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Back Clinic Conditions Treated. Chronic Pain, Auto Accident Care, Back Pain, Low Back Pain, Back Injuries, Sciatica, Neck Pain, Work Injuries, Personal Injuries, Sports Injuries, Migraine Headaches, Scoliosis, Complex Herniated Discs, Fibromyalgia, Wellness & Nutrition, Stress Management, and Complex Injuries.

At El Paso’s Chiropractic Rehabilitation Clinic & Integrated Medicine Center, we are focused on treating patients after debilitating injuries and chronic pain syndromes. We focus on improving your ability through flexibility, mobility, and agility programs tailored for all age groups and disabilities.

If Dr. Alex Jimenez feels you need other treatment, then you will be referred to a clinic or Physician that is best suited for you. Dr. Jimenez has teamed with the top surgeons, clinical specialists, medical researchers, and premiere rehabilitation providers to bring El Paso the top clinical treatments to our community. Providing the top non-invasive protocols is our priority. Clinical insight is what our patients demand in order to give them the appropriate care required. For answers to any questions you may have please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900


Ankylosing Spondylitis and Brain Fog: El Paso Back Clinic

Ankylosing Spondylitis and Brain Fog: El Paso Back Clinic

Ankylosing spondylitis, or AS, is a type of inflammatory arthritis that usually impacts the spine, causing back stiffness and pain, pain in the hips, and decreased range of motion. Brain fog can also be a symptom of AS and other chronic inflammatory conditions. Brain fog can affect memory, concentration, decision-making, learning, and problem-solving. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic can educate on the causes of ankylosing spondylitis brain fog and how to reduce its effects.

Ankylosing Spondylitis and Brain Fog: Injury Medical ChiropracticBrain Fog

Experts do not fully understand how conditions like AS cause brain fog and how it affects the brain and central nervous system. However, they believe brain fog is linked to chronic inflammation and pain associated with the condition, along with certain factors.

Chronic Inflammation

  • Inflammation occurs when the body’s immune system attacks healthy cells.
  • This triggers the release of inflammation-causing cytokines.
  • Cytokines can interfere with normal brain function.

Ankylosing Spondylitis Chronic Pain

  • Chronic pain can cause fatigue and unhealthy sleep quality.
  • Fatigue and poor sleep can worsen chronic pain, leading to intense fatigue and extreme sleep issues, becoming a vicious cycle.

Corticosteroids

  • Doctors typically treat ankylosing spondylitis with corticosteroids.
  • Individuals with cardiovascular risk factors have an increased risk of brain fog from the medications.

Depression

  • Individuals with AS can present symptoms of depression, which has been linked to cognitive impairment.
  • Depression can contribute to the development of brain fog.

Other Medical Conditions

Other Possible Causes

  • Stress
  • Sleep problems
  • Little to no physical activity or exercise.
  • Pregnancy
  • Menopause
  • Antidepressants
  • Chemotherapy

Effects

The effects of brain fog.

  • Thoughts are blurry and difficult to recall.
  • There are major lapses in concentration.
  • Thinking is harder.
  • There is constant confusion.
  • More effort is required to maintain thoughts in short-term memory.
  • Constantly forgetting what to do.

Chiropractic Care

Doctors recommend a multidisciplinary approach to manage AS brain fog. This includes:

  • An anti-inflammatory nutrition plan.
  • Ergonomic adjustments
  • Regular physical activity and exercise.
  • Mental exercises
  • Concurrent treatment with a rheumatologist in combination with chiropractic care.
  • Chiropractic care focuses on improving joint mobility and the function of the musculoskeletal system.
  • Manual and instrument-assisted adjustments are paired with the following:
  • Soft-tissue therapies
  • Non-surgical spinal decompression
  • Health Coaching
  • Fitness Coaching
  • Nutritional recommendations

Brain Cognition


References

Chiropractic. (2019). nccih.nih.gov/health/chiropractic

Cornelson, Stacey M et al. “Chiropractic Care in the Management of Inactive Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case Series.” Journal of chiropractic medicine vol. 16,4 (2017): 300-307. doi:10.1016/j.jcm.2017.10.002

Creaky Joints. (September 17, 2018) “You can ease inflammatory arthritis brain fog with these 12 tips for a sharper mind.” creakyjoints.org/living-with-arthritis/arthritis-brain-fog/

Vitturi, Bruno Kusznir et al. “Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.” The Canadian journal of neurological sciences. Le journal canadien des sciences neurologiques vol. 47,2 (2020): 219-225. doi:10.1017/cjn.2020.14

Zhang, Jun-Ming, and Jianxiong An. “Cytokines, inflammation, and pain.” International anesthesiology clinics vol. 45,2 (2007): 27-37. doi:10.1097/AIA.0b013e318034194e

Issues In Your Calves? It Might Be Trigger Points In The Soleus Muscles

Issues In Your Calves? It Might Be Trigger Points In The Soleus Muscles

Introduction

The calves are extremely important to the lower portions of the legs as they allow the individual to move around and help stabilize the entire body. The calves have two muscles: the gastrocnemius and the soleus, which provide plantarflexion and stability at the ankle joint. These two muscles work together to ensure that the upper body’s weight doesn’t lean forward too much to let the individual fall. However, when many people overuse the calf muscles constantly, it can cause the muscle fibers in the lower legs to be overstretched and develop small nodules known as trigger points to cause referred pain to the calves and the ankles that can affect a person’s ability to walk, run, or jump. Today’s article looks at the soleus muscle, how trigger points affect the muscle, and different methods to reduce pain while managing trigger points along the calves. We refer patients to certified providers that incorporate various techniques in the lower body extremities, like lower leg and calve pain therapies correlating to trigger points, to aid many people dealing with pain symptoms along the soleus muscles, causing muscle cramps and issues along the ankles. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent way when asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request and understanding. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

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What Is The Soleus Muscle?

 

Do you feel a cramping sensation in your calves? Do your feet hurt when you are walking, jumping, or running? Or are you experiencing tightness in your calve muscles? When a person is experiencing calf pain in their legs, it could be trigger points causing overlapping issues in the soleus muscles. As stated earlier, the calves have two muscles: the gastrocnemius and the soleus. The gastrocnemius makes up the round shape of the calves and is a complex, superficial muscle. At the same time, the soleus is a large, flat muscle deep within the gastrocnemius and forms the calcaneal tendon (Achilles tendon), which can be mistaken as a nerve for the ankle. Studies reveal that the soleus muscle works together with the gastrocnemius, and these muscles constitute a plantar flexor. The soleus is part of a group of muscles known as antigravity muscles. It acts like a skeletal muscle and helps maintain good posture in the body to prevent the sheer body weight from falling forwards at the ankle when standing.

 

How Do Trigger Points Affect The Soleus Muscle?

 

The calves are essential for the movement and mobility functions of the body. When the calve muscles have been overused to repetitive movements or have been dealing with trauma, it can cause the muscle fibers to tear and develop trigger points along the calves causing referred pain to travel down the ankles. Trigger points along the soleus muscle are tricky to diagnose since they cause referred pain to the surrounding muscles. “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., mention that, unlike the latent trigger points that can affect the gastrocnemius, active trigger points can affect the soleus muscle and cause tenderness referred to the heel. When muscle tenderness affects the heels, it can cause trigger points to mimic chronic conditions like plantar fasciitis. Additional studies reveal that musculoskeletal impairments like trigger points in the soleus muscle could potentially lead to biomechanical changes in the ankle. When trigger points cause hypersensitivity spots in the skeletal muscle taut band, it can restrict the soleus muscle to allow ankle dorsiflexion. Individuals with active soleus trigger points are prone to develop low back pain due to ankle dorsiflexion restriction, leading to them leaning over and lifting objects improperly.

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Soleus – Video

Have you been dealing with pain traveling down from your calves to your ankles? Experiencing stiffness around your ankles? Or do you feel like you are about to fall? These pain-like issues are associated with trigger points along the soleus muscles along the calves. The soleus is one of the two muscles (the other is the gastrocnemius) that make up the calves and acts as a skeletal muscle to help maintain good posture in the body. When trigger points affect the soleus muscle, they can cause referred pain to the calves and mimic chronic issues like plantar fasciitis at the ankles. The video above explains where the soleus muscles are located, deep within the gastrocnemius, where the trigger points are causing referred pain to the ankles, and where they are in the soleus muscle fibers in the calves. Even though trigger points can cause referred pain in the affected muscle fibers of the body, they are treatable and can be managed through different methods to help the calves.


Different Methods To Reduce Pain And Manage Trigger Points In The Calves

 

Even though trigger points can affect the soleus muscles and cause referred pain to the ankles, different methods can reduce the pain and help manage trigger points in the calves. Studies reveal that when there are multitudes of therapies that can help manage trigger points, it can help reduce the pain affecting the soleus muscle by optimizing muscle function and preventing the development of chronic pain syndromes. Besides therapies that target trigger points, corrective actions and stretches can help release the pain from the soleus muscle. Incorporating calf stretches, having a correct posture when sitting down, wearing long loose socks while sleeping, and wearing low heels can prevent the soleus muscle from shortening and help manage trigger points from re-occurring in the calves. When people start to take care of their calve muscles, it can help their mobility and stability at the ankles.

 

Conclusion

As part of the calf muscles and an antigravity muscle, the soleus works with the gastrocnemius to help with stability and plantarflexion to the ankles. This muscle is deep within the gastrocnemius and helps maintain good posture in the body that prevents a person from falling forward at the ankles when standing. When the soleus muscles have been overused, they can develop tiny knots in the muscle fibers known as trigger points that can cause referred pain to the ankles. Trigger points along the soleus muscles can cause overlapping features in the calves by restricting ankle dorsiflexion, causing individuals to develop low back pain associated with leaning forward. However, various therapies can manage trigger points through multiple treatments that can reduce the pain and allow stability back to the calves, enabling the individual to continue walking without feeling pain.

 

References

Binstead, Justin T, et al. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Calf – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 May 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459362/.

Jurkovicova, Emma. “Soleus Muscle.” Kenhub, Kenhub, 14 Feb. 2022, www.kenhub.com/en/library/anatomy/soleus-muscle.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Valera-Calero, Juan Antonio, et al. “Prediction Model of Soleus Muscle Depth Based on Anthropometric Features: Potential Applications for Dry Needling.” Diagnostics (Basel, Switzerland), U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 May 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7277950/.

