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Neck Pain

Back Clinic Neck Treatment Team. Dr. Alex Jimenezs collection of neck pain articles contain a selection of medical conditions and/or injuries regarding symptoms surrounding the cervical spine. The neck is made up of various complex structures; bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, and other types of tissues. When these structures are damaged or injured as a result of improper posture, osteoarthritis, or even whiplash, among other complications, the pain and discomfort an individual experiences can be impairing. Through chiropractic care, Dr. Jimenez explains how the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations focuses on the cervical spine can greatly help relieve the painful symptoms associated with neck issues. For more information, please feel free to contact us at (915) 850-0900 or text to call Dr. Jimenez personally at (915) 540-8444.


It Could Be More Than Shoulder Pain

It Could Be More Than Shoulder Pain

Introduction

The body is a functional machine that requires many muscles, organs, ligaments, joints, and tissues that provide everyday movements. In the upper extremities, the head, neck, and shoulders have many muscles, ligaments, and tissues that work together with the nerve roots from the nervous system that provides sensory-motor function to make the fingers move, the shoulders rotate, and the head turns from side to side. When injuries or common issues affect the muscles in the headneck, or shoulders, it can cause small nodules to form along the muscle fibers of the affected muscle area and cause referred pain in different locations of the body. Today’s article looks at the scalene muscles, how trigger points affect the scalene muscles while mimicking shoulder pain, and how to manage chronic pain associated with trigger points. We refer patients to certified providers who specialize in musculoskeletal treatments to aid individuals suffering from trigger points related to the shoulders affecting the scalene muscles. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when appropriate. We ensure to find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Jimenez DC observes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

What Are The Scalene Muscles?

Have you been experiencing tingling sensations running down your fingertips? Do you feel stiffness when rotating your neck or shoulders? Or do you feel muscle soreness in your shoulders? Many individuals who are feeling any of these symptoms affecting their neck or shoulders could be dealing with trigger point pain along the scalene muscles. The scalene muscles play a crucial part in the head and neck as they are deep muscles positioned laterally on the cervical tract of the spine. These muscles have three different branches: the anterior, medius, and posterior, which play the role of being accessory breathing muscles while being an important contributor to head and neck movement. To that point, it allows stability to the cervical spine. The scalene muscles even help support and elevate the upper rib cage when a person is lifting, pulling, or carrying heavy objects. However, like most muscles in the body, the scalene muscles can be prone to injury and can develop issues that can affect the upper extremities of the body.

 

Trigger Points Affects The Scalene Muscles Mimicking Shoulder Pain

When common injuries like pulling a muscle when carrying a heavy object or even a traumatic injury like being involved in an auto accident can cause pain in the affected area, over time, if not treated, can cause various symptoms to overlap and affect the muscles. When the scalene muscles are affected by injuries, they can develop tiny nodules along the taut muscle fibers and become hyperirritable to the surrounding areas of the upper half of the body. This is known as trigger point pain and can mimic other chronic issues that affect different body areas. To that point, trigger points affecting the scalene muscles may mimic shoulder pain in the upper half of the body. Studies reveal that scalene myofascial pain is a regional pain syndrome that originates pain in the neck area and radiates pain down to the arm. Since trigger points mimic other chronic issues, it is often misdiagnosed as another neck pain associated with radiculopathy when the scalene muscles are affected. When this happens, the muscles become stiff and weak, causing a reduction in the range of movement. 

 

 

Studies reveal that when individuals suffer from acute whiplash-associated disorders, the local and referred pain can be elicited from active trigger points to reproduce neck and shoulder pain. This causes a higher disability that exhibits widespread pressure causing the muscles to be hypersensitive and reducing the cervical range of motion. Many individuals often complain about shoulder pain while rubbing the upper parts of their arms. The scalene muscle is affected by active trigger points, thus mimicking shoulder pain.

 


Scalenes Trigger Points-Video

Have you been feeling muscle stiffness in your neck or shoulders? Have you been experiencing a numbing sensation along your arms? Have you felt tenderness along your shoulders when you touch them? Many of these pain symptoms are associated with trigger points along the scalene muscles. The video above explains where the trigger points are located along the scalene muscles and how they are causing referred pain in the neck and shoulder areas. Many factors can lead to the causation of trigger point pain and overlap with other chronic issues that can affect the upper extremities of the body, using sleep as an example. Studies reveal that poor sleeping posture can affect the neck and shoulders, leading to muscle stiffness along the scalene muscles and developing trigger points over time. Fortunately, various ways to manage referred shoulder pain are associated with trigger points.


Management Of Chronic Shoulder Pain Associated With Trigger Points

 

Many individuals are referred to pain specialists that can alleviate trigger points along the scalene muscle to reduce the effects of shoulder and neck pain. When referred pain along the scalene muscles causes chronic shoulder pain associated with trigger points, many people often do various movements to alleviate the pain. However, it can cause more pain in the affected area and prevent relief from the neck and shoulders. Studies reveal that various treatments like physiotherapy, trigger point injections, manipulation of the cervical spine, or acupuncture can help relax and lengthen the muscle fibers associated with the scalene muscle. To that point, this allows the neck to extend further without pain and reduces the overlapping symptoms that affect the upper extremities of the body. 

 

Conclusion

The scalene muscles play a crucial part in the head and neck area as deep muscles are positioned laterally on the cervical tract of the spine. These muscles help elevate the upper chest and laterally bend the neck from side to side. When injuries affect the scalene muscles and form tiny nodules known as trigger points, it can cause referred pain to the shoulders and the neck. To that point, symptoms like numbing or tingling sensations can travel down the arms and fingers. Fortunately, available treatments can reduce the symptoms and manage myofascial trigger pain along the shoulders and neck associated with the scalene muscles. This allows a better range of motion to the neck and shoulder and prevents future trigger points from forming in the scalene muscles.

 

References

Abd Jalil, Nizar, et al. “Scalene Myofascial Pain Syndrome Mimicking Cervical Disc Prolapse: A Report of Two Cases.” The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences : MJMS, Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, Jan. 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3216145/.

Bordoni, Bruno, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Head and Neck, Scalenus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 16 Apr. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK519058/.

Fernández-Pérez, Antonio Manuel, et al. “Muscle Trigger Points, Pressure Pain Threshold, and Cervical Range of Motion in Patients with High Level of Disability Related to Acute Whiplash Injury.” The Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2012, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22677576/.

Lee, Won-Hwee, and Min-Seok Ko. “Effect of Sleep Posture on Neck Muscle Activity.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, The Society of Physical Therapy Science, June 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5468189/.

Thapa, Deepak, et al. “Management of Chronic Shoulder Pain with Restricted Mobility – a Case Series.” Indian Journal of Anaesthesia, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, Nov. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5125193/.

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Trigger Points Associated With Levator Scapulae

Trigger Points Associated With Levator Scapulae

Introduction

The muscles in the body help provide motion and protect the skeletal joints from harm. Each muscle group has ligaments, tissues, and muscle fibers that retract, stretch, and contract the body while helping the host to do everyday movements, breath, digest food, stabilize, and even rest. When a person is dealing with pain from a traumatic event or making repetitive motions, it can affect the muscles over time. Factors like not drinking enough water, constantly looking down on the phones, and being hunched over can cause strain on the muscles, causing overlapping pain on top of other chronic issues that may develop. When the muscles begin to cause pain along the shoulders and neck, it can become a risk of developing trigger points in the levator scapulae muscles. Today’s article examines the levator scapulae muscles, how trigger points affect these muscles, and how treatments can help manage the trigger points on the levator scapulae muscles. We refer patients to certified providers who specialize in musculoskeletal treatments to aid individuals suffering from trigger points associated with the neck and shoulders affecting the levator scapulae muscles. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when appropriate. We ensure to find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Jimenez DC observes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

What Is The Levator Scapulae?

Have you been dealing with pain along the neck or shoulders? Do you feel stiffness when turning your head from side to side? Or do you feel tenderness in the base of your neck and shoulders? Many individuals with shoulder and neck pain risk developing trigger points along the levator scapulae. The levator scapulae muscles originate from the posterior tubercles of the C1 through C4 vertebrae in the neck that is between the superior angle and the root of the scapulae spine. This superficial muscle’s primary function is to elevate the scapulae or the shoulder blades while working together with the trapezius and rhomboid muscles to assist the movement. The levator scapulae muscles also assist in providing neck extension, ipsilateral rotation, and lateral flexion. When pathologies like fibromyalgia, levator scapulae syndrome, or cervical myofascial pain begin to affect the levator scapulae muscles, the symptoms can potentially involve the shoulders and neck to cause referred pain to the upper extremities. 

 

How Trigger Points Affect The Levator Scapulae?

Many individuals with shoulder and neck pain have described radiating pain from their neck to their shoulders. Known as referred pain, the pain is located in one area of the body but in a different location. Studies reveal that when pain radiates from the neck and shoulders, any movements that are overstretching the levator scapulae can aggravate overlapping symptoms on the affected side. This allows small nodules to form along the levator scapulae muscle fibers, causing trigger points to affect the shoulder and neck muscles. 

 

 

Trigger point associated with the levator scapulae muscles causes the individual to have pain-like symptoms in the neck that causes muscle stiffness. This causes an emphasis on referred pain symptoms from the levator scapulae, like neck tension and restriction of range of motion on the neck. Studies reveal that pain over the superior angle of the levator scapulae is a common musculoskeletal disorder that is often accompanied by radiating pain on the neck, head, and shoulders. Some of the ways that trigger points form along the levator scapulae muscle can be due to ordinary factors like:

  • Stress
  • Posture
  • Over-exercising
  • Upper respiratory infections

Some of these factors above can shorten the levator scapulae muscle and restrict muscle movement to provide a full range of motion for the head and neck to turn. To that point, treatments are available to help loosen up and stretch the levator scapulae muscles to allow rotation and flexion on the neck and shoulders.


Trigger Points Anatomy On The Levator Scapulae- Video

Have you been dealing with stress that is affecting your neck and shoulders? Have you been dealing with neck stiffness when turning your head? Or have you been feeling muscle tenderness between the neck and shoulders? Some of these symptoms are associated with trigger points affecting the levator scapulae muscles between the neck and shoulder. The video above overviews common trigger points and how they affect the levator scapulae, causing shoulder and neck pain. Since the levator scapulae muscles lay behind the trapezius muscle, studies reveal that trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome can cause hyperirritability in the muscle tissues and affect mobility functions in the nerve ends. Even though referred pain affects the neck and shoulder of the body, treatments are available to manage trigger points on the levator scapulae and relieve neck and shoulder pain.


Treatments To Manage Trigger Points On The Levator Scapulae

 

When there is trigger point pain affecting the levator scapulae, some common complaints that many individuals often complain about are neck and shoulder pain. However, various ways can alleviate the pain symptoms from the neck and shoulders while managing trigger points associated with the levator scapulae. Studies reveal that stretching the levator scapulae muscle in a seated position can improve muscle length along the levator scapulae and the cervical range of motion. Stretching the levator scapulae muscle can help reduce the pain along the levator muscle. To that point, it even helps reduce muscle imbalances and movement dysfunction along the cervical joints. Many individuals are referred to pain specialists like chiropractors by their doctors to reduce pain and functionality disability in the neck and realign the spine to loosen up the stiff muscles caused by subluxation. Realigning the cervical spine and stretching can reduce future trigger points and reduce pain symptoms from affecting the muscle.

