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Lower Back Pain

Back Clinic Lower Back Pain Chiropractic Team. More than 80% of the population suffers from back pain at some point in their lives. Most cases can be linked to the most common causes: muscle strain, injury, or overuse. But it can also be attributed to a specific condition of the spine: Herniated Disc, Degenerative Disc Disease, Spondylolisthesis, Spinal Stenosis, and Osteoarthritis. Less common conditions are sacroiliac joint dysfunction, spinal tumors, fibromyalgia, and piriformis syndrome.

Pain is caused by damage or injury to the muscles and ligaments of the back. Dr. Alex Jimenez compiled articles outline the importance of understanding the causes and effects of this uncomfortable symptom. Chiropractic focuses on restoring a person’s strength and flexibility to help improve symptoms of lower back pain.


IBD Back Symptoms: El Paso Back Clinic

IBD Back Symptoms: El Paso Back Clinic

Inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD, causes inflammation of the digestive tract lining, which often involves the deeper layers. Gastrointestinal or GI problems of the stomach and intestines often include diarrhea, weight loss, rectal bleeding, fatigue, and back pain. The inflammation can reach the spine’s joints, causing stiffness, discomfort, and pain symptoms. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic can help manage symptoms and guide individuals on treatment options.

IBD Back Symptoms: EP's Chiropractic Functional Medicine TeamIBD Back Pain

IBD is a set of conditions associated with chronic or intermittent inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. It includes Crohn’s disease – CD and ulcerative colitisUC. Although there are genetic components that predispose individuals to IBD, environmental factors appear to contribute the most. Research shows that IBD is likely related to disturbances in the gut’s flora, which include:

  • Bacteria
  • Fungi
  • Viruses

These set up a systemic inflammatory response.

Symptoms

Other environmental factors associated with IBD include the long-term use of birth control pills and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/NSAIDs. Research theorizes that as the gut becomes inflamed, its normal integrity and structure become compromised and begin to leak out, causing an immune system overreaction response. This can cause non-gastrointestinal symptoms that include:

  • Fever
  • Anemia
  • Joint swelling
  • Varying pain sensations
  • Inflammation of blood vessels
  • Breathing problems
  • Vision issues

Other symptoms can include:

  • Anorexia
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Chest pain
  • Heartburn
  • Liver issues – For example, gallstones

Spine

IBD can cause low back pain as the IBD can inflame the spine’s joints, especially the sacrum, as well as cause abdominal cramps and rectal sensations that radiate to the low back area. However, irritation, inflammation, or infection of any central, abdominal, or pelvic organs can cause low back pain.

Diagnosis

  • Diagnosis requires a physical examination of the colon – a sigmoidoscopy or a colonoscopy is used.
  • Both procedures take a biopsy of the intestinal tissues, which is studied to determine the extent and degree of inflammation.
  • Depending on the circumstances, an X-ray could be used to show the depth or extent of the condition.

Chiropractic Management

A chiropractor can help individuals decrease or completely alleviate musculoskeletal symptoms by realigning the spine and pelvis and massaging, releasing, and relaxing the muscles, which increases circulation and soothes inflammation. The reason why chiropractic care can effectively treat IBD is its ability to stabilize the internal systems. When the central nervous system and immune system communicate and function properly, this prevents the immune system from attacking the body’s tissue cells, preventing inflammation. The chiropractic whole-body approach can also help with recommendations regarding lifestyle changes and nutritional anti-inflammatory modifications.


Ulcerative Colitis


References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “What Is Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?” 2022, www.cdc.gov/ibd/what-is-IBD.htm

Danese S, Fiocchi C. Etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. World J Gastroenterol. 2006;12(30):4807-4812. doi:10.3748/wjg.v12.i30.4807

Limsrivilai, Julajak et al. “Systemic Inflammatory Responses in Ulcerative Colitis Patients and Clostridium difficile Infection.” Digestive diseases and sciences vol. 63,7 (2018): 1801-1810. doi:10.1007/s10620-018-5044-1

van Erp, S J et al. “classifying Back Pain and Peripheral Joint Complaints in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients: A Prospective Longitudinal Follow-up Study.” Journal of Crohn’s & colitis vol. 10,2 (2016): 166-75. doi:10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjv195

Zeitz, Jonas, et al. “Pain in IBD Patients: Very Frequent and Frequently Insufficiently Taken into Account.” PloS one vol. 11,6 e0156666. 22 Jun. 2016, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0156666

Piriformis Syndrome & Myofascial Pain Syndrome

Piriformis Syndrome & Myofascial Pain Syndrome

Introduction

The lumbar region of the spine has various muscles and nerve roots that work together with the lower body extremities, like the hips, buttocks, legs, knees, and feet, for mobility and walking function. The various muscles in the buttock region include the gluteal muscles. They have a casual relationship with the hip muscles as they work together for hip mobility and erect good posture in the body. These various muscles and nerves also supply sensory-motor function for the legs to be mobile and provide hip mobility. The piriformis is one of the muscles assisting in the hips and buttock region. When this muscle becomes overused, it can cause mobility issues in the legs and affect a person’s ability to walk. Today’s article looks at the piriformis muscle, how trigger points are associated with piriformis syndrome, and how to manage piriformis syndrome associated with trigger points. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like sciatic pain and piriformis syndrome treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the piriformis muscle. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

exercises-for-neck-and-shoulder-pain-from-myofascial-trigger-points-by-dr-andrea-furlan-md-phd_63543ea0

What Is The Piriformis Muscle?

 

Have you been having issues walking from one place to another? Do you feel muscle tightness in your hips or buttock region? Or are you experiencing radiating pain traveling to your knees and feet? These pain symptoms are correlated with trigger points affecting the piriformis muscle. The piriformis is a flat, pear-shaped muscle, one of the six short rotator muscle groups in the gluteal region of the hips and thighs. The rotator muscle groups consist of the following:

  • Gemelli
  • Quadratus Femoris
  • Obturator Internus
  • Obturator Externus

This muscle is parallel to the posterior margins of the gluteus medius and deep into the gluteus maximus. This muscle is very important to the body as it provides lower-body movement by stabilizing the hip joint and can lift and rotate the thighs away from the body. The piriformis muscle also surrounds the sciatic nerve, as this long nerve runs deep beneath the piriformis and enters the gluteal region of the rear. When the piriformis muscle becomes overused or suffers from associated traumatic factors, it can aggravate the sciatic nerve and even develop tiny nodules known as trigger points, causing mobility issues. 

 

Trigger Points Associated With Piriformis Syndrome

 

When abnormal factors affect the piriformis muscles, they can develop into trigger points associated with piriformis syndrome and cause issues in the pelvic and hip regions of the body. According to Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” trigger points can be activated when repetitive strain affects the piriformis muscle and causes symptoms of muscle weakness and pain in the hips. This causes overlapping issues in the surrounding muscles and the sciatic nerve, making diagnosing tricky for trigger points. Studies reveal that trigger points associated with piriformis syndrome may potentially cause muscle spasms or an inflammatory process to irritate the sciatic nerve that may be presented as identical to lumbar disk syndrome without neurological findings. Trigger points associated with piriformis syndrome may mimic chronic issues like fibromyalgia. Even though trigger points are tricky to pinpoint in a thorough examination, there are various ways to reduce the pain and prevent trigger points from affecting the piriformis muscle causing sciatic nerve pain. 

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Piriformis Muscle- Video

Have you been dealing with sciatic nerve pain? Have you found it difficult to walk for a short period? Or are you dealing with muscle tenderness or soreness in your buttock or hips? People experiencing these symptoms could be dealing with piriformis syndrome associated with trigger points. The piriformis is a small, fan-shaped muscle, one of the six short rotator muscle groups that help with hip and thigh mobility through stabilization. The piriformis muscles also surround the sciatic nerve and can succumb to injuries. When traumatic forces affect the hips and thighs, the piriformis muscle develops nodules known as trigger points, causing the muscle to irritate the sciatic nerve and cause pain in the legs. The video above shows where the piriformis muscle is located and how trigger points can mimic sciatic nerve pain in the leg without neurological findings. Studies reveal that trigger points could be a rare anatomical variation that can correlate with piriformis syndrome associated with sciatica. However, there is some good news, as there are ways to manage piriformis syndrome associated with trigger points.


Managing Piriformis Syndrome Associated With Trigger Points

 

Various techniques can help manage piriformis syndrome associated with trigger points to relieve the piriformis muscle. Studies reveal that Kinesio tape on the piriformis muscle can help reduce pain and improve many individuals’ hip joint range of motion. Other techniques like stretching or deep tissue massage can help loosen up the stiff muscles and relieve trigger points from forming on the piriformis. For sciatica pain associated with trigger points along the piriformis muscle, decompression therapy can help the piriformis muscle lay off pressure on the sciatic nerve and reduce aggravated pain. These techniques can help improve hip joint mobility and increase the range of motion to the hips and lower extremities.

 

Conclusion

The piriformis is a small muscle that provides hip and thigh mobility. This small muscle surrounds the sciatic nerve, which helps give motor function to the legs. When traumatic factors affect the piriformis muscle, it can develop trigger points and cause sciatic pain in the hips. This causes mobility issues and pain around the hips. Various treatments are provided to help reduce the trigger points along the piriformis muscle and reduce sciatic nerve pain from causing more problems to the hips and legs mobility.

 

References

Chang, Carol, et al. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Piriformis Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 3 Oct. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK519497/.

Pfeifer, T, and W F Fitz. “[The Piriformis Syndrome].” Zeitschrift Fur Orthopadie Und Ihre Grenzgebiete, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1989, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2618150/.

R;, Hashemirad F;Karimi N;Keshavarz. “The Effect of Kinesio Taping Technique on Trigger Points of the Piriformis Muscle.” Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 8 Feb. 2016, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27814861/.

