covers the knee joint becomes inflamed and swollen, causing knee pain, discomfort, and stiffness. RA is an autoimmune disease, which means that the immune system attacks its own soft tissues. The immune system attacks healthy tissue,�including tendons, ligaments and cartilage, as well as softens the bone.

 

Post-traumatic Arthritis

� Posttraumatic arthritis is a form of arthritis that develops after damage or injury to the knee. By way of instance, the knee joint may be harmed by a broken bone, or fracture, and result in post-traumatic arthritis years after the initial injury. Meniscal tears and ligament injuries can cause additional wear-and-tear on the knee joint, which over time can lead to arthritis and other problems.

 

Symptoms of Knee Arthritis

� The most common symptoms of knee arthritis include pain and discomfort, inflammation, swelling, and stiffness. Although sudden onset is probable, the painful symptoms generally�develop gradually over time. Additional symptoms of knee arthritis can be recognized as follows:

 

  • The joint may become stiff and swollen, making it difficult to bend and straighten the knee.
  • Swelling and inflammation may be worse in the morning, or when sitting or resting.
  • Vigorous activity might cause the pain to flare up.
  • Loose fragments of cartilage and other soft tissue may interfere with the smooth motion of the joints, causing the knee to lock or stick through motion. It could also creak, click, snap or make a grinding sound, known as crepitus.
  • Pain can cause a sense of fatigue or buckling from the knee.
  • Many individuals with arthritis may also describe increased joint pain with rainy weather and climate changes.

 

 

Diagnosis for Knee Arthritis

� During the patient’s appointment for diagnosis of knee arthritis, the healthcare professional will talk about the symptoms and medical history, as well as conduct a physical examination. The doctor may also order imaging diagnostic tests, such as X-rays, MRI or blood tests for further diagnosis. During the physical examination, the doctor will search for:

 

  • Joint inflammation, swelling, warmth, or redness
  • Tenderness around the knee joint
  • Assortment of passive and active movement
  • Instability of the knee joint
  • Crepitus, the grating sensation inside the joint, with motion
  • Pain when weight is placed on the knee
  • Issues with gait, or manner of walking
  • Any signs of damage or injury to the muscles, tendons, and ligaments surrounding the knee joint
  • Involvement of additional joints (an indicator of rheumatoid arthritis)

 

Imaging Diagnostic Tests

 

  • X-rays. These imaging diagnostic tests produce images of compact structures, such as bones. They can help distinguish among various forms of arthritis. X-rays for knee arthritis may demonstrate a portion of the joint distance, changes in the bone as well as the formation of bone spurs, known as osteophytes.
  • Additional tests. Sometimes, magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, scans, computed tomography, or CT,�scans, or bone scans are required to ascertain the condition of the bone and soft tissues of the knee.

 

Blood Tests

� Your doctor may also recommend blood tests to determine which type of arthritis you have. With some kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, blood tests can help with the proper identification of the disease.

 

Dr Jimenez White Coat
Although the knee joint is one of the strongest and largest joints in the human body, it is often prone to suffering damage or injury, resulting in a variety of conditions. In addition, however, other health issues, such as arthritis, can affect the knee joint. In network for most insurances of El Paso, TX, chiropractic care can help ease painful symptoms associated with knee arthritis, among other health issues. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Treatment for Knee Arthritis

 

Non-surgical Treatment

� Non-surgical treatment approaches are often recommended before considering surgical treatment for knee arthritis. Healthcare professionals may recommend a variety of treatment options, including chiropractic care, physical therapy, and lifestyle modifications, among others.

Lifestyle modifications. Some lifestyle modifications can help protect the knee joint and impede the progress of arthritis. Minimizing physical activities which aggravate the condition, will put less strain on the knee. Losing weight may also help lessen stress and pressure on the knee joint, resulting in less painful symptoms and increased function.

Chiropractic care and physical therapy.�Chiropractic care utilizes full body chiropractic adjustments to carefully restore any spinal misalignments, or subluxations, which may�be causing symptoms, including arthritis. The doctor may also recommend physical therapy to create an individualized exercise and physical activity program for each patient’s needs.�Specific exercises will help increase range of motion and endurance, as well as help strengthen the muscles in the lower extremities.

Assistive devices. Using assistive devices, such as a cane, shock-absorbing shoes or inserts, or a brace or knee sleeve, can decrease painful symptoms. A brace helps with function and stability, and may be particularly useful if the arthritis is based on one side of the knee. There are two types of braces that are often used for knee arthritis: A “unloader” brace shifts weight from the affected section of the knee, while a “support” brace helps support the entire knee load.

Drugs and/or medications. Several types of medications are useful in treating arthritis of the knee. Since individuals respond differently to medications, your doctor will work closely with you to determine the medications and dosages which are safe and effective for you.

 

Surgical Treatment

� The healthcare professional may recommend surgical treatment if the patient’s knee arthritis causes severe disability and only if the problem isn’t relieved with non-surgical treatment. Like all surgeries, there are a few risks and complications with surgical treatment for knee arthritis. The�doctor will discuss the possible problems with the patient.

Arthroscopy. During arthroscopy, physicians use instruments and small incisions to diagnose and treat knee joint problems. Arthroscopic surgery isn’t frequently used in the treatment of arthritis of the knee. In cases where osteoarthritis is accompanied with a degenerative meniscal tear, arthroscopic surgery may be wise to treat the torn meniscus.

Cartilage grafting. Normal cartilage tissue may be taken from a tissue bank or through a different part of the knee to fill out a hole in the articular cartilage. This process is typically considered only for younger patients.

Synovectomy. The lining damaged by rheumatoid arthritis is eliminated to reduce swelling and pain.

Osteotomy. In a knee osteotomy, either the tibia (shinbone) or femur (thighbone) is cut then reshaped to relieve stress and pressure on the knee joint. Knee�osteotomy is utilized when early-stage osteoarthritis has damaged one facet of the knee joint. By changing the weight distribution, this can relieve and enhance the function of the knee.

Total or partial knee replacement (arthroplasty).�The�doctor will remove the damaged bone and cartilage, then place new plastic or metal surfaces to restore the function of the knee�and its surrounding structures.