Disclaimer

Peroneal Muscles, Weak Ankles, & Trigger Points

Peroneal Muscles, Weak Ankles, & Trigger Points

Introduction

The ankles and the lower legs have a casual relationship by allowing movement to the foot that causes an up-and-down motion. The lower leg has various muscles and tendons that surround the shin bone and allows the feet to take the body from one location to another. The peroneal muscles in the legs allow ankle stability to ensure that the weight from the host’s body doesn’t cause overload to the legs and ankles. However, factors like obesity, trauma, or overexerting can cause the peroneal muscles to be inflamed and develop issues like weak ankles or trigger points that can cause referred pain to the ankles and affect how a person walks. Today’s article examines the peroneal muscles, how weak ankles correlate with trigger points, and ways to strengthen the ankles while managing trigger points. We refer patients to certified providers that incorporate various techniques in the lower body extremities, like lower leg and ankle pain therapies correlating to trigger points, to aid many people dealing with pain symptoms along the peroneal muscles, causing weak ankles. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent way when asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request and understanding. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

pelvic-pain-mayo-clinic_635d9698

The Peroneal Muscles On The Ankles

Have you been experiencing pain when walking around constantly? What about feeling a sharp or dull ache in the back or side of your legs? Or do you feel like falling when you are just standing around? Many people experiencing these issues on their legs and ankles could be dealing with trigger points along the peroneal muscles in the ankles. The peroneal muscles consist of two muscles in the lateral compartment of the lower legs: the peroneus longus and peroneus brevis. The peroneus longus is an important long muscle in the lower legs as it is at the top of the fibula and then runs down the outer leg while connecting to the foot. One of the primary functions of the peroneus longus is allowing plantarflex and evert the foot at the ankle. This means that the peroneus longus helps provide motor strength and range of motion to the ankles. 

 

 

The peroneus brevis is one of the shorter peroneal muscles in the legs that go down to the ankles and provides assistance to allow eversion to the foot and plantarflexion to the ankles. This shorter muscle is important since the ankle joint is relatively mobile and needs stability from the surrounding ligaments and muscles. These two muscles work together for ankle stability when walking and positioning when the body is moving. Studies reveal that depending on a person’s environment, the peroneal muscles allow support and stability to the ankle in various positions. A good example is if the foot is placed in a sloped position, the peroneal muscles and the surrounding ligaments help stabilize the ankle so it won’t induce pain, causing the individual not to fall over. 

 

Weak Ankles & Trigger Points

 

When factors like obesity, trauma, or injuries begin to affect the lower half of the body, it can cause instability in the legs and cause the surrounding muscles, tendons, and ligaments to be overstretched, take on more of an overload to the legs, or suffer from a muscle or tendon tear. These factors are associated with various issues that can invoke pain along with developing trigger points along the lower legs. When there are issues in the peroneal muscles, it can lead to muscle weakness in the ankles or “weak ankles,” which causes instability in the body and causes the individual to sprain their ankles. Studies reveal that when the peroneal tendons have a tear in the lower extremities, it can lead to lateral ankle pain that is often missed when examined. However, to that point, if the incision has been left untreated, it can lead to persistent ankle pain, instability, and ankle dysfunction. In “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., stated that when individuals suffer from weak ankles or have an ankle sprain, active trigger points can cause pain and tenderness to the ankles and cause the person to become unstable. If left untreated, it can cause them to lose balance and have foot drop and ankle fractures to their foot. The book also mentioned that any ruptures in the tendons and muscles might cause lateral compartment syndrome. When there is instability in the ankles, many people resort to using mobility aids like a cane or a walker to be mobile to compensate for the function lost in their feet.

 


Trigger Point Therapy On The Peroneal Muscles- Video

Do you feel the pain from the bottom of your feet to your ankles? Does it hurt to walk around for a short period? Or have you sprained your ankle, and there is a dull ache when you try to rotate? Some ankle issues are associated with trigger points affecting the peroneal muscles. The peroneal muscles help the lower legs by allowing eversion to the foot and plantarflexion to the ankles. The two muscles that make up the peroneal muscles are the peroneus longus and the peroneus brevis, and they, along with the other tendons and ligaments, help with ankle stability. Since the ankle is a mobile joint, it can succumb to sprains, tears, and instability in the body, allowing trigger points to develop and causing even more issues. The great news is that there are ways to manage trigger points along the peroneal muscles and reduce ankle instability. The video above shows where the peroneal muscles are located on the leg, where the trigger points are, and how to use K-tape to help support the ankle and prevent more injuries on this moveable joint.


Strengthening The Ankles & Managing Trigger Points

 

Instability in the ankles can be a bummer to many individuals that are on the move, but when it comes to treatment, it can prevent future injuries from re-occurring. Studies reveal that when pain specialists incorporate joint mobilization techniques and dry needling therapy into their patients, it can allow them to reduce the pain and disability to the ankles, thus managing the trigger points along the peroneal muscles. Another way many people can reduce pain in their peroneal muscles is by incorporating stretches and exercises to strengthen their ankles. This allows the peroneal muscles to be loose and gently stretched while slowly strengthening the ankles in a semi-lock position. When people utilize these techniques on their legs and ankles, it can bring mobility and stability back to the body without fear of falling or causing more issues in the ankles. 

 

Conclusion

As one of the most mobile skeletal joints in the lower body, the ankles work together with the legs to provide mobility and stability to the body. The lower legs have various muscles, tendons, and ligaments that travel down and help support the legs and ankles. One of the muscles that provide that support is the peroneal muscle. The peroneal muscles consist of two muscles known as the peroneus longus and peroneus brevis help with eversion to the foot and allow plantarflexion to the ankle. When a person has sprained their ankle, it causes the peroneal muscle to become overstretched and develop trigger points. The great news is that trigger points are treatable, and various treatments can reduce pain in the affected muscle. This allows stability and mobility back to the ankles and improves the body’s functionality.

 

References

Abd-Rasid, A F, and M Y Bajuri. “Isolated Peroneus Longus Tear – Commonly Missed Diagnosis of Lateral Ankle Pain: A Case Report.” Malaysian Orthopaedic Journal, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7513650/.

Basit, Hajira, et al. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Foot Peroneus Brevis Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 8 Feb. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK535427/.

Lezak, Bradley, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Calf Peroneus Longus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 25 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK546650/.

Salom-Moreno, Jaime, et al. “Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4430654/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Shin Splints & Myofascial Trigger Points

Shin Splints & Myofascial Trigger Points

Introduction

The legs are crucial for many individuals to move, jump, run, walk, and stand in various locations. The legs involve the thighs, hips, and knees as they work together to provide support and a range of movements for the body. For athletes, the legs allow them to run from one obstacle to another and kick the object to finish the game they are participating. Many individuals require strong leg muscles to keep the body balanced and stabilized from the upper body’s weight. One leg muscle that allows the body to be stabilized is the anterior tibialis muscle. When the legs suffer from various sports injuries or injuries in general, it can lead to issues like shin splints correlated with trigger points that can cause pain to the lower portion of the legs and can affect the body’s stability. Today’s article examines the anterior tibialis muscles, how shin splints are associated with myofascial trigger points, and various methods to treat shin splints. We refer patients to certified providers that incorporate various techniques in the lower body extremities, like lower leg pain therapies correlating to myofascial trigger point pain, to aid many people dealing with pain symptoms along the anterior tibialis muscles, causing shin splints. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent source to asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

myofascial-exercises-for-headaches-amp-migraines_635d8322

What Is The Tibialis Anterior Muscles?

 

Have you been dealing with leg pain affecting your ability to move? Do you feel radiating pain going down to your feet? Or does even the smallest amount of pressure sends shooting pain from your knees to your feet? Many of these leg pain issues correlate to myofascial trigger points along the anterior tibialis muscles, mimicking shin splints. Studies reveal that the leg is divided into anterior, lateral, and posterior crural compartments. As one of the largest four muscles in the anterior compartment of the legs, the tibialis anterior is a thick muscle located in the front of the lateral tibia of the legs. The tibialis anterior has the muscle that allows the function to the lower leg and tendons that travel down to the ankle and foot. The anterior tibial muscle plays an important role in the lower leg through dorsiflexion and inversion of the foot. To that point, the anterior tibial muscle plays a key role in energy absorption when walking and maintaining balance.

 

Shin Splints Associated With Myofascial Trigger Points

Since the anterior tibial muscle plays a key role in energy absorption when it comes to walking and maintaining balance in the body, when the lower leg extremity muscles have been overused, it causes stress on the tibial anterior. It can lead to medial tibial stress syndrome or shin splints. Studies reveal that shin splints affect many athletes, especially runners, by causing pain and discomfort to the tibial anterior. This can cause mobility and balancing issues in the legs and lead to the development of myofascial trigger points in the anterior tibial muscle. Now, how do shin splints and myofascial trigger points correlate with each other?

 

 

Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., author of “Myofascial Pain and Discomfort: The Trigger Point Manual,” mentioned that one of the chief complaints many people have when experiencing myofascial trigger points would feel muscle weakness of dorsiflexion to the foot when walking. Other complaints include:

  • Falling
  • Dragging their feet
  • Ankle weakness

The book also mentioned that myofascial pain causes referred pain to the anterior tibial muscle, thus mimicking shin splints. The activation from myofascial trigger points causes an overload of the anterior tibial muscle, thus causing various pain issues in the legs and restricting mobility to the muscle itself.

 


An Overview Of Tibialis Anterior Trigger Points- Video

Have you been dealing with radiating pain from your knees to your feet? Do your legs feel heavy from walking a short distance? Or do your leg muscles feel cramps that hinder your ability to move? These pain-like issues are associated with the anterior tibialis muscle being affected by trigger points. Trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome can affect the worldwide population by affecting a muscle or muscle group in the body that can impair mobility, cause pain-like symptoms, and reduces a person’s overall sense of well-being. Trigger points along the tibialis anterior muscle cause mobility issues and mimic shin splint issues in the legs. All is not lost, however, as there are ways to reduce pain-like symptoms and help manage myofascial trigger points in the anterior tibialis muscle. The video above explains where the trigger points are located in the tibialis anterior through palpitation. By finding the trigger points in the affected muscle, doctors can refer patients to pain specialists who target trigger points and provide treatment to reduce the pain.


Various Methods Of Treating Shin Splints

 

There are various methods to treat the tibialis anterior when treating shin splints associated with trigger points. Studies reveal that one of the multiple ways to reduce shin splints is to strengthen the core hip muscles, improve running mechanics, and prevent lower-extremity overuse injuries. Muscle strength training allows the other muscles from the abdominals, gluteal, and hips to be stronger and reduce strain on the anterior tibialis muscles. Another method that many individuals should consider is to wear the appropriate footwear. Wearing the proper footwear can reduce the shock absorption to the feet and reduce the overloading forces on the anterior tibialis. These are two methods to manage trigger points and prevent shin splints from re-occurring in the legs. 

 

Conclusion

As one of the four leg muscles, the anterior tibialis is a large muscle located in front of the lateral tibia and travels down to the ankles and foot. This muscle plays an important role in the legs as it allows dorsiflexion and inversion of the foot while also playing a key role in energy absorption when walking and maintaining balance. When the anterior tibialis becomes overused, it can develop trigger points, which invoke shin splints in the legs. When the legs suffer from shin splints associated with trigger points, it can cause pain in the lower leg extremities and cause the body to become unstable. However, various methods can take the load off the tibialis anterior and help improve the body’s stability, allowing the individual to walk without feeling pain traveling up from their feet.

 

References

Deshmukh, Nikita S, and Pratik Phansopkar. “Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: A Review Article.” Cureus, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 July 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9356648/.