Ro, Tae Hoon, and Lance Edmonds. “Diagnosis and Management of Piriformis Syndrome: A Rare Anatomic Variant Analyzed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.” Journal of Clinical Imaging Science, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 21 Feb. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5843966/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Sciatica Pain & The Gluteus Minimus Muscles

Sciatica Pain & The Gluteus Minimus Muscles

Introduction

The buttock and the lower back have a casual relationship to the body, as the lower back has various muscles and nerves surrounding the spinal column. In contrast, the buttock region has multiple muscles and the sciatic nerve to keep the body upright. The sciatic nerve travels from the lumbar region of the spine across the gluteus muscles and down to the legs. The gluteus muscles include the Maximus, medius, and minimus, and they work with the sciatic nerve regarding good posture. When normal or traumatic factors begin to affect the body, like sciatica or poor posture, it can lead to developing trigger points associated with the gluteus minimus affecting the sciatic nerve. Today’s article examines the gluteus minimus, how trigger points mimic sciatic pain on the gluteus minimus, and various treatments to relieve sciatic nerve pain. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like sciatic pain treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the gluteus medius muscles associated with sciatica. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

exercises-for-neck-and-shoulder-pain-from-myofascial-trigger-points-by-dr-andrea-furlan-md-phd_63543ea0

What Is The Gluteus Minimus?

 

Have you been experiencing radiating pain traveling down to your leg? Do you have difficulty walking or sitting down? Do you feel tenderness or referred pain near your buttock region? Some of the issues correlate with trigger points affecting the gluteus minimus, causing pain in the sciatic nerve. As the smallest muscle in the gluteal region of the buttock, the gluteus minimus shares similar characteristics to the gluteus medius while being located beneath the medius muscle. One of the primary functions of the gluteus minimus is that it predominantly acts as a hip stabilizer and abductor. The nerves from the gluteal muscles include the sciatic nerve, which is on top of the gluteus muscles and the other nerves help supply the muscles to function in the posterior region of the body. Studies reveal that the structural integrity of the gluteus minimus muscles is the key to the lateral hip muscle, which contributes to pelvic stability and lower extremity function. However, when issues affect the gluteal muscles’ posterior region could trigger point pain mimicking sciatica.

 

How Trigger Points Mimic Sciatic Pain On The Gluteus Minimus?

When the lower body extremities begin to suffer from multiple issues that cause the individual to have mobility dysfunction, various factors could correlate to the dysfunction. When the gluteus minimus muscles have been overused or been through a traumatic experience, they can develop trigger points along the muscle fibers and even cause nerve entrapment along the sciatic nerve. Trigger points along the gluteus minimus can mimic sciatic nerve pain down to the back or even the side of the legs that causes excruciating and deep pain in the posterior region. Studies reveal that pain in the buttock region is a deep gluteal syndrome caused by non-discogenic pain that causes sciatic nerve entrapment.

 

 

The book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., states that many patients with active trigger points located in their gluteus minimus would complain about hip pain that could cause them to limp-walk when they are going to places. The pain caused by the active trigger points can make it difficult to stand up from a seated position due to the painful movements. The associated pain that the trigger points are causing to the gluteus minimus can be constant and excruciating; even small stretches can not alleviate the pain. The book also mentioned that trigger points could cause referred pain to the gluteus minimus that can cause various somato-visceral issues to the hips, legs, and knees if the pain worsens.


Sciatic Type Pain: Gluteus Minimus Trigger Points- Video

Are you dealing with pain in your hips, low back, and legs? Do you find it difficult to walk or stand up constantly? Or are you experiencing sciatic nerve pain that is radiating down your leg? All these pain-like symptoms are associated with trigger points along the gluteus minimus affecting the sciatic nerve. The gluteus minimus is the smallest of the gluteal muscles with the same function as the gluteus medius and predominately acts as the hip’s stabilizer and abductor. When the gluteus minimus muscles have been overused from traumatic events or normal factors, they can develop trigger points in the muscle fibers, entrap the sciatic nerve and irritate the nerve causing sciatica. The video above explain where the gluteus minimus is located and pinpoints where the trigger points are in the muscle fibers. Trigger points along the gluteus minimus can mimic sciatica by causing referred pain to travel down the leg. This can cause the individual to be unable to walk or even stand up due to the excruciating pain that they are in. Luckily, trigger points are treatable even though they are tricky to diagnose.


Various Treatments To Release Sciatic Nerve Pain

 

Even though trigger points along the gluteus minimus are tricky to diagnose, they are treatable through various treatments to alleviate the pain that the person is experiencing and can reduce sciatic nerve pain from causing more issues in the legs. Studies reveal that the effectiveness of active soft tissue release and trigger point block treatments combined can release entrapped nerves from the gluteus minimus and reduce low back and sciatic pain from the lower extremities. Now the treatments alone can only do so much to the individual, as many doctors tell their patients to take corrective actions or techniques to reduce the chances of trigger points from forming again on the gluteus minimus. Techniques like glute stretches, ischemic compressions, or using a foam roller can break the myofascial triggers from the gluteus minimus muscles and reduce the pain in the glutes and legs. This will help bring mobility back to the lower extremities.

 

Conclusion

As the smallest muscle in the body’s gluteal region, the gluteus minimus is the lower body’s predominant hip stabilizer and abductor. The gluteus minimus contributes to pelvic stability and lower extremity functionality that can be overused and can develop trigger points associated with sciatica. Trigger points along the gluteus minimus can cause referred pain to the legs and lower back while mimicking sciatic nerve pain. Thankfully various treatments and techniques can help reduce the chances of trigger points forming along the gluteus minimus and release nerve entrapment from the aggravated muscles pressing on the sciatic nerve, bringing back lower extremity mobility to the body.

 

References

Greco, Anthony J, and Renato C Vilella. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Gluteus Minimus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 May 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK556144/.

Kameda, Masahiro, and Hideyuki Tanimae. “Effectiveness of Active Soft Tissue Release and Trigger Point Block for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back and Leg Pain of Predominantly Gluteus Medius Origin: A Report of 115 Cases.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, The Society of Physical Therapy Science, Feb. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6382483/.

Martin, Hal David, et al. “Deep Gluteal Syndrome.” Journal of Hip Preservation Surgery, Oxford University Press, July 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4718497/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Whiler, Lisa, et al. “Gluteus Medius and Minimus Muscle Structure, Strength, and Function in Healthy Adults: Brief Report.” Physiotherapy Canada. Physiotherapie Canada, University of Toronto Press, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963550/.

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Lumbago Pain & Gluteus Medius Trigger Pain

Lumbago Pain & Gluteus Medius Trigger Pain

Introduction

Many individuals utilize the lower half of their bodies to go to different places and use the various surrounding muscles that provide stability on the hips and low back while supporting the upper body’s weight. Along the lower back is the buttock region, where the gluteal muscles help stabilize the pelvis, extend the hips, and rotate the thighs. The gluteal muscles also help shape and support the spine and have an erect posture in the body. One of the gluteal muscles that support the lower body is the gluteus medius, which can succumb to injuries and strain when overused or strained. This leads to developing trigger points that can cause various issues in the lower extremities and lead to corresponding chronic conditions. Today’s article focuses on the gluteus medius muscles, how the lumbago is associated with gluteus medius trigger pain, and various techniques to manage trigger points along the gluteus medius muscle. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like butt and low back pain treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the gluteus medius muscles near and surrounding the body’s lower extremities. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-anatomy-levator-scapulae

What Is The Gluteus Medius?

 

Have you been experiencing pain near your buttock and lower back? Have you been feeling unstable when you are walking? What about feeling pain in your tailbone that makes it unbearable to sit down? Many of these issues are associated with referred pain caused by trigger points affecting the gluteus medius. As part of the gluteal muscle region, the gluteus medius lies between the gluteus maximus and minimus is a flat, triangular muscle and is the primary hip abductor. The gluteus medius and minimus work together for internal rotation for the thighs and lateral rotation for the knees when they are extended. The gluteus medius muscles also help stabilize the pelvis, while the trunk maintains an upright position when the legs are in motion. Studies reveal that the gluteus medius is a key lateral hip muscle that correlates with muscle function with other muscle groups like the quadriceps and abdominal muscles. When injuries or not activating the gluteal muscles often, various muscle issues can cause problems to the gluteus medius muscles. 

 

Lumbago Associated With Gluteus Medius Trigger Pain

Dysfunction in the hips can lead to various issues that can either be acute or chronic, depending on how severely the muscles have been overused or injured. Studies reveal that low back pain has been identified as the leading contributor to disability and when there is dysfunction in the lumbopelvic-hip complex, causing a reduction in gluteus medius strength. When the gluteus medius muscles have become overused or injured through trauma, it can develop trigger points on the muscle causing low back pain issues. When trigger points affect the gluteus medius, additional studies reveal that latent trigger points along the gluteus medius muscles may cause joint movement limitation while causing overload by affecting muscle activation from the hips.

 

 

According to Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D.’s book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual,” patients with active trigger points along their gluteus medius complain of pain when they are doing normal actions like walking or sitting. The pressure from the trigger points along the gluteus medius causes the individual to be in a slumped position, causing them to be uncomfortable. This causes instability in the hips and lower body extremities, making many people miserable. The book also explains that the referred pain patterns caused by gluteus medius trigger points can overlap other chronic conditions like sacroiliac joint dysfunction, low back pain, and inflammation of the subgluteus medius bursa.

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Gluteus Medius- Video

Have you been dealing with hip pain? Do you feel uncomfortable pain when walking or sitting down? Or Do you feel muscle stiffness or tenderness near your tailbone constantly? If you have been experiencing these painful symptoms constantly in your lower back or your hips, it could be due to your gluteus medius muscles being affected by trigger points. The video above overviews the gluteus medius location and how trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome causes referred pain to the lower back and hips. When trigger points affect the gluteus medius, the referred pain can overlap and correlate to low back and hip pain, thus causing various issues to the muscles surrounding the low back and buttock region. Regarding trigger points affecting the gluteus medius, they can be treatable through multiple techniques specific to the low back, buttocks, and hips.


Various Techniques For Managing Trigger Pain Along The Gluteus Medius

 

When issues of low back or hip pain begin to cause a problem in the lower extremities, the gluteus muscles can invoke pain-like symptoms in the affected muscle regions, thus developing trigger points. Even though trigger points are tricky to diagnose, they can be treated with various techniques that many people can incorporate into their daily lives. Exercises like resistance training on the gluteus medius can help improve hip abductor functionality and increase the strength of the gluteus medius. To manage trigger points along the gluteus medius, many people must do these corrective actions to reduce the pain that they may be causing to their glutes. When people are putting on pants, it is best to sit down and then put on their pants to prevent muscle strain on their hips and gluteus medius. Another corrective action is to move around after sitting down for a prolonged period to avoid trigger pain from developing. These corrective actions and techniques can help strengthen the lower body extremities and improve hip mobility. 