 

Conclusion

The levator scapulae muscles in the body provide movement functionality to the neck and shoulders. The levator scapulae work together with the trapezius and rhomboid muscles to elevate the shoulder blades and assist with neck extension, ipsilateral rotation, and lateral flexion. When pathologies affect the levator scapulae muscles, they can develop trigger point pain along the muscle and cause neck and shoulder pain. The factors that cause trigger point pain can either be ordinary or traumatic and cause referred pain to the neck and shoulders. Fortunately, treatments like stretching and adjustments can help reduce the pain and loosen up stiff muscles along the levator scapulae. This will allow a cervical range of motion back to the neck and shoulder and elongate the levator scapulae.

 

References

Akamatsu, Flávia Emi, et al. “Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4355109/.

Henry, James P, and Sunil Munakomi. “Anatomy, Head and Neck, Levator Scapulae Muscles.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 13 Aug. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK553120/.

Jeong , Hyo-Jung, et al. “Stretching Position Can Affect Levator Scapular Muscle Activity, Length, and Cervical Range of Motion in People with a Shortened Levator Scapulae.” Physical Therapy in Sport : Official Journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 4 Apr. 2017, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28578252/.

Kulow, Charlotte, et al. “Levator Scapulae and Rhomboid Minor Are United.” Annals of Anatomy = Anatomischer Anzeiger : Official Organ of the Anatomische Gesellschaft, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2022, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35367623/.

Menachen, A, et al. “Levator Scapulae Syndrome: An Anatomic-Clinical Study.” Bulletin (Hospital for Joint Diseases (New York, N.Y.)), U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1993, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8374486/.

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Trigger Points Affect Posterior Cervical Muscles

Trigger Points Affect Posterior Cervical Muscles

Introduction

The cervical spine has a casual relationship with the central nervous system as the brain and spinal cord works together to send neuron signals through the nerve pathways spread throughout the entire body. The cervical spine is part of the neck, where ligaments and muscles encompass the cervical joints to stabilize the head, neck, and shoulders. The neck has various muscles that support the head and can succumb to various injuries that can cause muscle strain and other associated symptoms that can affect the upper extremities of the body. Today’s article looks at the posterior cervical muscles, how trigger points affect the posterior cervical muscles, and how non-invasive treatments can help manage myofascial cervical pain. We refer patients to certified providers who specialize in musculoskeletal treatments to aid individuals suffering from myofascial trigger pain associated with the neck affecting the posterior cervical muscles. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when appropriate. We ensure to find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Jimenez DC observes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

What Are The Posterior Cervical Muscles?

 

Have you been experiencing random headaches that affect your day? Do you feel any tension in your neck? Or do you experience stiffness and limited mobility when turning your neck? Most of these symptoms are associated with trigger pain affecting the posterior cervical muscle on the neck. The posterior cervical muscles function in the neck’s anatomic region while protecting the cervical spine. The muscles in the cervical spine form a triangle on the neck while providing functionality and movement to the neck, the head, shoulder, and upper back. Some of the muscles that work together with the cervical spine include:

  • Levator scapulae
  • SCM (Sternocleidomastiod)
  • Trapezius
  • Erector spinae
  • Deep cervical flexors
  • Suboccipitals
  • Semispinalis
  • Splenius

These muscles and soft tissues provide stability to the neck and work together with the tendons and ligaments to rotate, extend, and retract the head, neck, shoulders, and upper back. To that point, if the neck muscles become strained, it can lead to various issues that can cause pain to the neck and cervical spine.

 

How Trigger Points Affect The Posterior Cervical Muscles

 

Studies reveal that a musculoskeletal disorder known as cervical myofascial pain causes the surrounding muscles in the neck and shoulder regions to become tender to the touch and evoke pain in different areas of the body. When the posterior cervical muscle has become strained from various issues like poor posture, over-exercising, getting involved in an auto accident, or have suffered from a degenerative condition, it can cause the muscles to be overused, hypersensitive, and stiff while potentially being at risk of developing trigger points along the neck and shoulder muscles. Trigger points are a bit problematic as they are associated with referred pain and can be either latent or active as they create tiny nodules along the taut muscle fibers in the area. Research studies reveal that referred pain from cervical myofascial pain can be elicited by active trigger points on the affected muscle. To that point, the active trigger points can mimic other pain symptoms along the upper extremities, making diagnosing myofascial pain challenging. Thankfully there are ways to manage trigger point pain associated with the posterior cervical muscles along the neck and cervical spine.


Exercises For Neck & Shoulder Pain-Video

Have you been experiencing stiffness along the sides of your neck or on your shoulders? Do headaches make it impossible to get through an entire day? Or have you been feeling tightness along your jawline? Many people with neck pain and its associated symptoms could risk developing myofascial trigger pain along the posterior cervical muscles. Having myofascial trigger pain associated with the posterior cervical muscle and affecting the neck and upper extremities can cause many people to be miserable; however, there are many ways that people can utilize to relieve the pain along the posterior cervical muscles and manage myofascial cervical pain associated with the neck. The video above provides various neck and shoulder pain exercises correlating with myofascial trigger points. To that point, finding non-invasive available treatments to manage myofascial cervical pain can help reduce the effects of pain along the neck and posterior cervical muscles.


Non-Invasive Treatments To Manage Myofascial Cervical Pain

 

Many people suffer from neck pain associated with myofascial cervical pain; many factors can contribute to developing tiny nodules along the posterior muscles. Studies reveal that activities, whether work-related or for entertainment, can yield repetitive stress on the muscle groups that cause chronic tension in the muscle fibers to form trigger points. To that point, myofascial trigger pain causes the taut muscle bands to be hyper-sensitive and affect the muscle area. Many people suffering from myofascial trigger pain can utilize non-invasive treatments to manage myofascial pain associated with the posterior cervical muscle. Some of the treatments that help manage myofascial cervical pain include:

  • Acupuncture
  • Trigger point release therapy
  • Chiropractic care
  • Heat therapy
  • Exercise/stretching

Many of these treatments help release the trigger points from the affected muscles and help prevent them from re-occurring on the affected muscles along the upper extremities.

Conclusion

The neck has many muscles, ligaments, and tissues that help support the upper extremities of the body. When issues begin to affect the functionality of the neck muscles, it can lead to the development of myofascial trigger pain in the posterior cervical muscles along the neck to cause painful symptoms. This can lead to overlapping chronic issues like stiffness and tenderness in the upper extremities. Non-invasive treatments can help alleviate the pain and manage the symptoms caused by myofascial cervical pain in the upper extremities of the body. This allows the affected muscle to return to its functionality and prevents future issues from affecting the body.

 

References

Alghadir, Ahmad H, et al. “Efficacy of Combination Therapies on Neck Pain and Muscle Tenderness in Male Patients with Upper Trapezius Active Myofascial Trigger Points.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi, 10 Mar. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7085833/.

Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César, et al. “The Role of Myofascial Trigger Points in Musculoskeletal Pain Syndromes of the Head and Neck.” Current Pain and Headache Reports, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2007, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17894927/.

Stathakios, James, and Michael A Carron. “Anatomy, Head and Neck, Posterior Cervical Region.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 27 July 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK551521/.

Touma, Jeffrey, et al. “Cervical Myofascial Pain.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 4 July 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507825/.

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Trigger Points Affecting The Neck & Splenius Muscles

Trigger Points Affecting The Neck & Splenius Muscles

Introduction

The neck is the connector to the head and shoulders, allowing mobility and functionality to stabilize the head from dropping down. The neck is also part of the cervical spine, where many neuron pathways, ligaments, and muscles work with the central nervous system to provide sensory-motor signals to the brain. The neck muscles also work together with the shoulder and upper back muscles to function for the upper extremities. These are known as the splenius muscles and help support the cervical spine. However, like all muscles in the body, the neck can succumb to traumatic injuries or common factors that can cause the neck muscles to be overused, injured, and strained to cause the nerves to send out disruptive signals to the brain and issues to develop. Today’s article looks at the splenius muscles on the neck, how trigger points affect the splenius muscles, and how to manage neck pain associated with trigger points. We refer patients to certified providers who specialize in musculoskeletal treatments to aid individuals suffering from myofascial trigger pain associated with neck pain affecting the splenius muscles. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when appropriate. We ensure to find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Jimenez DC observes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

The Splenius Muscles On The Neck

 

Have you been experiencing muscle pain in your neck? What about feeling tightness on the sides of your neck when you move your head from side to side? Or do random headaches seem to pop out of nowhere and affect your day? Most of these symptoms are associated with neck pain affecting the splenius muscles and can cause overlapping issues affecting the neck and the upper back. The splenius muscles are split into two muscle groups: the splenius capitis and the splenius cervicis. Both of the splenius muscles each have a job for neck functionality. The splenius capitis provides rotation and extension to the head, while the splenius cervicis provides rotation and extends to the cervical spine. The splenius capitis fibers are connected with the SCM (sternocleidomastoid) muscles that help move the head. The splenius cervicis encompasses the upper three cervical vertebrae and attach their muscle fibers to scapulae muscles. Even though these two muscles offer different functions, they could potentially be involved in injuries that can cause neck and upper back issues.

 

How Trigger Points Affect The Splenius Muscles

 

One of the most common complaints many people seem to be impacted is shoulder and neck pain. Various factors can cause an impact on the shoulders and neck due to overusing the splenius muscles connected to the neck and shoulders and developing trigger points associated with the splenius muscles. Studies reveal that trigger points or myofascial pain can make the splenius muscles hypersensitive and tender along the taut band of the splenius muscles. To that point, the splenius muscles become palpable and produce localized pain to other structures along the neck, shoulders, and head. Trigger points are a bit complex to diagnose because they mimic other chronic issues that affect the body and potentially involve many common symptoms that could happen daily. Studies reveal that common symptoms like headaches are associated with trigger points along the head, neck, and shoulder muscles. Since trigger points are challenging to diagnose, they can make the taut band of the musculoskeletal fibers and become either active or latent when pressure is on the affected area. To that point, causes tension occurs in the body’s head, neck, and shoulders. Fortunately, various ways to manage trigger point pain are associated with neck pain along the splenius muscles.


Trigger Points & Splenius Muscles- Video

Have you been dealing with random headaches that randomly occur throughout the day? What about experiencing muscle stiffness and tenderness located on your neck and shoulders? Or have you been experiencing poor sleep throughout the night? Most of these symptoms are associated with trigger point pain associated with neck pain along the splenius muscles. The video above explains how trigger points affect the splenius muscles and some of the causes that lead to the development of trigger point pain along the splenius muscles. Many people dealing with trigger points associated with neck pain often explain to their doctors that they have been feeling muscle stiffness along their neck, causing limited mobility. Studies reveal that active myofascial trigger points along the neck and shoulder muscles elicited referred pain to contribute to symptoms of pain intensity, disability, and poor sleep quality to mechanical neck pain. To that point, many individuals try to incorporate various treatments to alleviate the symptoms and manage neck pain associated with trigger points.