� Following any type of surgery for knee�arthritis will involve a period of recovery. Recovery time and rehabilitation will depend on the type of surgery performed. It’s essential to talk with your healthcare professional to determine the best treatment option for your�knee arthritis. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900�.

� Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez �

 

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Additional Topic Discussion: Relieving Knee Pain without Surgery

� Knee pain is a well-known symptom which can occur due to a variety of knee injuries and/or conditions, including�sports injuries. The knee is one of the most complex joints in the human body as it is made-up of the intersection of four bones, four ligaments, various tendons, two menisci, and cartilage. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, the most common causes of knee pain include patellar subluxation, patellar tendinitis or jumper’s knee, and Osgood-Schlatter disease. Although knee pain is most likely to occur in people over 60 years old, knee pain can also occur in children and adolescents. Knee pain can be treated at home following the RICE methods, however, severe knee injuries may require immediate medical attention, including chiropractic care.

 

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EXTRA EXTRA | IMPORTANT TOPIC: El Paso, TX Chiropractor Recommended

Sports Injury Rehabilitation | Video | El Paso, Tx

Sports Injury Rehabilitation | Video | El Paso, Tx

Louie Martinez has been a Wrestling coach for 15 years, coaching young athletes ranging from 8 to 15 years old. Louie Martinez shares how he met Dr. Alex Jimenez 10 years ago after he suffered an initial injury. Coach Martinez has experienced a variety of injuries throughout his coaching career, from shoulder injuries to back injuries, and every time, Dr. Alex Jimenez has helped Coach Martinez regain his health. Before meeting Dr. Jimenez, Louie Martinez didn’t understand the importance of seeing a chiropractor. Louie Martinez recommends Dr. Alex Jimenez as the non-surgical choice for sports injuries.

Sports Injury Rehabilitation

When visiting a chiropractor for sports injuries, a physical exam will help pinpoint the health issue to make an individualized treatment plan to treat it. Chiropractic care was observed in several studies to reduce the healing time of sports injuries, as well as help prevent future sports injuries. It’s important to understand your chiropractor. The healthcare professional might have useful suggestions that can keep you healthy as you work to attain your athletic objectives.

Sports injury chiropractic treatment el paso tx.

 

We are blessed to present to you�El Paso�s Premier Wellness & Injury Care Clinic.

Our services are specialized and focused on injuries and the complete recovery process.�Our areas of practice includeWellness & Nutrition, Chronic Pain,�Personal Injury,�Auto Accident Care, Work Injuries, Back Injury, Low�Back Pain, Neck Pain, Migraine Treatment, Sports Injuries,�Severe Sciatica, Scoliosis, Complex Herniated Discs,�Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain, Stress Management, and Complex Injuries.

As El Paso�s Chiropractic Rehabilitation Clinic & Integrated Medicine Center,�we passionately are focused on treating patients after frustrating injuries and chronic pain syndromes. We focus on improving your ability through flexibility, mobility and agility programs tailored for all age groups and disabilities.

If you have enjoyed this video and we have helped you in any way, please feel free to subscribe and recommend�us.

Recommend: Dr. Alex Jimenez � Chiropractor

Health Grades: http://www.healthgrades.com/review/3SDJ4

Facebook Clinical Page: https://www.facebook.com/dralexjimene…

Facebook Sports Page: https://www.facebook.com/pushasrx/

Facebook Injuries Page: https://www.facebook.com/elpasochirop…

Facebook Neuropathy Page: https://www.facebook.com/ElPasoNeurop…

Yelp: http://goo.gl/pwY2n2

Clinical Testimonies: https://www.dralexjimenez.com/categor…

Information: Dr. Alex Jimenez � Chiropractor

Clinical Site: https://www.dralexjimenez.com

Injury Site: https://personalinjurydoctorgroup.com

Sports Injury Site: https://chiropracticscientist.com

Back Injury Site: https://elpasobackclinic.com

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Evaluation of Patients Presenting with Knee Pain: Part I. History, Physical Examination, Radiographs, and Laboratory Tests

Evaluation of Patients Presenting with Knee Pain: Part I. History, Physical Examination, Radiographs, and Laboratory Tests

Knee pain is a common health issue among athletes and the general population alike. Although symptoms of knee pain can be debilitating and frustrating, knee pain is often a very treatable health issue. The knee is a complex structure made up of three bones: the lower section of the thighbone, the upper region of the shinbone, and the kneecap.

Powerful soft tissues, such as the tendons and ligaments of the knee as well as the cartilage beneath the kneecap and between the bones, hold these structures together in order to stabilize and support the knee. However, a variety of injuries and/or conditions can ultimately lead to knee pain. The purpose of the article below is to evaluate patients with knee pain.

Abstract

Family physicians frequently encounter patients with knee pain. Accurate diagnosis requires a knowledge of knee anatomy, common pain patterns in knee injuries, and features of frequently encountered causes of knee pain, as well as specific physical examination skills. The history should include characteristics of the patient�s pain, mechanical symptoms (locking, popping, giving way), joint effusion (timing, amount, recurrence), and mechanism of injury. The physical examination should include careful inspection of the knee, palpation for point tenderness, assessment of joint effusion, range-of-motion testing, evaluation of ligaments for injury or laxity, and assessment of the menisci. Radiographs should be obtained in patients with isolated patellar tenderness or tenderness at the head of the fibula, inability to bear weight or flex the knee to 90 degrees, or age greater than 55 years. (Am Fam Physician 2003; 68:907-12. Copyright� 2003 American Academy of Family Physicians.)

Introduction

Knee pain accounts for approximately one-third of musculoskeletal problems seen in primary care settings. This complaint is most prevalent in�physically active patients, with as many as 54 percent of athletes having some degree of knee pain each year.1 Knee pain can be a source of significant disability, restricting the ability to work or perform activities of daily living.

The knee is a complex structure (Figure 1),2 and its evaluation can present a challenge to the family physician. The differential diagnosis of knee pain is extensive but can be narrowed with a detailed history, a focused physical examination and, when indicated, the selective use of appropriate imaging and laboratory studies. Part I of this two-part article provides a systematic approach to evaluating the knee, and part II3 discusses the differential diagnosis of knee pain.