Galbraith, R Michael, and Mark E Lavallee. “Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: Conservative Treatment Options.” Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 Oct. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2848339/.

Juneja, Pallavi, and John B Hubbard. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Tibialis Anterior Muscles.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK513304/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Zielinska, Nicol, et al. “Anatomical Variations of the Tibialis Anterior Tendon Insertion: An Updated and Comprehensive Review.” Journal of Clinical Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 19 Aug. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8396864/.

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Having Unquestionable Knee Pain? Could Be Trigger Points

Having Unquestionable Knee Pain? Could Be Trigger Points

Introduction

As one of the stabilizers for the body, the knees are located between the thighs and legs, allowing flexion and extension. The knees help the hips by supporting the upper body’s weight and allowing the legs to move from one place to another without feeling pain. The knee has various muscles and ligaments surrounding the knee joint, allowing the leg to be bent when active. One of the muscles is located behind the knee, known as the popliteus, and supports the legs. However, minor injuries or actions can affect the knees causing the joint to be in a “lock” position and develop myofascial trigger points that can induce muscle spasms in the knees. Today’s article focuses on the popliteus muscle, how knee pain is associated with trigger points, and how to manage knee pain through various treatments. We refer patients to certified providers that incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like knee pain treatments correlating to myofascial trigger points, to aid many people dealing with pain symptoms along the popliteus muscles. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent source to asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

myofascial-exercises-for-headaches-amp-migraines_635d8322

What Is The Popliteus Muscle?

popliteus-muscles.png

Have you been dealing with pain behind your knees? Do you have issues bending your knees when climbing up or down the stairs? Or do your back knee muscles start to twitch uncontrollably, causing muscle spasms? Many knee issues correlate with various factors that can affect the popliteus muscle and develop trigger points. The popliteus is a small muscle with a very important job as it is a major stabilizing muscle to the knees. The popliteus muscle originates from the lateral side of the femur and inserts itself into the posterior surface of the tibia. Some attachments are between the popliteus and lateral meniscus, allowing the knees to be in motion and providing flexion without pain and entrapment. Additional studies reveal that when a person exercises, the popliteus’s basic function helps bring about and maintain internal rotation of the tibia on the femur. The popliteus also helps prevent the foot from external rotation and allows the individual to stand correctly. However, injuries to the knee could overstretch the popliteus muscle and cause mobility issues to the knee flexion.

 

Knee Pain Associated With Trigger Points

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When dealing with knee pain, it could often be a joint disorder like osteoarthritis or a musculoskeletal condition like sciatica pain associated with the knee. These issues could be due to normal factors like constantly sitting down or bending down to lift heavy objects that cause the knees to buckle. However, when the popliteus muscle has been continuously overused from being bent, it can form tiny nodules known as trigger points to cause knee pain. Studies reveal that trigger points on the muscles surrounding the knee are often ignored during a clinical diagnosis. Trigger points cause referred pain to the surrounding muscles, accompanied by various sensory sensations like heaviness, tingling, and hypersensitivity to the popliteus muscle. In “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Travell, M.D. stated that one of the chief complaints that many patients often talk to their doctors about is the pain they feel in the back of their knees when they are in a crouch position. The book also states when normal actions like running or twisting have overloaded the popliteus muscle, it can cause trauma or strain to the popliteus muscle and tear the posterior cruciate ligament to the knees.

 


How To Find Trigger Points In The Popliteus- Video

Have you been having knee issues that make walking difficult for a long period? Do you feel like your knees are locking up constantly? What about feeling unstable when standing or carrying objects around? These issues that affect the knees are associated with trigger points along the popliteus muscles. The popliteus muscle is small, located at the back of the knees, and assists with knee flexion. When the popliteus muscle becomes overused, it can cause trigger points to form and cause knee issues. Studies reveal that various issues, like tendon injuries, are associated with repetitive mechanical stresses that can cause degenerative knee lesions. Any trauma or muscle strain can affect the knee’s function of flexing and bending without pain for trigger points to form along the popliteus muscles. The video above focuses on the popliteus muscle, where the trigger points are located, and where the referred pain patterns are situated in the knees. On the bright side, all is not lost, as various treatments offer ways to manage knee pain associated with trigger points.


Managing Knee Pain Through Various Treatments

 

When it comes to knee pain, many individuals will apply an ice or heat compress to allow the surrounding muscles to relax while reducing the pain and swelling. Other individuals use over-the-counter medicines to eliminate the pain for a few hours. While these work at managing knee pain, various treatments target trigger points and can help improve flexion mobility back to the knees. Studies reveal that muscle stretching on the popliteus muscle contributes to joint position sense to knee joint stability and function. Stretching the popliteus muscles can reduce the pain in the back of the knee while elongating the muscle fibers to manage trigger points from forming again. Other treatments that people can do to avoid trigger points from returning is to avoid walking or running in a lateral sloped area to prevent the knees from locking up. Incorporating these treatments to prevent knee issues and allow the knee to function properly. 

 

Conclusion

The knees are one of the stabilizers in the body that are located between the thighs and legs, allowing flexion and extension. As a small muscle located in the back of the knees, the popliteus stabilizes the knees and enables them to be in motion without pain. However, when the popliteus muscle becomes overstretched and overused, it can develop trigger points in the popliteus that invoke referred pain to the surrounding muscles and cause the knees to lock up. To that point, it causes the body to be unstable and mimics knee pain issues. Fortunately, trigger points are treatable through various treatments that help relieve the pain and reduce the trigger points from returning. When these treatments are utilized on the knees, the surrounding muscles regain flexion mobility in the lower body.

 

References

English, S, and D Perret. “Posterior Knee Pain.” Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 12 June 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941578/.

Ghaffarinejad, Farahnaz, et al. “Effect of Static Stretching of Muscles Surrounding the Knee on Knee Joint Position Sense.” British Journal of Sports Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2007, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2465159/.

Hyland, Scott, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Popliteus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 6 June 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526084/.

Mann, R A, and J L Hagy. “The Popliteus Muscle.” The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 1977, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/908724/.

Sánchez Romero, Eleuterio A, et al. “Prevalence of Myofascial Trigger Points in Patients with Mild to Moderate Painful Knee Osteoarthritis: A Secondary Analysis.” Journal of Clinical Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 Aug. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7464556/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Dealing With Upper Thigh Pain? Could Be Trigger Points In the Hamstrings

Dealing With Upper Thigh Pain? Could Be Trigger Points In the Hamstrings

Introduction

Many individuals utilize their lower muscles to move around and stay active as each muscle does its job and allows mobility to the hips and thighs. In sports, the thigh muscles are utilized constantly to extend the legs and bend the knees, allowing a powerful force to win any sports competition. At the same time, various sports injuries can occur to the hips, thighs, and legs and can affect the muscles causing pain and discomfort to the lower extremities. A hamstring injury is one of the most common injuries that can affect the thighs, which can cause many athletes to be taken out of their favorite sport to recover from the injury. Today’s article looks at the hamstring muscle, how trigger points correlate with a hamstring strain, and how various stretches can reduce muscle strain on the hamstrings. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like upper thigh and hip pain treatments correlating to myofascial trigger point pain, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the hamstring muscles. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

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What Are The Hamstring Muscles?

 

Do you experience pain in the back of your upper thigh? When walking from one place to another, do you hear a popping sound in the back of your thigh? Or are you dealing with muscle tenderness in the back of your upper thigh? Many of these symptoms correlate with issues affecting the hamstrings causing trigger points to affect the upper thighs. As one of the most complex muscles comprising three muscles (semitendinosus, semimembranosus, biceps femoris), the hamstrings play a crucial part in daily activities. From simple actions like standing to explosive movements like sprinting or jumping, the hamstrings are known as posterior thigh muscles that begin from the pelvis and run behind the femur bone and cross the femoroacetabular and tibiofemoral joints. The hamstring muscles in the body play a prominent role in hip extension and is a dynamic stabilizer of the knee joint. To that point, the hamstring muscles are the most susceptible muscle that succumbs to injuries that can lead to disability in the legs and affect daily activities.

 

Hamstring Strain & Trigger Points

 

Since the hamstrings are the most susceptible muscles that can succumb to injuries, it takes a while for the muscle to heal, depending on the severity of the damage. Studies reveal that the hamstrings can occur injuries when a person is running or sprinting due to their anatomic arrangement, which causes the muscles to strain. To that point, depending on how much force has impacted the hamstrings, the injuries can lead to 3 of the following:

  • Grade 1: Mild pain or swelling (no loss of function)
  • Grade 2: Identifiable partial tissue disruption with moderate pain and swelling (minimal loss of function)
  • Grade 3: Complete disruption of the tissue with severe pain and swelling (total loss of function)

The pain that patients experience can be painful when walking, causing them to limp. In “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., stated that when patients are dealing with pain in their hamstrings, it could potentially be associated with trigger points along the three muscles, causing pain and disability in the upper thighs. The book also mentioned that when trigger points affect the hamstrings, it can lead to muscle inhibition, compromising hip stability. Another issue that trigger points associated with hamstring strain causes in the body are that when individuals are sitting down are likely to experience posterior pain in the buttock, upper thighs, and back of the knees. Luckily, there are various ways to reduce the pain along the hamstring muscles. 

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Hamstrings- Video

Have you dealt with pain along the back of your upper thighs? Does it feel uncomfortable when you are sitting down? Or do your hamstrings ache or feel tight after running for a long period? People dealing with issues in their hamstrings could be dealing with muscle strain associated with trigger points. The hamstring muscles play a vital role in the body as it allows the individual to walk, run, bend the knees and even extend the legs. The hamstring muscles are also the most susceptible to injury, causing disability to the legs. Studies reveal that trigger points associated with the hamstring muscles can lead to soreness or irritability in the muscle fibers that may interfere with the biomechanics and normal functioning of the lower limbs. The video above explains where the hamstrings are located and how the trigger points can cause referred pain to the hamstrings. To that point, trigger points can affect a person’s ability to walk and affect the surrounding muscles in the lower body while mimicking other chronic conditions.


Various Stretches To Reduce Muscle Strain On The Hamstrings

 

When the hamstrings become injured, the healing rate usually depends on how severe the injury is in the hamstrings. If a hamstring injury is mild, the tears or strains can heal within about three to eight weeks, and if the hamstring injury is severe, the tears or strains could be long as three months. When the hamstrings are tense and on the verge of tearing, many people should stop overusing the muscle. Various stretches can reduce muscle strain on the hamstrings and relieve tension from the hamstrings to allow mobility back to the legs. Studies reveal that manual ischemic compression on the upper thigh muscles can significantly reduce pain in the lower limbs. This allows the individual to manage the trigger points associated with the hamstrings and reduce the chances of them re-occurring in the legs.