 

Conclusion

As part of the gluteal muscle region, the gluteus medius lies between the gluteus maximus and minimus by being a primary hip abductor. The gluteus medius helps with pelvic stabilization and helps the trunk maintain an upright position when the legs are in motion. When normal or traumatic factors affect the gluteus medius, it can develop trigger points on the muscle fibers, causing referred pain to the hips and lower back. Trigger points along the gluteus medius are manageable through various techniques that people can use to prevent hip and low back issues. These techniques can minimize the trigger points and strengthen the gluteus medius muscles in the glutes.

 

References

Bagcier, Fatih, et al. “The Relationship between Gluteus Medius Latent Trigger Point and Muscle Strength in Healthy Subjects.” Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2022, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35248262/.

Sadler, Sean, et al. “Gluteus Medius Muscle Function in People with and without Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review.” BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, BioMed Central, 22 Oct. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6805550/.

Shah, Aashin, and Bruno Bordoni. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Gluteus Medius Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 25 Jan. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK557509/.

Stastny, Petr, et al. “Strengthening the Gluteus Medius Using Various Bodyweight and Resistance Exercises.” Strength and Conditioning Journal, Strength and Conditioning Journal, June 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890828/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Whiler, Lisa, et al. “Gluteus Medius and Minimus Muscle Structure, Strength, and Function in Healthy Adults: Brief Report.” Physiotherapy Canada. Physiotherapie Canada, University of Toronto Press, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963550/.

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Experiencing Pain In Your Gluteus Max? Could Be Trigger Points

Experiencing Pain In Your Gluteus Max? Could Be Trigger Points

Introduction

The body’s lower extremities have various muscles that allow the legs and feet to move around from one location to another. The different muscles that make up the lower extremities of the body help stabilize the hips and allow mobility to the legs. The legs and hip muscles have a mutual relationship with one body muscle that helps the lower body, and it’s the glutes, specifically the gluteus maximus. Many individuals must realize that the glutes must be activated when working out. When the glutes are not activated, it can lead to the rest of the lower extremities, like the lower back, hips, and knees, taking most of the loaded weight on the body. This leads to the development of trigger points associated with butt pain along the gluteus maximus, causing referred pain down the legs. Today’s article looks at the gluteus maximus muscles, how trigger points are associated with butt pain, and relieving pain is associated with trigger points along the gluteus maximus. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple techniques in the lower body extremities, like butt pain treatments related to trigger points, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the gluteus maximus muscles near and surrounding the body’s lower extremities. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-anatomy-levator-scapulae

What Is The Gluteus Maximus?

 

Have you been experiencing pain in your hips, low back, and knees? Are you uncomfortable when you are trying to sit down? Or are you experiencing sciatic pain-like symptoms running from your buttock to your leg? These issues affecting the body’s lower extremities may correlate with trigger points along the gluteus maximus in the buttock. The gluteus maximus is the largest gluteus muscle that makes up the shape and form of the buttock and hip areas of the body. The gluteus maximus can come in different sizes depending on the individual’s body type. This large muscle plays a prominent role in the body as it helps maintain an erect posture for the upper body. Studies reveal that the gluteus maximus is one of the primary hip extensors, and some of its functions include extending and externally rotating the thighs. The gluteus maximus, when trained properly through exercise, can increase in size and strength while supporting the upper body. However, only a few people realize that when their gluteus maximus muscles are not properly trained, it can lead to various issues that can cause trigger points to form along the gluteus maximus.

 

Trigger Points Associated With Butt Pain

 

As mentioned earlier, when individuals don’t properly strengthen their gluteus maximus through exercises, it can lead to unwanted pain symptoms affecting the lower back, hips, and knees in the lower body. When the gluteus maximus muscles are not fully activated to their full potential, they can develop into trigger points associated with butt pain. Studies reveal that trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome associated with the gluteus maximus can affect the entry point of the inferior gluteal nerve, causing pain and a limited range of motion to the joints. Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., who wrote “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” mentioned that the symptoms caused by active trigger points could make the individual uncomfortable and cause a cramping sensation to the gluteus maximus. At the same time, trigger points along the gluteus maximus can correlate with referred pain that can entrap the sciatic nerve causing sciatica to affect the legs. When this happens, many other issues can pop up and affect the lower extremities, mimicking low back pain.

 


How To Release Trigger Points On The Gluteus Maximus-Video

Are you experiencing a cramping sensation in your buttock? What about feeling an electric sense running down your leg? Or are you dealing with low back pain? Many of these issues are associated with trigger points affecting the gluteus maximus, causing butt pain. The gluteus maximus is a large, superficial muscle that helps support the hips and ensures that the upper body has an erect posture. When issues affect the gluteus maximus, it can lead to unwanted pain in the lower back, hips, and knees, causing the individual to be in constant pain. This leads to the development of trigger points along the gluteus maximus, thus mimicking sciatica. The video above demonstrates where the trigger points are located in the gluteus maximus and how they can potentially overlap to cause sciatica nerve pain. The video also shows how to use various techniques to relieve the pain from the trigger points and help release the trapped muscle from causing additional pain in the lower body.


Relieving Pain Associated With Trigger Points Along The Gluteus Maximus

 

Since the gluteus maximus is a large important muscle, it is important to strengthen the glutes to prevent low back pain. When it comes to relieving pain associated with trigger points along the gluteus maximus, there are various techniques that many people can utilize to release the tension from the gluteus maximus and the rest of the lower body. Various glute stretches can help elongate the gluteus maximus muscle after a workout and reduce the chances of triggering points and referred pain re-occurring. Another technique that many people should do is to bend at the knees when lifting heavy objects to reduce overload on the lower back and cause more issues on the gluteus maximus.

 

Conclusion

The gluteus maximus is a large superficial muscle with a very important function in the body. This muscle helps with extending and externally rotating the thighs and helps keep the posture erect for the upper back. However, the gluteus maximus muscles are not properly trained and can lead to unwanted issues that cause referred pain to the hips, low back, and knees that correlate with triggering points. Luckily though, through proper training and stretching, the lower body can prevent the gluteus maximus from developing trigger points and help improve a person’s posture.

 

References

Akamatsu, Flavia Emi, et al. “Anatomical Basis of the Myofascial Trigger Points of the Gluteus Maximus Muscle.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5733974/.

Elzanie, Adel, and Judith Borger. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Gluteus Maximus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 28 Mar. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538193/.

Neto, Walter Krause, et al. “Gluteus Maximus Activation during Common Strength and Hypertrophy Exercises: A Systematic Review.” Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, Uludag University, 24 Feb. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7039033/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Thigh & Low Back Pain Caused By Trigger Points

Thigh & Low Back Pain Caused By Trigger Points

Introduction

The posterior section of the lower half of the body consists of the hipslow back, pelvis, legs, and feet, which provide stability to the body while supporting the upper body’s weight. The various muscles surround the lower extremities and make different motions for mobility and functionality by contracting and retracting when the legs and hips are in motion. The various muscles that provide stability to the hips and the legs are the iliopsoas muscles. When normal age or incidents affect the lower body extremities, it can correlate to the development of trigger point pain. Today’s article examines the iliopsoas muscles, how referred trigger pain affects the thighs and low back, and treating trigger point pain on the thighs and low back. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple techniques in the low back and thigh pain therapies related to trigger points to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the iliopsoas muscle in the lower back, thigh, and near the pelvis. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-week-spelenius-cervicis

What Is The Iliopsoas Muscle?

Have you been dealing with muscle cramps in your thighs? What about feeling muscle stiffness in your lower back when you are stretching? Or do you feel your thigh muscles become heavy after a workout? Many of these issues correlate with the iliopsoas muscle becoming overused and developing trigger points, thus affecting the thighs and lower back. In the lower body extremities, the muscles that help provide stability to the hips are the iliopsoas muscles. The iliopsoas muscles consist of three muscles: iliacus, psoas major, and psoas minor, which can work individually or as a unit. When working individually, the iliacus muscle provides stability to the pelvis, the psoas major muscle helps stabilize the lumbar spine when a person is sitting, and the psoas minor helps with flexion of the trunk and stretch the iliac fascia. As a unit, however, these muscles work together to become the primary flexors of the thighs and allow hip flexion. 

 

 

Studies reveal that the iliopsoas is a deep muscle group that anatomically connects the spine to the body’s lower limbs. The iliopsoas muscles have an important function in the body’s lower limbs as primary hip flexors for daily activities, especially for those in sports. However, many impairments and pathologies affect the iliopsoas, which causes significant limitations and challenges since the symptoms mask the pain, causing individuals to think they are dealing with low back and hip pain. 

 

Referred Trigger Pain On The Thighs & Low Back

 

Since the iliopsoas muscles provide hip and thigh flexion to the lower body, many impairments and pathologies can affect this muscle group, causing issues in the hips, thighs, and even the lower back. These impairments can cause the iliopsoas muscles to be overused and overstretched, thus potentially developing trigger points along the iliopsoas muscles, causing referred pain on the thighs and low back. Studies reveal that when the iliopsoas muscle becomes overused or traumatic issues affect it, it can lead to problems in hip flexion and impairment in the lower extremities. In “Myofascial Pain and Disorders: The Trigger Point Manual,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., when trigger points begin to affect the iliopsoas muscles, it is known as the “Hidden Prankster” as normal factors like poor posture can overload the back causing trigger points to form not only on the iliopsoas muscles but the hamstrings, gluteal, thoracolumbar paraspinal, and posterior cervical muscles. Trigger points can mimic other chronic conditions that cause referred pain in different body areas. Trigger point pain in the iliopsoas muscle can lead to back pain, groin pain, snapping hips, and standing up difficult for the individual if it is not treated immediately.

 


Trigger Point Therapy: Iliopsoas Muscle- Video

Since the iliopsoas muscles provide hip and thigh flexion to the lower body, many impairments and pathologies can affect this muscle group, causing issues in the hips, thighs, and even the lower back. These impairments can cause the iliopsoas muscles to be overused and overstretched, thus potentially developing trigger points along the iliopsoas muscles, causing referred pain in the thighs and low back. Studies reveal that when the iliopsoas muscle becomes overused or traumatic issues affect it, it can lead to problems in hip flexion and impairment in the lower extremities. In “Myofascial Pain and Disorders: The Trigger Point Manual,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., when trigger points begin to affect the iliopsoas muscles, it is known as the “Hidden Prankster” as normal factors like poor posture can overload the back causing trigger points to form not only on the iliopsoas muscles but the hamstrings, gluteal, thoracolumbar paraspinal, and posterior cervical muscles. Trigger points can mimic other chronic conditions that cause referred pain in different body areas. Trigger point pain in the iliopsoas muscle can lead to back pain, groin pain, snapping hips, and standing up difficult for the individual if it is not treated immediately.