Managing Neck Pain Associated With Trigger Points

 

Many people dealing with neck pain associated with trigger points along the splenius muscles often don’t realize that some causes affect how the muscles are used. Ordinary factors like poor posture, looking down at the phones, or leaning closer to any screens can cause strain on the splenius muscles. In contrast, traumatic factors like whiplash or auto accidents can inflict pain on the muscle fibers. Various ways to manage neck pain associated with trigger points are non-invasive unless the pain is severe. When a person goes to their primary doctor for a routine check-up, they describe the symptoms of pain affecting their bodies while the doctor examines them. Once the issue is diagnosed, many doctors will refer their patients to a pain specialist specializing in the matter. So say if a person is dealing with neck pain associated with trigger point pain along their splenius muscles that is causing them headaches, would be referred to a pain specialist like a chiropractor to relieve myofascial trigger pain along the splenius muscles that are suffering from spinal subluxation in the musculoskeletal system. Spinal adjustments allow the stiff muscles to become loose and even break up the adhesion of the trigger points on the muscle. Incorporating chiropractic care to treat neck pain associated with trigger points can bring back functionality to the body.

Conclusion

The neck allows the head to be mobile and help keeps it stable. As part of the cervical spine, the neck has many neuron pathways, ligaments, and muscles that work with the central nervous system to provide sensory-motor function. The muscles that provide functionality to the shoulders, neck, and upper back are called the splenius muscles. The splenius muscles consist of two groups: the capitis and cervicis, which have different jobs for neck functionality. However, like any muscle in the body may potentially be impacted by various issues that can cause neck and upper back issues. Common and traumatic issues can lead to the development of myofascial trigger pain along the neck muscles. To that point causes neck pain and disability to the neck. When this happens, various treatments are available to manage neck pain associated with myofascial pain and alleviate the symptoms, causing relief to the neck.

 

References

Chatchawan, Uraiwan, et al. “Characteristics and Distributions of Myofascial Trigger Points in Individuals with Chronic Tension-Type Headaches.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, The Society of Physical Therapy Science, Apr. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451952/.

Henson, Brandi, et al. “Anatomy, Back, Muscles – StatPearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 10 Aug. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537074/.

Muñoz-Muñoz , Sonsoles, et al. “Myofascial Trigger Points, Pain, Disability, and Sleep Quality in Individuals with Mechanical Neck Pain.” Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2012, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23158466/.

Ribeiro, Daniel Cury, et al. “The Prevalence of Myofascial Trigger Points in Neck and Shoulder-Related Disorders: A Systematic Review of the Literature.” BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, BioMed Central, 25 July 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060458/.

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Myofascial Trigger Pain On The Face

Myofascial Trigger Pain On The Face

Introduction

Everyone in the world has various expressions that reflect how they are feeling. From being excited, worried, sad, angry, and disgusted, facial expressions defy people who they are, what they eat, and how they look. Each of the different muscles that make up the face has other jobs to work at the various locations of the upper extremities. The muscles on the forehead and near the eyes help people see while opening, closing, and raising their eyebrows. The muscles around the nose help take in air to breathe. The muscles located in the jaw help people chew food and speak. The neck muscles help support the head and provide mobility. All these muscles have specific jobs, and when issues affect the upper body extremities, they can potentially lead to different problems. When environmental factors like stressanxiety, or depression begin to affect the body, it can also affect its facial features, causing unwanted symptoms to develop. Today’s article focuses on myofascial trigger pain on the face, the signs and symptoms associated with myofascial facial pain, and how to manage myofascial facial pain. We refer patients to certified providers who specialize in musculoskeletal and oral treatments to aid individuals suffering from myofascial trigger pain affecting their facial muscles. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when appropriate. We ensure to find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Jimenez DC observes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

How Does Myofascial Trigger Pain Affect The Face?

Have you been experiencing pain-like symptoms in your jaw? What about feeling constant pressure around your nose or cheeks? Do you feel tenderness in certain body areas around your face? Many of these symptoms you are experiencing could potentially involve myofascial trigger pain affecting the facial muscles. Having myofascial trigger pain in the upper extremities of the body can be challenging, as studies reveal that myofascial pain syndrome is a muscular pain disorder that is often misunderstood as it involves referred pain from small, tender trigger pain within the muscle fibers causing pain in different locations of the body than the actual source. Myofascial trigger pain often mimics other chronic conditions that cause doctors to be confused when patients mention that they have been experiencing symptoms and it’s affecting their daily lives. For myofascial trigger pain affecting the face, studies reveal that facial pain associated with myofascial trigger pain can be classified in various ways that affect the nasal, orbital, and oral cavities, the temporomandibular joint, and the sinuses from underlying pathologies. Myofascial pain correlating with the face can have many trigger points that can make a person feel miserable and affect their daily lives.

 

Signs & Symptoms Associated Myofascial Facial Pain

Like the rest of the body, the face has numerous nerves that branched out from the brain in the central nervous system, providing sensory-motor functions to the muscles. The trigeminal nerves help give movement to the face, and when myofascial pain affects the facial regions, studies reveal that the causes can include:

  • Idiopathic factors
  • Trigeminal neuralgia
  • Dental problems
  • TMJ disorders 
  • Cranial abnormalities
  • Infection
  • Acute muscle injury
  • Stress and anxiety

These signs are associated with myofascial facial pain due to common overlapping symptoms affecting each muscle around the face. Some of the symptoms related to myofascial facial pain include:

  • Tingling sensations 
  • Throbbing pain
  • Headaches
  • Toothaches
  • Neck pain
  • Shoulder pain
  • Feeling stuffed up
  • Muscle tenderness

 


Chronic Facial Pain-Video

Have you been experiencing muscle tenderness in certain parts of your face? What about feeling stuffed up around the areas of your cheeks and nose? Or have you been feeling stiffness and pain along your jaw, neck, or shoulders? If you have been experiencing these pain symptoms, it could be facial pain associated with myofascial trigger pain. The video above overviews chronic facial pain and how it affects the head and neck. Research studies reveal that pain affecting the body for more than six months is considered chronic. Just like any other chronic pain symptoms in the body, chronic facial pain causes a neuropathic response to the central nervous system, making an injury hypersensitive and potentially involving associated symptoms from other chronic disorders. Myofascial dysfunction related to facial pain may become severe to activate trigger points along the facial muscle fibers, causing prickling sensations in the face. Luckily, there are available treatments for managing myofascial facial pain.


Management Of Myofascial Facial Pain

When managing myofascial pain associated with the face, many patients will go to their primary doctor and explain that they are experiencing pain and other symptoms that make them miserable. Doctors then examine the patient to see what is ailing them through a physical examination. Some doctors often utilize manual manipulation and other tools to diagnose that myofascial pain might be the cause. As stated earlier, myofascial pain associated with the face can be a bit complex as it can mimic other chronic conditions. Once the doctor diagnoses myofascial pain related to the face, they can refer their patients to pain specialists like chiropractors, physical therapists, physiatrists, and massage therapists to alleviate myofascial pain related to the face by examining where the causes are coming from. Pain specialists incorporate various techniques to relieve myofascial pain associated with the face:

  • Stretch & spray (Stretching the muscle and spraying a coolant spray to loosen tight muscles along the neck)
  • Putting pressure on the trigger point (This helps smooth out the affected muscle and fascia)
  • Gentle stretching exercises (Help strengthen the affected muscles)
  • Hot or cold compress (Helps relax the muscles and break up the adhesion from scar tissue)

Incorporating these treatments can help manage the symptoms associated with myofascial pain and can help alleviate muscle pain, thus preventing further issues from developing over time.

 

Conclusion

The facial muscles have specific jobs with different functions that help the body function properly. These jobs help various sections of the face by expressing how we feel, what we eat and taste, breath, and other jobs that define people. When issues begin to affect the upper extremities of the body, they can cause lead to different problems that affect the facial features of the face and cause unwanted symptoms to develop. This is known as myofascial pain and is often misunderstood,s since it can mimic other chronic conditions that affect the body. Different factors and symptoms associated with myofascial pain can become difficult to diagnose. Still, various techniques can help manage the symptoms over time to prevent further injuries from occurring on the face and the body.

 

References

Fricton, J R, et al. “Myofascial Pain Syndrome of the Head and Neck: A Review of Clinical Characteristics of 164 Patients.” Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, and Oral Pathology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 1985, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3865133/.

Williams, Christopher G, et al. “Management of Chronic Facial Pain.” Craniomaxillofacial Trauma & Reconstruction, Thieme Medical Publishers, May 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3052669/.

Yoon, Seung Zhoo, et al. “A Case of Facial Myofascial Pain Syndrome Presenting as Trigeminal Neuralgia.” Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 25 Dec. 2008, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19111486/.

Zakrzewska, J M. “Differential Diagnosis of Facial Pain and Guidelines for Management.” Define_me, July 2013, www.bjanaesthesia.org/article/S0007-0912(17)32972-0/fulltext.

Zakrzewska, Joanna M, and Troels S Jensen. “History of Facial Pain Diagnosis.” Cephalalgia : an International Journal of Headache, SAGE Publications, June 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5458869/.

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What Is TMJ Dysfunction?

What Is TMJ Dysfunction?

Introduction

The lower jaw of the body has the mastication muscles surrounding the mandible and provides functionality to the jaw through chewing, moving the lower jaw up, down, left, and right, and speaking. The jaw also has joints known as the temporomandibular joints that slide back and forth to provide movement also. The jaw is also home to the teeth and tongue, which play a role in the mouth by consuming and grinding food into smaller bites to travel down to the gut system. Just like every joint and muscle in the body, common issues or injuries can affect the jaw and cause pain symptoms associated with the problem. Sometimes normal wear and tear can affect the joints in the jaw, or traumatic events can affect the surrounding muscles causing soreness in the jaw area. If the issue involving the jaw is not treated over time, it can lead to chronic disorders and overlap with other chronic disorders that can affect the whole body and the jaw. One of the jaw disorders is TMJ dysfunction, which can cause overlapping symptoms in the jaw and the body. Today’s article examines what TMJ dysfunction is, the signs and symptoms, and ways to manage TMJ dysfunction in the jaw. We refer patients to certified providers who specialize in musculoskeletal and oral treatments to aid individuals suffering from TMJ dysfunction affecting their jaws. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when appropriate. We ensure to find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Jimenez DC observes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

What Is TMJ Dysfunction?

Have you been experiencing muscle pain in your neck, shoulders, and jaw? What about tenderness in your cheek when you lightly touched it? Or do you have difficulty chewing or moving your jaw when speaking? Many of these symptoms are signs that you could be experiencing TMJ dysfunction in your jaw. TMJ dysfunction, or temporomandibular dysfunction, is part of a group of orofacial pain conditions that affects the jaw joint and muscle, thus causing overlapping issues in the lower jaw. TMJ dysfunction also affects the mastication muscles that help move the jaw by making the muscles hyperactive and causing referred pain to the rest of the body. Studies reveal that about 25% of the population does get affected by TMJ dysfunction since it is a degenerative musculoskeletal condition associated with morphological and functional jaw deformities.