 

Conclusion

As the most important muscle in the lower body extremities, the hamstrings play a crucial part in the body as they allow the individual to walk, run, and stand without feeling pain. However, even though they are important muscles, they are susceptible to injuries. When the hamstrings become injured, the recovery process varies depending on the severity and can develop trigger points along the muscle fibers. To that point, it causes referred pain along the upper thigh muscle and affects a person’s ability to walk. Fortunately, incorporating various stretches to the hamstrings can alleviate the pain and reduce the trigger points from re-occurring in the muscle. This allows mobility back to the legs, and many individuals can resume their daily activities.

 

References

Esparza, Danilo, et al. “Effects of Local Ischemic Compression on Upper Limb Latent Myofascial Trigger Points: A Study of Subjective Pain and Linear Motor Performance.” Rehabilitation Research and Practice, Hindawi, 4 Mar. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425406/.

Poudel, Bikash, and Shivlal Pandey. “Hamstring Injury – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 28 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK558936/.

Rodgers, Cooper D, and Avaias Raja. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Hamstring Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 Jan. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK546688/.

Thummar, Ravindra C, et al. “Association between Trigger Points in Hamstring, Posterior Leg, Foot Muscles and Plantar Fasciopathy: A Cross- Sectional Study.” Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 Aug. 2020, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33218537/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Pain In Your Adductor Muscles? Could Be Myofascial Trigger Points

Pain In Your Adductor Muscles? Could Be Myofascial Trigger Points

Introduction

The hips and thighs have a working relationship as their jobs are to maintain stability for the legs and pelvis while supporting the upper body’s weight. These two body groups have various muscles, tendons, and nerves that have specific jobs that allow mobility to the lower body. Many athletes in multiple sports events use their thighs to exert a huge amount of power to be the best. This is due to the adductor muscles in the thighs that allow the athlete to win the event. These adductor muscles are voluminous in size and can become overstretched if the muscles have been worked out too much or injuries have caused dysfunction in the surrounding muscles, causing mobility issues. To that point, the adductor muscles will develop myofascial trigger points and cause hip and thigh pain. Today’s article looks at the two adductor muscles (Longus and Magnus), how myofascial trigger points affect the adductor muscles, and available treatments to manage hip adductor trigger points. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like thigh and hip pain treatments correlating to myofascial trigger point pain, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the adductor muscles. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

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Adductor Longus & Adductor Magnus

Have you been dealing with groin pain located near your thighs? Do you feel muscle tenderness or stiffness when stretching your inner thighs? Or have you been feeling unstable in your hips or thighs when walking? Many individuals, especially athletes and older adults, could be experiencing myofascial trigger points associated with groin pain along their adductor muscles. The thighs contain several muscles and functions that allow many people to bend and extend their knees and hips. The adductor muscles allow the legs to move inward toward one another. The adductor muscles have five muscles: magnus, brevi, longus, pectineus, and gracilis. These muscles enable functionality to the thighs and hips, and we will look at two adductor muscles in the inner thighs. The long adductor muscle is a large, fan-shaped muscle that starts from the superior aspect of the pubis bone and travels down to connect at the thigh bone. Studies reveal that the adductor longus is a long and thin muscle with many actions for the thighs, including external/lateral rotation and thigh flexion.

 

 

Now the adductor Magnus is a large triangular-shaped muscle of the inner thighs that are important for thigh and hip function and stabilizing the pelvis. Studies reveal that even though the adductor Magnus is a large muscle in the inner thighs, its primary function is to allow the thigh to move in a larger range of motion without any pain inflicted on the thigh muscles. However, the adductor muscle can succumb to various issues affecting the thighs and groin regions of the body that can be overstretched and strain the body.

 

Myofascial Trigger Points Affecting The Adductor Muscles

 

Groin pain is a multi-factorial pain issue that affects the lower limbs, and its often due to muscle strain in the inner thigh muscles. This pain increases during vigorous activities and when there is a sudden twist in the hips. When the adductor muscles suddenly change in motion when the body is active, they can be overstretched and correlate to myofascial trigger points that can affect the inner thigh and groin regions. According to “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” by Dr. Travell, M.D., patients with active myofascial trigger points in the two adductor muscles (Longus and Magnus) would become frequently aware of the pain in their groin and medial thigh. When the adductor muscles have myofascial trigger points in the inner thigh, diagnosing is difficult since the individual thinks they are suffering from groin pain when the pain is in their inner thighs. To that point, studies reveal that many individuals participating in various sports would suffer from groin pain due to myofascial trigger points affecting the adductor muscles. Luckily, there are multiple treatments to reduce the pain in the adductor muscles.

 


Hip Adductors: Trigger Point Anatomy- Video

Have you been dealing with groin pain when you are walking? What about experiencing unquestionable thigh pain that affects your daily activities? Or does stretching your inner thigh muscles seem difficult, causing muscle tenderness? Many of these symptoms correlate with groin pain associated with myofascial trigger points affecting the adductor muscles in the inner thighs. The adductor muscles allow mobility function to the thighs and enable the hips to have a wide range of motion. When the adductor muscles are overstretched due to a sudden change of hip rotation or injury has occurred on the thighs can lead to referred pain in the groin and inner thighs and develop myofascial trigger points. The video above shows where the trigger points are located in the hip adductor muscles. The video also explains where the pain is localized in the adductor muscles and the symptoms it produces that can affect the lower body extremities. Fortunately, even though diagnosing myofascial trigger points are a bit challenging, available treatments can manage trigger points along the hip adductors.


Available Treatments To Manage Hip Adductor Trigger Points

When myofascial trigger points affect the hip adductor muscles, many individuals complain about stiffness in their inner thighs and how they feel miserable when they don’t have mobility from their thighs and hips. As stated earlier, trigger points are a bit challenging when diagnosed, but they are treatable when doctors examine patients dealing with myofascial pain in their hips and thigh muscles. Once the diagnosis is complete, doctors work with pain specialists who can locate the trigger points and devise a treatment plan to relieve the pain. Available treatments like trigger point injections can minimize the pain and reduce the chances of trigger points returning. Other available therapies like exercising or stretching, especially for the hips and thighs. Specific exercises for the hips and thigh muscles can help strengthen the adductor muscles from suffering pain and can help reduce the pain symptoms. Another treatment is applying moist heat on the hip adductor muscles to release the tension from the tight muscles and allow mobility back to the hip adductors.  

 

Conclusion

The adductor muscles work with the hips and thighs to allow a wide range of motions and extension to the knees and hips. The hips and the thighs allow stability to the lower body and support the weight to the upper body. When injuries or sudden changes start to affect the adductor muscles, it can lead to symptoms of groin pain associated with myofascial trigger points. Myofascial trigger points produce tiny nodules in the affected muscle that causes referred pain to the muscle group. When this happens, it causes the body to be dysfunctional and can affect a person’s mobility to function in the world. Luckily myofascial trigger points are treatable through various techniques and treatments that can reduce the chances of trigger points from re-occurring in the body.

 

References

Jeno, Susan H, and Gary S Schindler. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Thigh Adductor Magnus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 1 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK534842/.

Sedaghati, Parisa, et al. “Review of Sport-Induced Groin Injuries.” Trauma Monthly, Kowsar, Dec. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3864393/.

Shahid, Shahab. “Adductor Longus Muscle.” Kenhub, Kenhub, 30 June 2022, www.kenhub.com/en/library/anatomy/adductor-longus-muscle.

Simons, D. G., and L. S. Simons. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Takizawa, M, et al. “Why Adductor Magnus Muscle Is Large: The Function Based on Muscle Morphology in Cadavers.” Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 27 Apr. 2012, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22537037/.

van de Kimmenade, R J L L, et al. “A Rare Case of Adductor Longus Muscle Rupture.” Case Reports in Orthopedics, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4397006/.

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Inner Thigh Pain Associated With Trigger Points

Inner Thigh Pain Associated With Trigger Points

Introduction

When many individuals begin to work out or start training for an event, they incorporate various muscles to give optimal output and strength when doing a set of exercises. Many athletes or individuals trying to train for an event or to better themselves have to do a pre-workout routine involving various stretches to warm up the muscles before the actual workout and do stretches post-workout again. This ensures that the muscles are ready to give it their all when a person is working out. The body has various parts with different functions and jobs that help the body’s motor function. The upper body has the shoulders, arms, hands, elbows, neck, head, and chest to allow movements and stability. At the same time, the lower body has the hips, low back, thighs, legs, knees, pelvis, and feet to support the upper body’s weight and stabilize the lower extremities from collapsing. When various factors affect the body, it can lead to dysfunction and causes referred pain to different body locations that can mask chronic conditions. Today’s article looks at one of the lower body muscles located at the inner thighs, known as the pectineus muscle, how trigger point pain affects the inner thighs, and various stretches to strengthen the hip adductors. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like thigh and hip pain treatments correlating to trigger point pain, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the pectineus muscle. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

how-to-stretch-the-masseter-muscle-trigger-point-therapy_63546cd8

What Is The Pectineus Muscle?

 

Have you been experiencing pain in your inner thighs? Do you find it difficult to play various sports? Do you feel tenderness or soreness in your thighs or near your groin? Most of these symptoms are associated with trigger point pain along the pectineus muscles that affect the thighs. The pectineus is part of the anterior thigh muscles that extend the leg to the knee joint. The pectineus works with another muscle known as the sartorius and a muscle group known as the quadriceps femoris. The pectineus muscle is responsible for flexion, adduction, and medial rotation since it is a hip adductor for the thighs. This muscle is important for various sports activities like running, skating, soccer, or basketball and can become overused due to overstretching the legs too far, thus developing trigger points in the pectineus muscle.

 

Trigger Point Pain Affecting The Inner Thighs

 

When athletes overuse their legs and overstretch the pectineus muscle, it can cause issues with the thighs, hips, and legs’ mobility causing referred pain to the lower body. This is known as trigger point pain and can be challenging when diagnosing where the pain is located. Studies reveal that trigger point pain affecting the inner thighs, especially the pectineus muscle, can mimic groin and hip pain, causing various symptoms in the lower extremities. The multiple symptoms can include:

  • Weak adductor muscles
  • Muscle fatigue
  • Decreased range of motion
  • Leg-length discrepancy

Various reasons can lead to the development of trigger point pain associated with the inner thighs along the pectineus; according to “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., stated that when patients are dealing with pectineus trigger points would complain about the referred pain surrounding the muscle but not the muscle itself. The book also mentioned that nerve entrapment could also be an issue since trigger points like to mimic other chronic conditions. Trigger points along the pectineus muscle can also develop associated with hip joint diseases like advanced osteoarthritis.

 


Treating Trigger Points In Hip Adductors- Video

Are you experiencing issues when moving around constantly? Do you experience pain in your inner thighs and hips? Or do you have difficulty rotating your thighs or hips? If you have been dealing with these issues throughout your entire life, it could be due to your pectineus muscles being affected by trigger points along your inner thighs. Trigger points (myofascial pain syndrome) develop tiny nodules along the muscle fibers, causing referred pain to the surrounding muscles that can cause dysfunction in the lower extremities. Studies reveal that myofascial trigger points can cause the affected muscles to be intensely sensitive and irritable, predominantly near the reflex muscle. To that point, it causes hip and thigh disability in the lower body. Fortunately, there are ways to reduce the pain and manage the trigger point pain along the pectineus muscle, as shown in the video above. The hip adductor muscles are being stretched and treated for trigger point pain and allowing mobility back to the hips and inner thighs. 