Treating Trigger Point Pain On The Thighs & Low Back

 

When trigger point pain begins to cause issues in the thighs and low back, the iliopsoas muscles will suffer from muscle spasms, stiffness, and difficulty standing. This is due to nerve entrapment from aggravated iliopsoas muscles caused by trigger points. However, various treatments can manage trigger point pain in the thighs, and low back through multiple techniques that pain specialists utilize can help relieve the pain symptoms from the iliopsoas muscle and manage trigger point pain. Studies reveal that combination treatments like soft tissue manipulation and trigger point therapy can help release the tiny nodules from the affected muscle and reduce the symptoms from re-occurring in the body. Other treatments, like correcting one’s posture, strength exercising, and even stretching, can help lengthen the iliopsoas muscles, stretch and strengthen the surrounding muscles, and prevent pain-like symptoms from affecting the thigh and low back muscles again. These various treatments can even improve hip mobility in the lower body extremities. 

 

Conclusion

In the lower body extremities, an iliopsoas is a group of deep muscles that provide stability to the lumbar spine and allow hip and thigh flexion. These groups of deep muscles can work individually or together to enable the individual to sit, stand and move around through physical activities; however, when the iliopsoas muscles become overused or suffer from a traumatic event, they can develop trigger points that can cause mobility issues on the thighs, hips, and lower back. Even though trigger points are difficult to diagnose, they are treatable through various treatments. Various treatments, like soft tissue massages, trigger point therapy, strength exercising, or stretching the iliopsoas muscles, can release trigger points from the affected body part and help bring back mobility function to the hips, thighs, and low back.

 

References

Bordoni, Bruno, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Iliopsoas Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 2 Apr. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK531508/.

Dydyk, Alexander M, and Amit Sapra. “Psoas Syndrome.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 12 June 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK551701/.

Kameda, Masahiro, and Hideyuki Tanimae. “Effectiveness of Active Soft Tissue Release and Trigger Point Block for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back and Leg Pain of Predominantly Gluteus Medius Origin: A Report of 115 Cases.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, The Society of Physical Therapy Science, Feb. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6382483/.

Lifshitz, Liran, et al. “Iliopsoas the Hidden Muscle: Anatomy, Diagnosis, and Treatment.” Current Sports Medicine Reports, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2020, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32516195/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Myofascial Trigger Pain Affecting The Quadratus Lumborum

Myofascial Trigger Pain Affecting The Quadratus Lumborum

Introduction

The lower back works with the body’s lower extremities by stabilizing the hips and helping support the upper body’s weight. The lower back also has many functions when it comes to mobility. The lower back allows the person to bend, twist, and rotate the torso without any pain inflicted on the body. When normal factors or traumatic issues start to cause low back pain in the individual, the pain-like symptoms can correlate to the development of trigger points in the lower back muscles. Today’s article examines the quadratus lumborum, how myofascial trigger pain affects the low back, and how to manage myofascial trigger pain through various treatments. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple techniques in low back pain therapies related to trigger points to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the quadratus lumborum in the lower back. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-therapy-pectoralis-major_634aeb8b

What Is The Quadratus Lumborum?

 

Have you been experiencing low back pain? Do you feel relief when you stretch your lower back, only to have the pain return later? Do you feel tenderness or soreness on the sides? Many of these complaints are correlated with low back pain associated with trigger points along the quadratus lumborum. The quadratus lumborum is a flat, quadrangular-shaped muscle in the iliac crest and deep back. This muscle plays an important part in the thoracolumbar fascia that covers the posterior body area while involving the lower and upper parts of the limbs. According to “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., mentioned that the quadratus lumborum functions to control the side bending to the opposite side by lengthening contraction. Other studies reveal that various actions on the lumbar spine have been attributed to the quadratus lumborum. When the quadratus lumborum goes through these different actions, it can cause the muscles to become overused, or when injuries occur in the lower back, it can lead to various issues that can develop into overlapping conditions in the lower back.

 

Myofascial Trigger Pain Affecting The Low Back

 

When it comes to the lower back, many individuals worldwide experience some pain in their backs, and low back pain is common. Various factors cause low back pain from lifting heavy objects, over-exerting the sides with rapid turning, or even normal wear and tear of the body, which can cause lower back pain. When low back pain affects the quadratus lumborum, it can develop trigger points or myofascial trigger pain. Studies reveal that low back pain from the quadratus lumborum can present myofascial pain, causing the individual to have an acute pain episode in their lower back. Myofascial trigger pain is developed when the affected muscle has been overused and causes tiny knots to form along the muscle fibers. When myofascial trigger pain is in the quadratus lumborum, it becomes activated acutely through awkward movements or sudden trauma in the lower back, affecting the mobility of the lower back and the hips. Additional studies reveal that the prevalence of myofascial trigger pain in the quadratus lumborum, when being diagnosed, can display significantly less hip abduction strength. Low back pain associated with myofascial trigger pain can correlate with other chronic issues affecting the body’s lower extremities.

 


Trigger Point Release: Quadratus Lumborum- Video

Are you experiencing mobility issues in your hips? Do you feel symptoms of tenderness or stiffness in your lower back? Does it hurt when you are bending down to pick up an item? Most of these symptoms correlate with low back pain, potentially involving trigger points along the quadratus lumborum. Trigger points are formed when the muscle has been overused or been through a traumatic event like an auto accident, and since low back pain is common worldwide, it can mask other chronic conditions that overlap the pain. The video explains where the quadratus lumborum is located in the back, where the trigger points are marked, and how to manage the trigger points through manual manipulation while reducing pain away from the lower body. When myofascial trigger pain begins to wreak havoc on the affected muscles in the lower back. Various treatments applied to the lower back can help alleviate the symptoms caused by trigger points associated with the lower back along the quadratus lumborum.


Managing Myofascial Trigger Pain Through Various Treatments

 

Since low back pain is common worldwide and can potentially lead to the development of trigger points along the various lower back muscles, especially the quadratus lumborum, many individuals would utilize medication specifically for low back pain to reduce the pain symptoms; however, it only masks the pain caused by myofascial trigger pain. Studies reveal manual trigger-point therapy techniques that healthcare providers use to assess patients who are in pain from myofascial trigger pain. Many will go to a pain specialist to manage trigger points when the pain becomes too much for the individual. Another method that many people should utilize as part of their daily practice is doing gentle side stretching on the quadratus lumborum to loosen up the stiff muscles and reduce the chances of trigger points forming in the affected muscle in the future. 

 

Conclusion

The quadratus lumborum is a flat, quadrangular-shaped muscle in the iliac crest and deep back. This muscle helps with posterior mobility of the lower extremities and, when overused, can develop myofascial trigger pain associated with the low back. This can lead to various common back pain issues that affect how a person moves and become unstable when in motion. Fortunately, low back pain associated with myofascial trigger pain is treatable through various treatments that can reduce the pain and manage trigger points located in the low back. When people incorporate treatments to alleviate pain in their lower back, they will begin to experience relief and have their sense of purpose back in their lives.

 

References

Bordoni, Bruno, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Abdomen and Pelvis, Quadratus Lumborum.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 18 July 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK535407/.

de Franca, G G, and L J Levine. “The Quadratus Lumborum and Low Back Pain.” Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 11AD, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1826922/.

Grover, Casey, et al. “Atraumatic Back Pain Due to Quadratus Lumborum Spasm Treated by Physical Therapy with Manual Trigger Point Therapy in the Emergency Department.” Clinical Practice and Cases in Emergency Medicine, University of California Irvine, Department of Emergency Medicine Publishing Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 29 May 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6682240/.

Phillips, S, et al. “Anatomy and Biomechanics of Quadratus Lumborum.” Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Part H, Journal of Engineering in Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2008, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18441751/.

Roach, Sean, et al. “Prevalence of Myofascial Trigger Points in the Hip in Patellofemoral Pain.” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Mar. 2013, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23127304/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

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Trigger Points Affecting The Lower Torso

Trigger Points Affecting The Lower Torso

Introduction

The body’s lower extremities have a very important role as it helps support the upper body’s weight and provide stability to the lower body. The lower half of the body consists of the lower abdominals, hipspelvic, and buttock regions, which have various muscles surrounding the lumbar and pelvic areas of the spine. These muscles help protect the lower vital organs and work with the central nervous system to utilize the sensory-motor function of the legs and feet. When normal factors like prolonged sitting or standing begin to affect the lower body, it can cause referred pain to travel down to the legs and push the lower extremities to develop symptoms associated with trigger points on the lower torso. Today’s article looks at the lower torso, how trigger points affect the lower torso, and therapeutic ways to manage trigger points in the lower torso. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate various techniques in more inadequate body pain treatments related to trigger points to aid people suffering from pain-like symptoms along the lower torso muscles along the body’s lower extremities. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

trigger-point-therapy-pectoralis-major_634aeb8b

What Is The Lower Torso?

 

Have you been feeling stiffness around your hips lately? Have you noticed that you are leaning forward constantly, causing strain on your lower back? Or have you been experiencing pain in one location in your lower half? When dealing with these issues in the lower half of the body, it could correlate with somato-visceral symptoms associated with trigger points in the lower torso. The lower torso of the human body, or the lower abdominals, is defined as the anterior region of the trunk between the thoracic diaphragm and serves as the cavity to house the digestive, urinary, endocrine, and parts of the reproductive system. The lower torso has various muscles and nerves that surround the lower back, the hips, the pelvis, and the buttock region of the body that stabilizes the legs when in motion and supports the upper body. The muscles in the lower torso also surround the lumbar and pelvic areas of the spine to protect the joints and vertebrae from becoming dysfunctional. When issues begin to rise and affect the lower torso, it can lead to overlapping problems affecting the body’s lower extremities.

 

How Do Trigger Points Affect The Lower Torso?