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History

Pain Characteristics

The patient�s description of knee pain is helpful in focusing the differential diagnosis.4 It is important to clarify the characteristics of the pain, including its onset (rapid or insidious), location (anterior, medial, lateral, or posterior knee), duration, severity, and quality (e.g., dull, sharp, achy). Aggravating and alleviating factors also need to be identified. If knee pain is caused by an acute injury, the physician needs to know whether the patient was able to continue activity or bear weight after the injury or was forced to cease activities immediately.

 

Mechanical Symptoms

The patient should be asked about mechan- ical symptoms, such as locking, popping, or giving way of the knee. A history of locking episodes suggests a meniscal tear. A sensation of popping at the time of injury suggests liga- mentous injury, probably complete rupture of a ligament (third-degree tear). Episodes of giving way are consistent with some degree of knee instability and may indicate patellar sub- luxation or ligamentous rupture.

Effusion

The timing and amount of joint effusion are important clues to the diagnosis. Rapid onset (within two hours) of a large, tense effusion suggests rupture of the anterior cru- ciate ligament or fracture of the tibial plateau with resultant hemarthrosis, whereas slower onset (24 to 36 hours) of a mild to moderate effusion is consistent with meniscal injury or ligamentous sprain. Recurrent knee effusion after activity is consistent with meniscal injury.

Mechanism of Injury

The patient should be questioned about specific details of the injury. It is important to know if the patient sustained a direct blow to the knee, if the foot was planted at the time of injury, if the patient was decelerating or stopping suddenly, if the patient was landing from a jump, if there was a twisting component to the injury, and if hyperextension occurred.

A direct blow to the knee can cause serious injury. The anterior force applied to the proximal tibia with the knee in flexion (e.g., when the knee hits the dashboard in an automobile accident) can cause injury to the posterior cruciate ligament. The medial collateral ligament is most commonly injured as a result of direct lateral force to the knee (e.g., clipping in football); this force creates a val- gus load on the knee joint and can result in rupture of the medial collateral ligament. Conversely, a medial blow that creates a varus load can injure the lateral collateral ligament.

Noncontact forces also are an important cause of knee injury. Quick stops and sharp cuts or turns create significant deceleration forces that can sprain or rupture the anterior cruciate ligament. Hyperextension can result in injury to the anterior cruciate ligament or posterior cruciate ligament. Sudden twisting or pivoting motions create shear forces that can injure the meniscus. A combination of forces can occur simultaneously, causing injury to multiple structures.

 

Medical History

A history of knee injury or surgery is important. The patient should be asked about previous attempts to treat knee pain, including the use of medications, supporting devices, and physical therapy. The physician also should ask if the patient has a history of�gout, pseudogout, rheumatoid arthritis, or other degenerative joint diseases.

Dr Jimenez White Coat

Knee pain is a common health issue which can be caused by sports injuries, automobile accident injuries, or by an underlying health issue, such as arthritis. The most common symptoms of knee injury include pain and discomfort, swelling, inflammation and stiffness. Because treatment for knee pain varies according to the cause, it’s essential for the individual to receive proper diagnosis for their symptoms. Chiropractic care is a safe and effective, alternative treatment approach which can help treat knee pain, among other health issues.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Physical Examination

Inspection and Palpation

The physician begins by comparing the painful knee with the asymptomatic knee and inspecting the injured knee for erythema, swelling, bruising, and discoloration. The mus- culature should be symmetric bilaterally. In particular, the vastus medialis obliquus of the quadriceps should be evaluated to determine if it appears normal or shows signs of atrophy.

The knee is then palpated and checked for pain, warmth, and effusion. Point tenderness should be sought, particularly at the patella, tibial tubercle, patellar tendon, quadriceps tendon, anterolateral and anteromedial joint line, medial joint line, and lateral joint line. Moving the patient�s knee through a short arc of motion helps identify the joint lines. Range of motion should be assessed by extending and flexing the knee as far as possible (normal range of motion: extension, zero degrees; flex- ion, 135 degrees).5

Patellofemoral Assessment

An evaluation for effusion should be conducted with the patient supine and the injured knee in extension. The suprapatellar pouch should be milked to determine whether an effusion is present.

Patellofemoral tracking is assessed by observing the patella for smooth motion while the patient contracts the quadriceps muscle. The presence of crepitus should be noted during palpation of the patella.

The quadriceps angle (Q angle) is determined by drawing one line from the anterior superior iliac spine through the center of the patella and a second line from the center of the patella through the tibial tuberosity (Figure 2).6 A Q angle greater than 15 degrees is a predisposing factor for patellar subluxation (i.e., if the Q angle is increased, forceful contraction of the quadriceps muscle can cause the patella to sublux laterally).

A patellar apprehension test is then performed. With fingers placed at the medial aspect of the patella, the physician attempts to sublux the patella laterally. If this maneuver reproduces the patient�s pain or a giving-way sensation, patellar subluxation is the likely cause of the patient�s symptoms.7 Both the superior and inferior patellar facets should be palpated, with the patella subluxed first medially and then laterally.

 

Cruciate Ligaments

Anterior Cruciate Ligament. For the anterior drawer test, the patient assumes a supine position with the injured knee flexed to 90 degrees. The physician fixes the patient�s foot in slight external rotation (by sitting on the foot) and then places thumbs at the tibial tubercle and fingers at the posterior calf. With the patient�s hamstring muscles relaxed, the physician pulls anteriorly and assesses anterior displacement of the tibia (anterior drawer sign).

The Lachman test is another means of assessing the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (Figure 3).7 The test is performed with the patient in a supine position and the injured knee flexed to 30 degrees. The physician stabilizes the distal femur with one hand, grasps the proximal tibia in the other hand, and then attempts to sublux the tibia anteriorly. Lack of a clear end point indicates a positive Lachman test.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament. For the posterior drawer test, the patient assumes a supine position with knees flexed to 90 degrees. While standing at the side of the examination table, the physician looks for posterior displacement of the tibia (posterior sag sign).7,8 Next, the physician fixes the patient�s foot in neutral rotation (by sitting on the foot), positions thumbs at the tibial tubercle, and places fingers at the posterior calf. The physician then pushes posteriorly and assesses for posterior displacement of the tibia.