Various Stretches To Strengthen Hip Adductor

 

Since the pectineus muscle is part of the hip adductor muscles, various stretches can reduce the chances of trigger points from future development while minimizing the pain that it is causing along the surrounding muscles. Studies reveal that multiple exercises and stretches for the pectineus muscle can help with hip flexion and stabilization. These stretches can help stretch and strengthen the hip adductor muscles while preventing groin pain associated with trigger points. Incorporating these stretches before and after a workout can reduce trigger points and allow hip mobility and thigh rotation back to the legs. This ensures that the trigger points along the pectineus muscle are managed, and the individual doesn’t have to suffer from referred pain issues on the thighs and can move around without pain.

 

Conclusion

As part of the hip adductor muscles, the pectineus is a small muscle that extends the leg to the knees and allows the thighs to flex, adduct, and rotate without pain. This muscle is important for many athletes participating in sports and can be easily overstretched to cause referred pain around the thighs. To that point, it can develop trigger points along the pectineus muscles can correlate to groin pain in the lower extremities. All is not lost, as various stretches and exercises can strengthen the hip adductor muscles and improve thigh and hip mobility. This allows athletes and individuals to continue playing the sport they enjoy.

 

References

Giphart, J Erik, et al. “Recruitment and Activity of the Pectineus and Piriformis Muscles during Hip Rehabilitation Exercises: An Electromyography Study.” The American Journal of Sports Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2012, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22523373/.

Khan, Ayesha, and Abdul Arain. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Anterior Thigh Muscles.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 10 June 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538425/.

Kiel, John, and Kimberly Kaiser. “Adductor Strain.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 21 June 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493166/.

Simons, D. G., and L. S. Simons. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Wada, Juliano T, et al. “An Anatomical Basis for the Myofascial Trigger Points of the Abductor Hallucis Muscle.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi, 22 Jan. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6998759/.

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Myofascial Trigger Pain Affecting The Sartorius Muscle

Myofascial Trigger Pain Affecting The Sartorius Muscle

Introduction

The lower body extremities help provide stability to the various body parts, including the hips, thighs, pelvis, legs, knees, and feet. The hips and thighs comprise multiple muscles and nerves that provide mobility to the lower half and allow the host to move around in different locations. While the hip muscles act on the thigh muscles at the hip joint and stabilize the pelvis, the thigh muscles allow the lower body to bend, flex and rotate while bearing most of the upper body’s weight and keeping alignment with the hips and legs. One of the thigh muscles is the sartorius muscle, and if it becomes overused and injured can lead to complications in the form of myofascial pain syndrome. Today’s article post examines the sartorius muscle, how myofascial trigger pain is associated with the sartorius, and the effectiveness of myofascial pain treatment on the thighs. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like thigh pain treatments correlating to myofascial pain syndrome, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the sartorius muscle. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

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What Is The Sartorius Muscle?

 

Are you experiencing pain in the upper, mid, or lower parts of your thighs? Do you have difficulty walking for long periods? Or do your knees hurt more than usual? Most of these issues correlate with myofascial trigger pain associated with the sartorius muscle. As the longest muscle that spans from the hips to the knee joints, the sartorius muscle, or the “tailor muscle,” serves as both a hip and knee flexor while working with other muscles that allow hip mobility. The sartorius shares its origin location with the TFL (tensor fascia latae) muscle at the anterior superior iliac spine and is responsible for internal rotation at the hips. In the book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” the author Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., mentioned that the sartorius muscle assists the iliacus and the TFL muscles in hip flexion while assisting the short head of the bicep femoris in the knees for knee flexion, allowing the individual to walk for long distances. Even though this long muscle assists in hip and knee flexion, it can succumb to injuries and create issues with the hips and knees in the lower body.

 

Myofascial Trigger Pain Associated With The Sartorius Muscle

 

When traumatic forces or normal factors begin to affect the sartorius muscle, the surrounding muscles on the thighs and hips are also affected. The sartorius muscle allows the individual to move around and allows flexion to the hips and knees when injuries or the muscle is being overused; it can cause pain-like symptoms that correlate with hip and knee issues associated with myofascial trigger pain. Myofascial trigger pain along the sartorius muscle doesn’t usually occur in the muscle but can occur in conjunction with trigger point involvement in the surrounding muscles. Studies reveal that myofascial trigger pain is found in the hip muscles and can cause issues in the lumbopelvic-hip muscles of the lower body. This causes referred pain on the sartorius to be more diffused and superficial to the knees. When myofascial trigger pain is associated with the sartorius, many individuals often mistake it for knee pain. To that point, myofascial trigger pain could affect how a person walks and bends at the knees. 

 


Anatomy & Palpation Of The Sartorius Muscle- Video

Are you experiencing issues when you are walking? Do your knees hurt constantly? Or are you experiencing tenderness or pain in your thighs? Most of these issues correlate with myofascial trigger pain associated with the sartorius muscle. The sartorius is a long muscle that connects the hips and spans to the knee joints to provide hip and knee flexion. The sartorius muscle works with the other muscles in the thighs and hips, allowing hip mobility and motor function to the legs. When multiple issues affect the sartorius and the surrounding muscles, it can develop into myofascial trigger pain and cause overlapping risk profiles to the knees and hips. To that point, it causes referred pain issues in the hips and knees, making the individual have difficulty walking from place to place. However, there are available treatments to reduce the pain in the hips and knees and manage the myofascial trigger pain from affecting the sartorius muscle on the thighs. The video above explains the anatomy of the sartorius muscle location and how palpation is used to locate the muscle to see if it is tight or could be affected by trigger points along the muscle fibers. This is one of the techniques that is used when a person is dealing with myofascial trigger pain associated with the sartorius muscle.


The Effectiveness Of Myofascial Pain Treatment On The Thighs

 

When a person is dealing with myofascial trigger pain in their thighs, and it is affecting the sartorius, many will often try to find available treatments to alleviate the pain. Treatments like dry needling are one of the various myofascial pain treatments that can reduce pain and related disability on the thighs, hips, and knees. Studies reveal that dry needling treatments can help manage knee pain syndrome associated with trigger points on the thighs. However, treatment alone can not be the only solution to reduce myofascial trigger pain in the thighs. Various hip stretches can loosen up tight hip flexors and help elongate the sartorius muscles to break up the nodules and improve mobility function to the hips and knees. People can even utilize self-ischemic compression to allow a more effective stretch on the sartorius muscle.

 

Conclusion

As the longest muscle in the thighs, the sartorius helps provide a service to hip and knee flexion while working with various muscles to keep the legs moving. When the sartorius muscles become overused and start to cause referred pain to the hips and knees, it can develop into myofascial trigger pain along the sartorius muscle. This can make many individuals believe they are suffering from knee pain when it’s their thigh muscle. However, myofascial trigger pain is treatable through treatments and corrective actions that people can incorporate into their daily activities to prevent pain from escalating and manage trigger points along the sartorius muscle. This can allow people to get back their mobility in their legs.

 

References

Rahou-El-Bachiri, Youssef, et al. “Effects of Trigger Point Dry Needling for the Management of Knee Pain Syndromes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” Journal of Clinical Medicine, MDPI, 29 June 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7409136/.

Samani, Mahbobeh, et al. “Prevalence and Sensitivity of Trigger Points in Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Muscles in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome.” Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 15 Oct. 2019, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31987531/.

Simons, D. G., and L. S. Simons. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Walters, Benjamin B, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Thigh Sartorius Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK532889/.

Disclaimer

Myofascial Pain Syndrome On The Tensor Fasciae Latae

Myofascial Pain Syndrome On The Tensor Fasciae Latae

Introduction

The thighs in the lower half of the body work together with the hips to stabilize the legs when the body is in motion. The thighs and the hips also support the weight of the upper half of the body and are surrounded by muscles, ligaments, and nerve roots to supply blood and sensory-motor function to the legs. One of the thigh muscles that work with the hips is the tensor fasciae latae (TFL) muscle. When the thigh muscles are being overused or suffer from injuries, tiny nodules known as trigger points (myofascial pain syndrome) can affect a person’s ability to function worldwide. Today’s article examines what the tensor fasciae latae muscles do, how myofascial pain syndrome affects the thighs, and various stretches/techniques for the thighs. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like thigh pain treatments correlating to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the tensor fasciae latae muscle. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-release-serratus-anterior_63546d25

What Does The Tensor Fasciae Latae Muscle Do?

 

Do you have difficulty walking for a long period? So you feel that your hips feel unstable when you move? Or do you feel radiating pain down from your thighs to your knees? Thigh pain associated with these symptoms can affect a person’s ability to move around from one location to another due to trigger points affecting the tensor fasciae latae muscle. The tensor fasciae latae (TFL) muscles are located at the proximal anterolateral thigh and originate from the anterior superior iliac spine. The TFL muscle is between the superficial and deep muscle fibers of the iliotibial (IT) band, as its attachment assists with knee flexion and lateral rotation. The TFL muscles also work together with the gluteus muscles in various hip movements. Studies reveal that the primary function of the TFL muscles is providing balance to the body’s weight and the non-weight-bearing leg to walk. The TFL muscles allow the individual to walk, run, and assist with movement and stabilization to the hips and knees without pain inflicted on the joints and muscles. 

 

Myofascial Pain Syndrome Affecting The Thighs

Since the TFL muscles allow the person to walk and run, this muscle can become overused and strained through repetitive motions causing many issues to the hips, knees, and thighs. When these issues affect the TFL muscles, they can develop nodules along the muscle fibers known as trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome. Myofascial pain syndrome is a musculoskeletal disorder that can invoke referred pain in one location of the body while affecting the surrounding muscles in a different body location. Myofascial pain syndrome associated with the TFL muscles can cause issues to the hips, thighs, and knees while affecting a person’s ability to walk. Studies reveal that the prevalence of myofascial pain syndrome on the TFL muscles correlates to pain and disability in the thighs. When myofascial pain syndrome affects the TFL muscles, it can mimic chronic knee osteoarthritis. 

 

Even though myofascial pain syndrome is challenging to diagnose, it is treatable through various stretches and techniques. In Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D.’s book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” it mentioned that when patients have active trigger points in their TFL muscles, they become aware of the referred pain affecting their hip joints and are unable to lie comfortably on their sides due to the body-weight pressure pressing on the affected TFL muscle. The book also points out that when pain is referred to from trigger points associated with the TFL muscles, it can be mistaken for pain in the glutes.