 

The Signs & Symptoms Of TMJ Dysfunction On The Jaw

TMJ dysfunction may potentially not only cause jaw pain but can also affect the neck and shoulders connected to the cervical spine. Studies reveal that TMJ dysfunction is correlated with neck disability, jaw dysfunction, and muscle tenderness in many individuals that suffer pain with or without TMJ dysfunction. TMJ dysfunction is associated with these issues because the jaw structures are affected by trigger points along the neck and jaw. To that point, TMJ dysfunction is often accompanied by back, joint, and abdominal pain. But how would TMJ dysfunction correlate with these pain issues? Studies reveal that disturbances in the upper body extremities may cause an increase in muscle tension associated with the whole-body imbalance that is potentially causing TMJ dysfunction. Some of the related symptoms of TMJ dysfunction in the jaw include:

  • Pain in neck and shoulders
  • The jaw becomes “locked” in an open or closed position
  • Headaches
  • Earaches
  • Muscle tenderness in the jaw
  • Having difficulty chewing
  • Swelling on the side of the face
  • Body imbalance

 


Exercises For TMJ Dysfunction- Video

Have you been experiencing muscle tenderness in your jaw? What about having some difficulty chewing or speaking? Do you hear popping sounds when your open or close your mouth? Some of these symptoms are associated with a musculoskeletal jaw disorder known as TMJ (temporomandibular joint) dysfunction. The video above shows the top 3 exercises for TMJ dysfunction that can help alleviate pain from the jaw, face, or ear. TMJ dysfunction is a musculoskeletal disorder that affects the mastication muscles and causes referred pain to the neck, head, and ear. TMJ dysfunction is tricky to diagnose since trigger points associated with TMJ may also affect the teeth, causing tooth pain in the oral-facial region. This is known as somato-visceral, where the affected muscle correlates with the corresponding organ. Thankfully, there are ways to manage TMJ dysfunction and its associated symptoms.


Ways To Manage TMJ Dysfunction In The Jaw

 

Many people can use various ways to manage TMJ dysfunction in the jaw to alleviate the pain. Some non-surgical treatments that individuals can incorporate include:

  • Heat or cold pack applied to the side of the face 
  • Gentle stretching exercises for the jaw
  • Eating soft foods
  • Wearing a night guard while sleeping

If the pain from TMJ dysfunction still affects the individual, therapies like chiropractic care can help manage the symptoms. Chiropractic care can effectively treat TMJ dysfunction, especially spinal subluxation or misalignment in the cervical region. Chiropractors will fully evaluate the patient’s temporomandibular joint and surrounding muscles, joints, and ligaments to identify the TMJ problem and the underlying causes. To that point, a chiropractor may suggest a range of treatments, which includes stretches and exercises to not only alleviate pain and stiffness in the jaw point but also to bring back balance to the body. This allows minimal rubbing and friction in the jaw joint.

Conclusion

Overall, TMJ dysfunction is a musculoskeletal jaw disorder that affects the mastication muscles and causes referred pain to different areas in the upper extremities of the body. Some of the symptoms of TMJ dysfunction can make it difficult for the jaw to open or close, causing pain, headaches, and muscle tenderness in the neck and shoulders. To that point, individuals suffering from TMJ dysfunction may potentially deal with pain-related symptoms. Various non-surgical treatments are available to manage TMJ dysfunction and reduce associated pain symptoms affecting the jaw.

 

References

Kim, Doori, et al. “The Relationship between Spinal Pain and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Korea: A Nationwide Propensity Score-Matched Study – BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders.” BioMed Central, BioMed Central, 29 Dec. 2019, bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12891-019-3003-4.

Murphy, Meghan K, et al. “Temporomandibular Disorders: A Review of Etiology, Clinical Management, and Tissue Engineering Strategies.” The International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4349514/.

Silveira, A, et al. “Jaw Dysfunction Is Associated with Neck Disability and Muscle Tenderness in Subjects with and without Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4391655/.

Walczyńska-Dragon, Karolina, et al. “Correlation between TMD and Cervical Spine Pain and Mobility: Is the Whole Body Balance TMJ Related?” BioMed Research International, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4090505/.

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Trigger Pain Affecting The Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

Trigger Pain Affecting The Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

Introduction

The neck is vital in keeping the head upright in a casual relationship with the cervical spine. The neck is home to the thyroid organ and the surrounding muscles that help support the neck to the rest of the body. One of the muscles that help support the neck is the sternocleidomastoid muscle. When traumatic forces begin to affect the neck, over time can lead to the development of chronic conditions associated with pain. When individuals start to feel pain affecting their neck, it can cause them to be miserable and find ways to relieve the pain they are experiencing. Today’s article focuses on the sternocleidomastoid muscle, how trigger pain affects this muscle, and ways to relieve SCM pain. We refer patients to certified providers who specialize in musculoskeletal treatments to aid individuals suffering from SCM associated with trigger pain along the neck. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when appropriate. We ensure to find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Jimenez DC observes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

What Is The Sternocleidomastoid Muscle?

Have you been experiencing pain along the sides of your neck? What about limited mobility when you turn your neck from side to side? Or do headaches seem to worsen throughout the entire day? Some of these symptoms are associated with pain along the neck and could affect the surrounding muscles that are connected. One of the surrounding muscles that sit behind the thyroid is known as SCM or sternocleidomastoid muscle. The sternocleidomastoid muscle is a long muscle with dual innervation and multiple functions in the neck. The SCM is connected to the trapezius muscle that helps flex the neck, pulling the head forward while bringing the chin down to the chest. The SCM and the trapezius muscle work together to help stabilize and fix the head position while the host is talking or eating. When factors affect the neck over time, the SCM also gets involved.

 

How Does Trigger Pain Affect The Sternocleidomastoid?

 

When factors affect SCM associated with the neck, many issues will start to affect the neck and overlap pain near the eyes, ears, sides of the cheeks, and forehead. Studies reveal that SCM may develop myofascial trigger points in the head, causing referred pain. Trigger points are usually formed when traumatic forces affect certain areas in the body. For SCM to be affected by trigger pain, tiny knots along the taut band of the SCM muscle fibers become sensitive to pressure when compressed, and many people often describe the pain as deep and dull. To that point, the symptoms associated with SCM trigger pain may appear in numerous combinations or together depending on how severe the pain is on the person. Some of the symptoms related to SCM trigger pain include:

  • Headaches (sinus, cluster, or tension)
  • Sore throat
  • Ear pain (popping sounds in the ears)
  • Blurred vision
  • Vertigo
  • Dizzyness
  • Balance issues
  • Muscle soreness

 


SCM Pain & Trigger Points- Video

Have you been dealing with headaches throughout the entire day? What about muscle tenderness in certain areas near your neck or shoulders? Or have you been feeling dizzy that it is affecting your daily activities? Many people with these symptoms may be dealing with SCM pain associated with trigger pain. The video above offers an insightful overview of how does trigger pain may be involved with SCM pain. SCM or sternocleidomastoid muscle is a long muscle that surrounds the sides of the neck and is connected to the trapezius muscle. When factors begin to affect the SCM, the muscle is at risk of developing trigger pain along the muscle fibers. Studies reveal that trigger pain along the SCM may affect SCM’s normal muscle functions, like chewing due to hyperactivity. Fortunately, there are ways to relieve SCM pain associated with trigger pain affecting the neck.


Ways To Relieve SCM Pain In The Neck

 

When it comes to SCM pain associated with trigger pain along the neck, many individuals find ways to relieve the related symptoms that are causing the pain. Some individuals will take over-the-counter medication to relieve their neck, shoulders, and head pain. At the same time, others do stretches to release the tension on their head, neck, and shoulders. However, trigger pain is a bit complex and challenging to diagnose since it mimics other conditions that affect the body. As luck would have it, many doctors will refer musculoskeletal specialists like massage therapists, physical therapists, and chiropractors who can help relieve SCM pain in the neck. Studies reveal that a combination of physiotherapy, classical massages, and stretching exercises can be applied to alleviate SCM pain in the neck. By stretching and massaging the SCM, many individuals can begin to feel pain relief in their neck, increase their range of motion, and have endurance in their neck. Integrating these various treatments for the SCM (sternocleidomastoid muscle) pain in the neck can help revitalize a person’s sense of well-being without being in pain.

 

Conclusion

The SCM, or sternocleidomastoid muscle, is a long muscle that sits behind the thyroid organ and is connected with the trapezius muscle. This muscle helps stabilize and holds the head position while flexing the neck and bringing the chin down to the chest. When environmental or traumatic factors affect the neck muscles, it can lead to chronic conditions over time, thus inflicting pain and tenderness along the SCM. These are known as trigger points and can be hard to diagnose due to them mimicking other chronic symptoms associated with the neck, head, and shoulders. Thankfully, various treatments like physiotherapy, stretching exercises, and classical massages can help relieve the trigger points along the SCM and relieve the neck and surrounding muscles.

 

References

Bordoni, Bruno, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Head and Neck, Sternocleidomastoid Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 5 Apr. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK532881/.

Büyükturan, Buket, et al. “The Effects of Combined Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Stretching and Massage on Pain, Disability, Endurance, Kinesiophobia, and Range of Motion in Individuals with Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized, Single-Blind Study.” Musculoskeletal Science & Practice, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 12 June 2021, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34147954/.

Kohno, S, et al. “Pain in the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle and Occlusal Interferences.” Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 1988, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3171759/.

Missaghi, Babak. “Sternocleidomastoid Syndrome: A Case Study.” The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association, Canadian Chiropractic Association, Sept. 2004, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1769463/.

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Myofascial Trigger Pain Affecting The Trapezius Muscle

Myofascial Trigger Pain Affecting The Trapezius Muscle

Introduction

The body incorporates different muscles that have specific jobs to help mobilize the skeletal joints while providing function to the arms, neck, legs, and back. Many individuals use their muscles for everyday uses like lifting and carrying objects, moving from one place to another, and protecting vital organs from damage. To that point, issues like traumatic events, injuries, and environmental factors can affect the body and cause damage to the muscles. When the muscles are affected by these factors, tiny knots can form along the taut muscle band that can cause painful symptoms that affect specific areas in the body. One of the muscles affected by pain is the trapezius muscle, known as the “coat hanger” muscle, which can be associated with chronic symptoms of myofascial pain syndrome. Today’s article examines the trapezius muscle, how myofascial pain affects the trapezius muscle, and how to manage myofascial trapezius pain. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to aid individuals suffering from trapezius muscle pain associated with myofascial pain. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

What Is The Trapezius Muscle?

 

Have you experienced pain in your neck, shoulders, or mid-upper back? Do you feel headaches occurring near your temples? What about tenderness in certain areas of your body? Some of these symptoms may appear in your trapezius muscles. The trapezius muscle is located across the back that looks like a simple trapezoid with upper, middle, and lower muscle fibers that have different functions for the upper-middle back, shoulders, and neck. While the entire trapezius muscle helps rotates, elevate, and retract the scapula while extending the head and neck, and turning the chin by itself. At the same time, the entire muscle can help with assisting the extension of the cervical and thoracic spine.

  • Upper Trapezius muscles: allow the shoulders to rise, bend the head and neck, and help support the weight of the upper extremities of the body, including the arms.
  • Middle Trapezius muscles: assist with flexion and abduction of the arms around the shoulders at a nearly full range.
  • Lower Trapezius muscles: Helps retract the scapula while rotating the glenoid fossa upwards by decompressing the vertebral borders of the scapula. These fibers help assist the flexion and abduction of the arms.

When traumatic forces or injuries affect the trapezius muscles, painful symptoms begin to affect the muscles, causing them to be tender to the touch and affecting different areas in the body.

 

How Does Myofascial Pain Affect The Trapezius Muscle?

 

When traumatic forces or injuries affect the trapezius muscles, certain parts of the shoulders, neck, and upper-mid back will experience pain-related symptoms. When people experience headaches and shoulder and neck pain in their bodies while feeling tenderness in their trapezius muscles, this is known as referred pain associated with myofascial pain. Myofascial pain is when tiny knots along the taut muscle bands begin to make the muscle area tender to the touch. Individuals who suffer from myofascial pain in their trapezius muscles might experience hyperirritable spots that inflict pain and motor dysfunction. Studies reveal that individuals who work in food services may have symptoms of shoulder pain associated with myofascial pain due to repetitive motions on the upper trapezius muscles affecting their upper bodies. Myofascial trigger pain is a bit challenging to diagnose since the pain can be in different locations and mimic various ailments in the body. To that point, when the trapezius muscles are affected by trigger pain may potentially be involved with cervical myofascial pain. Cervical myofascial pain is a disorder that causes pain from muscle overuse or trauma in the neck. When the pain affects the neck muscles, it can travel down to the trapezius muscles causing tenderness and sensitivity in the affected muscle area. Stress, postural mechanics, or repetitive movements can develop myofascial pain syndrome and affect the surrounding muscles.


