ClickCease
+1-915-850-0900 spinedoctors@gmail.com
Select Page

Mobility & Flexibility

Back Clinic Mobility & Flexibility: The human body retains a natural level to ensure all its structures are functioning properly. The bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons, and other tissues work together to allow a range of movement and maintaining proper fitness and balanced nutrition can help keep the body functioning properly. Great mobility means executing functional movements with no restrictions in the range of motion (ROM).

Remember that flexibility is a mobility component, but extreme flexibility really is not required to perform functional movements. A flexible person can have core strength, balance, or coordination but cannot perform the same functional movements as a person with great mobility. According to Dr. Alex Jimenez’s compilation of articles on mobility and flexibility, individuals who don’t stretch their body often can experience shortened or stiffened muscles, decreasing their ability to move effectively.


Foods That Help Maintain Flexibility: El Paso Back Clinic

Foods That Help Maintain Flexibility: El Paso Back Clinic

Having and maintaining flexibility in the joints depends on the connective tissues surrounding the muscles. Proper lubrication in the connective tissues enables the fibers to slide over one another easily. Naturally occurring proteins collagen and elastin are key components of connective tissue that provide strength and elasticity. The more elastic the connective tissue, the more flexibility around the joint. If it is becoming difficult to stretch out or there is chronic stiffness and tightness, there are foods that help maintain flexibility and enhance overall health.

Foods That Help Maintain Flexibility: EP Chiropractic Clinic

Foods That Help Maintain Flexibility

Joint flexibility means functioning connective tissues that join the skeleton and muscles and the ability of different body parts to extend and complete motions. Connecting tissues assists with movement and stabilization. These issues include:

Ligaments

  • Ligaments can be band-shaped or string-shaped collagen fibers that connect bones.

Tendons

  • Tendons are similar to ligaments and are band or string shaped but connect muscles to the bones.

Fascia

  • Fascia is a densely woven mesh that wraps around the blood vessels, bones, muscles, organs, and nerves.

Flexibility keeps the muscles active and mobile as they are necessary for daily physical activities. When these tissues become stiff from inactivity or an unhealthy diet, it limits the body’s range of movement and increases the risk of injury. Stretching improves flexibility, and adding foods to a nutrition plan will help maintain limberness.

Nutrition

A nutrition plan full of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants will nourish connecting tissues and cells and increase collagen production. Foods rich in essential fatty acids/EFAs, vitamin C, sulfur, and water will promote healthy connective tissue for enhanced flexibility.

Fatty Acids

  • Essential fatty acids include omega-3 and omega-6, primarily found in fish, flax seeds, and liquid oils.
  • These fatty acids are essential because they cannot be made in the body.
  • Foods like fatty fish, flax seeds, walnuts, or supplements, can help achieve the proper ratio.
  • For individuals not too keen on fish, consider omega-3 supplements.

Collagen

  • Collagen is the main protein from connective tissue, and vitamin C is essential for collagen production.
  • Vitamin C-rich foods – oranges, bell peppers, broccoli, strawberries, tomatoes, leafy green vegetables, raspberries, pineapple, cruciferous vegetables, parsley, and watermelon.
  • Make various smoothie recipes for breakfast or an afternoon snack.
  • For increased protein synthesis, add branched-chain amino acids.

Sulfur

  • Sulfur helps maintain the flexible bonds in connective tissues.
  • Animal proteins that provide sulfur include fish, poultry, beef, and eggs.
  • Vegetable sources include Brussels sprouts, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, onions, and garlic.

Hydration

Water is not considered food as it contains no calories, but it is vital as it makes up 76 percent of the muscles. A high percentage of water content is the key to muscle elasticity. When the body is dehydrated, it holds onto water, causing fluid retention and stiffness. The more the muscles stay dehydrated, the more they have trouble recovering from physical activities, fatigue levels increase, the range of motion decreases, and the risk of injury increases. Don’t wait until you are thirsty. Stay hydrated throughout the day to keep the joints lubricated and energy levels high.

Fruits high in water include:

  • Strawberries
  • Watermelon
  • Cantaloupe
  • Peaches
  • Grapefruit
  • Pineapple
  • Apples
  • Pears

Vegetables high in water include:

  • Cucumber
  • Lettuce
  • Zucchini
  • Celery
  • Eggplant

Limit Salt and Sugar Intake

  • Processed foods tend to have a high salt content.
  • Too much salt causes the joints to swell as the body retains fluid.
  •  Keeping sugar intake low is important in enhancing flexibility.
  • This is because sugar breaks down the collagen in the skin and connective tissues.
  • This means avoiding processed foods, ready meals, and junk food.

Flexibility can be improved by eliminating foods that destroy collagen, focusing on foods that reduce insulin spikes, and maintaining hydration in the connective tissues. A nutritionist can develop a personalized nutrition plan for optimal neuromusculoskeletal health.


Foods That Help Maintain Flexibility


References

Beba, Mohammad et al. “The effect of curcumin supplementation on delayed-onset muscle soreness, inflammation, muscle strength, and joint flexibility: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.” Phytotherapy research: PTR vol. 36,7 (2022): 2767-2778. doi:10.1002/ptr.7477

Kviatkovsky, Shiloah A et al. “Collagen peptide supplementation for pain and function: is it effective?.” Current opinion in clinical nutrition and metabolic care vol. 25,6 (2022): 401-406. doi:10.1097/MCO.0000000000000870

MacKay, Douglas, and Alan L Miller. “Nutritional support for wound healing.” Alternative medicine review: a journal of clinical therapeutic vol. 8,4 (2003): 359-77.

Shaw, Gregory, et al. “Vitamin C-enriched gelatin supplementation before intermittent activity augments collagen synthesis.” The American journal of clinical nutrition vol. 105,1 (2017): 136-143. doi:10.3945/ajcn.116.138594

Zdzieblik, Denise, et al. “Improvement of activity-related knee joint discomfort following supplementation of specific collagen peptides.” Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie applique, nutrition et metabolism vol. 42,6 (2017): 588-595. doi:10.1139/apnm-2016-0390

Stretching Objective: El Paso Back Clinic

Stretching Objective: El Paso Back Clinic

Stretching Objective: The body needs to be flexible to maintain a full range of motion. Stretching keeps the muscles supple, strong, and healthy; without it, the muscles shorten and become stiff and tight. Then, when the muscles are needed, they are weak and unable to extend fully. This increases the risk of joint pain, strains, injuries, and muscle damage. For example, sitting in a chair for a long time results in tight glute muscles and hamstrings, which leads to back discomfort symptoms and inhibits walking. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic can help individuals develop a personalized stretching program to maintain smooth mobility, flexibility, and function.

Stretching Objective: EP Chiropractic Wellness ClinicStretching Objective

Benefits

The body needs to be flexible to maintain mobility, balance, and independence. The benefits of regularly stretching include:

  • Muscles function at optimal levels.
  • Maintains muscle length.
  • Maintains muscle strength.
  • Increased blood circulation.
  • Endorphin release.
  • Parasympathetic activation.
  • Relieves stress.
  • Natural toxin removal.
  • Relieves body aches and soreness.
  • Improves ability and performance in physical activities.
  • Reduces the risk of injuries.
  • Improves posture.

Important Areas

The areas critical for mobility include:

  • Lower back/waistline
  • Hip flexors
  • Hamstrings
  • Quadriceps in the front of the thigh.
  • Calves
  • Neck
  • Shoulders

Stretch Reflex

When the muscles are stretched, so are the muscle spindles. The spindle records the change in length and speed and transmits the signals through the spinal cord, which conveys the information. This triggers the stretch reflex, which tries to resist the change by causing the stretched muscle to contract. Muscle spindle function helps maintain muscle tone and protects the body from injury. One of the reasons for holding a stretch for a specific amount of time is because, as the muscle stays in a stretched position, the spindle acclimates to the new condition and reduces its resistance signaling, gradually training the stretch receptors to allow greater lengthening of the muscles.

Chiropractic Stretch Training

However, stretching once won’t generate maximum flexibility. Tight muscles may have taken months or years to develop; therefore, it will take time to achieve flexibility and must be continually worked on to maintain it. Chiropractors and physical therapists are body movement experts and can assess individual muscle strength and develop a customized stretching program.


Muscle Spindle Activation


References

Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B. “The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden.” Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology vol. 20,1 (2017): 1-4. doi:10.4103/0972-2327.199906

Behm, David G et al. “Acute effects of muscle stretching on physical performance, range of motion, and injury incidence in healthy active individuals: a systematic review.” Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie applique, nutrition et metabolism vol. 41,1 (2016): 1-11. doi:10.1139/apnm-2015-0235

Berg, K. Stretching fundamentals. In: Prescriptive Stretching. 2nd ed. Kindle edition. Human Kinetics; 2020.

da Costa, Bruno R, and Edgar Ramos Vieira. “Stretching to reduce work-related musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review.” Journal of rehabilitation medicine vol. 40,5 (2008): 321-8. doi:10.2340/16501977-0204

Page, Phil. “Current concepts in muscle stretching for exercise and rehabilitation.” International journal of sports physical therapy vol. 7,1 (2012): 109-19.

Witvrouw, Erik, et al. “Stretching and injury prevention: an obscure relationship.” Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.) vol. 34,7 (2004): 443-9. doi:10.2165/00007256-200434070-00003

Leg Adjustments: El Paso Back Clinic

Leg Adjustments: El Paso Back Clinic

The legs are important for standing and motion. Various problems can affect any part, including the bones, tendons, joints, blood vessels, and connective tissues of the entire leg, foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Common problems include unbalanced/unevenness, muscle sprains and strains, joint dislocations, nerve compression, and fractures. These issues can benefit from chiropractic leg adjustments to relieve the symptoms, realign the body, restore mobility, strengthen the muscles, and prevent further complications.

Leg Adjustments: EP's Chiropractic Functional Clinic Leg Adjustments

The legs are composed of two major sections: upper and lower. The ball-and-socket hip joint connects the upper portion, with only one bone comprising the upper leg, the femur, the largest bone in the body. The lower leg goes from the knee to the ankle and is composed of two bones, the fibula, and the tibia.

  • The tibia makes up the knee together with the base of the femur.
  • The fibula starts from the knee joint and is connected to the tibia.