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Tensor Fasciae Latae- Video

Have you been experiencing difficulty walking from one location to another? Do you feel pain in your thighs or knees? Or do you have a problem lying down on your side that is causing you pain? If you have been dealing with walking issues, it could be due to myofascial trigger pain in your tensor fasciae latae (TFL) muscles affecting your ability to walk. The TFL muscles help provide stability to the hips and thighs and assist with knee flexion and lateral rotation. This muscle also allows people to walk and run without any pain inflicted on the joints and muscles. When repetitive motions start to cause the TFL muscles to become overused and strained, it can lead to myofascial pain syndrome or trigger points developing, causing referred pain to the thighs. The video above explains where the TFL muscles are located and where the trigger points on the TFL muscles are causing pain to the thighs. Myofascial pain syndrome can mimic other chronic conditions like knee osteoarthritis, which causes pain and disability to the lower half of the body.


Various Stretches & Techniques For The Thighs

 

Now myofascial pain syndrome is challenging to diagnose in an examination due to the referred pain affecting one location of the body than the actual source of where the pain is coming. However, it is treatable through various techniques and stretches for the thighs to restore leg mobility. Studies reveal that direct stretching of the TFL (tensor fasciae latae) muscles can reduce long-term pain effects on the hips, thighs, and lower back and improve hip and thigh mobility. Various stretches like hip extensions and laterally rotating the hips can break the myofascial trigger points in the TFL muscle. Using a foam roller on the hips can gently stretch and loosen the muscle fibers on the TFL and help warm up the muscle before working out. Sitting down correctly in a chair can help the hips from causing more muscle strain to the thighs and prevent the TFL muscles from being shortened. Incorporating these stretches and techniques can improve hip and thigh mobility in the legs, allowing the individual to walk or run without pain.

 

Conclusion

The TFL (tensor fasciae latae) muscles are located on the proximal anterolateral thigh between the IT (iliotibial) band, which assists with knee flexion and lateral rotation. The TFL muscle also works with the gluteal muscles and allows the person to walk, run, and help with stability movement to the hips and knees with inflicted pain on the joints and surrounding muscles. When the TFL muscles become overused, they can develop myofascial trigger pain on the TFL, causing referred hip, knee, and thigh pain. This can cause the individual not to be able to walk for long periods and think they might have osteoarthritis in the knees. Fortunately, people can incorporate various stretches and techniques to reduce the pain in the thighs and hips while managing myofascial trigger pain along the TFL muscles. These various stretches and techniques allow mobility back to the hips and thighs so the individual can walk without pain.

 

References

Gottschalk, F, et al. “The Functional Anatomy of Tensor Fasciae Latae and Gluteus Medius and Minimus.” Journal of Anatomy, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 1989, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1256751/.

Ohtsuki, Keisuke. “A 3-Month Follow-up Study of the Long-Term Effects of Direct Stretching of the Tensor Fasciae Latae Muscle in Patients with Acute Lumbago Using a Single-Case Design.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, The Society of Physical Therapy Science, May 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4047246/.

Simons, D. G., and L. S. Simons. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Sánchez Romero, Eleuterio A, et al. “Prevalence of Myofascial Trigger Points in Patients with Mild to Moderate Painful Knee Osteoarthritis: A Secondary Analysis.” Journal of Clinical Medicine, MDPI, 7 Aug. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7464556/.

Trammell, Amy P, et al. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Tensor Fasciae Muscle – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 8 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK499870/.

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Piriformis Syndrome & Myofascial Pain Syndrome

Piriformis Syndrome & Myofascial Pain Syndrome

Introduction

The lumbar region of the spine has various muscles and nerve roots that work together with the lower body extremities, like the hips, buttocks, legs, knees, and feet, for mobility and walking function. The various muscles in the buttock region include the gluteal muscles. They have a casual relationship with the hip muscles as they work together for hip mobility and erect good posture in the body. These various muscles and nerves also supply sensory-motor function for the legs to be mobile and provide hip mobility. The piriformis is one of the muscles assisting in the hips and buttock region. When this muscle becomes overused, it can cause mobility issues in the legs and affect a person’s ability to walk. Today’s article looks at the piriformis muscle, how trigger points are associated with piriformis syndrome, and how to manage piriformis syndrome associated with trigger points. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like sciatic pain and piriformis syndrome treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the piriformis muscle. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

exercises-for-neck-and-shoulder-pain-from-myofascial-trigger-points-by-dr-andrea-furlan-md-phd_63543ea0

What Is The Piriformis Muscle?

 

Have you been having issues walking from one place to another? Do you feel muscle tightness in your hips or buttock region? Or are you experiencing radiating pain traveling to your knees and feet? These pain symptoms are correlated with trigger points affecting the piriformis muscle. The piriformis is a flat, pear-shaped muscle, one of the six short rotator muscle groups in the gluteal region of the hips and thighs. The rotator muscle groups consist of the following:

  • Gemelli
  • Quadratus Femoris
  • Obturator Internus
  • Obturator Externus

This muscle is parallel to the posterior margins of the gluteus medius and deep into the gluteus maximus. This muscle is very important to the body as it provides lower-body movement by stabilizing the hip joint and can lift and rotate the thighs away from the body. The piriformis muscle also surrounds the sciatic nerve, as this long nerve runs deep beneath the piriformis and enters the gluteal region of the rear. When the piriformis muscle becomes overused or suffers from associated traumatic factors, it can aggravate the sciatic nerve and even develop tiny nodules known as trigger points, causing mobility issues. 

 

Trigger Points Associated With Piriformis Syndrome

 

When abnormal factors affect the piriformis muscles, they can develop into trigger points associated with piriformis syndrome and cause issues in the pelvic and hip regions of the body. According to Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” trigger points can be activated when repetitive strain affects the piriformis muscle and causes symptoms of muscle weakness and pain in the hips. This causes overlapping issues in the surrounding muscles and the sciatic nerve, making diagnosing tricky for trigger points. Studies reveal that trigger points associated with piriformis syndrome may potentially cause muscle spasms or an inflammatory process to irritate the sciatic nerve that may be presented as identical to lumbar disk syndrome without neurological findings. Trigger points associated with piriformis syndrome may mimic chronic issues like fibromyalgia. Even though trigger points are tricky to pinpoint in a thorough examination, there are various ways to reduce the pain and prevent trigger points from affecting the piriformis muscle causing sciatic nerve pain. 

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Piriformis Muscle- Video

Have you been dealing with sciatic nerve pain? Have you found it difficult to walk for a short period? Or are you dealing with muscle tenderness or soreness in your buttock or hips? People experiencing these symptoms could be dealing with piriformis syndrome associated with trigger points. The piriformis is a small, fan-shaped muscle, one of the six short rotator muscle groups that help with hip and thigh mobility through stabilization. The piriformis muscles also surround the sciatic nerve and can succumb to injuries. When traumatic forces affect the hips and thighs, the piriformis muscle develops nodules known as trigger points, causing the muscle to irritate the sciatic nerve and cause pain in the legs. The video above shows where the piriformis muscle is located and how trigger points can mimic sciatic nerve pain in the leg without neurological findings. Studies reveal that trigger points could be a rare anatomical variation that can correlate with piriformis syndrome associated with sciatica. However, there is some good news, as there are ways to manage piriformis syndrome associated with trigger points.


Managing Piriformis Syndrome Associated With Trigger Points

 

Various techniques can help manage piriformis syndrome associated with trigger points to relieve the piriformis muscle. Studies reveal that Kinesio tape on the piriformis muscle can help reduce pain and improve many individuals’ hip joint range of motion. Other techniques like stretching or deep tissue massage can help loosen up the stiff muscles and relieve trigger points from forming on the piriformis. For sciatica pain associated with trigger points along the piriformis muscle, decompression therapy can help the piriformis muscle lay off pressure on the sciatic nerve and reduce aggravated pain. These techniques can help improve hip joint mobility and increase the range of motion to the hips and lower extremities.

 

Conclusion

The piriformis is a small muscle that provides hip and thigh mobility. This small muscle surrounds the sciatic nerve, which helps give motor function to the legs. When traumatic factors affect the piriformis muscle, it can develop trigger points and cause sciatic pain in the hips. This causes mobility issues and pain around the hips. Various treatments are provided to help reduce the trigger points along the piriformis muscle and reduce sciatic nerve pain from causing more problems to the hips and legs mobility.

 

References

Chang, Carol, et al. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Piriformis Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 3 Oct. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK519497/.

Pfeifer, T, and W F Fitz. “[The Piriformis Syndrome].” Zeitschrift Fur Orthopadie Und Ihre Grenzgebiete, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1989, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2618150/.

R;, Hashemirad F;Karimi N;Keshavarz. “The Effect of Kinesio Taping Technique on Trigger Points of the Piriformis Muscle.” Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 8 Feb. 2016, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27814861/.

Ro, Tae Hoon, and Lance Edmonds. “Diagnosis and Management of Piriformis Syndrome: A Rare Anatomic Variant Analyzed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.” Journal of Clinical Imaging Science, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 21 Feb. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5843966/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Lumbago Pain & Gluteus Medius Trigger Pain

Lumbago Pain & Gluteus Medius Trigger Pain

Introduction

Many individuals utilize the lower half of their bodies to go to different places and use the various surrounding muscles that provide stability on the hips and low back while supporting the upper body’s weight. Along the lower back is the buttock region, where the gluteal muscles help stabilize the pelvis, extend the hips, and rotate the thighs. The gluteal muscles also help shape and support the spine and have an erect posture in the body. One of the gluteal muscles that support the lower body is the gluteus medius, which can succumb to injuries and strain when overused or strained. This leads to developing trigger points that can cause various issues in the lower extremities and lead to corresponding chronic conditions. Today’s article focuses on the gluteus medius muscles, how the lumbago is associated with gluteus medius trigger pain, and various techniques to manage trigger points along the gluteus medius muscle. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like butt and low back pain treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the gluteus medius muscles near and surrounding the body’s lower extremities. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-anatomy-levator-scapulae

What Is The Gluteus Medius?

 

Have you been experiencing pain near your buttock and lower back? Have you been feeling unstable when you are walking? What about feeling pain in your tailbone that makes it unbearable to sit down? Many of these issues are associated with referred pain caused by trigger points affecting the gluteus medius. As part of the gluteal muscle region, the gluteus medius lies between the gluteus maximus and minimus is a flat, triangular muscle and is the primary hip abductor. The gluteus medius and minimus work together for internal rotation for the thighs and lateral rotation for the knees when they are extended. The gluteus medius muscles also help stabilize the pelvis, while the trunk maintains an upright position when the legs are in motion. Studies reveal that the gluteus medius is a key lateral hip muscle that correlates with muscle function with other muscle groups like the quadriceps and abdominal muscles. When injuries or not activating the gluteal muscles often, various muscle issues can cause problems to the gluteus medius muscles. 

 

Lumbago Associated With Gluteus Medius Trigger Pain

Dysfunction in the hips can lead to various issues that can either be acute or chronic, depending on how severely the muscles have been overused or injured. Studies reveal that low back pain has been identified as the leading contributor to disability and when there is dysfunction in the lumbopelvic-hip complex, causing a reduction in gluteus medius strength. When the gluteus medius muscles have become overused or injured through trauma, it can develop trigger points on the muscle causing low back pain issues. When trigger points affect the gluteus medius, additional studies reveal that latent trigger points along the gluteus medius muscles may cause joint movement limitation while causing overload by affecting muscle activation from the hips.