Trapezius Trigger Points- Video

Have you felt sore around your shoulders, neck, and upper-mid back? What about muscle tenderness in certain areas of your body? Do you feel tension along your neck or near the temples of your head? If you have been dealing with any of these symptoms, then you might be experiencing myofascial trapezius pain. The video above explains how trigger points from traumatic events can affect the trapezius muscle and cause referred pain that overlaps other conditions that may affect the body. Studies reveal that trigger points in the head and neck muscles of many suffering individuals have tension-type headaches. Tension-type headaches are one of the symptoms associated with myofascial trapezius pain. Some of the other symptoms related to myofascial pain affecting the trapezius muscle include:

  • Deep aching pain
  • Stiffness
  • Muscle spasms
  • Tightness around the shoulder and neck
  • Tenderness along the shoulders, neck, and upper back
  • Occipital headaches

 


How To Manage Myofascial Trapezius Pain

 

When many individuals suffer from myofascial trapezius pain, many would go to their primary doctor and explain to them that they are experiencing tension headaches constantly. Since myofascial pain is associated with the trapezius muscle is a bit complex and challenging for doctors to diagnose since every person’s pain is different. Many doctors will refer their patients to associated specialists like physical therapists, massage therapists, or chiropractors to determine where the pain is located along the trapezius muscle. Different treatments can help alleviate stiff muscles, and studies reveal that spinal manipulative therapy can help manage chronic pain from myofascial origins. Spinal subluxations or misalignment could potentially involve the corresponding spinal nerve root causing antinociceptive effects to the tender muscle, thus causing pain to the trapezius muscle. Utilizing various treatments to treat myofascial trapezius pain can provide individuals with beneficial relief from their pain along with managing their associated symptoms.

 

Conclusion

The trapezius muscle is a large superficial trapezoid-shaped muscle located in the back. The upper, middle, and lower muscle fibers have different functions in the head, neck, shoulders, and arms. The trapezius muscle also helps with assisting the extension of the cervical and thoracic spine. When traumatic events or injuries affect the trapezius muscle, it can be developed over time to create trigger points along the taut muscle band of the trapezius muscle and cause referred pain to the upper extremities of the body. Luckily various treatments can help manage the associated pain symptoms from myofascial trapezius pain and can help many individuals get back on their health and wellness journey.

 

References

Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César, et al. “Myofascial Trigger Points and Their Relationship to Headache Clinical Parameters in Chronic Tension-Type Headache.” Headache, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2006, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16942471/.

Hwang, Ui-Jae, et al. “Predictors of Upper Trapezius Pain with Myofascial Trigger Points in Food Service Workers: The Strobe Study.” Medicine, Wolters Kluwer Health, June 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5500039.

Laframboise, Michelle A, et al. “Effect of Two Consecutive Spinal Manipulations in a Single Session on Myofascial Pain Pressure Sensitivity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association, Canadian Chiropractic Association, June 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4915475/.

Ourieff, Jared, et al. “Anatomy, Back, Trapezius – StatPearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 26 July 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK518994/.

Touma, Jeffrey, et al. “Cervical Myofascial Pain – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 4 July 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507825/.

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Neck Pain Associated With Myofascial Trigger Pain

Neck Pain Associated With Myofascial Trigger Pain

Introduction

The neck ensures that the head is upright in the body while providing mobility to rotate, bend, and tilt in various directions. The neck is part of the cervical spine and provides sensory-motor functions from the nerve pathways spread out along the shoulders and upper back. When traumatic events or injuries affect the cervical spine and cause pain to the neck over time, however, if not treated, it can lead to problematic symptoms associated with muscle pain. Neck pain can lead to muscle stiffness and cause myofascial trigger pain associated with referred pain along the rest of the upper body. Today’s article looks at the effects of neck pain, how it is associated with myofascial trigger pain, and ways to manage neck pain associated with myofascial trigger pain. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to aid individuals suffering from neck pain associated with myofascial trigger pain. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11 Trindade Endocrine Disruption-compressed

The Effects Of Neck Pain

 

Have you been feeling muscle stiffness around your neck and shoulders? Do you experience random headaches that affect your day? What about feeling tingling sensations along your arms and hands? These symptoms are associated with neck pain and can affect many individuals if not treated over time. Many people who suffer from neck pain will feel muscle stiffness that affects not only the sides of the neck but around the shoulders and their upper back. Studies reveal that neck pain is a multifactorial musculoskeletal disorder that affects the worldwide population and can become a chronic problem. Risk factors associated with the contributing development of neck pain include:

  • Stress
  • Poor posture
  • Anxiety
  • Sleep position
  • Neuromusculoskeletal disorders
  • Auto accidents
  • Traumatic events

Many of these risk factors associated with neck pain can cause pain symptoms and cause pain in different locations of the body, making diagnosing the pain source problematic for doctors.

 

Neck Pain Associated With Myofascial Trigger Pain

Since neck pain is common for many individuals, one of the symptoms associated with muscle stiffness and tenderness is myofascial trigger pain overlapping neck pain. Studies reveal that the formation of trigger points is caused when various physical activities begin to yield repetitive stress or cause micro-tears in the definite muscle groups that can cause tension within the muscle fibers. To that point, knots in the taut band of the muscles become hypersensitive and produce referred pain, tenderness, motor dysfunction, and autonomic phenomena. When the neck suffers from a traumatic event that affects the spine, over time can create trigger points or myofascial pain. It is difficult to diagnose where the pain is located in the body because myofascial trigger pain often mimics other pain conditions. It can confuse many individuals as they think they are suffering from one pain, but it’s a different pain that affects their body. Other studies reveal that individuals with myofascial pain syndrome associated with neck pain have a tender point within the tight muscular band, causing local discomfort. To that point, myofascial pain can cause referral pain in remote areas like cervical spine disorders like herniation can often be confused with myofascial pain when there is referral pain in the upper extremities of the body. Some of the symptoms associated with myofascial trigger pain that affects the neck include:

  • Deep, aching pain
  • Headaches
  • Muscle tenderness in the neck or shoulders
  • Tingling sensation or numbness down the arms and hands
  • Muscle stiffness

 


Neck Pain & Trigger Points- Video

Are you experiencing numbness that is running down your shoulders to your hands? What about muscle stiffness along the sides of the neck or shoulders? Or do headaches seem to pop out of nowhere and affect your day? You could risk suffering from neck pain associated with myofascial trigger pain. The video above explains how neck pain is associated with trigger points and how to trigger pain can be primary or secondary to neck pain. Studies reveal that myofascial pain syndrome is a common muscular pain disorder that is misunderstood and involves referred pain to form minor, tender trigger points within the muscles. To that point, myofascial pain associated with neck pain may be consistent with specific patterns of pain associated with each trigger point, contributing factors like emotional, postural, and behavioral factors that cause tension in the neck and frequently related symptoms from various conditions make diagnosing difficult. Since myofascial trigger points are complex and mimic other conditions that affect a different body part, many believe that different ailments affect their body than the actual ailment itself. Thankfully there are ways to manage neck pain associated with myofascial trigger pain and relieve muscle pain.


Ways To Manage Neck Pain Associated With Myofascial Trigger Pain

 

Since myofascial trigger pain associated with the neck can be a bit complex and challenging to diagnose, many doctors will refer patients to a physical therapist, a chiropractor, or another spine specialist to examine the trigger points causing neck pain. Various treatments can range from home remedies to severe muscle injections, depending on how severe the injuries are since everyone’s pain is different. Some of the available treatments that can reduce and manage myofascial neck pain include:

  • Exercising (helps stretch and strengthen neck and upper back muscles)
  • Massage (helps loosen stiff muscles in the neck and shoulders)
  • Heat therapy (helps relax and increase blood flow to the affected area)
  • Chiropractic care (uses spinal manipulation to prevent further pain issues from happening)
  • Acupuncture (helps to relax the trigger point and relieve pain)

Incorporating these various treatments can provide beneficial relief to those suffering from myofascial neck pain and help manage the symptoms associated with the body.

 

Conclusion

The neck provides mobility to the head as it can rotate, bend, and tilt in various directions while providing sensory-motor functions to the shoulders and upper back from the nerve roots in the cervical spine. When traumatic forces impact the neck, myofascial trigger pain can lead to neck pain. Myofascial trigger pain associated with neck pain is where tiny knots in the affected neck muscles become tender and stiff, which causes referred pain to different locations in the body. Myofascial neck pain is challenging to diagnose but manageable to treat with various treatments and techniques that can release the knots from the affected muscle and prevent future symptoms from happening. This allows many individuals to feel relief from their neck pain and continue their wellness journey.

 

References

Alghadir, Ahmad H, et al. “Efficacy of Combination Therapies on Neck Pain and Muscle Tenderness in Male Patients with Upper Trapezius Active Myofascial Trigger Points.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi, 10 Mar. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7085833/.

Ezzati, Kamran, et al. “Prevalence of Cervical Myofascial Pain Syndrome and Its Correlation with the Severity of Pain and Disability in Patients with Chronic Non-Specific Neck Pain.” The Archives of Bone and Joint Surgery, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mar. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8121028/.

Fricton, J R, et al. “Myofascial Pain Syndrome of the Head and Neck: A Review of Clinical Characteristics of 164 Patients.” Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, and Oral Pathology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 1985, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3865133/.

Kazeminasab, Somaye, et al. “Neck Pain: Global Epidemiology, Trends and Risk Factors.” BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, BioMed Central, 3 Jan. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8725362/.

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How Trigger Points Affect The Musculoskeletal System

How Trigger Points Affect The Musculoskeletal System

Introduction

The body is a functional machine that consists of muscles, organs, and skeletal joints that play different parts in making the body healthy as possible. Each section has a casual relationship as they work together and do their jobs separately. The muscles provide protection and movement from daily activities. The organs supply hormones, oxygen, and nutrients, so the body’s internal functions work correctly. And finally, the skeletal joints help with mobility and stabilization for the body to stay upright. When environmental factors or traumatic injuries affect the body, many issues over time may cause damage, and the body may develop pain-related symptoms. Today’s article examines how the musculoskeletal system works in the body, how trigger points affect the musculoskeletal system, and how chiropractic care can help alleviate trigger point pain. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to aid individuals suffering from muscle pain associated with trigger points. We also guide our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

How Does The Musculoskeletal System Works?

 

Have you been experiencing muscle stiffness in specific areas located in your body? Do you feel tenderness in your neck, shoulders, or back? Or do you feel knots along your muscles that are causing you pain? Some of these symptoms are associated with muscle pain in the musculoskeletal system. The musculoskeletal system in the body has muscles, ligaments, and connective tissues surrounding the skeletal joints. Studies reveal that the structure of the musculoskeletal system shows how the surrounding muscles protect the joints and help provide the body functionality. The various muscles in the body offer a range of motion, sensory-motor functions, reflexes, and strength when functioning normally. However, when environmental factors begin to affect the body over time, it can lead to musculoskeletal disorders associated with pain. Studies reveal that when the body succumbs to pain related to musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal disorders are a common issue that has affected many individuals worldwide and causes various disabilities and symptoms that affect the body. Some of the musculoskeletal disorder symptoms that affect the body include:

  • Burning sensations
  • Muscle twitches
  • Fatigue 
  • Stiffness and aching
  • Myofascial trigger pain

 

How Do Trigger Points Affect The Body?