Muscles

The leg muscles support standing and sitting, carry the body’s weight, and provide movement. Several muscles in the upper and lower legs work together to enable walking, running, jumping, flexing, and pointing the toes.

Upper Leg

The upper leg muscles support the body’s weight and movement. Their jobs include:

  • Anterior muscles: These muscles stabilize the body and help with balance. They also allow:
  • Bending and extension of the knees.
  • Flexion of the thigh at the hip joints.
  • Rotation of the legs at the hips.
  • Medial muscles assist in hip adduction – moving the leg toward the body’s center. They also allow flexion, extension, and rotation of the thigh.
  • Posterior muscles help move the leg from front to back and rotate at the hip socket.

Lower Leg

  • Anterior muscles are in the front/anterior part of the lower leg and help lift and lower the foot and toe extension.
  • Lateral muscles run outside the lower leg and stabilize the foot when walking or running. They also allow side-to-side movement.
  • Posterior muscles: These muscles are in the back of the lower leg. Some are superficial (close to the skin surface), and some sit deeper inside the leg. They help:
  • Flex and point the toes.
  • Jump, run and push off.
  • Lock and unlock the knee.
  • Maintain a healthy posture by stabilizing the legs.
  • Stand up straight by supporting the arch of the feet.

Causes

There are different causes of leg discomfort symptoms. Age, work, physical activity, sports, and misalignments can all cause leg issues to develop.

Musculoskeletal

  • Musculoskeletal system injuries, conditions, and disorders are related to the bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments. This includes bruising, tendonitis, muscle strain, overuse, and fractures can all lead to musculoskeletal issues.

Neurological

  • Neurological symptoms are related to a problem with the nerves and the nervous system. Damaged and pinched nerves can contribute to leg issues.

Vascular

  • If there are blood vessel issues, it can also lead to leg symptoms. Depending on the cause, leg symptoms can vary from moderate to severe and may be non-stop or come and go.

Symptoms

Symptoms typically include:

  • Muscle weakness.
  • Muscle stiffness.
  • Muscle tightness.
  • A feeling of tiredness and heaviness in the legs.
  • Decreased range of motion.
  • Difficulty in walking or moving the legs.
  • Leg cramps.
  • Tenderness.
  • Pain that may be dull or sharp.
  • Pain that gets worse as time goes on.
  • Bruising.
  • Swelling.
  • Tingling sensations.
  • Numbness.
  • Complete loss of sensation.
  • Edema – fluid retention.
  • Physical deformity of the legs.

Chiropractic Adjustments

Chiropractic care is a proven way of reducing swelling and discomfort throughout the body. Chiropractic leg adjustments help release restrictions and misalignments. This results in increased mobility of the joints, decreased inflammation, and improved function. A chiropractic adjustment on the leg is known as a long-axis distraction adjustment. This adjustment is designed to open the affected joint in the direction the chiropractor pulls. They can adjust their contact to open the femur from the acetabulum of the pelvis, the knee joint, the ankle joints, and the low back. This encourages proper joint space and motion in the affected areas, promoting healthy movement and space and allowing more nutrient flow and pressure removal from the surrounding nerves to help with symptom relief.


Hip Long Axis Distraction


References

Binstead JT, Munjal A, Varacallo M. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis, and Lower Limb, Calf. (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459362/) [Updated 2020 Aug 22]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Accessed 12/29/2021.

Eid K, Tafas E, Mylonas K, Angelopoulos P, Tsepis E, Fousekis K. Treatment of the trunk and lower extremities with Ergon® IASTM technique can increase hamstrings flexibility in amateur athletes: A randomized control study. Phys Ther Sport. 2017;28:e12. doi:10.1016/J.PTSP.2017.08.038

Jeno SH, Schindler GS. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis, and Lower Limb, Thigh Adductor Magnus Muscles. (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK534842/) [Updated 2020 Aug 10]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Accessed 12/29/2021.

McGee S. Stance and gait. In: McGee S. Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 6.

Ransom AL, Sinkler MA, Nallamothu SV. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis, and Lower Limb, Femoral Muscles. (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK500008/) [Updated 2020 Oct 30]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Accessed 12/29/2021.

Thompson PD Nutt JG. Gait disorders. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC. Bradley’s Neurology in Clinical Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 22.

Young G. Leg cramps. (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4429847/) BMJ Clinical Evidence. 2015 May 13;2015:1113. Accessed 12/29/2021.

Different Stretches To Improve Hip Mobility

Different Stretches To Improve Hip Mobility

Introduction

The hips in the lower portions of the body allow the legs to move the host from one location to another and provide stability to support the upper body’s weight. The hips will enable the torso to twist and turn without feeling pain. This is due to the various muscles and ligaments surrounding the pelvic bone and hip joint socket that allow the motion to be possible. However, when various injuries or factors start to affect the multiple muscles surrounding the pelvis or there is a chronic condition like osteoarthritis that causes wear and tear on the hip joints can cause underlying symptoms associated with the hips and cause many individuals to have difficulty when moving around. Luckily there are ways to improve hip mobility and the surrounding muscles in the hip and pelvic region of the body. Today’s article looks at the causes of the development of tight hips in the body and how different stretches can release tight hip flexor muscles. We refer our patients to certified providers that incorporate techniques and multiple therapies for many individuals suffering from hip pain and its correlating symptoms that can affect the musculoskeletal system in the hips, legs, and lumbar region of the spine. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis when it is appropriate. We understand that education is a fantastic way when asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request and understanding. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

trigger-point-therapy-treating-the-abs_639e1158

What Causes The Body To Develop Tight Hips?

 

Have you been dealing with hip mobility issues? When you sit, do you feel uncomfortable, and your hip muscles become tight? Or do you have a decreased range of motion when moving your hips? It could correlate with your hips if you have been experiencing muscle pain issues in the lower extremities. The hips help stabilize the upper and lower portions of the body while providing the full leg’s range of motion. When a person begins to sit for long periods or twist their body in a weird position, it can cause the muscles that surround the hips to become shortened. Other issues, like chronic conditions, can play a role in developing tight hip flexors. Studies reveal that various pathologies affecting the hips, lumbar spine, and lower extremities could strongly correlate with restricted hip mobility that can cause harmful effects that can affect the hips. To that point, some of the symptoms associated with tight hip flexors include:

  • Instability
  • Hypermobility
  • Limited range of motion
  • Reduce muscle strength in the groin
  • Muscle cramps
  • Sharp, sudden pain in the hips, pelvis, or groin
  • Low back pain
  • Piriformis syndrome

Other research studies mentioned that hypermobility disorders could affect the hip joints. Hypermobility disorders like EDS (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) could cause micro or macro-trauma on the hip joint and affect the ligaments surrounding the hip joint. To that point, it can cause the hip flexor muscles to become tense and potentially affect how a person moves, which then causes soft tissue injuries and chronic pain.


Hip Flexor Stretches-Video

Do you feel tight along your hips? Do you see yourself hobbling around when walking? Or do you feel aches or strains when stretching? Many of these issues correlate with tight hip flexors that could result from hip pain in the lower extremities. When a person has tight hip flexors, it could be due to them constantly sitting down, causing the hip muscles to be shortened, or chronic conditions that can affect the hip joint and muscles. However, there are various ways to prevent tight hip flexors and regain mobility back to the hips. Studies reveal that stretching combined with core stabilization can help improve the hip’s range of motion while ensuring core endurance exercises can help strengthen the surrounding muscles in the hip area. The video above shows stretches targeting the hip flexor muscles and helps improve hip mobility.


Different Stretches To Release Tight Hip Flexors

Studies have shown that the hip flexor muscles are the main contributors to lumbar spine stability when releasing tight hip flexor muscles. So when there are tight hip flexors, it can cause overlapping risk profiles to the lumbar spine, which leads to pain and impairment in performance. The best way to reduce the pain-like symptoms associated with tight hip flexors is by stretching the lower half of the body to reduce muscle strain and tightness in the hip flexors. Additional studies have found that stretching combined with exercises targeting the low back can reduce the pain caused in the low back and help improve stability and strengthen the surrounding muscles located in the hips. Now it is important to remember that stretching for at least 5-10 minutes before and after working out allows the muscles to warm up and improve flexibility. Below are some different stretches that can release tight hip flexors.

 

High Crescent Lunge

 

  • While standing on the mat, take a step forward to allow your right foot to be in a staggard stance *Think in a lunge position.
  • Bend the front knee gently while keeping the back leg straight, as this allows the heel in the back leg to be lifted off the mat; the bent front knee enables the thigh to be parallel to the floor, and the right foot is pressed flat on the mat.
  • Square up the hips, so they face toward the mat’s front.
  • Extend the arm up towards the ceiling to stretch upwards while pressing into the mat to feel the hips stretch
  • Hold for five breaths before slowly rising out of the lunge position and repeating on the other side. 

This stretch helps release tension in the hip flexors and quads while warming up the muscles and increasing blood flow to the legs.

 

Knee-To Chest Stretch

 

  • Lie on the mat with both legs extended out and feet flexed.
  • Pull on the left knee to the chest while keeping the right leg straight, and the lumbar portion of the back is pressed into the mat.
  • Hold the position while taking deep breaths for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.
  • Release slowly and repeat on the right leg *You can lift both knees to your chest and rock slowly from side to side to relieve low back tension as an alternative.

This stretch is extremely helpful for tight hamstrings and allows the tense muscles on the hips and lower back to relax while increasing blood flow back to the muscles.

 

Piriformis Stretch

 

  • On the mat, sit with both legs extended out.
  • Cross the right leg over the left and place the other flat on the floor while the left foot is flexed
  • Place the right hand behind the body while the left elbow is on the right knee.
  • On inhale, press the right leg to the left while allowing the torso to twist on the right.
  • Take five breaths for a deeper stretch and switch sides to repeat the action with the left hand *If you have low back pain issues, the modified version allows you to use your left hand to pull the right quad in and out to the left and vice versa.

This stretch helps loosen tight muscles in the lower back, hips, and glutes. If you have sciatic nerve pain associated with piriformis syndrome, this stretch helps release muscle tension from the piriformis muscle aggravating the sciatic nerve.