 

 

According to Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D.’s book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual,” patients with active trigger points along their gluteus medius complain of pain when they are doing normal actions like walking or sitting. The pressure from the trigger points along the gluteus medius causes the individual to be in a slumped position, causing them to be uncomfortable. This causes instability in the hips and lower body extremities, making many people miserable. The book also explains that the referred pain patterns caused by gluteus medius trigger points can overlap other chronic conditions like sacroiliac joint dysfunction, low back pain, and inflammation of the subgluteus medius bursa.

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Gluteus Medius- Video

Have you been dealing with hip pain? Do you feel uncomfortable pain when walking or sitting down? Or Do you feel muscle stiffness or tenderness near your tailbone constantly? If you have been experiencing these painful symptoms constantly in your lower back or your hips, it could be due to your gluteus medius muscles being affected by trigger points. The video above overviews the gluteus medius location and how trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome causes referred pain to the lower back and hips. When trigger points affect the gluteus medius, the referred pain can overlap and correlate to low back and hip pain, thus causing various issues to the muscles surrounding the low back and buttock region. Regarding trigger points affecting the gluteus medius, they can be treatable through multiple techniques specific to the low back, buttocks, and hips.


Various Techniques For Managing Trigger Pain Along The Gluteus Medius

 

When issues of low back or hip pain begin to cause a problem in the lower extremities, the gluteus muscles can invoke pain-like symptoms in the affected muscle regions, thus developing trigger points. Even though trigger points are tricky to diagnose, they can be treated with various techniques that many people can incorporate into their daily lives. Exercises like resistance training on the gluteus medius can help improve hip abductor functionality and increase the strength of the gluteus medius. To manage trigger points along the gluteus medius, many people must do these corrective actions to reduce the pain that they may be causing to their glutes. When people are putting on pants, it is best to sit down and then put on their pants to prevent muscle strain on their hips and gluteus medius. Another corrective action is to move around after sitting down for a prolonged period to avoid trigger pain from developing. These corrective actions and techniques can help strengthen the lower body extremities and improve hip mobility. 

 

Conclusion

As part of the gluteal muscle region, the gluteus medius lies between the gluteus maximus and minimus by being a primary hip abductor. The gluteus medius helps with pelvic stabilization and helps the trunk maintain an upright position when the legs are in motion. When normal or traumatic factors affect the gluteus medius, it can develop trigger points on the muscle fibers, causing referred pain to the hips and lower back. Trigger points along the gluteus medius are manageable through various techniques that people can use to prevent hip and low back issues. These techniques can minimize the trigger points and strengthen the gluteus medius muscles in the glutes.

 

References

Bagcier, Fatih, et al. “The Relationship between Gluteus Medius Latent Trigger Point and Muscle Strength in Healthy Subjects.” Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2022, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35248262/.

Sadler, Sean, et al. “Gluteus Medius Muscle Function in People with and without Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review.” BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, BioMed Central, 22 Oct. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6805550/.

Shah, Aashin, and Bruno Bordoni. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Gluteus Medius Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 25 Jan. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK557509/.

Stastny, Petr, et al. “Strengthening the Gluteus Medius Using Various Bodyweight and Resistance Exercises.” Strength and Conditioning Journal, Strength and Conditioning Journal, June 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890828/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Whiler, Lisa, et al. “Gluteus Medius and Minimus Muscle Structure, Strength, and Function in Healthy Adults: Brief Report.” Physiotherapy Canada. Physiotherapie Canada, University of Toronto Press, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963550/.

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Experiencing Pain In Your Gluteus Max? Could Be Trigger Points

Experiencing Pain In Your Gluteus Max? Could Be Trigger Points

Introduction

The body’s lower extremities have various muscles that allow the legs and feet to move around from one location to another. The different muscles that make up the lower extremities of the body help stabilize the hips and allow mobility to the legs. The legs and hip muscles have a mutual relationship with one body muscle that helps the lower body, and it’s the glutes, specifically the gluteus maximus. Many individuals must realize that the glutes must be activated when working out. When the glutes are not activated, it can lead to the rest of the lower extremities, like the lower back, hips, and knees, taking most of the loaded weight on the body. This leads to the development of trigger points associated with butt pain along the gluteus maximus, causing referred pain down the legs. Today’s article looks at the gluteus maximus muscles, how trigger points are associated with butt pain, and relieving pain is associated with trigger points along the gluteus maximus. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple techniques in the lower body extremities, like butt pain treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the gluteus maximus muscles near and surrounding the body’s lower extremities. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-anatomy-levator-scapulae

What Is The Gluteus Maximus?

 

Have you been experiencing pain in your hips, low back, and knees? Are you uncomfortable when you are trying to sit down? Or are you experiencing sciatic pain-like symptoms running from your buttock to your leg? These issues affecting the body’s lower extremities may correlate with trigger points along the gluteus maximus in the buttock. The gluteus maximus is the largest gluteus muscle that makes up the shape and form of the buttock and hip areas of the body. The gluteus maximus can come in different sizes depending on the individual’s body type. This large muscle plays a prominent role in the body as it helps maintain an erect posture for the upper body. Studies reveal that the gluteus maximus is one of the primary hip extensors, and some of its functions include extending and externally rotating the thighs. The gluteus maximus, when trained properly through exercise, can increase in size and strength while supporting the upper body. However, only a few people realize that when their gluteus maximus muscles are not properly trained, it can lead to various issues that can cause trigger points to form along the gluteus maximus.

 

Trigger Points Associated With Butt Pain

 

As mentioned earlier, when individuals don’t properly strengthen their gluteus maximus through exercises, it can lead to unwanted pain symptoms affecting the lower back, hips, and knees in the lower body. When the gluteus maximus muscles are not fully activated to their full potential, they can develop into trigger points associated with butt pain. Studies reveal that trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome associated with the gluteus maximus can affect the entry point of the inferior gluteal nerve, causing pain and a limited range of motion to the joints. Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., who wrote “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” mentioned that the symptoms caused by active trigger points could make the individual uncomfortable and cause a cramping sensation to the gluteus maximus. At the same time, trigger points along the gluteus maximus can correlate with referred pain that can entrap the sciatic nerve causing sciatica to affect the legs. When this happens, many other issues can pop up and affect the lower extremities, mimicking low back pain.

 


How To Release Trigger Points On The Gluteus Maximus-Video

Are you experiencing a cramping sensation in your buttock? What about feeling an electric sense running down your leg? Or are you dealing with low back pain? Many of these issues are associated with trigger points affecting the gluteus maximus, causing butt pain. The gluteus maximus is a large, superficial muscle that helps support the hips and ensures that the upper body has an erect posture. When issues affect the gluteus maximus, it can lead to unwanted pain in the lower back, hips, and knees, causing the individual to be in constant pain. This leads to the development of trigger points along the gluteus maximus, thus mimicking sciatica. The video above demonstrates where the trigger points are located in the gluteus maximus and how they can potentially overlap to cause sciatica nerve pain. The video also shows how to use various techniques to relieve the pain from the trigger points and help release the trapped muscle from causing additional pain in the lower body.


Relieving Pain Associated With Trigger Points Along The Gluteus Maximus

 

Since the gluteus maximus is a large important muscle, it is important to strengthen the glutes to prevent low back pain. When it comes to relieving pain associated with trigger points along the gluteus maximus, there are various techniques that many people can utilize to release the tension from the gluteus maximus and the rest of the lower body. Various glute stretches can help elongate the gluteus maximus muscle after a workout and reduce the chances of triggering points and referred pain re-occurring. Another technique that many people should do is to bend at the knees when lifting heavy objects to reduce overload on the lower back and cause more issues on the gluteus maximus.

 

Conclusion

The gluteus maximus is a large superficial muscle with a very important function in the body. This muscle helps with extending and externally rotating the thighs and helps keep the posture erect for the upper back. However, the gluteus maximus muscles are not properly trained and can lead to unwanted issues that cause referred pain to the hips, low back, and knees that correlate with triggering points. Luckily though, through proper training and stretching, the lower body can prevent the gluteus maximus from developing trigger points and help improve a person’s posture.

 

References

Akamatsu, Flavia Emi, et al. “Anatomical Basis of the Myofascial Trigger Points of the Gluteus Maximus Muscle.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5733974/.

Elzanie, Adel, and Judith Borger. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Gluteus Maximus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 28 Mar. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538193/.

Neto, Walter Krause, et al. “Gluteus Maximus Activation during Common Strength and Hypertrophy Exercises: A Systematic Review.” Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, Uludag University, 24 Feb. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7039033/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Pelvic Floor Muscles & Trigger Points

Pelvic Floor Muscles & Trigger Points

Introduction

The body’s pelvic region has many functions crucial for functionality with the host. The various muscles surrounding the pelvis help provide stability to the body’s core, allow circulation to the heart in the cardiovascular system, support the reproductive and abdominal organs, and much more the body requires. The pelvic joints’ various muscles also allow hip mobility and function for the lower body extremities. When traumatic injuries or abnormal activities start to affect the pelvic floor muscles, the various issues can affect the functionality of the pelvic region and cause problems in bladder control for both the male and female bodies. Many of these issues correlate with trigger points surrounding or on the pelvic floor muscles that can affect how the vital organs operate in the body. Today’s article examines the pelvic floor muscles, how trigger points correlate with pelvic pain, and managing pelvic pain is associated with trigger points. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple techniques in the lower body extremities, like pelvic pain treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the pelvic floor muscles near and surrounding the pelvis. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-week-spelenius-cervicis

What Are The Pelvic Floor Muscles?

 

Have you been experiencing bladder issues that constantly make you go to the bathroom? Have you been dealing with severe cramps that mimic sciatica pain? Or does it hurt when you are sitting down? Many of these issues correlate with muscle pain associated with trigger point pain along the pelvic floor muscles. The pelvic floor muscles are a unique anatomical body location with a balance of different pressures (visceral, muscular, or liquid) that play a fundamental role in the body’s lower extremities. The pelvic floor muscles have four divided compartments but have different parts and functions to allow optimal bodily function. The four pelvic floor compartments include:

  • Anterior or urinary (bladder)
  • Medium or genital (uterus in women, prostate in men)
  • Posterior or anterior (anus, anal cavity, and rectum)
  • Peritoneal (endopelvic fascia and perineal membrane)

Some of the functions that the pelvic floor muscles allow the body to perform properly include proper contraction for sexual function, allowing respiration in the abdominal organs, maintaining bodily fluid actions like going to the restroom, and maintaining good posture by working together with the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral columns of the spine. Studies reveal that the spine’s autonomic nerves, which include the sympathetic and parasympathetic, help supply the posterior and anterior compartments in the pelvic floor. When traumatic factors affect the pelvic floor muscles, it can lead to correlating issues regarding trigger points in the pelvic muscles.