 

Some of the issues affecting the lower torso that most people don’t realize are that prolonged sitting or standing can cause problems to the legs, hips, pelvis, and feet. This causes the blood supply to pool into the legs and feet, thus causing swelling and muscle weakness in the lower torso muscles. Another issue is when the lower torso has been through a traumatic event that can cause the affected muscles to develop tiny nodules known as trigger points to cause problems in the lower back, hipspelvis, and buttock region of the body. Studies reveal that trigger points are often characterized by pain causing a limited range of motion in the joints while causing muscular contracture and mimicking other chronic conditions affecting the muscles. When trigger points affect the muscles in the lower torso, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet Travell, M.D., pain associated with movement can cause tingling or electric sensations down to the lower extremities causing somato-visceral referred pain to the lower torso. Since the nerve roots from the spinal cord branch out to the various muscles and become irritated, causing referred pain to different areas of the lower extremities.

 


Trigger Point Therapy For The Abs- Video

Have you been dealing with hip mobility issues? What about experiencing low back pain after being in a hunch position for an extended period? Or have you been experiencing problems in your pelvic region? Many of these issues are correlated with trigger points associated with the lower torso. Trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome are caused when the affected muscles have been overused or been through a traumatic event that causes referred pain to different body locations. The video explains where trigger points are located in the lower torso, especially in the abdomen and how to release them through palpations and massage. These techniques can help reduce the pain symptoms that affect the lower torso and manage myofascial pain from developing in the future.


Therapeutic Ways To Manage Trigger Points In The Lower Torso

 

Pain specialists like chiropractors and massage therapists will use various techniques to reduce the pain and alleviate the trigger points from the affected muscles. Many often go to a pain specialist who deals with trigger points through recommendations by their primary doctor. They will go through an examination process and explain to the pain specialist where the pain is located. Afterward, they will devise a treatment plan with the patient’s primary doctor, allowing them to follow a routine to prevent the pain from returning. Various techniques like stretching the abdominals, exercising, and resting can manage trigger points from returning to the affected muscles and even help bring muscle strength back to the body.

 

Conclusion

The lower torso consists of the hips, lower back, pelvis, and buttock region while protecting the body’s vital organs. The lower torso helps stabilize, the lower body extremities and supports the upper body’s weight. When normal issues like prolonged sitting or standing start to cause muscle strain to the lower torso region, it can develop trigger points to cause various problems to that region and cause mobility issues in the lower abdominal area. When the pain becomes unbearable, many individuals go to a pain specialist to help manage the trigger points from affecting the lower torso region and bring back mobility function to the lower extremities.

 

References

Akamatsu, Flavia Emi, et al. “Anatomical Basis of the Myofascial Trigger Points of the Gluteus Maximus Muscle.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5733974/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Wade, Christian I, and Matthew J Streitz. “Anatomy, Abdomen and Pelvis, Abdomen – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 25 July 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK553104/.

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How Trigger Points Affect The Musculoskeletal System

How Trigger Points Affect The Musculoskeletal System

Introduction

The body is a functional machine that consists of muscles, organs, and skeletal joints that play different parts in making the body healthy as possible. Each section has a casual relationship as they work together and do their jobs separately. The muscles provide protection and movement from daily activities. The organs supply hormones, oxygen, and nutrients, so the body’s internal functions work correctly. And finally, the skeletal joints help with mobility and stabilization for the body to stay upright. When environmental factors or traumatic injuries affect the body, many issues over time may cause damage, and the body may develop pain-related symptoms. Today’s article examines how the musculoskeletal system works in the body, how trigger points affect the musculoskeletal system, and how chiropractic care can help alleviate trigger point pain. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to aid individuals suffering from muscle pain associated with trigger points. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

How Does The Musculoskeletal System Works?

 

Have you been experiencing muscle stiffness in specific areas located in your body? Do you feel tenderness in your neck, shoulders, or back? Or do you feel knots along your muscles that are causing you pain? Some of these symptoms are associated with muscle pain in the musculoskeletal system. The musculoskeletal system in the body has muscles, ligaments, and connective tissues surrounding the skeletal joints. Studies reveal that the structure of the musculoskeletal system shows how the surrounding muscles protect the joints and help provide the body functionality. The various muscles in the body offer a range of motion, sensory-motor functions, reflexes, and strength when functioning normally. However, when environmental factors begin to affect the body over time, it can lead to musculoskeletal disorders associated with pain. Studies reveal that when the body succumbs to pain related to musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal disorders are a common issue that has affected many individuals worldwide and causes various disabilities and symptoms that affect the body. Some of the musculoskeletal disorder symptoms that affect the body include:

  • Burning sensations
  • Muscle twitches
  • Fatigue 
  • Stiffness and aching
  • Myofascial trigger pain

 

How Do Trigger Points Affect The Body?

One of the musculoskeletal symptoms associated with muscle pain is trigger points or myofascial pain. Myofascial pain is a common condition involving the muscles and surrounding connective tissues that may be acute or chronic depending on where the pain is located. While trigger points refer to hard palpable nodules in the taut bands of the skeletal muscle that can be active (causes spontaneous pain or abnormal sensory symptoms) or latent (causes no spontaneous pain but shows operational myofascial trigger points characteristics). Studies reveal that myofascial pain can be associated with muscle dysfunction, weakness, and limited range of motion that affects the body. A knot in the muscle in certain body areas can make the muscle hyperirritable, causing painful compression while invoking characteristic referred pain and autonomic phenomena in the body. To that point, it can be difficult for doctors to diagnose since trigger points are caused by traumatic events in the body and can occur in different spots in different people. Trigger points can form all over the body, including:

  • Neck 
  • Mid-back
  • Low back

One common characteristic when trigger points affect the body is that they can travel or even spread to the surrounding muscles.

 


Myofascial Pain Syndrome & Trigger Points- Video

Have you been feeling pain located in your neck, back, or particular areas in your body? What about feeling pain in a different location of your body? Or have you experienced muscle stiffness or tenderness in certain areas of your body? If you have been experiencing these symptoms associated with muscle pain, you could be dealing with trigger point pain or myofascial pain in your musculoskeletal system. The video above explains myofascial pain and trigger points and how they affect the body. Studies reveal that myofascial pain is caused by myofascial trigger points that produce exquisitely tender spots in the taut bands of hardened muscles. To that point, it stimulates local and referred pain amongst other sensory, motor, and autonomic symptoms. Myofascial trigger points can cause stiffness and weakness in the involved muscle, making it difficult to diagnose since it can cause pain in different body areas. Fortunately, there are ways to alleviate trigger point pain associated with myofascial pain syndrome from the body.


How Chiropractic Care Alleviates Trigger Point Pain

 

Since myofascial trigger point pain can be challenging to diagnose, it can range from neck to low back pain in different locations and mimic other pain conditions that affect the body. It can affect the body to become hypersensitive and hyperirritable while decreasing a person’s overall sense of well-being. Luckily, treatments like chiropractic care can help alleviate trigger point pain and help manage myofascial pain syndrome. Chiropractic care is not just for the skeletal system but can help relieve muscle pain associated with myofascial pain. Since the muscles are layered and interwoven around the joints, they play an integral part in supporting the body. Studies reveal that chiropractors are great at finding trigger points and utilize specific exercises and physical modalities to treat myofascial pain syndrome symptoms. Some of the benefits chiropractic care use include:

  • Breaking up scar tissue
  • Applying pressure on the trigger point
  • Aligning the spine to reduce the spinal subluxation
  • Ease muscle pain

 

Conclusion

The body consists of muscles, organs, and joints in a casual relationship that helps function and stabilizes the host. The musculoskeletal system has muscles, tissues, and ligaments that are interwoven and layered, surrounding the skeletal joints to prevent injuries or traumatic events from affecting the body. When the body does suffer from damages caused by traumatic events, it can lead to a musculoskeletal disorder known as myofascial pain or trigger pain. Trigger pain is when the muscles have knots along taut bands of the muscle that can cause muscle stiffness and pain. Trigger point pain can be challenging to diagnose since the pain can travel from one location to another section of the body. This is referred pain, and myofascial trigger pain can mimic other chronic musculoskeletal symptoms. Treatments like chiropractic care can help alleviate myofascial trigger pain through spinal manipulation and trigger point therapy, thus relieving the stiff muscle causing pain. Incorporating treatments like chiropractic care can help loosen stiff muscles, increase joint range of motion and bring a person’s wellness back.

 

References

Bron, Carel, and Jan D Dommerholt. “Etiology of Myofascial Trigger Points.” Current Pain and Headache Reports, Current Science Inc., Oct. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3440564/.

Morgan, William. “Chiropractic Treatment for Myofascial Pain Syndrome.” Spine, Spine-Health, 24 Sept. 2014, www.spine-health.com/treatment/chiropractic/chiropractic-treatment-myofascial-pain-syndrome.

Murphy, Andrew C, et al. “Structure, Function, and Control of the Human Musculoskeletal Network.” PLoS Biology, Public Library of Science, 18 Jan. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5773011/.

Shah, Jay P, et al. “Myofascial Trigger Points Then and Now: A Historical and Scientific Perspective.” PM & R : the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508225/.

Vilella, Renato C, and Anil Kumar Reddy Reddivari. “Musculoskeletal Examination.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 8 Sept. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK551505.

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Aqua Therapy For Low Back Pain

Aqua Therapy For Low Back Pain

Introduction

When it comes to the body, many factors can cause low back pain without a person knowing they encounter it. Simple actions like sitting, standing, and walking can be difficult or helpful, depending on the person’s actions. Since low back pain tends to vary from person to person and the possible factors that can cause low back pain make diagnosing a bit difficult. Fortunately, there are available treatments that can help manage low back pain symptoms and can help alleviate its associated symptoms in the body. Today’s article examines the causes and symptoms of low back pain, aqua therapy for low back pain, and how chiropractic care goes hand in hand with aqua therapy. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments and hydrotherapy to help many individuals with low back pain. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

Journal of Neuro Imaging

The Causes Of Low Back Pain

 

Have you been feeling aches along the sides of your back? Do you feel stiff when hunched over for an extended period? Or does sitting down make the pain go away or worsen? Many of these factors are associated with signs that you could be suffering from low back pain. Low back pain is considered the leading disability causes worldwide, as studies reveal, which can be influenced by many factors that a person is going through. Anyone can risk developing low back pain as it can derive from different sources that overlap many potential issues. Some of the causes associated with low back pain vary depending on how severely the factors affect the individual, which includes:

  • Muscle and ligament sprain (Overused muscles and ligaments from injuries, poor posture, or lifting heavy objects)
  • Herniated discs/ degenerative disc disease (Spinal nerve root compression)
  • Joint dysfunction (Cartilage begins to wear down)
  • Spinal stenosis 
  • Trauma
  • Deformity
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Fractures

 

The Symptoms

When it comes to the symptoms of low back pain, many individuals will experience pain ranging from a dull ache to a sudden shooting burning pain that travels down the legs. Many individuals often feel pain from one location of the lower half of the body; instead, it is located on the other side, known as referred pain. Low back pain can potentially mean that another issue is affecting the body. Some of the symptoms associated with low back pain include:

  • Muscle stiffness
  • Sciatica
  • Muscle spasms
  • Limited mobility on the hips and pelvis
  • Inflammation
  • Muscle tenderness

All is not lost, as treatments are available to manage low back pain symptoms and alleviate the body’s pain.