Happy Baby Pose

 

  • Lie on the mat with both knees bent and feet on the ground.
  • On inhale, lift the feet off the ground and grab the outer sections of the feet with your hands.
  • Then gently pull the feet towards the chest and allow the knees to lower to the ground, on either side of the body, while keeping the back flat on exhale.
  • Hold the position for at least five breaths.

This stretch helps with the inner thigh muscles or hip adductors and helps them become loose and mobile without feeling any strain or tension.

 

Bridge Pose

 

  • On the mat, lie on your back and sides, and extend your arms while your feet are flat on the floor with your knees bent.
  • Press with your heels to lift the hips and allow the feet to walk a few steps toward the body. *Keep the feet and knees hip-width apart.
  • Clasp hands together underneath the body and press them into the mat
  • Hold the position for five breaths.

This stretch helps take the pressure off the hip muscles while strengthening the glutes and abdominal muscles.

 

Conclusion

When it comes to releasing tight hip flexors after sitting for a long time or having hip issues affecting your low back or pelvis, Doing different stretches that target the hips can reduce the pain and release tight muscles associated with other conditions that can affect the body. The hips are important to take care of since they provide mobility and stability to the upper and lower portions of the body. They support the upper body’s weight while providing a huge range of motion to the legs. Incorporating these different stretches can reduce the pain that they have been under and help warm up the other muscles that surround the lower extremities.

 

References

Lee, Sang Wk, and Suhn Yeop Kim. “Effects of Hip Exercises for Chronic Low-Back Pain Patients with Lumbar Instability.” Journal of Physical Therapy Science, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4339134/.

Moreside, Janice M, and Stuart M McGill. “Hip Joint Range of Motion Improvements Using Three Different Interventions.” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2012, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22344062/.

Reiman, Michael P, and J W Matheson. “Restricted Hip Mobility: Clinical Suggestions for Self-Mobilization and Muscle Re-Education.” International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3811738/.

Reiman, Michael P, and J W Matheson. “Restricted Hip Mobility: Clinical Suggestions for Self-Mobilization and Muscle Re-Education.” International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8027473/es/PMC3811738/.

Disclaimer

The Benefits Of Foam Rolling To Reduce Trigger Point Pain

The Benefits Of Foam Rolling To Reduce Trigger Point Pain

Introduction

When exercising, it is very important to warm each muscle group to prevent injuries from occurring when working out. Stretching the arms, legs, and back can loosen up stiff muscles and increase blood flow to allow each muscle fiber to warm up and allow maximum power when each set is performed. One of the best ways to reduce muscle fatigue or stiffness before working out is to foam roll each muscle group for at least 1-2 minutes max to provide optimal functionality. Foam rolling allows the muscles to warm up before an extensive workout session. Still, it can also offer many benefits when combined with other therapies to reduce pain-like symptoms like trigger point pain from causing further injuries from reoccurring in the body. Today’s article focuses on the benefits of foam rolling, how it reduces trigger point pain, and how it is combined with chiropractic care to achieve optimal health and wellness. We refer patients to certified providers incorporating techniques and therapies for individuals dealing with trigger point pain affecting different body areas. By locating where the trigger points are coming from, many pain specialists utilize a treatment plan to reduce the effects that trigger points are causing on the body while suggesting different tools, like using a foam roller to reduce pain in the other muscle groups. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis when it is appropriate. We understand that education is a terrific way when asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request and understanding. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

how-to-find-trigger-points-popliteus_638bd9c4

The Benefits Of Foam Rolling

Have you been dealing with pain-like symptoms in different parts of your body? Do you feel stiffness in your muscles? Or have you been feeling exhausted throughout the entire day? Many people often feel stressed, overworked, and exhausted after a long day and need to find different ways to relieve stress. Whether going to the gym to work out or yoga class, many people should warm up for about 5-10 minutes to work out each muscle group to reduce muscle fatigue and stiffness. One of the tools that people should utilize is using a foam roller. Studies reveal that foam rolling before working out can improve muscle performance and flexibility and, at the same time, alleviate muscle fatigue and soreness. 

 

Incorporating foam rolling as part of your warm-up can prevent issues like trigger point pain from causing more problems in the affected muscle group and causing more harm. Foam rolling has been known as a self-myofascial release (SMR) tool for many athletic people to relieve delay-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and can help the recovery process for muscular performance. Studies show that when athletes have DOMS, their muscles are tender and stiff that which causes restricted movement. By foam rolling, each sore muscle group can get rolled out on a dense foam roll from the person’s body weight to apply pressure on the soft tissue. When performed correctly, the body’s range of motion will increase, and soft tissue restriction is prevented.

 

Foam Rolling To Reduce Trigger Point Pain

 

When the body has been overworked, the muscle fibers will start to overstretch and cause various issues in different body parts. When this happens, tiny, hard nodules form over time and cause referred pain to other body locations in each muscle group. This is known as myofascial pain syndrome or trigger points. Studies reveal that trigger point pain is when the affected muscles are either acute or chronic and cause pain in the surrounding connective tissues. Dr. Travell, M.D.’s book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” mentioned that myofascial pain could cause somato-visceral dysfunction in the body as the affected muscles and nerves are correlated with the corresponding vital organs. This means that if someone is dealing with back pain, it could be an issue with their gut system. Now how does foam rolling help prevent trigger point pain? As mentioned earlier, foam rolling each muscle group can alleviate muscle soreness and improve blood circulation. Studies reveal that foam rolling on the muscle group affected by trigger point pain can increase blood flow to the affected muscle and reduce fascial inflammation in the body.

 


What Foam Rolling Does To The Body- Video

Have you been dealing with muscle soreness? Do you feel like you are constantly bending over or shuffling your feet? Or have you been experiencing constant aches and pains when stretching? If you have been dealing with these musculoskeletal issues, why not incorporate foam rolling as part of your routine? Many individuals have some pain that is affecting their muscles that is causing them pain. Regarding reducing pain, incorporating foam rolling on the affected muscles can increase blood flow to the muscle and reduce any symptoms associated with chronic conditions. Studies reveal that the combination of foam rolling and stretching before working out can provide these amazing benefits, which include the following:

  • Ease muscle pain
  • Increase range of motion
  • Reduce cellulite
  • Relieve back pain
  • Relive trigger points in muscles

The video above gives an excellent explanation of what foam rolling does to the body and why it provides relief to those different muscle groups. When people merge foam rolling with other treatments, it can benefit their health and wellness.


Foam Rolling & Chiropractic Care

 

As stated earlier, other various treatments can combine foam rolling to promote a healthy body. One of the treatments is chiropractic care. Chiropractic care incorporates mechanical and manual manipulation of the spine, especially in subluxation or spinal misalignment. When the spine is misaligned, it can cause muscle strain and mobility issues that can affect the body over time. So how does foam rolling play a part in chiropractic care? Well, a chiropractor or doctor of chiropractic can develop a plan to help manage the pain while treating the condition affecting the body. Since foam rolling is utilized in a warm-up session in association with physical therapy, many individuals who work with a personal trainer can incorporate foam rolling as part of their warm-up to loosen up stiff muscles and go to regular chiropractic treatments to improve muscle strength, mobility, and flexibility.

 

Conclusion

There are many beneficial properties that foam rolling can provide to the body. Foam rolling can allow blood circulation to the muscles while reducing muscle fatigue and soreness. Incorporating foam rolling as part of a daily warm-up can also prevent trigger points from forming in the muscle groups and can work out the tight knots that the muscle has occurred. At the same time, treatments like chiropractic care and physical therapy can combine foam rolling to promote health and wellness in the body and prevent muscle pain.

 

References

Konrad A, Nakamura M, Bernsteiner D, Tilp M. The Accumulated Effects of Foam Rolling Combined with Stretching on Range of Motion and Physical Performance: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. J Sports Sci Med. 2021 Jul 1;20(3):535-545. doi: 10.52082/jssm.2021.535. PMID: 34267594; PMCID: PMC8256518.

 

Pagaduan, Jeffrey Cayaban, et al. “Chronic Effects of Foam Rolling on Flexibility and Performance: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 4 Apr. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8998857/.

Pearcey, Gregory E P, et al. “Foam Rolling for Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Recovery of Dynamic Performance Measures.” Journal of Athletic Training, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4299735/.

Shah, Jay P, et al. “Myofascial Trigger Points Then and Now: A Historical and Scientific Perspective.” PM & R : the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508225/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Wiewelhove, Thimo, et al. “A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Foam Rolling on Performance and Recovery.” Frontiers in Physiology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 9 Apr. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6465761/.

Disclaimer

Plantar Fasciitis & Trigger Points On The Feet

Plantar Fasciitis & Trigger Points On The Feet

Introduction

Everyone worldwide knows that feet are important. The feet allow many individuals to run, walk, or jog for long periods without feeling pain for a moderate amount of time. To that point, the various muscles and tendons surrounding the foot provide full body flexion, extension, and stability. Even though it is very easy to get in the recommended amount of steps into being healthy, around 75% of individuals will have foot pain that can impact their ability to walk. One of the most common foot pains is plantar fasciitis, which can become a painful foot condition if it is not treated as soon as possible. Today’s article looks at plantar fasciitis, its symptoms, how trigger points correlate, and treatments for it. We refer patients to certified providers incorporating techniques and therapies for individuals dealing with plantar fasciitis. By locating where the trigger points are coming from, many pain specialists can develop a treatment plan to reduce the effects that plantar fasciitis is causing on the feet. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis when it is appropriate. We understand that education is a terrific way when asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request and understanding. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

taping-for-trigger-point-peroneal-muscles_6394f3b4

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

 

Have you been dealing with constant heel pain? Do you feel pain shooting up your leg when you step or walk? Or do you feel a stabbing ache in your heel? Many of these pain issue people are dealing with correlate with plantar fasciitis. Studies reveal that plantar fasciitis results from degenerative irritation on the plantar fascia and its ligaments. This causes the muscle ligaments to become inflamed, swollen, and weak, which then causes the bottom of the foot or heel to hurt when a person is walking or standing. To that point, when there is a repetitive strain on the feet, it causes microtears in the plantar fascia. The plantar fascia in the foot plays an important role as it comprises three segments that support the medial arch and shock absorption when stepping down. As one of the most common causes of heel pain, the residual pain from plantar fasciitis tends to be a sharp, stabbing sensation. Plantar fasciitis is more prominent in middle-aged people. Still, anyone at any age can develop plantar fasciitis, especially if they have labor jobs requiring them to be constantly on their feet.