One of the musculoskeletal symptoms associated with muscle pain is trigger points or myofascial pain. Myofascial pain is a common condition involving the muscles and surrounding connective tissues that may be acute or chronic depending on where the pain is located. While trigger points refer to hard palpable nodules in the taut bands of the skeletal muscle that can be active (causes spontaneous pain or abnormal sensory symptoms) or latent (causes no spontaneous pain but shows operational myofascial trigger points characteristics). Studies reveal that myofascial pain can be associated with muscle dysfunction, weakness, and limited range of motion that affects the body. A knot in the muscle in certain body areas can make the muscle hyperirritable, causing painful compression while invoking characteristic referred pain and autonomic phenomena in the body. To that point, it can be difficult for doctors to diagnose since trigger points are caused by traumatic events in the body and can occur in different spots in different people. Trigger points can form all over the body, including:

  • Neck 
  • Mid-back
  • Low back

One common characteristic when trigger points affect the body is that they can travel or even spread to the surrounding muscles.

 


Myofascial Pain Syndrome & Trigger Points- Video

Have you been feeling pain located in your neck, back, or particular areas in your body? What about feeling pain in a different location of your body? Or have you experienced muscle stiffness or tenderness in certain areas of your body? If you have been experiencing these symptoms associated with muscle pain, you could be dealing with trigger point pain or myofascial pain in your musculoskeletal system. The video above explains myofascial pain and trigger points and how they affect the body. Studies reveal that myofascial pain is caused by myofascial trigger points that produce exquisitely tender spots in the taut bands of hardened muscles. To that point, it stimulates local and referred pain amongst other sensory, motor, and autonomic symptoms. Myofascial trigger points can cause stiffness and weakness in the involved muscle, making it difficult to diagnose since it can cause pain in different body areas. Fortunately, there are ways to alleviate trigger point pain associated with myofascial pain syndrome from the body.


How Chiropractic Care Alleviates Trigger Point Pain

 

Since myofascial trigger point pain can be challenging to diagnose, it can range from neck to low back pain in different locations and mimic other pain conditions that affect the body. It can affect the body to become hypersensitive and hyperirritable while decreasing a person’s overall sense of well-being. Luckily, treatments like chiropractic care can help alleviate trigger point pain and help manage myofascial pain syndrome. Chiropractic care is not just for the skeletal system but can help relieve muscle pain associated with myofascial pain. Since the muscles are layered and interwoven around the joints, they play an integral part in supporting the body. Studies reveal that chiropractors are great at finding trigger points and utilize specific exercises and physical modalities to treat myofascial pain syndrome symptoms. Some of the benefits chiropractic care use include:

  • Breaking up scar tissue
  • Applying pressure on the trigger point
  • Aligning the spine to reduce the spinal subluxation
  • Ease muscle pain

 

Conclusion

The body consists of muscles, organs, and joints in a casual relationship that helps function and stabilizes the host. The musculoskeletal system has muscles, tissues, and ligaments that are interwoven and layered, surrounding the skeletal joints to prevent injuries or traumatic events from affecting the body. When the body does suffer from damages caused by traumatic events, it can lead to a musculoskeletal disorder known as myofascial pain or trigger pain. Trigger pain is when the muscles have knots along taut bands of the muscle that can cause muscle stiffness and pain. Trigger point pain can be challenging to diagnose since the pain can travel from one location to another section of the body. This is referred pain, and myofascial trigger pain can mimic other chronic musculoskeletal symptoms. Treatments like chiropractic care can help alleviate myofascial trigger pain through spinal manipulation and trigger point therapy, thus relieving the stiff muscle causing pain. Incorporating treatments like chiropractic care can help loosen stiff muscles, increase joint range of motion and bring a person’s wellness back.

 

References

Bron, Carel, and Jan D Dommerholt. “Etiology of Myofascial Trigger Points.” Current Pain and Headache Reports, Current Science Inc., Oct. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3440564/.

Morgan, William. “Chiropractic Treatment for Myofascial Pain Syndrome.” Spine, Spine-Health, 24 Sept. 2014, www.spine-health.com/treatment/chiropractic/chiropractic-treatment-myofascial-pain-syndrome.

Murphy, Andrew C, et al. “Structure, Function, and Control of the Human Musculoskeletal Network.” PLoS Biology, Public Library of Science, 18 Jan. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5773011/.

Shah, Jay P, et al. “Myofascial Trigger Points Then and Now: A Historical and Scientific Perspective.” PM & R : the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508225/.

Vilella, Renato C, and Anil Kumar Reddy Reddivari. “Musculoskeletal Examination.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 8 Sept. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK551505.

Disclaimer

An Overview Of Polymyalgia Rheumatica

An Overview Of Polymyalgia Rheumatica

Introduction

The body is exposed to various environmental factors daily. Whether it is the environment that a person is living, the foods being consumed, or the level of physical activities a person has plays a part in the body. Many individuals that want to live a healthier lifestyle will start small by incorporating nutritious foods they can add, sticking to an exercise regime they might enjoy, and finding time to meditate. Those who don’t want to change their lifestyle habits will continue eating foods that are high in fats, not exercising enough, or have problems sleeping. Over time, the body will be at risk of developing autoimmune disorders associated with musculoskeletal symptoms when exposed to environmental factors that impact a person’s lifestyle. Today’s article looks at an autoimmune disorder that causes inflammatory effects on the joints, known as polymyalgia rheumatica, the symptoms associated with this disorder, and how chiropractic care can help manage the symptoms of polymyalgia rheumatica. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in autoimmune treatments to help many individuals with autoimmune diseases associated with musculoskeletal disorders. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

10_Kaplan Redefining Chronic Pain

What Is Polymyalgia Rheumatica?

 

Have you been experiencing pain along your shoulders, neck, hips, or thighs? Does your body feel stiff in the morning and better throughout the day? Or have you been experiencing a limited range of motion in certain areas of your body? Many of these symptoms are signs that you might be at risk of developing polymyalgia rheumatica in your joints. Polymyalgia rheumatica is defined as a rheumatic disorder that is common in elderly adults over the age of 50. Polymyalgia rheumatica is an inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder that induces muscle pain and stiffness around the joints, especially in the morning. Studies reveal that polymyalgia rheumatica is often characterized by aching muscle pain in the shoulders, pelvis, and neck; it can mimic other rheumatic diseases like RA (rheumatoid arthritis), SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus), and polymyositis. When the body is dealing with the inflammatory effects of polymyalgia rheumatica, many people believe they are dealing with a different disorder affecting their bodies. To that point, diagnosing polymyalgia rheumatica is difficult.

 

The Symptoms Associated With Polymyalgia Rheumatica

Since polymyalgia rheumatica can mimic other rheumatic diseases, some of the symptoms associated with this inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder are similar to other chronic common diseases in the body. Studies reveal that the cause of polymyalgia is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors contribute to this inflammatory disease. Another disease that shares similar symptoms with polymyalgia is a disease known as giant cell arteritis. Giant cell arteritis causes inflammatory effects along the lining of the arteries, and individuals with this disease may have polymyalgia rheumatica. Some of the symptoms associated with polymyalgia rheumatica include:

  • Shoulder pain
  • Pelvic pain
  • Limited range of motion
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Joint pain
  • Inflammation
  • Neck pain

 


An Overview Of Polymyalgia Rheumatica- Video

Have you been experiencing pain in some regions of your body, like the shoulders, pelvis, and neck? Do you feel muscle stiffness every morning, but does it get better throughout the day? Have you been dealing with joint inflammation? If you have been experiencing these musculoskeletal symptoms, you might be at risk of developing polymyalgia rheumatica. The video above gives an insightful overview of what polymyalgia is and the symptoms associated with this inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder. Polymyalgia rheumatica is an auto-inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder that affects many adults over 50 and causes muscle stiffness in the body’s neck, shoulder, and pelvic regions. This inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder does mimic other rheumatic disorders like RA (rheumatoid arthritis) and lupus. The symptoms associated with polymyalgia rheumatica are generally similar to other common chronic disorders, making diagnosis challenging to pinpoint. Luckily there are ways to manage polymyalgia rheumatica and its associated musculoskeletal symptoms.


Managing Polymyalgia Rheumatica With Chiropractic Care

 

Since the body is dealing with symptoms from polymyalgia rheumatica is challenging to diagnose since it mimics other rheumatic disorders and their associated symptoms. When the body is suffering from joint pain associated with polymyalgia rheumatica, the surrounding muscles, and ligaments that help stabilize the joints become inflamed and cause discomfort to the body. Fortunately, treatments like chiropractic care are available to help manage the joint inflammation associated with polymyalgia rheumatica. Chiropractic care utilizes spinal manipulation of the body by manipulating spinal subluxation or misalignment of the joints. Spinal manipulation helps the body relax and incorporates healing properties into the inflamed joints. Chiropractic care helps loosen up the stiff muscles and ligaments surrounding the joints to reduce pressure on the nerves and help bring the range of motion back to the joints. Many individuals who incorporate chiropractic care to help manage musculoskeletal symptoms associated with rheumatic disorders like polymyalgia rheumatica will be pain-free on their wellness journey.

 

Conclusion

Polymyalgia rheumatica is an inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder common in elderly adults that induces muscle pain and stiffness around the joints. This inflammatory musculoskeletal disorder affects the shoulder, neck, and pelvic region while mimicking other rheumatic disorders like RA (rheumatoid arthritis) and lupus. Since the body is exposed to various environmental daily, over time may be at risk of developing autoimmune diseases associated with musculoskeletal symptoms that can impact the individual. To that point, making it difficult to diagnose. Fortunately, treatments like chiropractic care can help manage the musculoskeletal symptoms associated with polymyalgia rheumatica. Chiropractic care can help reduce stiff joint inflammation by manipulating the body, causing the aching muscles to relax and increase their range of motion. Utilizing chiropractic care can help a person get back to their health and wellness journey.

 

References

Acharya, Saurav, and Rina Musa. “Polymyalgia Rheumatica – StatPearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 21 June 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537274/.

Al-Kaabi, Juma, et al. “Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Mimicking Polymyalgia Rheumatica in a Young Patient.” Oman Medical Journal, OMJ, July 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3282323/.

Michet, Clement J, and Eric L Matteson. “Polymyalgia Rheumatica.” BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), BMJ Publishing Group Ltd., 5 Apr. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2287267/.

Milchert, Marcin, and Marek Brzosko. “Diagnosis of Polymyalgia Rheumatica Usually Means a Favourable Outcome for Your Patient.” The Indian Journal of Medical Research, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, May 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5644293/.

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The Role Of Central Sensitization In Myofascial Pain Syndrome

The Role Of Central Sensitization In Myofascial Pain Syndrome

Introduction

The muscles, tissues, and ligaments help stabilize the joints and structure of the spine so that the body can function. These muscles are layered and interwoven in the spine and joints that help facilitate movement. When the body suffers from injuries or traumatic events, the muscles, tissues, and ligaments become affected, causing muscle pain and discomfort. This causes the muscles to be tender to the touch and sensitive. This is known as myofascial pain syndrome. Today’s article looks at myofascial pain syndrome, how it is linked with central sensitization, and ways to manage myofascial pain syndrome. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to help many individuals with myofascial pain syndrome associated with central sensitization. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

11_Shah Role of Central Sensitization-compressed

What Is Myofascial Pain Syndrome?