 

Collateral Ligaments

Medial Collateral Ligament. The valgus stress test is performed with the patient�s leg slightly abducted. The physician places one hand at the lateral aspect of the knee joint and the other hand at the medial aspect of the distal tibia. Next, valgus stress is applied to the knee at both zero degrees (full extension) and 30 degrees of flexion (Figure 4)7. With the knee at zero degrees (i.e., in full extension), the posterior cruciate ligament and the articulation of the femoral condyles with the tibial plateau should stabilize the knee; with the knee at 30 degrees of flexion, application of valgus stress assesses the laxity or integrity of the medial collateral ligament.

Lateral Collateral Ligament. To perform the varus stress test, the physician places one hand at the medial aspect of the patient�s knee and the other hand at the lateral aspect of the distal fibula. Next, varus stress is applied to the knee, first at full extension (i.e., zero degrees), then with the knee flexed to 30 degrees (Figure 4).7 A firm end point indicates that the collateral ligament is intact, whereas a soft or absent end point indicates complete rupture (third-degree tear) of the ligament.

Menisci

Patients with injury to the menisci usually demonstrate tenderness at the joint line. The McMurray test is performed with the patient lying supine9 (Figure 5). The test has been described variously in the literature, but the author suggests the following technique.

The physician grasps the patient�s heel with one hand and the knee with the other hand. The physician�s thumb is at the lateral joint line, and fingers are at the medial joint line. The physician then flexes the patient�s knee maximally. To test the lateral meniscus, the tibia is rotated internally, and the knee is extended from maximal flexion to about 90 degrees; added compression to the lateral meniscus can be produced by applying valgus stress across the knee joint while the knee is�being extended. To test the medial meniscus, the tibia is rotated externally, and the knee is extended from maximal flexion to about 90 degrees; added compression to the medial meniscus can be produced by placing varus stress across the knee joint while the knee is degrees of flexion. A positive test produces a thud or a click, or causes pain in a reproducible portion of the range of motion.

Because most patients with knee pain have soft tissue injuries, plain-film radiographs generally are not indicated. The Ottawa knee rules are a useful guide for ordering radiographs of the knee10,11.

If radiographs are required, three views are usually sufficient: anteroposterior view, lateral view, and Merchant�s view (for the patellofemoral joint).7,12 Teenage patients who report chronic knee pain and recurrent knee effusion require a notch or tunnel view (posteroanterior view with the knee flexed to 40 to 50 degrees). This view is necessary to detect radiolucencies of the femoral condyles (most�commonly the medial femoral condyle), which indicate the presence of osteochondritis dissecans.13

Radiographs should be closely inspected for signs of fracture, particularly involving the patella, tibial plateau, tibial spines, proximal fibula, and femoral condyles. If osteoarthritis is suspected, standing weight-bearing radiographs should be obtained.

 

Laboratory Studies

The presence of warmth, exquisite tenderness, painful effusion, and marked pain with even slight range of motion of the knee joint is consistent with septic arthritis or acute inflammatory arthropathy. In addition to obtaining a complete blood count with differential and an erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), arthro- centesis should be performed. The joint fluid should be sent to a laboratory for a cell count with differential, glucose and protein measure- ments, bacterial culture and sensitivity, and polarized light microscopy for crystals.

Because a tense, painful, swollen knee may present an unclear clinical picture, arthrocentesis may be required to differentiate simple effusion from hemarthrosis or occult osteochondral fracture.4 A simple joint effusion produces clear, straw-colored transudative fluid, as in a knee sprain or chronic meniscal injury. Hemarthrosis is caused by a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament, a fracture or, less commonly, an acute tear of the outer portion of the meniscus. An osteochondral fracture causes hemarthrosis, with fat globules noted in the aspirate.

Rheumatoid arthritis may involve the knee joint. Hence, serum ESR and rheumatoid factor testing are indicated in selected patients.

The authors indicate that they do not have any conflicts of interest. Sources of funding: none reported.

In conclusion, knee pain is a common health issue which occurs due to a variety of injuries and/or conditions, such as sports injuries, automobile accidents, and arthritis, among other problems. Treatment of knee pain depends largely on the source of the symptoms. Therefore, it is essential for the individual to seek immediate medical attention to receive a diagnosis.

Chiropractic care is an alternative treatment option which focuses on the treatment of a variety of injuries and/or conditions associated with the musculoskeletal and nervous system. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900�.

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Relieving Knee Pain without Surgery

Knee pain is a well-known symptom which can occur due to a variety of knee injuries and/or conditions, including�sports injuries. The knee is one of the most complex joints in the human body as it is made-up of the intersection of four bones, four ligaments, various tendons, two menisci, and cartilage. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, the most common causes of knee pain include patellar subluxation, patellar tendinitis or jumper’s knee, and Osgood-Schlatter disease. Although knee pain is most likely to occur in people over 60 years old, knee pain can also occur in children and adolescents. Knee pain can be treated at home following the RICE methods, however, severe knee injuries may require immediate medical attention, including chiropractic care.

 

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References

1. Rosenblatt RA, Cherkin DC, Schneeweiss R, Hart LG. The content of ambulatory medical care in the United States. An interspecialty comparison. N Engl J Med 1983;309:892-7.

2. Tandeter HB, Shvartzman P, Stevens MA. Acute knee injuries: use of decision rules for selective radiograph ordering. Am Fam Physician 1999;60: 2599-608.

3. Calmbach WL, Hutchens M. Evaluation of patients presenting with knee pain: part II. Differential diag- nosis. Am Fam Physician 2003;68:917-22

4. Bergfeld J, Ireland ML, Wojtys EM, Glaser V. Pin- pointing the cause of acute knee pain. Patient Care 1997;31(18):100-7.

5. Magee DJ. Knee. In: Orthopedic physical assessment. 4th ed. Philadelphia: Saunders, 2002:661-763.

6. Juhn MS. Patellofemoral pain syndrome: a review and guidelines for treatment. Am Fam Physician 1999;60:2012-22.

7. Smith BW, Green GA. Acute knee injuries: part I. History and physical examination. Am Fam Physi- cian 1995;51:615-21.

8. Walsh WM. Knee injuries. In: Mellion MB, Walsh WM, Shelton GL, eds. The team physician�s hand- book. 2d ed. St. Louis: Mosby, 1997:554-78.