 

Symptoms Of Plantar Fasciitis

Since around 2 million Americans could potentially develop plantar fasciitis, it is important to know that when a person has been on their feet constantly, there will be inflammation along the tissues in the feet. Many individuals with a busy lifestyle that requires them to be on their feet frequently would often ignore the pain or discomfort. Some of the symptoms that plantar fasciitis causes include the following:

  • Pain on the bottom of the heel
  • Pain in the arch 
  • Pain that is usually worse when waking up
  • Pain that increases over months
  • Swelling on the bottom of the heel

However, when the pain becomes overbearing, many people would often think they have sore feet or low back pain from being overly tired from work, under constant stress, or over-exerting their bodies. When this happens, many would think the pain would go away in a few days after resting for a short period.

 

Trigger Points Associated With Plantar Fasciitis

 

Now many individuals would often think that plantar fasciitis just only affects the heels, however, it can affect any part of the structure of the foot since all the surrounding muscle tissues are at risk of inflammation. When people start to ignore the pain and discomfort that plantar fasciitis is causing on the feet, it can overlap and develop trigger points in other areas of the body:

  • Ankles
  • Knees
  • Hips
  • Lower back

Studies reveal that trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome are hard, discrete, small nodules that are along the taut musculoskeletal band that causes numerous issues like inflammation, hypersensitivity, and pain to the affected muscle groups in the body. According to “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction” written by Dr. Travell, M.D., it mentions that when the deep intrinsic muscles that work with the plantar fascia are affected by trigger points, would cause symptoms of numbness and the feeling of swelling in the foot. This causes many people to have limited mobility and have intense pain when walking, which can negatively impact their lifestyle.

 


An Overview Of Plantar Fasciitis- Video

Have you been dealing with aching feet? Do you feel a sharp, radiating pain in your feet? Or do you have difficulty walking? Many often think they are dealing with sore feet or other issues causing them pain. Around 75% of Americans often have foot pain affecting their ability to walk, and one of them is plantar fasciitis. The video above explains plantar fasciitis and how it can affect the feet. When the plantar fascia tendons become overused, it causes micro-tears in the muscle ligaments. When added compressive force starts to push against the heel boner, it can lead to a pathological state whereby the plantar fascia degenerates and creates dysfunction and pain. When this happens, it can lead to other conditions like trigger point pain along the muscle fibers in the foot. The pain and tenderness caused by trigger points in the plantar muscles may mask as plantar fasciitis. To that point, when plantar fasciitis becomes an issue and causes the individual to be in immense pain, it can become problematic. As luck would have it, treatments are available to reduce the pain from plantar fasciitis.


Treatments For Plantar Fasciitis

 

When treating plantar fasciitis, many available treatments can reduce the inflammatory effects in the heel and prevent trigger points from coming back. One of the available treatments is chiropractic care. Chiropractic care is an alternative treatment option to prevent, diagnose, and treat numerous injuries and conditions associated with the spine, primarily subluxations or spinal misalignments. Chiropractic focuses on restoring and maintaining the overall health and wellness of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems through spinal manipulation and adjustments. A chiropractor can carefully re-align the spine, improving a patient’s strength, mobility, and flexibility. Regarding plantar fasciitis, chiropractic care can work with other treatments, including physical therapy, massage, and even injections, to manage the pain and treat the condition. Even though plantar fasciitis takes several months to heal, chiropractic care can involve a precise technique that involves adjustments to the feet, ankles, and spinal alignment. This provides several benefits, which include the following:

  • Reduces Stress in the Plantar Fascia 
  • Promotes Healing 
  • Provides Effective Pain Management 
  • Reduces the Risk of Further Injury 

 

Conclusion

As many individuals worldwide are on their feet constantly, foot pain can hinder one’s ability to move. One of the most common foot pain is plantar fasciitis which can correlate with trigger points along the various muscles of the foot. Plantar fasciitis results from degenerative irritation on the plantar fascia and its ligaments, which causes sharp, stabbing pain on the heel. When this happens, it can cause the heel to be inflamed, swollen, and weak. To that point, it causes instability and pain when walking. However, plantar fasciitis can be treated when it is caught early through various treatments like chiropractic care. Chiropractic care can reduce the stress in the plantar fascia and help reduce the risk of further injuries. Combined with other therapies, many people can function normally and regain their walking ability without pain.

 

References

Buchanan, Benjamin K, and Donald Kushner. “Plantar Fasciitis – StatPearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 30 May 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK431073/.

Petrofsky, Jerrold, et al. “Local Heating of Trigger Points Reduces Neck and Plantar Fascia Pain.” Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2020, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31594202/.

Shah, Jay P, et al. “Myofascial Trigger Points Then and Now: A Historical and Scientific Perspective.” PM & R : the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508225/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Disclaimer

Foot Pain, Plantar Fasciitis, & Trigger Point Pain

Foot Pain, Plantar Fasciitis, & Trigger Point Pain

Introduction

The various muscles and tendons surrounding the foot play an important role as they provide stability to the lower parts of the body and allow the individual to move and flex their feet. These various muscles and tendons help support the ankles and allow leg movement. Many people will be on their feet constantly as the world moves and sometimes have to deal with various issues affecting their ability to walk. As the body naturally ages, many people will begin to shuffle their feet around, which causes strain on the foot muscles and can affect the calves and legs over time. To that point, it can lead to foot pain and other conditions that can affect the individual. Other issues that can affect the feet and its muscle could be incorrect footwear, how they are standing, or how they walk. When this happens, conditions like plantar fasciitis and trigger point pain can affect the feet differently. Today’s article focuses on the superficial intrinsic foot muscles, how trigger points and plantar fasciitis correlate with foot pain, and how to strengthen the foot muscles. We refer patients to certified providers incorporating techniques and therapies in the lower body extremities of trigger points affecting the feet. This helps many people with trigger point pain symptoms associated with plantar fasciitis along the intrinsic foot muscles. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis when it is appropriate. We understand that education is a terrific way when asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request and understanding. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

anatomy-amp-palpation-of-the-sartorius-muscle_63951bec

The Superficial Intrinsic Foot Muscles

 

As stated earlier, the foot has various muscles and tendons that allow stability to the ankles and allow movement when a person is walking. The foot has two muscle groups: the extrinsic and intrinsic muscles. Today we will look at the intrinsic foot muscles and how important these muscles are in the foot. Studies reveal that the intrinsic foot muscles are highly important as they are contained to the foot and contribute to supporting the medial longitudinal arch. The intrinsic foot muscles are superficial and help keep the toes straight while providing flexion and extension when in motion. The foot has about 29 muscles, including 10 surrounding the foot and ankle, while the other 19 are intrinsic and provide the roles for gait and posture. The 19 intrinsic muscles have the following:

  • Abductor Hallucis
  • Quadratus Plantae
  • Flexor Hallucis Brevis
  • Flexor Digitorum Brevis
  • Abductor Digiti Minimi
  • Flexor Digiti Minimi
  • The Interossei Muscles
  • The Lumbricals

These muscles allow individuals to walk, run, or jog without pain. However, when the intrinsic muscles become impaired, studies reveal that intrinsic foot muscle function could be linked to various foot conditions that affect a person’s walking ability.

 

How Does Foot Pain Correlate With Plantar Fasciitis & Trigger Points?

Studies reveal that foot pain can cause an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience as many factors can affect how a person is walking and can lead to various issues affecting the lower extremities’ mobility. When multiple issues affect how a person walks, the intrinsic muscle and other muscles surrounding the ankle and foot could become strained and overlap with other foot conditions. When foot pain affects the intrinsic foot muscles, co-existing muscle impairments could affect the alignment, motion, load distribution, and muscle performance that involves the legs. When these impairments are causing foot pain, it can correlate with trigger points and conditions like plantar fasciitis that can affect a person walking. But how does foot pain connect with plantar fasciitis and trigger points?

 

According to Dr. Travell, M.D.’s book “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” when tension starts to overload the foot, the intrinsic muscles develop tiny nodules in the muscle fibers and reduce the muscle strength of the medial arch. To that point, it can collapse and cause the foot to develop inflammation associated with repetitive actions that cause plantar fasciitis in the feet. When this happens, it can affect a person’s ability to walk, run, stand, and affect the lower extremities’ mobility. If it is not treated right away, it can cause muscle and joint pain in the hips, legs, knees, and lower back.

 


An Overview Of The Intrinsic Foot Muscles-Video

Have you been dealing with issues on your feet? Do you find it difficult to step down or walk? Or have you been rubbing your feet constantly to reduce the soreness in your feet? Many of these issues correlate with trigger points affecting the intrinsic foot muscles that could cause foot issues like plantar fasciitis. The foot has various muscles, like the intrinsic muscles, that allow gait and stability to the body. Multiple factors affecting the intrinsic foot muscles can lead to instability, muscle strain, tendon stress, and muscle and joint pain. This can affect how a person moves throughout the day and their quality of life. The video above explains where each different muscles are, which ones are extrinsic and intrinsic, and how each muscle helps with foot function. When various issues begin to affect the foot and cause mobility issues, multiple techniques are available to help strengthen the foot muscles and prevent future problems from affecting the feet.


Strengthening The Foot Muscles

 

Regarding trigger point pain affecting the intrinsic foot muscles, various techniques can reduce the pain-like symptoms of trigger points and prevent foot issues like plantar fasciitis from re-occurring. Studies reveal that light, non-weight-bearing exercises like cycling and swimming can minimize muscle overload on foot. Other ways to strengthen the intrinsic foot muscles are by stretching the toe flexors to help improve stability and prevent hypermobility in the foot. Other techniques that can reduce trigger points in the foot’s muscle fibers include using a cylindrical or spherical object and rolling under the arches to massage and loosen stiff muscles. Many of these techniques could help restore foot functionality and stability while reducing future issues like plantar fasciitis in the feet. To that point, allow people to walk pain-free again.