Aqua Therapy For Spine Health-Video

Have you been experiencing muscle stiffness in your lower back? Do hip pain and sciatic symptoms cause mobility issues in your legs? Or does it hurt when you are bending down to pick something up? You could be dealing with low back pain associated with chronic symptoms affecting the body, so why not try aqua therapy? The video above demonstrates what aqua therapy does to the body and the exercises used to relieve low back pain. Studies reveal that the therapeutic purposes of water have dated back to ancient Egypt, Greek, and Roman civilization; that helps cleanse the body from ailments. Many physical therapists utilize aqua therapy to enable individuals with low back pain. Aqua therapy engages the waters, buoyancy, resistance, and hydrostatic pressure that helps rehabilitate injuries and maintain health. 


Aqua Therapy For Low Back Pain

 

Many individuals that suffer from low back pain will try to find ways to alleviate the pain. Aqua therapy is one available treatment that doesn’t strain the lower back and has therapeutic properties. Studies reveal that the beneficial properties of aqua therapy allow the body to improve muscle strength and range of motion while reducing muscle fatigue by using water buoyancy to take the pressure off the spine. Since low back pain is a common health issue associated with environmental factors for many individuals, studies reveal that water buoyancy can eliminate the gravitational forces impacting the body weight by counteracting it. To that point, this reduces joint stress on the body to perform the water aerobic exercises with ease. Individuals who incorporate aqua therapy in their health and wellness journey may be more motivated to exercise in the water without worrying about constant pain.

 

Aqua Therapy Goes Hand In Hand With Chiropractic Care

Like any treatment, chiropractic care and aqua therapy have an excellent relationship as they work together to assess and analyze the individual’s problem and devise a plan for them. Chiropractors utilize spinal manipulation to determine where the pain is located. So when a person is dealing with low back pain due to spinal subluxation or misalignment, a chiropractor can help the individual by loosening the stiff muscles and increasing the range of motion back to the spine. At the same time, aqua therapy incorporates the same benefits associated with land-based physical therapy, including a treatment plan tailored to the individual. Chiropractors and physical therapists work together to determine the best possible action to speed up the recovery process when it comes to a person’s pain, giving them the best chance to get back their quality of life.

 

Conclusion

Low back pain is one of many individuals’ most common complaints worldwide. The many factors associated with low back pain vary and range from a dull ache to a sharp pain radiating down the legs as part of the symptoms of low back pain. Treatments like aqua therapy can help take the load off the spine through water buoyancy and can help reduce the stress on the joints in the lumbar spine while reducing muscle fatigue. Combined with chiropractic care, many individuals can recover faster from their low back pain and bring back their quality of life without being in so much pain.

 

References

Abadi, Fariba Hossein, et al. “The Effect of Aquatic Exercise Program on Low-Back Pain Disability in Obese Women.” Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, Korean Society of Exercise Rehabilitation, 31 Dec. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6944883/.

Allegri, Massimo, et al. “Mechanisms of Low Back Pain: A Guide for Diagnosis and Therapy.” F1000Research, F1000Research, 28 June 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4926733/.

Carayannopoulos, Alexios G, et al. “The Benefits of Combining Water and Land-Based Therapy.” Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, Korean Society of Exercise Rehabilitation, 26 Feb. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7056478/.

Cole, Andrew, and Bruce Becker. “Water Therapy Exercise Program.” Spine, Spine-Health, 26 Feb. 2010, www.spine-health.com/wellness/exercise/water-therapy-exercise-program.

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Ways to Improve Hip & Pelvic Pain With Chiropractic

Ways to Improve Hip & Pelvic Pain With Chiropractic

Introduction

The skeletal joints can keep the body upright and stabilized while protecting the internal organs. The skeletal joints also are at risk of factors (normal and traumatic) that can impact the body, thus potentially causing painful symptoms to affect different body areas. Hip pain is among the most common complaints for many individuals, especially the elderly. To that point, when the body suffers from hip pain, it may involve pelvic pain and associated symptoms that mimic other issues within the body. Today’s article examines the causes of hip and pelvic pain, the symptoms related to hip and pelvic pain, and how chiropractic care may relieve hip and pelvic pain. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in osteopathic treatments to help many individuals with hip and pelvic pain. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

Pain Practice

The Causes Of Hip & Pelvic Pain

Do you experience stiffness located on your low back or hips? What about sciatic nerve pain that travels down your legs? Or have you been experiencing cramping around the pelvic regions of your body? Experiencing these symptoms may be the potential cause that you might be dealing with hip and pelvic pain. Even though hip pain is often associated with older individuals, it can affect many individuals of different ages. Studies reveal that the pathologies outside the hips may be the cause and referred pain, making diagnosing hip pain difficult. Hip pain causes could be overused joints and soft tissues that support the hips due to repetitive motions, strain from the multiple muscles that support the hips, or arthritic symptoms. Studies reveal that individuals who work in a desk job will potentially develop low back pain due to prolonged sitting, thus becoming associated with excessive mobility of the lumbar spine and decreased hip joint mobility. 

 

 

Individuals with hip pain could risk developing pelvic pain associated with the overuse of joints and soft tissues. Now how pelvic pain correlates with hip pain, and what’s the causation? Studies reveal that the stabilizing muscles (iliopsoas, pectineus, obturator externus, gluteus minimus, and piriformis muscles) are overworked and become consequent hip and joint destabilization. This causes the affected muscles to become tired and weak and triggers sciatic nerve compression along the piriformis muscle. Pelvic pain associated with hip pain may cause dysfunctional musculoskeletal symptoms along the lower abdominals, hips, and lumbosacral back.

 

The Associated Symptoms Of Hip & Pelvic Pain

The factors involved with hip and pelvic pain could potentially have associated symptoms that might affect the body’s lower extremities. One of the most prominent symptoms of hip pain is groin pain, which could possibly be involved with pelvic pain since the ligaments and muscles that encompass the hips and groin may be weak and overused. Sometimes various underlying causes do contribute to hip and pelvic pain, causing associated symptoms that may confuse the individual in pain. Hip and pelvic pain may refer to low back and sciatic nerve pain since the lower spine and hips are close together; thus, pinpointing where the true source of pain is in the body’s lower half makes it confusing. Some of the symptoms associated with hip and pelvic pain include:

  • Low back pain
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sacroiliac joint dysfunction
  • Bladder issues
  • Sciatic nerve pain
  • Piriformis syndrome

 


The 3 Common Causes Of Hip Pain-Video

Have you been dealing with muscle stiffness around or along your hips and lower back? Do you have bladder issues? Or have you experienced muscle weakness in the lower extremities of your body? Some of these symptoms could be associated with hip and pelvic pain. The video above explains the three common causes of hip pain, and interestingly, one of the causes of hip pain could potentially involve the lower back. Studies reveal that since the low back and hips are close to each other, alterations in the lumbopelvic region could potentially be involved with low back pain. Some of the issues associated with the alterations in the lumbopelvic area include:

  • Limited range of motion on hip rotation 
  • Tissue injury
  • Stiff joint capsules
  • Micro/macro trauma

Fortunately, hip and pelvic pain management may help alleviate referred pain issues through chiropractic care.


Chiropractic Relief For Hip & Pelvic Pain

 

Individuals dealing with hip and pelvic pain may find relief through chiropractic care. The pelvis is a direct continuation of the spine as the sacrum (the five lowest fused vertebrae) and the pelvic girdle complex interact with the joints from the lower skeletal system. If there is pain in the lower body and the individual is unsure whether it is their back or hips, their first course of action is to visit their primary doctor or a chiropractor. Afterward, they will review the individual’s medical history while performing a series of physical exams like various movements to make an accurate diagnosis. Once the pain diagnosis is identified, chiropractors utilize total body alignment by restoring balance in the pelvis and the spine through manipulation. When the spine and hips suffer from a subluxation, it can cause unnecessary strain on the surrounding muscles around the spine and hips. To that point, realigning the spine from a chiropractic adjustment could reduce or eliminate the excessive stress affecting the surrounding muscles. Chiropractic care can also promote various therapies that increase balance along the hips and pelvic region, which include:

  • Stretching
  • Therapeutic massage
  • Physical activities/Exercise therapy
  • Nutrition

Whether the pain is located in the hips, low back, or pelvic regions, chiropractic care can help restore, address, and alleviate the pain while maintaining optimal long-lasting results.

 

Conclusion

The skeletal joints can help keep the body upright and stabilized while protecting the internal organs from normal and traumatic factors. When these factors begin to cause an impact on the body, the skeletal joints are at risk of developing pain along the musculoskeletal structure. Hip and pelvic pain have an overlapping relationship as they are amongst the most common complaints for many individuals. To that point, pain from the hips or the pelvic may mimic other issues associated with chronic disorders. Incorporating treatments like chiropractic care can help alleviate, address, and restore the body through spinal manipulation. This allows individuals to be pain-free and help restore balance in their joints.

 

References

Harris-Hayes, Marcie, et al. “Relationship between the Hip and Low Back Pain in Athletes Who Participate in Rotation-Related Sports.” Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2699456/.

Lee, Dae Wook, et al. “Chronic Pelvic Pain Arising from Dysfunctional Stabilizing Muscles of the Hip Joint and Pelvis.” The Korean Journal of Pain, The Korean Pain Society, Oct. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5061646/.

Luthra, Jatinder Singh, et al. “Understanding Painful Hip in Young Adults: A Review Article.” Hip & Pelvis, Korean Hip Society, Sept. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6726866/.

Nishimura, Takaaki, and Ryo Miyachi. “Relationship between Low Back Pain and Lumbar and Hip Joint Movement in Desk Workers.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, The Society of Physical Therapy Science, Oct. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7590845/.