 

How Do Trigger Points Correlate With  Pelvic Pain?

The pelvic floor has four different components to allow the muscles to function properly when traumatic factors start to invoke pain-like symptoms that can affect pelvic functionality in both the male and female body, thus developing trigger point pain associated with pelvic pain. For the female body, trigger points along the bulbospongiosus muscle (part of the pelvic floor muscles) may cause aching pain in the perineal region. In contrast, in the male body, trigger points along the retroscrotal area may cause discomfort while sitting erect. According to the book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., stated that many individuals that are dealing with trigger point pain along their pelvic floor muscles would often complain about feeling localized aching pain in their anal region and may experience painful bowel movements when going to the bathroom.

 

Studies reveal that myofascial trigger points develop “muscle contraction knots” of the pelvic floor muscles, may be identified in many patients suffering from pelvic pain syndrome (urological, colorectal, and gynecological), and are associated with trigger points. Trigger points are tricky when diagnosing where the pain is located since myofascial pain syndrome mimics other chronic conditions of the surrounding muscles, causing referred pain. Additional studies reveal that the location and severity of pelvic floor myofascial pain was significantly correlated with various pelvic pain symptoms that can affect both males and females with different conditions. When doctors recognize that their patients are dealing with trigger points associated with pelvic pain after an examination, they devise a treatment plan and work with other specialists to manage trigger points and reduce pain in the pelvic region.

 


Top 3 Pelvic Floor Exercises- Video

Have you been dealing with urinary issues that make it tricky to go to the bathroom? Do you have trouble finding a comfortable position when you are sitting down? Or do you feel pain radiating down your buttock and leg? Pelvic pain is a common issue that can affect both men and women that can cause various pain symptoms that correlate with trigger points along the pelvic floor muscles. When trigger points affect the pelvic floor muscles, it can lead to referred pain that connects with pelvic pain in the body’s lower extremities. Many factors can affect the pelvis, like issues affecting the digestive, reproductive, or urinary systems, a trauma in the surrounding pelvic muscles that causes them to be weak or corresponding issues on the hips and lower back. Trigger points associated with pelvic pain may be tricky. Still, they can be treatable with different therapies that can reduce the pain and help strengthen those weak muscles in the pelvic region. The video above demonstrates three other pelvic floor exercises that can help support the pelvic muscles and reduce the trigger points from reoccurring in the pelvic area of the lower body.


Managing Pelvic Pain Associated With Trigger Points

 

Various treatments can manage pain associated with trigger points through multiple therapies that can reduce pain-like symptoms along the pelvic floor muscles. Many therapies, like trigger point therapy and muscle training, can help reduce the pain along the pelvic floor muscles and bring back bowel function to the pelvic region. Studies reveal that doctors provide a range of protocols designed to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles and the different muscle groups around the pelvic area while improving function. However, treatment alone can only go so far, as people must take corrective actions to ensure that the trigger points do not return in the future. Movements like corrective posture exercises focusing on the lower back, hips, and pelvis and eating a fiber-rich diet can reduce pelvic pain. This allows the individual to get their lower half mobility back. 

 

Conclusion

The pelvic floor muscle has four divided components that will enable optimal bodily function that has different jobs in the male and female bodies. The pelvic floor muscles have many crucial functions that provide the host stability in the body’s core, allow circulation to the cardiovascular system, and, most importantly, support the reproductive and abdominal organs. When issues affect the pelvic floor muscles, it can lead to pelvic pain associated with trigger points that can disrupt many from going to the bathroom or disrupting sexual functionality. All is not lost, as various therapies can reduce the pain and strengthen the pelvic muscles in the lower body. This allows lower body mobility back to the host and prevents unnecessary issues from reoccurring.

 

References

Bordoni, Bruno, et al. “Anatomy, Abdomen and Pelvis, Pelvic Floor.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 18 July 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482200/.

Marques, Andrea, et al. “The Status of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training for Women.” Canadian Urological Association Journal = Journal De L’Association Des Urologues Du Canada, Canadian Medical Association, Dec. 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2997838/.

Meister, Melanie R, et al. “Pelvic Floor Myofascial Pain Severity and Pelvic Floor Disorder Symptom Bother: Is There a Correlation?” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6732028/.

Moldwin, Robert M, and Jennifer Yonaitis Fariello. “Myofascial Trigger Points of the Pelvic Floor: Associations with Urological Pain Syndromes and Treatment Strategies Including Injection Therapy.” Current Urology Reports, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2013, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23943509/.

Raizada, Varuna, and Ravinder K Mittal. “Pelvic Floor Anatomy and Applied Physiology.” Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2617789/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Thigh & Low Back Pain Caused By Trigger Points

Thigh & Low Back Pain Caused By Trigger Points

Introduction

The posterior section of the lower half of the body consists of the hipslow back, pelvis, legs, and feet, which provide stability to the body while supporting the upper body’s weight. The various muscles surround the lower extremities and make different motions for mobility and functionality by contracting and retracting when the legs and hips are in motion. The various muscles that provide stability to the hips and the legs are the iliopsoas muscles. When normal age or incidents affect the lower body extremities, it can correlate to the development of trigger point pain. Today’s article examines the iliopsoas muscles, how referred trigger pain affects the thighs and low back, and treating trigger point pain on the thighs and low back. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple techniques in the low back and thigh pain therapies related to trigger points to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the iliopsoas muscle in the lower back, thigh, and near the pelvis. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

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What Is The Iliopsoas Muscle?

Have you been dealing with muscle cramps in your thighs? What about feeling muscle stiffness in your lower back when you are stretching? Or do you feel your thigh muscles become heavy after a workout? Many of these issues correlate with the iliopsoas muscle becoming overused and developing trigger points, thus affecting the thighs and lower back. In the lower body extremities, the muscles that help provide stability to the hips are the iliopsoas muscles. The iliopsoas muscles consist of three muscles: iliacus, psoas major, and psoas minor, which can work individually or as a unit. When working individually, the iliacus muscle provides stability to the pelvis, the psoas major muscle helps stabilize the lumbar spine when a person is sitting, and the psoas minor helps with flexion of the trunk and stretch the iliac fascia. As a unit, however, these muscles work together to become the primary flexors of the thighs and allow hip flexion. 

 

 

Studies reveal that the iliopsoas is a deep muscle group that anatomically connects the spine to the body’s lower limbs. The iliopsoas muscles have an important function in the body’s lower limbs as primary hip flexors for daily activities, especially for those in sports. However, many impairments and pathologies affect the iliopsoas, which causes significant limitations and challenges since the symptoms mask the pain, causing individuals to think they are dealing with low back and hip pain. 

 

Referred Trigger Pain On The Thighs & Low Back

 

Since the iliopsoas muscles provide hip and thigh flexion to the lower body, many impairments and pathologies can affect this muscle group, causing issues in the hips, thighs, and even the lower back. These impairments can cause the iliopsoas muscles to be overused and overstretched, thus potentially developing trigger points along the iliopsoas muscles, causing referred pain on the thighs and low back. Studies reveal that when the iliopsoas muscle becomes overused or traumatic issues affect it, it can lead to problems in hip flexion and impairment in the lower extremities. In “Myofascial Pain and Disorders: The Trigger Point Manual,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., when trigger points begin to affect the iliopsoas muscles, it is known as the “Hidden Prankster” as normal factors like poor posture can overload the back causing trigger points to form not only on the iliopsoas muscles but the hamstrings, gluteal, thoracolumbar paraspinal, and posterior cervical muscles. Trigger points can mimic other chronic conditions that cause referred pain in different body areas. Trigger point pain in the iliopsoas muscle can lead to back pain, groin pain, snapping hips, and standing up difficult for the individual if it is not treated immediately.

 


Trigger Point Therapy: Iliopsoas Muscle- Video

Since the iliopsoas muscles provide hip and thigh flexion to the lower body, many impairments and pathologies can affect this muscle group, causing issues in the hips, thighs, and even the lower back. These impairments can cause the iliopsoas muscles to be overused and overstretched, thus potentially developing trigger points along the iliopsoas muscles, causing referred pain in the thighs and low back. Studies reveal that when the iliopsoas muscle becomes overused or traumatic issues affect it, it can lead to problems in hip flexion and impairment in the lower extremities. In “Myofascial Pain and Disorders: The Trigger Point Manual,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., when trigger points begin to affect the iliopsoas muscles, it is known as the “Hidden Prankster” as normal factors like poor posture can overload the back causing trigger points to form not only on the iliopsoas muscles but the hamstrings, gluteal, thoracolumbar paraspinal, and posterior cervical muscles. Trigger points can mimic other chronic conditions that cause referred pain in different body areas. Trigger point pain in the iliopsoas muscle can lead to back pain, groin pain, snapping hips, and standing up difficult for the individual if it is not treated immediately.


Treating Trigger Point Pain On The Thighs & Low Back

 

When trigger point pain begins to cause issues in the thighs and low back, the iliopsoas muscles will suffer from muscle spasms, stiffness, and difficulty standing. This is due to nerve entrapment from aggravated iliopsoas muscles caused by trigger points. However, various treatments can manage trigger point pain in the thighs, and low back through multiple techniques that pain specialists utilize can help relieve the pain symptoms from the iliopsoas muscle and manage trigger point pain. Studies reveal that combination treatments like soft tissue manipulation and trigger point therapy can help release the tiny nodules from the affected muscle and reduce the symptoms from re-occurring in the body. Other treatments, like correcting one’s posture, strength exercising, and even stretching, can help lengthen the iliopsoas muscles, stretch and strengthen the surrounding muscles, and prevent pain-like symptoms from affecting the thigh and low back muscles again. These various treatments can even improve hip mobility in the lower body extremities. 

 

Conclusion

In the lower body extremities, an iliopsoas is a group of deep muscles that provide stability to the lumbar spine and allow hip and thigh flexion. These groups of deep muscles can work individually or together to enable the individual to sit, stand and move around through physical activities; however, when the iliopsoas muscles become overused or suffer from a traumatic event, they can develop trigger points that can cause mobility issues on the thighs, hips, and lower back. Even though trigger points are difficult to diagnose, they are treatable through various treatments. Various treatments, like soft tissue massages, trigger point therapy, strength exercising, or stretching the iliopsoas muscles, can release trigger points from the affected body part and help bring back mobility function to the hips, thighs, and low back.

 

References

Bordoni, Bruno, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Iliopsoas Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 2 Apr. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK531508/.

Dydyk, Alexander M, and Amit Sapra. “Psoas Syndrome.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 12 June 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK551701/.

Kameda, Masahiro, and Hideyuki Tanimae. “Effectiveness of Active Soft Tissue Release and Trigger Point Block for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back and Leg Pain of Predominantly Gluteus Medius Origin: A Report of 115 Cases.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, The Society of Physical Therapy Science, Feb. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6382483/.

Lifshitz, Liran, et al. “Iliopsoas the Hidden Muscle: Anatomy, Diagnosis, and Treatment.” Current Sports Medicine Reports, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2020, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32516195/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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