 

Conclusion

The foot has 29 muscles, including ten extrinsic muscles surrounding the foot and ankle and 29 intrinsic muscles on the foot. The intrinsic muscles are highly important for foot functionality as they are superficial and contribute to supporting the medial longitudinal arch. The intrinsic foot muscles also help keep the toes straight and allow flexion and extension when in motion. These muscles also help a person walk and stabilize the ankle. When various factors affect a person’s walking ability, it can lead to muscle strain and tendon stress to the foot, leading to the development of trigger points in the intrinsic muscle fibers and causing pain. This could cause foot conditions like plantar fasciitis and other co-existing muscle impairments that can affect the lower extremities’ mobility while causing muscle and joint pain in the hips, legs, knees, and lower back. Luckily there are available techniques that can help massage, stretch, and strengthen the intrinsic foot muscles while reducing trigger points and their associated symptoms from re-occurring. To that point, these techniques can allow many individuals to walk without feeling pain.

 

References

Card, Ryan K, and Bruno Bordoni. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Foot Muscles.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 27 Feb. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK539705/.

Gooding, Thomas M, et al. “Intrinsic Foot Muscle Activation during Specific Exercises: A T2 Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.” Journal of Athletic Training, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5094843/.

Hawke, Fiona, and Joshua Burns. “Understanding the Nature and Mechanism of Foot Pain.” Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 14 Jan. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2631512/.

Hayter, Matt. “Why Do We Need the Intrinsic Muscles of the Foot? [Guide 2022].” Dynamic Podiatry, 2022, www.dynamicpodiatry.com.au/what-are-the-intrinsic-muscles-of-the-foot-guide-2019/#intrinsic.

Lim, Ang Tee, et al. “Management of Plantar Fasciitis in the Outpatient Setting.” Singapore Medical Journal, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Apr. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4853481/.

Soysa, Achini, et al. “Importance and Challenges of Measuring Intrinsic Foot Muscle Strength.” Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 26 Nov. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3544647/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Disclaimer

Issues In Your Calves? It Might Be Trigger Points In The Soleus Muscles

Issues In Your Calves? It Might Be Trigger Points In The Soleus Muscles

Introduction

The calves are extremely important to the lower portions of the legs as they allow the individual to move around and help stabilize the entire body. The calves have two muscles: the gastrocnemius and the soleus, which provide plantarflexion and stability at the ankle joint. These two muscles work together to ensure that the upper body’s weight doesn’t lean forward too much to let the individual fall. However, when many people overuse the calf muscles constantly, it can cause the muscle fibers in the lower legs to be overstretched and develop small nodules known as trigger points to cause referred pain to the calves and the ankles that can affect a person’s ability to walk, run, or jump. Today’s article looks at the soleus muscle, how trigger points affect the muscle, and different methods to reduce pain while managing trigger points along the calves. We refer patients to certified providers that incorporate various techniques in the lower body extremities, like lower leg and calve pain therapies correlating to trigger points, to aid many people dealing with pain symptoms along the soleus muscles, causing muscle cramps and issues along the ankles. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent way when asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request and understanding. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

what-happens-in-your-body-during-migraine-webmd_635da814

What Is The Soleus Muscle?

 

Do you feel a cramping sensation in your calves? Do your feet hurt when you are walking, jumping, or running? Or are you experiencing tightness in your calve muscles? When a person is experiencing calf pain in their legs, it could be trigger points causing overlapping issues in the soleus muscles. As stated earlier, the calves have two muscles: the gastrocnemius and the soleus. The gastrocnemius makes up the round shape of the calves and is a complex, superficial muscle. At the same time, the soleus is a large, flat muscle deep within the gastrocnemius and forms the calcaneal tendon (Achilles tendon), which can be mistaken as a nerve for the ankle. Studies reveal that the soleus muscle works together with the gastrocnemius, and these muscles constitute a plantar flexor. The soleus is part of a group of muscles known as antigravity muscles. It acts like a skeletal muscle and helps maintain good posture in the body to prevent the sheer body weight from falling forwards at the ankle when standing.

 

How Do Trigger Points Affect The Soleus Muscle?

 

The calves are essential for the movement and mobility functions of the body. When the calve muscles have been overused to repetitive movements or have been dealing with trauma, it can cause the muscle fibers to tear and develop trigger points along the calves causing referred pain to travel down the ankles. Trigger points along the soleus muscle are tricky to diagnose since they cause referred pain to the surrounding muscles. “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., mention that, unlike the latent trigger points that can affect the gastrocnemius, active trigger points can affect the soleus muscle and cause tenderness referred to the heel. When muscle tenderness affects the heels, it can cause trigger points to mimic chronic conditions like plantar fasciitis. Additional studies reveal that musculoskeletal impairments like trigger points in the soleus muscle could potentially lead to biomechanical changes in the ankle. When trigger points cause hypersensitivity spots in the skeletal muscle taut band, it can restrict the soleus muscle to allow ankle dorsiflexion. Individuals with active soleus trigger points are prone to develop low back pain due to ankle dorsiflexion restriction, leading to them leaning over and lifting objects improperly.

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Soleus – Video

Have you been dealing with pain traveling down from your calves to your ankles? Experiencing stiffness around your ankles? Or do you feel like you are about to fall? These pain-like issues are associated with trigger points along the soleus muscles along the calves. The soleus is one of the two muscles (the other is the gastrocnemius) that make up the calves and acts as a skeletal muscle to help maintain good posture in the body. When trigger points affect the soleus muscle, they can cause referred pain to the calves and mimic chronic issues like plantar fasciitis at the ankles. The video above explains where the soleus muscles are located, deep within the gastrocnemius, where the trigger points are causing referred pain to the ankles, and where they are in the soleus muscle fibers in the calves. Even though trigger points can cause referred pain in the affected muscle fibers of the body, they are treatable and can be managed through different methods to help the calves.


Different Methods To Reduce Pain And Manage Trigger Points In The Calves

 

Even though trigger points can affect the soleus muscles and cause referred pain to the ankles, different methods can reduce the pain and help manage trigger points in the calves. Studies reveal that when there are multitudes of therapies that can help manage trigger points, it can help reduce the pain affecting the soleus muscle by optimizing muscle function and preventing the development of chronic pain syndromes. Besides therapies that target trigger points, corrective actions and stretches can help release the pain from the soleus muscle. Incorporating calf stretches, having a correct posture when sitting down, wearing long loose socks while sleeping, and wearing low heels can prevent the soleus muscle from shortening and help manage trigger points from re-occurring in the calves. When people start to take care of their calve muscles, it can help their mobility and stability at the ankles.

 

Conclusion

As part of the calf muscles and an antigravity muscle, the soleus works with the gastrocnemius to help with stability and plantarflexion to the ankles. This muscle is deep within the gastrocnemius and helps maintain good posture in the body that prevents a person from falling forward at the ankles when standing. When the soleus muscles have been overused, they can develop tiny knots in the muscle fibers known as trigger points that can cause referred pain to the ankles. Trigger points along the soleus muscles can cause overlapping features in the calves by restricting ankle dorsiflexion, causing individuals to develop low back pain associated with leaning forward. However, various therapies can manage trigger points through multiple treatments that can reduce the pain and allow stability back to the calves, enabling the individual to continue walking without feeling pain.

 

References

Binstead, Justin T, et al. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Calf – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 May 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459362/.

Jurkovicova, Emma. “Soleus Muscle.” Kenhub, Kenhub, 14 Feb. 2022, www.kenhub.com/en/library/anatomy/soleus-muscle.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Valera-Calero, Juan Antonio, et al. “Prediction Model of Soleus Muscle Depth Based on Anthropometric Features: Potential Applications for Dry Needling.” Diagnostics (Basel, Switzerland), U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 May 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7277950/.

Disclaimer

Muscle Cramps In The Calves? Might Be Trigger Point Pain

Muscle Cramps In The Calves? Might Be Trigger Point Pain

Introduction

Various muscles help support the lower legs in the body and allow movement to the host. The lower extremities include the hips, pelvis, thighs, legs, knees, and feet. At the same time, the various muscles help provide support and stability to the upper body’s weight and incorporate mobility and movement for the entire body to go from one location to another. The legs have two sections connected with the knees; the upper portion has the hips and thigh muscles, while the lower legs have the calve muscles, shin muscles, and the Achilles tendon. The calve muscles have two groups of muscles, and when the calve intense exercises, or normal factors have overused muscles may potentially lead to muscle cramps associated with trigger points. Today’s article examines one of the calve muscles known as the gastrocnemius, how the calves are affected by trigger points and corrective actions to prevent muscle cramps in the calves. We refer patients to certified providers that incorporate various techniques in the lower body extremities, like lower leg and calve pain therapies correlating to trigger points, to aid many people dealing with pain symptoms along the gastrocnemius muscles, causing muscle cramps. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent way when asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request and understanding. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

pelvic-pain-mayo-clinic_635d9698

What Are The Gastrocnemius Muscles?

 

Have you been dealing with walking from one place to another? Do your calves feel hard or tense with the slightest touch or movement? Or are you feeling excruciating pain in your calves that make it hard to move? These pain-like symptoms are indicators of trigger points associated with the calves affecting the gastrocnemius muscles. The calves are mostly referred to as the posterior portion of the lower legs responsible for the foot and ankle plantarflexion while also engaging in activities like running or jumping. The two muscles that make up the calves are the gastrocnemius and the soleus. The gastrocnemius is a complex, superficial muscle fundamental to good posture or walking. This muscle has a casual relationship with the lower body as it affects hip movement and the lumbar area of the spine. The gastrocnemius provides a round shape for the calves to form and narrows down to the ankles, where it forms a tendon.

 

How Are The Calves Affected By Trigger Point Pain?

 

Since the gastrocnemius provides the round shape to form the calves when the muscles have become overused or injured in a sports activity, it can cause the individual to have limited mobility. Studies reveal that a tear in the gastrocnemius muscles can implicate lower leg trauma and affect the muscle function to plantar flex the foot at the ankle joint and reduce flexion on the leg to the leg knee joint. When it comes to the development of trigger points along the gastrocnemius muscles that are affecting the calves, according to “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet Travell, M.D., the book states that latent trigger points along the gastrocnemius may cause individuals to complain about calf cramps on the legs, however, when the trigger points are active, the individual is aware of the calf pain and would complain about experiencing pain in the back of their knees. The book also mentioned that trigger points associated with the gastrocnemius muscle could be mistaken for other conditions like plantar foot pain or radiculopathy in the sacroiliac joints. When trigger points affect the calf muscles, it can lead to mobility issues and causes people to be unstable when walking. 