 

Have you been experiencing muscle tightness in different areas of your body? Have you felt your muscles tender to the touch? Or have you been having trouble sleeping? Many of these overlapping risk factors are signs that you might have myofascial pain syndrome. The term “myofascial” is split into two parts. “Myo” refers to the muscles, while “fascia” refers to the connective tissues found throughout the body. So myofascial pain syndrome is where there is muscle pain in various forms, which includes the muscle tissues, connective tissues, or both. Studies reveal that myofascial pain syndrome originates from trigger points in the skeletal muscle, causing the affected muscle to be in pain. The trigger points in the body’s skeletal muscles are the “knots” people feel when their muscles feel tight. These trigger points are challenging to identify because they occur in different areas causing referred pain (pain in one place but in another body area). 

 

How Central Sensitization Link To Myofascial Pain Syndrome?

Studies reveal that central sensitization in the body is represented as an enhancement in neuron function and circuits in the nociceptive pathways that increases membrane excitability and synaptic efficacy. To that point, it reduces inhibition and manifests the remarkable plasticity of the somatosensory nervous system. The nociceptor inputs can trigger and manifest central sensitization as pain hypersensitivity when the body suffers from an injury. So how is central sensitization linked to myofascial pain syndrome? Let’s use fibromyalgia as an example. Many individuals dealing with myofascial pain may be potentially involved with fibromyalgia. This is due to fibromyalgia being a chronic condition that features widespread pain, and this causes the body to be more sensitive to pain. Central sensitization linked to myofascial pain syndrome can mimic fibromyalgia symptoms in the body, causing muscle pain and discomfort. 

 


An Overview Of Myofascial Pain Syndrome-Video

Are you experiencing muscle weakness or soreness in some regions of your body? Have you dealt with chronic fatigue or poor sleep quality? Or have you been dealing with headaches constantly throughout the entire day? Many of these symptoms are signs that you might be at risk of developing myofascial pain syndrome. The video above explains myofascial pain syndrome, the symptoms, and the causes that affect the body. Studies reveal that myofascial pain has two types of trigger points:

  • Active trigger points associated with muscle pain without movement
  • Latent trigger points associated with muscle pain with movement

Myofascial pain syndrome can vary in acute or chronic forms and can range from mild to severe while being in different locations, making it very difficult to pinpoint where the pain is localized. Fortunately, there are ways to manage myofascial pain syndrome in the body that can help with the pain.


Ways To Manage Myofascial Pain Syndrome

 

When managing myofascial pain syndrome, many individuals dealing with muscle pain will take pain medication to alleviate it; however, that only minimizes the pain for a short period. One way to manage myofascial pain syndrome is by utilizing chiropractic care as part of treatment. Chiropractic care is non-invasive and often the preferred treatment for individuals with myofascial pain syndrome due to its effectiveness and drug-free approach. Chiropractors are not only good at finding the trigger points, but they are good when it comes to treating them using various techniques. Studies reveal that chiropractors use direct pressure on the trigger points to relieve the pain with their hands or specific tools. Incorporating chiropractic care provides the body with an increase in muscle strength, flexibility, and range of motion. Since chiropractic care is a whole-body approach, it allows many people with myofascial pain syndrome to have a better quality of life and learn healthy habits, which include diet, exercise, and mental health, while living with less or no pain at all.

 

Conclusion

The body has muscles, tissues, and ligaments that help stabilize the joints and structure of the body, so there is functionality. These muscles help facilitate movement since the muscles are interwoven in the spine and joints. When the body suffers from a traumatic event or an injury, the muscles, tissues, and ligaments become affected. This causes muscle pain and discomfort, known as myofascial pain, where the trigger points cause pain in the body and can occur in different areas. Myofascial pain can be challenging to diagnose since it can be on one side of the body but affects a different section, known as referred pain. Fortunately, treatments like chiropractic care can help manage myofascial pain by treating the pain and using direct pressure to alleviate the pain. Incorporating chiropractic care to manage myofascial pain can help many individuals be pain-free on their health and wellness journey.

 

References

Bordoni, Bruno, et al. “Myofascial Pain – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 18 July 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK535344/.

Desai, Mehul J, et al. “Myofascial Pain Syndrome: A Treatment Review.” Pain and Therapy, Springer Healthcare, June 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4107879/.

Latremoliere, Alban, and Clifford J Woolf. “Central Sensitization: A Generator of Pain Hypersensitivity by Central Neural Plasticity.” The Journal of Pain, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2750819/.

Morgan, William. “Chiropractic Treatment for Myofascial Pain Syndrome.” Spine, Spine-Health, 24 Sept. 2014, www.spine-health.com/treatment/chiropractic/chiropractic-treatment-myofascial-pain-syndrome.

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The Beneficial Properties Of Yoga For The Body

The Beneficial Properties Of Yoga For The Body

Introduction

When many individuals look for ways to relax after a stressful event in their daily lives, many people have an exercise regime that allows them to take their minds off of their hectic lives. When finding the proper exercise, it is best to consider that everybody is different and has different fitness levels. Many individuals could be dealing with chronic issues that affect them drastically and with so much pain in their bodies. When these chronic issues overlap with muscle and joint pain, it can make the body dysfunctional while potentially being involved in environmental factors. Yoga is a low-impact exercise that helps tone muscles, relax tension in the body, and focus on deep breathing. Today’s article looks at the benefits of yoga for the body, how chiropractic care works together with yoga, and different yoga poses can help manage various chronic issues. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to help many individuals with musculoskeletal problems affecting their bodies. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

SpineMed

The Benefits of Yoga For The Body

Have you been dealing with chronic stress affecting your quality of life? Have you been dealing with bladder or gut issues constantly? What about feeling muscle stiffness in your back, neck, shoulders, or pelvic regions? Some of these symptoms are signs that you could risk developing musculoskeletal problems associated with pain. Dealing with musculoskeletal issues related to pain can make a person feel miserable and have stress affecting their bodies. Yoga is a low-impact exercise that doesn’t put pressure on the joints and will provide a full-body workout through strengthening and stretching weak muscles. Yoga has many benefits for many individuals that are dealing with the following:

  • Muscle weakness
  • Back pain
  • Neck pain
  • Pelvic Pain
  • Arthritic symptoms
  • Cardiovascular issues
  • Chronic stress

Studies reveal that environmental factors are involved in non-specified chronic pain in the spine, overlapping musculoskeletal disorders causing many individuals to try to find relief. Many individuals incorporate yoga because it is a safe and effective way to alleviate various forms of back, neck, or pelvic pain causing issues to the body. Yoga utilizes gentle stretching and strengthening of weak, injured muscles while increasing blood circulation to promote healing in the body. 

 

Chiropractic Care & Yoga

When people are dealing with health conditions or injuries that have affected their bodies, it can make them feel frustrated and think their injuries are taking forever to heal. Many individuals don’t realize that incorporating yoga practices provides impressive health benefits while mirroring the similar foundations of chiropractic care. Both chiropractic care and yoga provide many beneficial results to an aching body that needs a good stretch and ready the body to heal itself naturally. Chiropractic care includes spinal manipulation to the spinal joints while reducing inflammation and strengthening weak muscles. Yoga allows the body to increase its flexibility and stamina, reduces stress and blood pressure, and provides a better sense of breathing and balance.


Yoga For Chronic Pain-Video

Have you felt muscle stiffness in your neck, back, or body? Have you felt sluggish or overly stressed from your day-to-day lives? Do you want to improve your balance? If you have been experiencing these issues affecting your quality of life, why not incorporate yoga as part of your exercise regime? The video above shows that yoga poses for chronic pain affect the body, including the neck, back, and pelvic regions. Studies reveal that yoga can help relieve intense neck pain while improving pain-related function disability. Yoga allows the muscles to not only relax but strengthen them as well. Yoga can also help improve the body’s range of motion through deep breathing and give more awareness of how the body holds tension in places a person hasn’t realized they were holding onto.


Yoga Poses For Different Issues

When a person does yoga, they will go through various poses and repeat them constantly as their body begins to get used to the movements. This allows the body to challenge itself and helps the individual focus more on deep breathing. A good example would be an individual taking a yoga class due to experiencing pelvic pain. By going through each yoga pose, many individuals suffering from pelvic pain will reduce the pain intensity while improving their quality of life. Below are some yoga poses that anyone can do to reduce pain associated with their back, neck, or pelvis.

Bridge Pose

  • Lie on your back
  • Bend both knees while placing the feet on the floor at hip-width apart
  • Arm on the sides with palms facing down
  • Press feet to the floor and lift the hips as you inhale
  • Engage the legs and buttock 
  • Hold 4-8 breaths and exhale to lower the hips back to the ground slowly

 

Cobra Pose

  • Lie on your stomach with hands near the chest just under the shoulders and fingers facing forward
  • Keep elbows close to sides
  • Press hands on the floor and slowly lift your head, chest, and shoulders while slightly bending the elbows by inhaling
  • Exhale to go back down slow and rest your head

 

Cat-Cow

  • Be on all fours, hands under the shoulders and knees under hips (Think like a table)
  • Inhale to lower your core to the floor as your head looks up to the sky
  • Exhale slowly to lower your chin to the chest as you round your back
  • Continue fluid motion for a minute

 

Forward Bend

  • Be in a standing position, and feet are at a hip distance apart
  • Lengthen the body as you lean forward while keeping the knees slightly bended
  • Place hands on either legs, yoga block, or the floor (Whichever makes you comfortable)
  • Tuck the chin into the chest, letting the neck and head relax
  • Gently rock your head side to side to relieve tension in the neck and shoulders
  • Slowly roll up to a standing position allowing the arms and head to be the last to rise

 

Supine Spinal Twist

  • Lie on your back while your knees bent and feet flat on the floor
  • Extend arms out of the side and place palms down on the floor
  • As you inhale, breathe into the gut and lower limbs
  • Exhale to lower knees on the left side (Look at the opposite way to slowly stretch the neck and shoulder muscles)
  • Pay attention to the stretches for 5 breathes as well as the lengthening sensations on the ribs
  • Return the knees to the middle and repeat on the right side

 

Child’s Pose

  • Sit back on the heels with the knees together (For added support, you can use a rolled-up blanket under your knees)
  • Bend forward and walk hands in front of you
  • Gently rest your forehead on the floor
  • Keep arms extended in the front while focusing on relieving tension in the back as the upper body falls to the knees
  • Stay in that pose for 5 minutes

 

Conclusion

Incorporating yoga as part of an exercise regime allows the individual to focus on deep breathing while calming the mind. Yoga is a low-impact exercise that helps strengthen weak muscles associated with pain and inflammation. Yoga provides a full-body workout that benefits many people dealing with chronic pain. Utilizing yoga as part of a daily practice might help individuals learn to be calm and practice mindfulness.

 

References

Busch, Fred. “Healing Benefits of Yoga.” Spine, Spine-Health, 27 Jan. 2004, www.spine-health.com/wellness/yoga-pilates-tai-chi/healing-benefits-yoga.

Crow, Edith Meszaros, et al. “Effectiveness of Iyengar Yoga in Treating Spinal (Back and Neck) Pain: A Systematic Review.” International Journal of Yoga, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, Jan. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4278133/.