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An Overview Of Polymyalgia Rheumatica

An Overview Of Polymyalgia Rheumatica

Introduction

The body is exposed to various environmental factors daily. Whether it is the environment that a person is living, the foods being consumed, or the level of physical activities a person has plays a part in the body. Many individuals that want to live a healthier lifestyle will start small by incorporating nutritious foods they can add, sticking to an exercise regime they might enjoy, and finding time to meditate. Those who don’t want to change their lifestyle habits will continue eating foods that are high in fats, not exercising enough, or have problems sleeping. Over time, the body will be at risk of developing autoimmune disorders associated with musculoskeletal symptoms when exposed to environmental factors that impact a person’s lifestyle. Today’s article looks at an autoimmune disorder that causes inflammatory effects on the joints, known as polymyalgia rheumatica, the symptoms associated with this disorder, and how chiropractic care can help manage the symptoms of polymyalgia rheumatica. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in autoimmune treatments to help many individuals with autoimmune diseases associated with musculoskeletal disorders. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

10_Kaplan Redefining Chronic Pain

What Is Polymyalgia Rheumatica?

 

Have you been experiencing pain along your shoulders, neck, hips, or thighs? Does your body feel stiff in the morning and better throughout the day? Or have you been experiencing a limited range of motion in certain areas of your body? Many of these symptoms are signs that you might be at risk of developing polymyalgia rheumatica in your joints. Polymyalgia rheumatica is defined as a rheumatic disorder that is common in elderly adults over the age of 50. Polymyalgia rheumatica is an inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder that induces muscle pain and stiffness around the joints, especially in the morning. Studies reveal that polymyalgia rheumatica is often characterized by aching muscle pain in the shoulders, pelvis, and neck; it can mimic other rheumatic diseases like RA (rheumatoid arthritis), SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus), and polymyositis. When the body is dealing with the inflammatory effects of polymyalgia rheumatica, many people believe they are dealing with a different disorder affecting their bodies. To that point, diagnosing polymyalgia rheumatica is difficult.

 

The Symptoms Associated With Polymyalgia Rheumatica

Since polymyalgia rheumatica can mimic other rheumatic diseases, some of the symptoms associated with this inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder are similar to other chronic common diseases in the body. Studies reveal that the cause of polymyalgia is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors contribute to this inflammatory disease. Another disease that shares similar symptoms with polymyalgia is a disease known as giant cell arteritis. Giant cell arteritis causes inflammatory effects along the lining of the arteries, and individuals with this disease may have polymyalgia rheumatica. Some of the symptoms associated with polymyalgia rheumatica include:

  • Shoulder pain
  • Pelvic pain
  • Limited range of motion
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Joint pain
  • Inflammation
  • Neck pain

 


An Overview Of Polymyalgia Rheumatica- Video

Have you been experiencing pain in some regions of your body, like the shoulders, pelvis, and neck? Do you feel muscle stiffness every morning, but does it get better throughout the day? Have you been dealing with joint inflammation? If you have been experiencing these musculoskeletal symptoms, you might be at risk of developing polymyalgia rheumatica. The video above gives an insightful overview of what polymyalgia is and the symptoms associated with this inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder. Polymyalgia rheumatica is an auto-inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder that affects many adults over 50 and causes muscle stiffness in the body’s neck, shoulder, and pelvic regions. This inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder does mimic other rheumatic disorders like RA (rheumatoid arthritis) and lupus. The symptoms associated with polymyalgia rheumatica are generally similar to other common chronic disorders, making diagnosis challenging to pinpoint. Luckily there are ways to manage polymyalgia rheumatica and its associated musculoskeletal symptoms.


Managing Polymyalgia Rheumatica With Chiropractic Care

 

Since the body is dealing with symptoms from polymyalgia rheumatica is challenging to diagnose since it mimics other rheumatic disorders and their associated symptoms. When the body is suffering from joint pain associated with polymyalgia rheumatica, the surrounding muscles, and ligaments that help stabilize the joints become inflamed and cause discomfort to the body. Fortunately, treatments like chiropractic care are available to help manage the joint inflammation associated with polymyalgia rheumatica. Chiropractic care utilizes spinal manipulation of the body by manipulating spinal subluxation or misalignment of the joints. Spinal manipulation helps the body relax and incorporates healing properties into the inflamed joints. Chiropractic care helps loosen up the stiff muscles and ligaments surrounding the joints to reduce pressure on the nerves and help bring the range of motion back to the joints. Many individuals who incorporate chiropractic care to help manage musculoskeletal symptoms associated with rheumatic disorders like polymyalgia rheumatica will be pain-free on their wellness journey.

 

Conclusion

Polymyalgia rheumatica is an inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder common in elderly adults that induces muscle pain and stiffness around the joints. This inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder affects the shoulder, neck, and pelvic region while mimicking other rheumatic disorders like RA (rheumatoid arthritis) and lupus. Since the body is exposed to various environmental daily, over time may be at risk of developing autoimmune diseases associated with musculoskeletal symptoms that can impact the individual. To that point, making it difficult to diagnose. Fortunately, treatments like chiropractic care can help manage the musculoskeletal symptoms associated with polymyalgia rheumatica. Chiropractic care can help reduce stiff joint inflammation by manipulating the body, causing the aching muscles to relax and increase their range of motion. Utilizing chiropractic care can help a person get back to their health and wellness journey.

 

References

Acharya, Saurav, and Rina Musa. “Polymyalgia Rheumatica – StatPearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 21 June 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537274/.

Al-Kaabi, Juma, et al. “Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Mimicking Polymyalgia Rheumatica in a Young Patient.” Oman Medical Journal, OMJ, July 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3282323/.

Michet, Clement J, and Eric L Matteson. “Polymyalgia Rheumatica.” BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), BMJ Publishing Group Ltd., 5 Apr. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2287267/.

Milchert, Marcin, and Marek Brzosko. “Diagnosis of Polymyalgia Rheumatica Usually Means a Favourable Outcome for Your Patient.” The Indian Journal of Medical Research, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, May 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5644293/.

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The Role Of Central Sensitization In Myofascial Pain Syndrome

The Role Of Central Sensitization In Myofascial Pain Syndrome

Introduction

The muscles, tissues, and ligaments help stabilize the joints and structure of the spine so that the body can function. These muscles are layered and interwoven in the spine and joints that help facilitate movement. When the body suffers from injuries or traumatic events, the muscles, tissues, and ligaments become affected, causing muscle pain and discomfort. This causes the muscles to be tender to the touch and sensitive. This is known as myofascial pain syndrome. Today’s article looks at myofascial pain syndrome, how it is linked with central sensitization, and ways to manage myofascial pain syndrome. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to help many individuals with myofascial pain syndrome associated with central sensitization. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

What Is Myofascial Pain Syndrome?

 

Have you been experiencing muscle tightness in different areas of your body? Have you felt your muscles tender to the touch? Or have you been having trouble sleeping? Many of these overlapping risk factors are signs that you might have myofascial pain syndrome. The term “myofascial” is split into two parts. “Myo” refers to the muscles, while “fascia” refers to the connective tissues found throughout the body. So myofascial pain syndrome is where there is muscle pain in various forms, which includes the muscle tissues, connective tissues, or both. Studies reveal that myofascial pain syndrome originates from trigger points in the skeletal muscle, causing the affected muscle to be in pain. The trigger points in the body’s skeletal muscles are the “knots” people feel when their muscles feel tight. These trigger points are challenging to identify because they occur in different areas causing referred pain (pain in one place but in another body area). 

 

How Central Sensitization Link To Myofascial Pain Syndrome?

Studies reveal that central sensitization in the body is represented as an enhancement in neuron function and circuits in the nociceptive pathways that increases membrane excitability and synaptic efficacy. To that point, it reduces inhibition and manifests the remarkable plasticity of the somatosensory nervous system. The nociceptor inputs can trigger and manifest central sensitization as pain hypersensitivity when the body suffers from an injury. So how is central sensitization linked to myofascial pain syndrome? Let’s use fibromyalgia as an example. Many individuals dealing with myofascial pain may be potentially involved with fibromyalgia. This is due to fibromyalgia being a chronic condition that features widespread pain, and this causes the body to be more sensitive to pain. Central sensitization linked to myofascial pain syndrome can mimic fibromyalgia symptoms in the body, causing muscle pain and discomfort. 

 


An Overview Of Myofascial Pain Syndrome-Video

Are you experiencing muscle weakness or soreness in some regions of your body? Have you dealt with chronic fatigue or poor sleep quality? Or have you been dealing with headaches constantly throughout the entire day? Many of these symptoms are signs that you might be at risk of developing myofascial pain syndrome. The video above explains myofascial pain syndrome, the symptoms, and the causes that affect the body. Studies reveal that myofascial pain has two types of trigger points:

  • Active trigger points associated with muscle pain without movement
  • Latent trigger points associated with muscle pain with movement

Myofascial pain syndrome can vary in acute or chronic forms and can range from mild to severe while being in different locations, making it very difficult to pinpoint where the pain is localized. Fortunately, there are ways to manage myofascial pain syndrome in the body that can help with the pain.


Ways To Manage Myofascial Pain Syndrome

 

When managing myofascial pain syndrome, many individuals dealing with muscle pain will take pain medication to alleviate it; however, that only minimizes the pain for a short period. One way to manage myofascial pain syndrome is by utilizing chiropractic care as part of treatment. Chiropractic care is non-invasive and often the preferred treatment for individuals with myofascial pain syndrome due to its effectiveness and drug-free approach. Chiropractors are not only good at finding the trigger points, but they are good when it comes to treating them using various techniques. Studies reveal that chiropractors use direct pressure on the trigger points to relieve the pain with their hands or specific tools. Incorporating chiropractic care provides the body with an increase in muscle strength, flexibility, and range of motion. Since chiropractic care is a whole-body approach, it allows many people with myofascial pain syndrome to have a better quality of life and learn healthy habits, which include diet, exercise, and mental health, while living with less or no pain at all.

 

Conclusion

The body has muscles, tissues, and ligaments that help stabilize the joints and structure of the body, so there is functionality. These muscles help facilitate movement since the muscles are interwoven in the spine and joints. When the body suffers from a traumatic event or an injury, the muscles, tissues, and ligaments become affected. This causes muscle pain and discomfort, known as myofascial pain, where the trigger points cause pain in the body and can occur in different areas. Myofascial pain can be challenging to diagnose since it can be on one side of the body but affects a different section, known as referred pain. Fortunately, treatments like chiropractic care can help manage myofascial pain by treating the pain and using direct pressure to alleviate the pain. Incorporating chiropractic care to manage myofascial pain can help many individuals be pain-free on their health and wellness journey.