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Gastrocnemius Muscle- Video

Have you been dealing with calf pain when walking for a short distance? Do your calf muscles ache or tense up when you put slight pressure when stepping down? Or do you feel that your calf muscles are hard when resting? Many of these issues affecting the calves are associated with trigger points affecting the gastrocnemius muscles. The gastrocnemius muscle is one of the muscles that make up the calves in the lower legs. This complex, superficial muscle provides a round shape to the calves and can become overused in various activities that can cause a person to have limited mobility. When the gastrocnemius muscle is overused, it can develop tiny nodules in the muscle fibers known as trigger points that mimic other conditions affecting leg mobility. The video above shows where this complex muscle is in the calves and where the trigger points are located in the muscle fibers. Trigger points along the affected muscle can cause referred pain while mimicking other conditions that can often confuse people about what they are feeling. All is not lost, however, as trigger points are treatable and can be managed through various treatments.


Corrective Actions To Prevent Muscle Cramps On The Calves

 

When the calf muscles like the gastrocnemius are causing symptoms of pain and muscle cramps due to trigger points, there are various treatments and corrective actions that can prevent muscle cramps from causing more issues in the legs and even help manage trigger points from re-forming in the muscle fibers. Some corrective actions that can help improve calve function are gently flexing the foot at the ankle joint to allow the calf muscles to tract and retract to reduce swelling and pain. Other correction actions that people should incorporate to prevent muscle cramping in the calves when they are sitting is to gently rock in a chair to reduce prolonged immobility to the calves and increase blood flow. Studies reveal that dry needling and other various treatments can help reduce muscle stiffness in the gastrocnemius and improve muscle strength in the calves.

 

Conclusion

The calves are part of the legs that allow plantarflexion at the ankle joint. Known as the gastrocnemius muscle, it makes up the calves’ round shape. The gastrocnemius muscle is complex and superficial as it forms a rounded shape at the calves and narrows down at the ankles. However, when the muscle has been through various activities and is constantly overstretched, it can affect a person’s walking mobility and develop tiny nodules known as trigger points. Trigger points in the gastrocnemius muscle can cause referred pain in the calve muscles and mimic conditions like plantar foot pain to the feet. Fortunately, various treatments and corrective actions can prevent referred pain from re-occurring in the calves and bring mobility back to the legs so a person can continue to their destination.

 

References

Albin, S R, et al. “The Effect of Dry Needling on Gastrocnemius Muscle Stiffness and Strength in Participants with Latent Trigger Points.” Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology : Official Journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 9 Oct. 2020, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33075711/.

Binstead, Justin T, et al. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Calf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 May 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459362/.

Bordoni, Bruno, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Gastrocnemius Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 26 Apr. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK532946/.

Nsitem, Virginia. “Diagnosis and Rehabilitation of Gastrocnemius Muscle Tear: A Case Report.” The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3845475/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Disclaimer

Peroneal Muscles, Weak Ankles, & Trigger Points

Peroneal Muscles, Weak Ankles, & Trigger Points

Introduction

The ankles and the lower legs have a casual relationship by allowing movement to the foot that causes an up-and-down motion. The lower leg has various muscles and tendons that surround the shin bone and allows the feet to take the body from one location to another. The peroneal muscles in the legs allow ankle stability to ensure that the weight from the host’s body doesn’t cause overload to the legs and ankles. However, factors like obesity, trauma, or overexerting can cause the peroneal muscles to be inflamed and develop issues like weak ankles or trigger points that can cause referred pain to the ankles and affect how a person walks. Today’s article examines the peroneal muscles, how weak ankles correlate with trigger points, and ways to strengthen the ankles while managing trigger points. We refer patients to certified providers that incorporate various techniques in the lower body extremities, like lower leg and ankle pain therapies correlating to trigger points, to aid many people dealing with pain symptoms along the peroneal muscles, causing weak ankles. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis when it is appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent way when asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request and understanding. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

pelvic-pain-mayo-clinic_635d9698

The Peroneal Muscles On The Ankles

Have you been experiencing pain when walking around constantly? What about feeling a sharp or dull ache in the back or side of your legs? Or do you feel like falling when you are just standing around? Many people experiencing these issues on their legs and ankles could be dealing with trigger points along the peroneal muscles in the ankles. The peroneal muscles consist of two muscles in the lateral compartment of the lower legs: the peroneus longus and peroneus brevis. The peroneus longus is an important long muscle in the lower legs as it is at the top of the fibula and then runs down the outer leg while connecting to the foot. One of the primary functions of the peroneus longus is allowing plantarflex and evert the foot at the ankle. This means that the peroneus longus helps provide motor strength and range of motion to the ankles. 

 

 

The peroneus brevis is one of the shorter peroneal muscles in the legs that go down to the ankles and provides assistance to allow eversion to the foot and plantarflexion to the ankles. This shorter muscle is important since the ankle joint is relatively mobile and needs stability from the surrounding ligaments and muscles. These two muscles work together for ankle stability when walking and positioning when the body is moving. Studies reveal that depending on a person’s environment, the peroneal muscles allow support and stability to the ankle in various positions. A good example is if the foot is placed in a sloped position, the peroneal muscles and the surrounding ligaments help stabilize the ankle so it won’t induce pain, causing the individual not to fall over. 

 

Weak Ankles & Trigger Points

 

When factors like obesity, trauma, or injuries begin to affect the lower half of the body, it can cause instability in the legs and cause the surrounding muscles, tendons, and ligaments to be overstretched, take on more of an overload to the legs, or suffer from a muscle or tendon tear. These factors are associated with various issues that can invoke pain along with developing trigger points along the lower legs. When there are issues in the peroneal muscles, it can lead to muscle weakness in the ankles or “weak ankles,” which causes instability in the body and causes the individual to sprain their ankles. Studies reveal that when the peroneal tendons have a tear in the lower extremities, it can lead to lateral ankle pain that is often missed when examined. However, to that point, if the incision has been left untreated, it can lead to persistent ankle pain, instability, and ankle dysfunction. In “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., stated that when individuals suffer from weak ankles or have an ankle sprain, active trigger points can cause pain and tenderness to the ankles and cause the person to become unstable. If left untreated, it can cause them to lose balance and have foot drop and ankle fractures to their foot. The book also mentioned that any ruptures in the tendons and muscles might cause lateral compartment syndrome. When there is instability in the ankles, many people resort to using mobility aids like a cane or a walker to be mobile to compensate for the function lost in their feet.

 


Trigger Point Therapy On The Peroneal Muscles- Video

Do you feel the pain from the bottom of your feet to your ankles? Does it hurt to walk around for a short period? Or have you sprained your ankle, and there is a dull ache when you try to rotate? Some ankle issues are associated with trigger points affecting the peroneal muscles. The peroneal muscles help the lower legs by allowing eversion to the foot and plantarflexion to the ankles. The two muscles that make up the peroneal muscles are the peroneus longus and the peroneus brevis, and they, along with the other tendons and ligaments, help with ankle stability. Since the ankle is a mobile joint, it can succumb to sprains, tears, and instability in the body, allowing trigger points to develop and causing even more issues. The great news is that there are ways to manage trigger points along the peroneal muscles and reduce ankle instability. The video above shows where the peroneal muscles are located on the leg, where the trigger points are, and how to use K-tape to help support the ankle and prevent more injuries on this moveable joint.


Strengthening The Ankles & Managing Trigger Points

 

Instability in the ankles can be a bummer to many individuals that are on the move, but when it comes to treatment, it can prevent future injuries from re-occurring. Studies reveal that when pain specialists incorporate joint mobilization techniques and dry needling therapy into their patients, it can allow them to reduce the pain and disability to the ankles, thus managing the trigger points along the peroneal muscles. Another way many people can reduce pain in their peroneal muscles is by incorporating stretches and exercises to strengthen their ankles. This allows the peroneal muscles to be loose and gently stretched while slowly strengthening the ankles in a semi-lock position. When people utilize these techniques on their legs and ankles, it can bring mobility and stability back to the body without fear of falling or causing more issues in the ankles. 

 

Conclusion

As one of the most mobile skeletal joints in the lower body, the ankles work together with the legs to provide mobility and stability to the body. The lower legs have various muscles, tendons, and ligaments that travel down and help support the legs and ankles. One of the muscles that provide that support is the peroneal muscle. The peroneal muscles consist of two muscles known as the peroneus longus and peroneus brevis help with eversion to the foot and allow plantarflexion to the ankle. When a person has sprained their ankle, it causes the peroneal muscle to become overstretched and develop trigger points. The great news is that trigger points are treatable, and various treatments can reduce pain in the affected muscle. This allows stability and mobility back to the ankles and improves the body’s functionality.

 

References

Abd-Rasid, A F, and M Y Bajuri. “Isolated Peroneus Longus Tear – Commonly Missed Diagnosis of Lateral Ankle Pain: A Case Report.” Malaysian Orthopaedic Journal, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7513650/.

Basit, Hajira, et al. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Foot Peroneus Brevis Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 8 Feb. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK535427/.

Lezak, Bradley, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Calf Peroneus Longus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 25 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK546650/.

Salom-Moreno, Jaime, et al. “Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4430654/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Disclaimer

Shin Splints & Myofascial Trigger Points

Shin Splints & Myofascial Trigger Points

Introduction

The legs are crucial for many individuals to move, jump, run, walk, and stand in various locations. The legs involve the thighs, hips, and knees as they work together to provide support and a range of movements for the body. For athletes, the legs allow them to run from one obstacle to another and kick the object to finish the game they are participating. Many individuals require strong leg muscles to keep the body balanced and stabilized from the upper body’s weight. One leg muscle that allows the body to be stabilized is the anterior tibialis muscle. When the legs suffer from various sports injuries or injuries in general, it can lead to issues like shin splints correlated with trigger points that can cause pain to the lower portion of the legs and can affect the body’s stability. Today’s article examines the anterior tibialis muscles, how shin splints are associated with myofascial trigger points, and various methods to treat shin splints. We refer patients to certified providers that incorporate various techniques in the lower body extremities, like lower leg pain therapies correlating to myofascial trigger point pain, to aid many people dealing with pain symptoms along the anterior tibialis muscles, causing shin splints. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent source to asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

myofascial-exercises-for-headaches-amp-migraines_635d8322

What Is The Tibialis Anterior Muscles?