Li, Yunxia, et al. “Effects of Yoga on Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Prisma Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” Medicine, Wolters Kluwer Health, Feb. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407933/.

Saxena, Rahul, et al. “Effects of Yogic Intervention on Pain Scores and Quality of Life in Females with Chronic Pelvic Pain.” International Journal of Yoga, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5225749/.

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Headaches As A Somatovisceral Problem

Headaches As A Somatovisceral Problem

Introduction

Everyone has headaches at some point throughout their lives, which can be excruciating, depending on the severity. Whether it is a heavy workload that causes a person to have severe tension on their foreheads, allergies that cause immense pressure in between the sinus cavity in the middle of the face, or common factors that seem to cause a pounding sensation in the head, headaches are no joke. Often, headaches seem to go away when it’s in their acute form but can become chronic when the pain doesn’t go away, causing issues to the eyes and muscles. Today’s article looks at how headaches affect the body and how they can become a somatovisceral problem for many individuals. We refer patients to certified, skilled providers specializing in neurological treatments that help those individuals that are suffering from headaches. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

05 - Cooper A4M Headache - 1 Slide-compressed

How Headaches Affect The Body

 

Do you feel a pounding sensation in your forehead? Do your eyes seem to become dilated and sensitive to light? Do both arms or hands seem to lock up and have a pins-and-needles sensation that feels uncomfortable? These signs and symptoms are various forms of headaches affecting the head. The head helps protect the brain from damage as the neuron signals from the central nervous system are connected to the cervical regions of the spine. When factors like lifestyle habits, dietary food intake, and stress affect the central nervous system, they begin to co-mingle to form various forms of headaches. Each form of headache continuously shifts in many suffering individuals to never sit still for their clinicians to capture their specific profile. Some of the multiple headaches include:

  • Tension headaches
  • Migraines
  • Stress headaches
  • Sinus pressure
  • Clustered headaches

When headaches begin to affect the neck and head, research shows that these headaches cause a convergence between the cervical sections of the spine and the skull base. This becomes a mediator for the neck and head to develop referred pain. Referred pain is known as pain that occurs in one section of the body than where it is located. For example, say someone has been through a traumatic injury that causes them to have whiplash in their neck; that pain in their neck muscles can mimic a headache affecting one side of their head. Additional information has mentioned that migraine headaches can cause chronic inflammatory issues in the gut-brain axis, causing dysfunctional autonomic and enteric nervous systems and affecting the body. 


How The Body Deals With  Migraines-Video

Have you experienced throbbing in various sections of your face? Do you feel your muscles tense up around your neck or shoulders? Or does your body feel exhausted that noise seems to cause immense pain? The various forms of headaches can cause many problems not only in the neck but in the body as well. The video above shows what happens to the body when a person is suffering from a migraine. Research studies have noticed that individuals suffering from migraines will develop associated somatic comorbid symptoms like anxiety and depression, making migraine headaches more frequent. At the same time, being the top three of the most common forms of headaches, migraines may share a common underlying mechanism involving the overlapping profiles of the cerebrovascular system that is equivalent to a repetitive stress disorder affecting the central nervous system.


How Headaches Are A Somatovisceral Problem

 

Research studies have found that the severity of the headache in a person, especially in women, causes a synergetic relationship that causes somatic symptoms and depression to be so high. This is due to the overlapping risk profiles that affect the mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system, causing the production of cervicogenic headaches and chronic migraines to form. This is because the junction of the brain stem and the spinal cord is called the trigeminocervical nucleus and overlaps the nociceptive cells. When this happens, The close anatomic pain fibers from the cervical spine and the trigeminal system start to be aggravated; it creates pain impulses from the neck to the head, causing headaches to be interpreted. 

 

Conclusion

Overall, headaches are no joke when they start to affect the body and cause mimic pain in different parts of the body. When various factors begin to cause somatic issues that tense the muscles but also affect the surrounding nerves, it can cause headaches to form and become excruciating. Different forms of headaches can affect other regions of the face and can go away for a short period in their acute form. However, in its chronic condition, it can cause the body to be in so much pain. Finding ways to prevent headaches from progressing further can benefit the individual.

 

References

Castien, René, and Willem De Hertogh. “A Neuroscience Perspective of Physical Treatment of Headache and Neck Pain.” Frontiers in Neurology, Frontiers Media S.A., 26 Mar. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6443880/.

Cámara-Lemarroy, Carlos R, et al. “Gastrointestinal Disorders Associated with Migraine: A Comprehensive Review.” World Journal of Gastroenterology, Baishideng Publishing Group Inc, 28 Sept. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5037083/.

Maizels, Morris, and Raoul Burchette. “Somatic Symptoms in Headache Patients: The Influence of Headache Diagnosis, Frequency, and Comorbidity.” Headache, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2004, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15546261/.

Tietjen;Brandes JL;Digre KB;Baggaley S;Martin V;Recober A;Geweke LO;Hafeez F;Aurora SK;Herial NA;Utley C;Khuder SA;, G E. “High Prevalence of Somatic Symptoms and Depression in Women with Disabling Chronic Headache.” Neurology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 9 Jan. 2007, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17210894/.

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Cervical Spinal Stenosis Relief With Decompression

Cervical Spinal Stenosis Relief With Decompression

Introduction

The neck can make sure that the head doesn’t flop around by letting the muscles, ligaments, and the spine hold the head upright. The neck is responsible for twisting and turning the head in all directions without the feeling of discomfort. However, the neck also has soft tissues, and nerve roots spread out from the cervical area of the spine that helps control the shoulders, arms, and hands. When a person suffers from a neck injury, it can cause unwanted pain and discomfort to the neck muscles and disrupt the motor functions in the upper body. Luckily, some treatments help alleviate the pain and restore motor function to the neck. Today’s article post will examine how cervical stenosis affects the neck and the cervical spine and how traction therapy can help alleviate cervical stenosis for many suffering individuals. Patients are referred to qualified, skilled providers who specialize in spinal decompression therapy. We go hand in hand with our patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is valuable for asking crucial questions to our providers. Dr. Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

G-7 -110 mm HG

How Does Cervical Stenosis Affect The Neck?

 

Has your neck been feeling stiff lately? Do you suffer from any pain in your neck after stretching from side to side? How about feeling discomfort after being hunched over for an extended period? All these issues are due to neck pain, and if a traumatic event or injury affects the neck even more, it can lead to the development of cervical stenosis. Like the lower back, the neck can also be injured as the soft tissues, and nerve roots spread out from the cervical area are compressed and aggravated. Research studies have found that cervical stenosis develops when the spinal column in the cervical spine becomes narrow due to either degenerative spinal changes or traumatic incidents. When the spinal canal becomes more limited, it can cause unwanted neck issues like cervical herniation and neck pain. If the nerve roots are aggravated due to being compressed, it can disrupt the sensory-motor function of the shoulders and arms, and hands. Additional information has shown that the symptoms of cervical stenosis symptoms develop gradually over time as there is no pain in the early stages. However, as cervical stenosis begins to progress in compressing the spinal canal and provoking the nerve roots, motor functions in the hands will start to lose their function in writing or grasping items. This can become a problem for many individuals if cervical stenosis is not treated immediately.

 

What Other Causes Does It Do To The Cervical Spine?

Since cervical stenosis progresses gradually without any pain symptoms in the early stages and becomes worse in the advanced settings, other causes can start affecting the neck and cervical spine. One of them is cervical myelopathy. Research studies have shown that it is a condition where the spinal cord becomes compressed and causes a disturbance in the upper extremity portions. When the upper part of the body begins to feel sharp electric sensations radiating from the neck down to the hands, it can cause muscle weakness and numbness in each section of the upper body. Other causes like natural degenerative issues can also result from cervical stenosis occurring in the cervical spine. Other research studies have shown that degenerative causes associated with cervical stenosis can activate pro-inflammatory factors in the spinal joints and cause excruciating swelling and pain-like symptoms along the spine. However, there are treatments to help reduce the pro-inflammatory markers and alleviate spinal cord compression along the cervical spine.


Traction Therapy For Cervical Stenosis-Video

Do you have neck pain? Do your shoulders feel tight and tense? Have you lost the sensation in your hands? Traction therapy alleviates spinal stenosis in the cervical area and has given many beneficial factors for people who need neck pain relief. Experiencing cervical stenosis can dampen a person’s day and progressively worsen if it is not treated right away; traction therapy can help alleviate cervical stenosis. The video above shows how traction therapy works using the cervical mechanics from the Chatanooga decompression table. Cervical traction helps loosen up the tight muscle tissues and resets the cervical spine by setting it back in its proper alignment. This allows the spinal cord and nerve roots to feel relief from the pressure they’ve been under. Cervical traction also helps rehydrate the dry spinal discs with the nutrients beneficial to the body. This link will explain what traction has to offer and the impressive results for many individuals who suffer from cervical spinal stenosis or other issues that occur in the neck.


Traction Therapy To Alleviate Cervical Stenosis

 

Many treatments associated with neck pain do have beneficial results when people are trying to relieve the pain. Some people use ice/hot packs to ease tense neck muscles, while others take over-the-counter medicine to stop the pain for the remainder of the day. Traction therapy is one treatment that seems to alleviate the pain and help restore the cervical spine. Research studies have mentioned that cervical traction is a non-surgical procedure that uses a tension pull on the cervical spine to increase the height of the spinal disc and take the pressure off the spinal cord and surrounding nerve roots. Traction on the cervical spine helps relax the neck muscles while also providing much-needed relief to the cervical spine. Additional research mentioned the beneficial properties that cervical traction offers to help separate the vertebral bodies while providing movement on the facet joints and gently stretching the soft tissues. 

 

Conclusion

The neck makes sure that the head stays upright and can make everyday motions without feeling pain or discomfort. When traumatic events or injuries affect the sensory-motor functions of the neck, it can narrow the spinal canal in the cervical spine and cause many unwanted symptoms like cervical stenosis. Cervical stenosis can develop over time and can progressively become worse if it is not treated right away. Some of the symptoms can induce muscle weakness, numbness, and pain along the neck, shoulders, arms, and hands in the body’s upper portion. Traction therapy for the cervical spine can help ease the painful symptoms by taking the pressure off the spinal canal and help reset the spine back in alignment. Incorporating cervical traction for neck pain can help many suffering individuals become pain-free on their health and wellness journey.

 

References

Abi-Aad, Karl R, and Armen Derian. “Cervical Traction – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 1 May 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK470412/.

Bjerke, Benjamin. “Cervical Stenosis with Myelopathy.” Spine, Spine-Health, 10 July 2017, www.spine-health.com/conditions/spinal-stenosis/cervical-stenosis-myelopathy.

Burns, Stephen P, et al. “Cervical Stenosis in Spinal Cord Injury and Disorders.” The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, Taylor & Francis, July 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5102300/.

Donnally III, Chester J, et al. “Cervical Myelopathy.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 6 Mar. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482312/.

Meyer, Frerk, et al. “Degenerative Cervical Spinal Stenosis: Current Strategies in Diagnosis and Treatment.” Deutsches Arzteblatt International, Deutscher Arzte Verlag, May 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2696878/.

Rulleau, Thomas, et al. “Effect of an Intensive Cervical Traction Protocol on Mid-Term Disability and Pain in Patients with Cervical Radiculopathy: An Exploratory, Prospective, Observational Pilot Study.” PloS One, Public Library of Science, 11 Aug. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8357129/.

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