9. McMurray TP. The semilunar cartilage. Br J Surg 1942;29:407-14.

10. Stiell IG, Wells GA, Hoag RH, Sivilotti ML, Cacciotti TF, Verbeek PR, et al. Implementation of the Ottawa knee rule for the use of radiography in acute knee injuries. JAMA 1997;278:2075-9.

11. Stiell IG, Greenberg GH, Wells GA, McKnight RD, Cwinn AA, Caciotti T, et al. Derivation of a decision rule for the use of radiography in acute knee injuries. Ann Emerg Med 1995;26:405-13.

12. Sartoris DJ, Resnick D. Plain film radiography: rou- tine and specialized techniques and projections. In: Resnick D, ed. Diagnosis of bone and joint disor- ders. 3d ed. Philadelphia: Saunders:1-40.

13. Schenck RC Jr, Goodnight JM. Osteochondritis dis- secans. J Bone Joint Surg [Am] 1996;78:439-56.

Close Accordion

What is a Quadriceps Tendon Rupture?

What is a Quadriceps Tendon Rupture?

The tendons are powerful soft tissues which connect the muscles to the bones. One of these tendons, the quadriceps tendon, works together with the muscles found at the front of the thigh in order to straighten the leg. A quadriceps tendon rupture can affect an individual’s quality of life.

A quadriceps tendon rupture can be a debilitating injury and it usually requires rehabilitation and surgical interventions to restore knee function. These type of injuries are rare. Quadriceps tendon ruptures commonly occur among athletes who perform jumping or running sports.

Quadriceps Tendon Rupture Description

The four quadriceps muscles come together above the kneecap, or patella, to form the quadriceps tendon. The quadriceps tendon joins the quadriceps muscles into the patella. The patella is connected to the shinbone, or tibia, by the patellar tendon. Working collectively, the quadriceps muscles, the quadriceps tendon, and the patellar tendon, straighten the knee.

A quadriceps tendon rupture can be partial or complete. Many partial tears don’t completely disrupt the soft tissues. However, a full tear will divide the soft tissues�into two parts. If the quadriceps tendon ruptures entirely, the muscle is no longer attached to the kneecap or patella. As a result, the knee is unable to straighten�out when the quadriceps muscles contract.

Quadriceps Tendon Rupture Causes

A quadriceps tendon rupture frequently occurs due to an increased load on the leg where the foot is planted and the knee is somewhat flexed. By way of instance, when landing from an awkward jump, the power is too much for the soft tissues to bear, causing a partial or complete tear. Tears may also be due to falls, direct impacts to the knee, and lacerations or cuts.

A weakened quadriceps tendon is also more likely to rupture. Several factors may result in tendon weakness, including quadriceps tendinitis, the inflammation of the quadriceps tendon, called quadriceps tendinitis. Quadriceps tendinitis is one of the most common sports injuries in athletes who participate in sports or physicial�activities which involve jumping.

Weakened soft tissues may also be brought on by diseases that interrupt blood flow to the knee or patella. Utilizing corticosteroids and some antibiotics have also been connected to weakness associated with quadriceps tendon ruptures. Immobilization for an extended period of time can also decrease strength in the quadriceps tendons. Finally, quadriceps tendon ruptures can occur due to dislocations and/or surgery.

Quadriceps Tendon Rupture Symptoms

A popping or tearing feeling is one of the most common symptoms associated with a quadriceps tendon rupture. Pain followed by swelling and inflammation of the knee�might make the individual unable to straighten out their knee. Other symptoms of a quadriceps tendon rupture include:

  • An indentation at the top of the kneecap or patella of the affected site
  • Bruising
  • Tenderness
  • Cramping
  • Sagging or drooping of the kneecap or patella where the tendon tore
  • Difficulty walking because the knee is buckling or giving away

 

 

Quadriceps Tendon Rupture Evaluation

The healthcare professional will perform an evaluation to diagnose a quadriceps tendon rupture by first discussing the patient’s symptoms�and medical history.�After talking about the patient’s symptoms and medical history, the doctor will conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the knee.

To ascertain the precise cause of the patient’s symptoms, the healthcare professional will examine how well it is possible to stretch, or straighten,�the knee. Although this area of the evaluation can be debilitating, it’s essential to diagnose a quadriceps tendon rupture.

To verify a quadriceps tendon rupture diagnosis, the doctor may order some imaging tests, like an x-ray or magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, scan. The kneecap moves from place once the quadriceps tendon ruptures. This can be quite evident on a sideways x-ray perspective of the knee.

Complete tears may frequently be identified with x-rays alone. The MRI can reveal the quantity of tendon torn along with the positioning of the tear. From time to time, an MRI will also rule out another injury with similar symptoms. Diagnostic imaging is helpful in the evaluation of sports injuries.

Dr Jimenez White Coat

The quadriceps tendon is the large tendon found just above the kneecap, or patella, which allows us to straighten out our knee. While the quadriceps tendon is a strong, fibrous cord which can withstand tremendous amounts of force, sports injuries or other health issues may lead to a quadriceps tendon rupture. Quadriceps tendon ruptures are debilitating problems which can affect a patient’s quality of life.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Quadriceps Tendon Rupture Treatment

Non-Surgical Treatment

A majority of partial tears react well to non-surgical treatment approaches. The doctor may advise the patient to utilize a knee immobilizer or brace to allow the quadriceps tendon to heal. Crutches will help avoid placing weight onto the leg. A knee immobilizer or brace is used�for 3 to 6 months.

Once the initial pain, swelling, and inflammation have�decreased, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care and physical therapy, can be utilized. A doctor of chiropractic, or chiropractor, utilizes spinal adjustments and manual manipulations to carefully correct any spinal misalignments, or subluxations, which may be causing problems.

Furthermore, chiropractic care and physical therapy can provide lifestyle modifications, including physical activity and exercise programs to help speed up the recovery process. The patient may be recommended a variety of stretches and exercises to improve strength, flexibility and mobility. The healthcare professional will determine when it’s safe to return-to-play.

Surgical Treatment

Many individuals with complete tears require surgery to repair a quadriceps tendon rupture. Surgical interventions depend on the patient’s age, actions, and prior level of function. Surgery for quadriceps tendon ruptures involves re-attaching the tendon to the kneecap or patella. Surgery is carried out with regional spinal anesthetic or general anesthetic.