 

Have you been dealing with leg pain affecting your ability to move? Do you feel radiating pain going down to your feet? Or does even the smallest amount of pressure sends shooting pain from your knees to your feet? Many of these leg pain issues correlate to myofascial trigger points along the anterior tibialis muscles, mimicking shin splints. Studies reveal that the leg is divided into anterior, lateral, and posterior crural compartments. As one of the largest four muscles in the anterior compartment of the legs, the tibialis anterior is a thick muscle located in the front of the lateral tibia of the legs. The tibialis anterior has the muscle that allows the function to the lower leg and tendons that travel down to the ankle and foot. The anterior tibial muscle plays an important role in the lower leg through dorsiflexion and inversion of the foot. To that point, the anterior tibial muscle plays a key role in energy absorption when walking and maintaining balance.

 

Shin Splints Associated With Myofascial Trigger Points

Since the anterior tibial muscle plays a key role in energy absorption when it comes to walking and maintaining balance in the body, when the lower leg extremity muscles have been overused, it causes stress on the tibial anterior. It can lead to medial tibial stress syndrome or shin splints. Studies reveal that shin splints affect many athletes, especially runners, by causing pain and discomfort to the tibial anterior. This can cause mobility and balancing issues in the legs and lead to the development of myofascial trigger points in the anterior tibial muscle. Now, how do shin splints and myofascial trigger points correlate with each other?

 

 

Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., author of “Myofascial Pain and Discomfort: The Trigger Point Manual,” mentioned that one of the chief complaints many people have when experiencing myofascial trigger points would feel muscle weakness of dorsiflexion to the foot when walking. Other complaints include:

  • Falling
  • Dragging their feet
  • Ankle weakness

The book also mentioned that myofascial pain causes referred pain to the anterior tibial muscle, thus mimicking shin splints. The activation from myofascial trigger points causes an overload of the anterior tibial muscle, thus causing various pain issues in the legs and restricting mobility to the muscle itself.

 


An Overview Of Tibialis Anterior Trigger Points- Video

Have you been dealing with radiating pain from your knees to your feet? Do your legs feel heavy from walking a short distance? Or do your leg muscles feel cramps that hinder your ability to move? These pain-like issues are associated with the anterior tibialis muscle being affected by trigger points. Trigger points or myofascial pain syndrome can affect the worldwide population by affecting a muscle or muscle group in the body that can impair mobility, cause pain-like symptoms, and reduces a person’s overall sense of well-being. Trigger points along the tibialis anterior muscle cause mobility issues and mimic shin splint issues in the legs. All is not lost, however, as there are ways to reduce pain-like symptoms and help manage myofascial trigger points in the anterior tibialis muscle. The video above explains where the trigger points are located in the tibialis anterior through palpitation. By finding the trigger points in the affected muscle, doctors can refer patients to pain specialists who target trigger points and provide treatment to reduce the pain.


Various Methods Of Treating Shin Splints

 

There are various methods to treat the tibialis anterior when treating shin splints associated with trigger points. Studies reveal that one of the multiple ways to reduce shin splints is to strengthen the core hip muscles, improve running mechanics, and prevent lower-extremity overuse injuries. Muscle strength training allows the other muscles from the abdominals, gluteal, and hips to be stronger and reduce strain on the anterior tibialis muscles. Another method that many individuals should consider is to wear the appropriate footwear. Wearing the proper footwear can reduce the shock absorption to the feet and reduce the overloading forces on the anterior tibialis. These are two methods to manage trigger points and prevent shin splints from re-occurring in the legs. 

 

Conclusion

As one of the four leg muscles, the anterior tibialis is a large muscle located in front of the lateral tibia and travels down to the ankles and foot. This muscle plays an important role in the legs as it allows dorsiflexion and inversion of the foot while also playing a key role in energy absorption when walking and maintaining balance. When the anterior tibialis becomes overused, it can develop trigger points, which invoke shin splints in the legs. When the legs suffer from shin splints associated with trigger points, it can cause pain in the lower leg extremities and cause the body to become unstable. However, various methods can take the load off the tibialis anterior and help improve the body’s stability, allowing the individual to walk without feeling pain traveling up from their feet.

 

References

Deshmukh, Nikita S, and Pratik Phansopkar. “Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: A Review Article.” Cureus, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 July 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9356648/.

Galbraith, R Michael, and Mark E Lavallee. “Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: Conservative Treatment Options.” Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 Oct. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2848339/.

Juneja, Pallavi, and John B Hubbard. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Tibialis Anterior Muscles.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK513304/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Zielinska, Nicol, et al. “Anatomical Variations of the Tibialis Anterior Tendon Insertion: An Updated and Comprehensive Review.” Journal of Clinical Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 19 Aug. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8396864/.

Disclaimer

Having Unquestionable Knee Pain? Could Be Trigger Points

Having Unquestionable Knee Pain? Could Be Trigger Points

Introduction

As one of the stabilizers for the body, the knees are located between the thighs and legs, allowing flexion and extension. The knees help the hips by supporting the upper body’s weight and allowing the legs to move from one place to another without feeling pain. The knee has various muscles and ligaments surrounding the knee joint, allowing the leg to be bent when active. One of the muscles is located behind the knee, known as the popliteus, and supports the legs. However, minor injuries or actions can affect the knees causing the joint to be in a “lock” position and develop myofascial trigger points that can induce muscle spasms in the knees. Today’s article focuses on the popliteus muscle, how knee pain is associated with trigger points, and how to manage knee pain through various treatments. We refer patients to certified providers that incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like knee pain treatments correlating to myofascial trigger points, to aid many people dealing with pain symptoms along the popliteus muscles. We encourage and appreciate each patient by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent source to asking our providers intricated questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

myofascial-exercises-for-headaches-amp-migraines_635d8322

What Is The Popliteus Muscle?

popliteus-muscles.png

Have you been dealing with pain behind your knees? Do you have issues bending your knees when climbing up or down the stairs? Or do your back knee muscles start to twitch uncontrollably, causing muscle spasms? Many knee issues correlate with various factors that can affect the popliteus muscle and develop trigger points. The popliteus is a small muscle with a very important job as it is a major stabilizing muscle to the knees. The popliteus muscle originates from the lateral side of the femur and inserts itself into the posterior surface of the tibia. Some attachments are between the popliteus and lateral meniscus, allowing the knees to be in motion and providing flexion without pain and entrapment. Additional studies reveal that when a person exercises, the popliteus’s basic function helps bring about and maintain internal rotation of the tibia on the femur. The popliteus also helps prevent the foot from external rotation and allows the individual to stand correctly. However, injuries to the knee could overstretch the popliteus muscle and cause mobility issues to the knee flexion.

 

Knee Pain Associated With Trigger Points

Popliteus-trigger.jpg

When dealing with knee pain, it could often be a joint disorder like osteoarthritis or a musculoskeletal condition like sciatica pain associated with the knee. These issues could be due to normal factors like constantly sitting down or bending down to lift heavy objects that cause the knees to buckle. However, when the popliteus muscle has been continuously overused from being bent, it can form tiny nodules known as trigger points to cause knee pain. Studies reveal that trigger points on the muscles surrounding the knee are often ignored during a clinical diagnosis. Trigger points cause referred pain to the surrounding muscles, accompanied by various sensory sensations like heaviness, tingling, and hypersensitivity to the popliteus muscle. In “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Travell, M.D. stated that one of the chief complaints that many patients often talk to their doctors about is the pain they feel in the back of their knees when they are in a crouch position. The book also states when normal actions like running or twisting have overloaded the popliteus muscle, it can cause trauma or strain to the popliteus muscle and tear the posterior cruciate ligament to the knees.

 


How To Find Trigger Points In The Popliteus- Video

Have you been having knee issues that make walking difficult for a long period? Do you feel like your knees are locking up constantly? What about feeling unstable when standing or carrying objects around? These issues that affect the knees are associated with trigger points along the popliteus muscles. The popliteus muscle is small, located at the back of the knees, and assists with knee flexion. When the popliteus muscle becomes overused, it can cause trigger points to form and cause knee issues. Studies reveal that various issues, like tendon injuries, are associated with repetitive mechanical stresses that can cause degenerative knee lesions. Any trauma or muscle strain can affect the knee’s function of flexing and bending without pain for trigger points to form along the popliteus muscles. The video above focuses on the popliteus muscle, where the trigger points are located, and where the referred pain patterns are situated in the knees. On the bright side, all is not lost, as various treatments offer ways to manage knee pain associated with trigger points.


Managing Knee Pain Through Various Treatments

 

When it comes to knee pain, many individuals will apply an ice or heat compress to allow the surrounding muscles to relax while reducing the pain and swelling. Other individuals use over-the-counter medicines to eliminate the pain for a few hours. While these work at managing knee pain, various treatments target trigger points and can help improve flexion mobility back to the knees. Studies reveal that muscle stretching on the popliteus muscle contributes to joint position sense to knee joint stability and function. Stretching the popliteus muscles can reduce the pain in the back of the knee while elongating the muscle fibers to manage trigger points from forming again. Other treatments that people can do to avoid trigger points from returning is to avoid walking or running in a lateral sloped area to prevent the knees from locking up. Incorporating these treatments to prevent knee issues and allow the knee to function properly. 

 

Conclusion

The knees are one of the stabilizers in the body that are located between the thighs and legs, allowing flexion and extension. As a small muscle located in the back of the knees, the popliteus stabilizes the knees and enables them to be in motion without pain. However, when the popliteus muscle becomes overstretched and overused, it can develop trigger points in the popliteus that invoke referred pain to the surrounding muscles and cause the knees to lock up. To that point, it causes the body to be unstable and mimics knee pain issues. Fortunately, trigger points are treatable through various treatments that help relieve the pain and reduce the trigger points from returning. When these treatments are utilized on the knees, the surrounding muscles regain flexion mobility in the lower body.