 

References

Bordoni, Bruno, et al. “Myofascial Pain – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 18 July 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK535344/.

Desai, Mehul J, et al. “Myofascial Pain Syndrome: A Treatment Review.” Pain and Therapy, Springer Healthcare, June 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4107879/.

Latremoliere, Alban, and Clifford J Woolf. “Central Sensitization: A Generator of Pain Hypersensitivity by Central Neural Plasticity.” The Journal of Pain, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2750819/.

Morgan, William. “Chiropractic Treatment for Myofascial Pain Syndrome.” Spine, Spine-Health, 24 Sept. 2014, www.spine-health.com/treatment/chiropractic/chiropractic-treatment-myofascial-pain-syndrome.

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A Look Into Pilates For Back Pain

A Look Into Pilates For Back Pain

Introduction

Many people worldwide know that exercising has impressive benefits that help improve the body’s overall wellness. The body has different muscle groups that have a casual relationship with the vital organs inside the body. Organs like the heart, lungs, gut, and bladder correlate with the different muscles through the nerve roots that connect them. When the body suffers from various factors that affect it, it causes referred pain to the body where one pain is at one location but radiates from the other side. Exercising can help the body recover through physical rehabilitation by reducing inflammation and scarring on the muscle tissues. One of the many exercises that helps strengthen the muscles, increase flexibility, and even improve posture is Pilates. Today’s article looks at Pilates, its benefits, and how it can help alleviate back pain. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to help many individuals with low back pain issues affecting their bodies. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

Axiom-JapanStudy

What Is Pilates?

 

Have you been feeling sluggish or having low energy throughout the entire day? What about experiencing pain in your lower back? Have you experienced muscle stiffness in certain areas around your body? Many of these symptoms are associated with musculoskeletal issues that correlate with different factors that affect the body; why not try an exercise regime like Pilates? Pilates is a system of exercises that uses a particular machine or body to improve a person’s physical strength and posture while increasing the body’s flexibility and enhancing mental awareness. Joseph Pilates developed Pilates in the early 20th century as an exercise program to help World War I soldiers improve their physical fitness levels. Pilates was used as rehabilitation therapy for injured individuals by incorporating resistance, stretching, and target muscle strengthening. Pilates is now utilized for all individuals with different bodies and fitness levels and can provide tremendous benefits. 

 

What Are The Benefits?

Pilates, like any other form of exercise, has many beneficial properties that help improve a person’s health and wellness. Studies reveal that Pilates helps many individuals, including older adults, by improving their posture by decreasing thoracic flexion while increasing lumbar extension for pain relief. Some of the beneficial properties that Pilates offer to the body include:

  • Increasing core strength: The deep muscles in the abdomen, back, and pelvic regions become stronger and help stabilize the body more.
  • Strengthen muscle groups: Pilates helps make the muscles not only strong but also helps stretch them so that they can look long and lean. This makes the individual look toned.
  • It’s a whole body workout: As many exercises work on specific body parts, Pilates focuses on each muscle part of the body and helps muscle development.
  • Posture Improvement: Pilates help keep the spine aligned while strengthening the body and core. Over time a person’s posture will improve naturally, making them stand taller, stronger, and even more graceful.
  • Increases energy: Like all exercises, Pilates will give a person the energy boost they need. This is due to the focused breathing and increased blood circulation that stimulates the muscles and the spine.

 


Pilates Exercises For Back Pain-Video

Are you looking for a new exercise to tone your muscles? Have you been dealing with pain in your lower back? Do you have muscle weakness in some regions of your body? If you have been experiencing pain-related issues, why not try Pilates? The video above goes through a 10-minute Pilates workout for back pain. Studies reveal that non-specific low back pain is a highly prevalent condition many individuals associate with disability and work absence worldwide. Many environmental factors affect many individuals, causing them to suffer back issues. Pilates can help encourage many individuals to regain their health and wellness by incorporating core strength and stability while improving their posture.


Pilates Alleviate Back Pain

 

Many people don’t realize that some low back pain symptoms are related to poor posture. Poor posture can lead to associated symptoms of headaches, back pain, improper balance, and pelvic issues. What Pilates does is that it creates body awareness and helps improve the lower back muscles by strengthening them and relaxing the stiff muscles. Studies reveal that incorporating Pilates as physical therapy for individuals suffering from low back pain can help address the mental and physical pain aspects with core strengthening, flexibility, and relaxing the tense muscles. Many individuals should never put off exercising when it comes to back pain. Incorporating an exercise routine can benefit the body and prevent future injuries.

 

Conclusion

An exercise regime can provide many beneficial results for those looking for ways to be healthy, those suffering from injuries, or those who want to add something else to their workout routine. Pilates is one of those exercises that incorporates resistance, stretching, and muscle targeting as it is a full-body workout. Pilates is used in rehabilitation therapy for injured individuals and can provide tremendous benefits. Pilates can help many individuals with back issues associated with environmental factors like poor posture. Many individuals that utilize Pilates as part of their exercise regime will begin to feel stronger and healthier as their backs will thank them.

 

References

Baker, Sara. “Pilates Exercise for a Healthy Spine – Spineuniverse.” Spineuniverse, 28 Dec. 2019, www.spineuniverse.com/wellness/exercise/pilates-exercise-healthy-spine.

Kuo, Yi-Liang, et al. “Sagittal Spinal Posture after Pilates-Based Exercise in Healthy Older Adults.” Spine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 May 2009, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19404180/.

Sorosky, Susan, et al. “Yoga and Pilates in the Management of Low Back Pain.” Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine, Humana Press Inc, Mar. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2684152/.

Yamato, Tiê P, et al. “Pilates for Low Back Pain.” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2 July 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8078578/.

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Diarrhea, Back Pain and Chiropractic Medical Care

Diarrhea, Back Pain and Chiropractic Medical Care

Experiencing low back pain and diarrhea can be a symptom of a viscerosomatic reflex, somatovisceral reflex, or a combination. A reflex is an involuntary response to nervous system stimulation. A doctor tapping below the knee causes the foot to kick forward is a basic example of a reflex. This is a somatovisceral or body organ reflex. Back pain could be from awkward posture, repetitive motions like bending or twisting, or injury that affects the spinal column. The effects could cause nerve compression and damage that can cause firing misinterpreted signals impacting/damaging internal organ function, causing pain and other symptoms.

However, the damage caused to the compressed/injured organ nerves can also cause back pain symptoms. This is a viscerosomatic or organ body reflex. One study found that a group of chiropractic patients dealing with low back pain also had increased bowel problems, even though there was no specific cause, link, or association between the two. Lower back pain and diarrhea may be completely unrelated, but if symptoms are recurring, there is an increased chance of an underlying medical issue.

Diarrhea and Back Pain: Chiropractic Medical Care

Chiropractic Medicine

Chiropractic medicine is founded on the nervous system’s control of the body’s organ systems, whose impulse signals travel through the spinal cord. Body systems include the muscles, bones, and all organs. Any problems with the spine and/or nerve changes from normal wear and tear, injury, or infection can affect signal transmissions that can alter system functions. Altered nerve conduction can impact overall health and is referred to as reflex pathways in the nervous system. A somatovisceral reflex is where the musculoskeletal system causes altered nerve conduction creating organ system dysfunction and/or illness. Diarrhea brought on by back pain is an example.

Causes Of Back Pain and Diarrhea

Appendicitis

The appendix extends from the colon in the lower right abdomen. Appendicitis is inflammation of the appendix. The pain usually appears near the belly button and spreads to the right side of the stomach. Some individuals’ appendix extends behind the colon, which can also cause low back pain. Symptoms include:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Inability to relieve gas
  • Constipation
  • Abdominal pain – Moderate to severe
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Appendicitis can be life-threatening and requires immediate treatment; if left untreated, the condition can worsen within hours, causing a rupture that can leak through the abdominal cavity.

Fecal impaction

Fecal impaction is stools that have become hard, dry, and stuck in the rectum and can cause abdominal and low back pressure and pain. It is commonly caused by chronic constipation, which can be associated with dehydration, lack of fiber, physical inactivity, medication side effects, or long-term use of laxatives. Taking laxatives for a long time can cause the intestines to shut off automatic evacuation of the bowels. Although the condition is common in older individuals, it can happen to individuals of any age who experience chronic constipation. Symptoms can include:

  • Bloating
  • Cramping
  • Bladder pressure
  • Bladder incontinence
  • Leakage or sudden diarrhea after long-term constipation.
  • Rectal bleeding

Enteropathic arthritis

Enteropathic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease or IBD. Types include:

  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Crohn’s disease

Different arthritic diseases like ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis can cause symptoms like diarrhea and abdominal pain or be associated with developing inflammatory bowel disease. Varying symptoms depend on the bowel disease and arthritis type and include:

  • Fatigue
  • Cramping
  • Joint pain
  • Joint stiffness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Bloody diarrhea

Pancreatic Cancer

The symptoms of pancreatic cancer vary depending on the type, location, and cancer stage. Pancreatic cancers in the early stages usually don’t cause signs or symptoms. Possible symptoms can include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Back pain
  • Poor appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Dark urine
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Jaundice

Chiropractic is ideal for addressing reflex issues. A doctor of chiropractic adjusts the spine to improve alignment, joint motion, and nerve energy transmission, improving nerve circulation/signal flow, which can help with unrelated health conditions. A chiropractor will locate any areas of spinal misalignment; once identified, a personalized treatment plan will return the correct alignment to the spine, enabling the nervous system to return to optimal function.


Decompression Spinal Non-Surgical


References

www.arthritis.org/diseases/inflammatory-bowel-disease

www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pancreatitis/symptoms-causes/syc-20360227

www.thieme-connect.de/products/ejournals/abstract/10.1055/s-0032-1301760

Sengupta, Jyoti N. “Visceral pain: the neurophysiological mechanism.” Handbook of experimental pharmacology,194 (2009): 31-74. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-79090-7_2

Walden, Anna L et al. “Bladder and bowel symptoms among adults presenting with low back pain to an academic chiropractic clinic: results of a preliminary study.” Journal of chiropractic medicine vol. 13,3 (2014): 178-87. doi:10.1016/j.jcm.2014.07.006

Wood, Jackie D. “Neuropathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders.” World journal of gastroenterology vol. 13,9 (2007): 1313-32. doi:10.3748/wjg.v13.i9.1313