To reattach the tendon, sutures are put in the tendon and then threaded through drill holes at the kneecap. The stitches are attached in the base of the kneecap. The�physician will tie the sutures to find the ideal tension in the kneecap or patella. This will also make sure that the place of the kneecap closely matches that of the uninjured patella or kneecap.

A knee immobilizer, brace or a long leg cast may be utilized following the surgery. The patient may be allowed to set weight on their leg by means of crutches. Stretches and exercises are added into a rehabilitation program by a chiropractor or physical therapist after a surgical intervention.

The precise timeline for chiropractic care and physical therapy following a surgery for those patients that require it will be individualized personally. The patient’s rehabilitation program will be contingent upon the kind of tear, their surgery, medical condition, along with other requirements.

Conclusion

The majority of patients can return to their original routines after recovering from a quadriceps tendon rupture. The individual’s return will be addressed very carefully by the healthcare professional.�The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900�.

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Relieving Knee Pain without Surgery

Knee pain is a well-known symptom which can occur due to a variety of knee injuries and/or conditions, including�sports injuries. The knee is one of the most complex joints in the human body as it is made-up of the intersection of four bones, four ligaments, various tendons, two menisci, and cartilage. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, the most common causes of knee pain include patellar subluxation, patellar tendinitis or jumper’s knee, and Osgood-Schlatter disease. Although knee pain is most likely to occur in people over 60 years old, knee pain can also occur in children and adolescents. Knee pain can be treated at home following the RICE methods, however, severe knee injuries may require immediate medical attention, including chiropractic care.

 

 

 

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Acute Injury Management: What Does the Acronym PRICE Stand For?

Acute Injury Management: What Does the Acronym PRICE Stand For?

When dealing with a sports injury or a similar type of injury, many people are familiar with the R.I.C.E. protocol for injury care. R.I.C.E. stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation and has long been used when treating everything from sprained ankles to banged up knees. With acute injury patients, experts recommend adding �P� for protection because of the protection of the area is vital in the healing process. It is crucial that this is implemented as soon after the injury as possible and it should be maintained for anywhere from 24 hours to 72 hours afterward. Of course, this depends on the severity of the injury.

P is for Protection: Injuries hurt and pain can be a good thing because it prevents you from further injuring that area. It encourages you to protect it.

It is essential to listen to your body and protect the injured area through full or partial immobilization and restricted use. The way you do this depends on the body part.

An arm or shoulder injury can be protected with the use of a sling. An ankle injury may require a brace or splint, and you may have to avoid or limit weight bearing for a while. This means using crutches a walker, or a cane.

R is for Rest: The body needs rest to heal. This could mean complete rest, but in many cases, it means what is known as �relative rest.� This means that it allows for enough rest to heal but is not entirely restrictive which could slow or inhibit recovery.

This means avoiding activities that are stressful to the area to the point that they cause pain or that they might compromise healing. Many times, though, some movement is a good thing, even beneficial. Some gentle movements can speed recovery.

Isometric contractions of the muscles and joints that surround the injury and even some range of motion exercises can help. The key is to keep the movements gentle and to listen to your body for guidance on how much and how far to push.

acute injury management chiropractic care el paso, tx.

I is for Ice: Cryotherapy or cold treatments can come in the form of actual ice, or there can be other types such as a cold soak. When treating acute injuries at home, the best known, and probably most straightforward way is to put some crushed ice in a freezer bag with a zip lock closure and wrap it in a small towel to keep the pack from directly touching the skin.

Frozen vegetables, like green beans, peas, or edamame work well too � remember to use the towel as a barrier between the skin and the pack. You should not use the pack more than 10 to 15 minutes as a time. The recommended cycle is 10 to 15 minutes on and 1 to 2 hours off.

In some cases, you may not be able to apply ice directly to the site. In those cases, you can use the pack at the joint above the affected area. For instance, a tightly wrapped ankle can still benefit from ice, you just apply the ice pack to the back on the knee on the same leg.

C is for Compression: A compression wrap can offer mild support and reduce swelling. Typically, an elastic bandage is used to compress or apply pressure to the injured tissue.

When applying a compression bandage, start it several inches below the area that is injured. It should be applied directly to your skin.

Use some tension as you wrap, but not to the point that it cuts off circulation (characterized by tingling or numbness and the soft tissue should not change color). Wrap the bandage in a figure eight configuration or spiral, depending on the area, stopping a few inches above the injury.

E is for Elevation: When an injured joint or extremity is not elevated, fluid can pool in the area and swelling can occur. This can lead to increased pain and limited range of motion. Elevation helps prevent these things from happening and can even help to speed up recovery.

The key to elevation is positioning the injured area at a level that is above the heart. The most effective way to accomplish this is to keep the area elevated as much as possible while awake and prop it up with pillows while sleeping for at least the first 24 to 48 hours. Some injuries may require more time though, so listen to your body.

Skateboarding Injury Treatment

What is Knee Plica Syndrome?

What is Knee Plica Syndrome?

The knee is a made up of a variety of complex soft tissues. Enclosing the knee joint is a fold at its membrane known as the plica. The knee is encapsulated�by a fluid-filled structure called the synovial membrane. Three of these capsules, known as the synovial plicae, develop around the knee joint throughout the fetal stage and are absorbed before birth.

However, during one research study in 2006, researchers found that 95 percent of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery had remnants of their synovial plicae. Knee plica syndrome occurs when the plica becomes inflamed, generally due to sports injuries.�This often takes place in the center of the kneecap, known as medial patellar plica syndrome.

What are the Symptoms of Knee Plica Syndrome?

The most common symptom of knee plica syndrome is knee pain, although a variety of health issues can also cause these symptoms. Knee pain associated with knee plica syndrome is generally: achy, instead of sharp or shooting; and worse when using stairs, squatting, or bending. Other symptoms of knee plica syndrome can also include the following:�

  • a catching or locking sensation on the�knee while getting up from a chair after sitting for an extended period of time,
  • difficulty sitting for extended intervals,
  • a cracking or clicking noise when bending or stretching the knee,
  • a feeling that the knee is slowly giving out,
  • a sense of instability on slopes and stairs,
  • and may feel swollen plica when pushing on the knee cap.

What are the Causes of Knee Plica Syndrome?

Knee plica syndrome is commonly caused as�a result of an excess of stress or pressure being placed on the knee or due to overuse. This can be brought on by physical activities and exercises which require the individual to bend and extend the knee like running, biking, or utilizing a stair-climbing machine. An automobile accident injury or�a�slip-and-fall accident can also cause knee plica syndrome.

Dr Jimenez White Coat

Knee plica syndrome, commonly referred to as medial patellar plica syndrome, is a health issue which occurs when the plica, a structure which surrounds the synovial capsule of the knee, becomes irritated and inflamed. Knee plica syndrome can occur due to sports injuries, automobile accident injuries, and slip-and-fall accidents, among other types of health issues. The symptoms of knee plica syndrome may commonly be mistaken for chondromalacia patella. Diagnostic imaging can help diagnose the problem to continue with treatment.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

How is Knee Plica Syndrome Diagnosed?

In order to diagnose medial patellar plica syndrome, the healthcare professional will first perform a physical examination. They will use the evaluation to rule out any other potential causes of knee pain, such as a torn meniscus, tendonitis, and broken bones or fractures. Be sure to talk to your doctor about any physical activities you participate in along with any recent health issues. The healthcare professional might also utilize an X-ray or MRI to have a better look at your knee.

 

 

What is the Treatment for Knee Plica Syndrome?�

Most instances of medial patellar plica syndrome respond well to alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, physical therapy or even a physical activity or exercise plan at home. Chiropractic care uses spinal adjustments and manual manipulations to safely and effectively correct a variety of health issues associated with the musculoskeletal and nervous system. Moreover, chiropractic care and physical therapy can include a series of stretches and exercises to help restore strength, mobility, and flexibility to the hamstrings and quadriceps. These stretches and exercises are described below.

Quadriceps Strengthening

The medial plica is attached to the quadriceps, a major muscle on the thighs. An individual with weakened quadriceps has a higher chance of developing knee plica syndrome. You can strengthen your quadriceps by performing the stretches and exercises as follow:

  • quadriceps sets or muscle tightening
  • straight leg raises
  • leg presses
  • mini-squats
  • biking, swimming, walking, or use an elliptical machine.

Hamstring Stretching

The hamstrings are the muscles which extend down the back of the thighs, from the pelvis to the shin bone. These help flex the knee. Tight hamstrings place more stress and pressure on the front of the knee, or the plica. A chiropractor or physical therapist will guide the patient through numerous stretches and exercises which may help unwind the nerves. As soon as the patient learns these moves, they may perform them a few times each day to keep the muscles relaxed.

Corticosteroid Injections

Some healthcare professionals may provide corticosteroid injections for the knee if the pain and inflammation causes a restriction in function. Corticosteroid injections can help temporarily reduce painful symptoms, however, it’s essential for the patient to continue with treatment to heal knee plica syndrome. The painful symptoms may return when the corticosteroid burns off if not treated.

Surgery

If chiropractic care, physical therapy, or the treatment described above does not help heal knee plica syndrome, a procedure known as arthroscopic resection may be needed. To perform this process, the doctor will insert a small camera, called an arthroscope, via a tiny cut at the side of the knee. Small surgical instruments are then inserted through a second small cut to take out the plica or correct its position.

After surgery, your doctor will consult with a chiropractor or physical therapist for a rehabilitation program.�Recovering from surgery for knee plica syndrome is dependent upon many factors, including the patient’s overall health and wellness. The patient may recover within a few days in case the knee has been changed. Remember to wair a few weeks before returning to a routine levels of exercise and physical activity.

Living with Knee Plica Syndrome

Plica syndrome is generally easy to treat with chiropractic care, physical therapy,�and other treatment approaches, as described above. Should you need surgery, the approach is minimally invasive and requires less recovery compared to a number of different types of knee surgery.

Talk to your healthcare professional to determine the best treatment choice for your knee plica syndrome. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900�.

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Relieving Knee Pain without Surgery

Knee pain is a well-known symptom which can occur due to a variety of knee injuries and/or conditions, including�sports injuries. The knee is one of the most complex joints in the human body as it is made-up of the intersection of four bones, four ligaments, various tendons, two menisci, and cartilage. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, the most common causes of knee pain include patellar subluxation, patellar tendinitis or jumper’s knee, and Osgood-Schlatter disease. Although knee pain is most likely to occur in people over 60 years old, knee pain can also occur in children and adolescents. Knee pain can be treated at home following the RICE methods, however, severe knee injuries may require immediate medical attention, including chiropractic care.

 

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EXTRA EXTRA | IMPORTANT TOPIC: El Paso, TX Chiropractor Recommended

What is Chondromalacia Patellae?

What is Chondromalacia Patellae?

Chondromalacia patellae, also referred to as runner’s knee, is a health issue in which the cartilage beneath the patella,�or kneecap, becomes soft�and ultimately degenerates. This problem is prevalent among young athletes,�however, it may also develop in older adults who suffer from arthritis of the knee.

Sports injuries like chondromalacia patellae are frequently regarded as an overuse injury. Taking some time off from participating in physical activities and exercise may produce superior outcomes. In the instance that the individual’s health issues are due to improper knee alignment, rest may not offer pain relief. Symptoms of runner’s knee include knee pain and grinding sensations.

What Causes Chondromalacia Patellae?

The kneecap,�or the patella, is generally found through the front of the knee joint. If you bend your knee, the rear end of your kneecap slips over the cartilage of your femur, or thigh bone, at the knee. Complex soft tissues, such as tendons and ligaments, connect the kneecap to the shinbone and thigh muscle. Chondromalacia patellae�can commonly occur when any of these structures fail to move accordingly, causing the kneecap to rub against the�thigh bone. Poor kneecap motion may result from:

  • Misalignment due to a congenital health issue
  • Weakened hamstrings and quadriceps, or the muscles of the thighs
  • Muscle imbalance between the adductors and abductors, the muscles on the inside and outside of the thighs
  • Continuous pressure to the knee joints from certain physical activities and exercise like running, skiing, or jumping
  • a direct blow or injury for a kneecap

Who is at Risk for Chondromalacia Patellae?

Below is an assortment of factors which may increase an individual’s chance for developing chondromalacia patellae.

Age

Adolescents and young adults have the highest risk for this health issue. During growth spurts, bones and muscles can often grow too rapidly, causing short-term muscle and bone imbalances in the human body.

Gender

Females are more likely than males to develop runner’s knee, because women generally possess less muscle mass than men. This may result in abnormal knee placement, and more lateral pressure on the kneecap.

Flat Feet

Individuals who have flat feet can add more strain to the knee joints as compared to individuals who have higher arches.

Past Injury

Previous injuries to the kneecap, including a dislocation, can raise the chance of developing chondromalacia patellae.

Increased Physical Activity

Increased levels of physical activities and exercise can place pressure on the knee joints, which may raise the risk for knee issues.

Arthritis

Runner’s knee may also be an indication of arthritis, a well-known problem causing pain and inflammation to the tissue and joint. Swelling can prevent the proper function of the knee and its complex structures.

What are the Symptoms of Chondromalacia Patellae?

Chondromalacia patellae will generally present as pain in the knee, called patellofemoral pain, accompanied by sensations of cracking or grinding when extending or bending the knee. Pain may worsen after sitting for an extended period of time or through physical activities and exercises that apply intense pressure for your knees, like standing. It’s essential for the individual to seek immediate medical attention if the symptoms of chondromalacia patellae, or runner’s knee, do not resolve on their own.

 

 

Diagnosis and Chondromalacia Patellae Grading

A healthcare professional will search for areas of pain and inflammation on the knee. They might also look at the way the kneecap aligns with the thigh bone. A misalignment may indicate the presence of chondromalacia patellae. The doctor may also perform a series of evaluations to ascertain the presence of this health issue.

The healthcare professional may also ask for any of the following tests to help diagnose chondromalacia patellae, including:�x-rays to show bone damage or misalignments or arthritis; magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, to see cartilage wear and tear; and�arthroscopic examination, a minimally invasive procedure which involves inserting an endoscope and camera inside the knee joint.

Grading

There are four levels of chondromalacia patellae, ranging from grade 1 to 4, which characterize the level of the patient’s runner’s knee. Grade 1 is considered mild while grade�4 is considered severe.

  • Grade 1 indicates the softening of the cartilage in the knee region.
  • Grade 2 suggests a softening of the cartilage followed by abnormal surface features, the start of degeneration.
  • Grade 3 reveals the thinning of the cartilage together with active degeneration of the complex soft tissues of the knee.
  • Grade 4, or the most severe grade, demonstrates exposure of the bone through a substantial part of the cartilage Bone exposure means that bone-to-bone rubbing is most likely happening in the knee.

What is the Treatment for Chondromalacia Patellae?

The goal of treatment for chondromalacia patellae is to first decrease the strain being placed on the kneecap, or patella, and the femur, or thigh bone. Rest and the use of ice and heat agains the affected knee joint is generally the first line of treatment. The cartilage damage associated with runner’s knee may often repair itself with these remedies along.

Moreover, the healthcare professional may prescribe anti-inflammatory drugs and/or medications, such as ibuprofen, to decrease pain and inflammation around the knee joint. When tenderness, swelling, and pain persist, the following treatment options could be explored. As mentioned above, individuals should seek immediate medical attention if symptoms persist.�

Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic care is a safe and effective, alternative treatment option which focuses on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of a variety of injuries and/or conditions associated with the musculoskeletal and nervous system, including chondromalacia patellae. Occasionally,�knee pain may originate due to spinal misalignments or subluxations. A doctor of chiropractic, or chiropractor, will use spinal adjustments and manual manipulations to carefully restore the natural integrity of the spine.�

Furthermore, a chiropractor may also recommend a series of lifestyle modifications, including nutritional advice and a physical activity or exercise guide to help ease symptoms associated with chondromalacia patellae. Rehabilitation may also focus on�strengthening the quadriceps, hamstrings, adductors, and abductors to improve muscular strength, flexibility, and mobility. The purpos of muscle balance is also to assist in preventing knee misalignment, among other complications.

Surgery

Arthroscopic surgery might be required to inspect the joint and ascertain whether there is a misalignment of the knee. This operation involves inserting a camera in the knee joint through a very small incision. A surgical procedure can repair the issue. One�common process is a lateral release. This surgery involves cutting a number of the ligaments to release tension and permit for more movement. Additional surgery may entail implanting the back of the kneecap, inserting a cartilage graft, or transferring the thigh muscle.

Dr Jimenez White Coat

Chondromalacia patellae is characterized as the inflammation of the underside of the patella, or kneecap, caused by the softening of the cartilage surrounding the soft tissues of the knee joint. This well-known health issue is generally caused due to sports injuries in young athletes, although chondromalacia patellae may also occur in older adults with arthritis in the knee. Chiropractic care can help restore strength and balance to the knee joint and its surrounding soft tissues.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

How to Prevent Chondromalacia Patellae

A patient can ultimately lower their chance of developing runner’s knee, or chondromalacia patellae, by:�

  • Avoiding repeated stress on the knees. In case the individual needs to spend time on their knees, they could wear kneepads.
  • Produce muscle balance by strengthening the quadriceps, hamstrings, abductors, and adductors.
  • Wear shoe inserts that correct flat feet. This may reduce the amount of pressure being placed on the knees to realign the kneecap, or patella.

Keeping a healthy body weight can also help prevent chondromalacia patellae. Following the nutritional advice and guidance from a healthcare profesional can help promote a healthy body weight. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900�.

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Relieving Knee Pain without Surgery

Knee pain is a well-known symptom which can occur due to a variety of knee injuries and/or conditions, including�sports injuries. The knee is one of the most complex joints in the human body as it is made-up of the intersection of four bones, four ligaments, various tendons, two menisci, and cartilage. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, the most common causes of knee pain include patellar subluxation, patellar tendinitis or jumper’s knee, and Osgood-Schlatter disease. Although knee pain is most likely to occur in people over 60 years old, knee pain can also occur in children and adolescents. Knee pain can be treated at home following the RICE methods, however, severe knee injuries may require immediate medical attention, including chiropractic care.

 

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