 

References

English, S, and D Perret. “Posterior Knee Pain.” Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 12 June 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941578/.

Ghaffarinejad, Farahnaz, et al. “Effect of Static Stretching of Muscles Surrounding the Knee on Knee Joint Position Sense.” British Journal of Sports Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2007, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2465159/.

Hyland, Scott, and Matthew Varacallo. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Popliteus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 6 June 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526084/.

Mann, R A, and J L Hagy. “The Popliteus Muscle.” The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 1977, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/908724/.

Sánchez Romero, Eleuterio A, et al. “Prevalence of Myofascial Trigger Points in Patients with Mild to Moderate Painful Knee Osteoarthritis: A Secondary Analysis.” Journal of Clinical Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 Aug. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7464556/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Disclaimer

Dealing With Upper Thigh Pain? Could Be Trigger Points In the Hamstrings

Dealing With Upper Thigh Pain? Could Be Trigger Points In the Hamstrings

Introduction

Many individuals utilize their lower muscles to move around and stay active as each muscle does its job and allows mobility to the hips and thighs. In sports, the thigh muscles are utilized constantly to extend the legs and bend the knees, allowing a powerful force to win any sports competition. At the same time, various sports injuries can occur to the hips, thighs, and legs and can affect the muscles causing pain and discomfort to the lower extremities. A hamstring injury is one of the most common injuries that can affect the thighs, which can cause many athletes to be taken out of their favorite sport to recover from the injury. Today’s article looks at the hamstring muscle, how trigger points correlate with a hamstring strain, and how various stretches can reduce muscle strain on the hamstrings. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like upper thigh and hip pain treatments correlating to myofascial trigger point pain, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the hamstring muscles. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

neck-pain-and-trigger-points_63547f68

What Are The Hamstring Muscles?

 

Do you experience pain in the back of your upper thigh? When walking from one place to another, do you hear a popping sound in the back of your thigh? Or are you dealing with muscle tenderness in the back of your upper thigh? Many of these symptoms correlate with issues affecting the hamstrings causing trigger points to affect the upper thighs. As one of the most complex muscles comprising three muscles (semitendinosus, semimembranosus, biceps femoris), the hamstrings play a crucial part in daily activities. From simple actions like standing to explosive movements like sprinting or jumping, the hamstrings are known as posterior thigh muscles that begin from the pelvis and run behind the femur bone and cross the femoroacetabular and tibiofemoral joints. The hamstring muscles in the body play a prominent role in hip extension and is a dynamic stabilizer of the knee joint. To that point, the hamstring muscles are the most susceptible muscle that succumbs to injuries that can lead to disability in the legs and affect daily activities.

 

Hamstring Strain & Trigger Points

 

Since the hamstrings are the most susceptible muscles that can succumb to injuries, it takes a while for the muscle to heal, depending on the severity of the damage. Studies reveal that the hamstrings can occur injuries when a person is running or sprinting due to their anatomic arrangement, which causes the muscles to strain. To that point, depending on how much force has impacted the hamstrings, the injuries can lead to 3 of the following:

  • Grade 1: Mild pain or swelling (no loss of function)
  • Grade 2: Identifiable partial tissue disruption with moderate pain and swelling (minimal loss of function)
  • Grade 3: Complete disruption of the tissue with severe pain and swelling (total loss of function)

The pain that patients experience can be painful when walking, causing them to limp. In “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Janet G. Travell, M.D., stated that when patients are dealing with pain in their hamstrings, it could potentially be associated with trigger points along the three muscles, causing pain and disability in the upper thighs. The book also mentioned that when trigger points affect the hamstrings, it can lead to muscle inhibition, compromising hip stability. Another issue that trigger points associated with hamstring strain causes in the body are that when individuals are sitting down are likely to experience posterior pain in the buttock, upper thighs, and back of the knees. Luckily, there are various ways to reduce the pain along the hamstring muscles. 

 


Trigger Point Of The Week: Hamstrings- Video

Have you dealt with pain along the back of your upper thighs? Does it feel uncomfortable when you are sitting down? Or do your hamstrings ache or feel tight after running for a long period? People dealing with issues in their hamstrings could be dealing with muscle strain associated with trigger points. The hamstring muscles play a vital role in the body as it allows the individual to walk, run, bend the knees and even extend the legs. The hamstring muscles are also the most susceptible to injury, causing disability to the legs. Studies reveal that trigger points associated with the hamstring muscles can lead to soreness or irritability in the muscle fibers that may interfere with the biomechanics and normal functioning of the lower limbs. The video above explains where the hamstrings are located and how the trigger points can cause referred pain to the hamstrings. To that point, trigger points can affect a person’s ability to walk and affect the surrounding muscles in the lower body while mimicking other chronic conditions.


Various Stretches To Reduce Muscle Strain On The Hamstrings

 

When the hamstrings become injured, the healing rate usually depends on how severe the injury is in the hamstrings. If a hamstring injury is mild, the tears or strains can heal within about three to eight weeks, and if the hamstring injury is severe, the tears or strains could be long as three months. When the hamstrings are tense and on the verge of tearing, many people should stop overusing the muscle. Various stretches can reduce muscle strain on the hamstrings and relieve tension from the hamstrings to allow mobility back to the legs. Studies reveal that manual ischemic compression on the upper thigh muscles can significantly reduce pain in the lower limbs. This allows the individual to manage the trigger points associated with the hamstrings and reduce the chances of them re-occurring in the legs.

 

Conclusion

As the most important muscle in the lower body extremities, the hamstrings play a crucial part in the body as they allow the individual to walk, run, and stand without feeling pain. However, even though they are important muscles, they are susceptible to injuries. When the hamstrings become injured, the recovery process varies depending on the severity and can develop trigger points along the muscle fibers. To that point, it causes referred pain along the upper thigh muscle and affects a person’s ability to walk. Fortunately, incorporating various stretches to the hamstrings can alleviate the pain and reduce the trigger points from re-occurring in the muscle. This allows mobility back to the legs, and many individuals can resume their daily activities.

 

References

Esparza, Danilo, et al. “Effects of Local Ischemic Compression on Upper Limb Latent Myofascial Trigger Points: A Study of Subjective Pain and Linear Motor Performance.” Rehabilitation Research and Practice, Hindawi, 4 Mar. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425406/.

Poudel, Bikash, and Shivlal Pandey. “Hamstring Injury – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 28 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK558936/.

Rodgers, Cooper D, and Avaias Raja. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Hamstring Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 29 Jan. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK546688/.

Thummar, Ravindra C, et al. “Association between Trigger Points in Hamstring, Posterior Leg, Foot Muscles and Plantar Fasciopathy: A Cross- Sectional Study.” Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 Aug. 2020, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33218537/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Disclaimer

Pain In Your Adductor Muscles? Could Be Myofascial Trigger Points

Pain In Your Adductor Muscles? Could Be Myofascial Trigger Points

Introduction

The hips and thighs have a working relationship as their jobs are to maintain stability for the legs and pelvis while supporting the upper body’s weight. These two body groups have various muscles, tendons, and nerves that have specific jobs that allow mobility to the lower body. Many athletes in multiple sports events use their thighs to exert a huge amount of power to be the best. This is due to the adductor muscles in the thighs that allow the athlete to win the event. These adductor muscles are voluminous in size and can become overstretched if the muscles have been worked out too much or injuries have caused dysfunction in the surrounding muscles, causing mobility issues. To that point, the adductor muscles will develop myofascial trigger points and cause hip and thigh pain. Today’s article looks at the two adductor muscles (Longus and Magnus), how myofascial trigger points affect the adductor muscles, and available treatments to manage hip adductor trigger points. We refer patients to certified providers who incorporate multiple methods in the lower body extremities, like thigh and hip pain treatments correlating to myofascial trigger point pain, to aid individuals dealing with pain symptoms along the adductor muscles. We encourage and appreciate patients by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis, especially when appropriate. We understand that education is an excellent solution to asking our providers complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

neck-pain-and-trigger-points_63547f68

Adductor Longus & Adductor Magnus

Have you been dealing with groin pain located near your thighs? Do you feel muscle tenderness or stiffness when stretching your inner thighs? Or have you been feeling unstable in your hips or thighs when walking? Many individuals, especially athletes and older adults, could be experiencing myofascial trigger points associated with groin pain along their adductor muscles. The thighs contain several muscles and functions that allow many people to bend and extend their knees and hips. The adductor muscles allow the legs to move inward toward one another. The adductor muscles have five muscles: magnus, brevi, longus, pectineus, and gracilis. These muscles enable functionality to the thighs and hips, and we will look at two adductor muscles in the inner thighs. The long adductor muscle is a large, fan-shaped muscle that starts from the superior aspect of the pubis bone and travels down to connect at the thigh bone. Studies reveal that the adductor longus is a long and thin muscle with many actions for the thighs, including external/lateral rotation and thigh flexion.

 

 

Now the adductor Magnus is a large triangular-shaped muscle of the inner thighs that are important for thigh and hip function and stabilizing the pelvis. Studies reveal that even though the adductor Magnus is a large muscle in the inner thighs, its primary function is to allow the thigh to move in a larger range of motion without any pain inflicted on the thigh muscles. However, the adductor muscle can succumb to various issues affecting the thighs and groin regions of the body that can be overstretched and strain the body.

 

Myofascial Trigger Points Affecting The Adductor Muscles

 

Groin pain is a multi-factorial pain issue that affects the lower limbs, and its often due to muscle strain in the inner thigh muscles. This pain increases during vigorous activities and when there is a sudden twist in the hips. When the adductor muscles suddenly change in motion when the body is active, they can be overstretched and correlate to myofascial trigger points that can affect the inner thigh and groin regions. According to “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” by Dr. Travell, M.D., patients with active myofascial trigger points in the two adductor muscles (Longus and Magnus) would become frequently aware of the pain in their groin and medial thigh. When the adductor muscles have myofascial trigger points in the inner thigh, diagnosing is difficult since the individual thinks they are suffering from groin pain when the pain is in their inner thighs. To that point, studies reveal that many individuals participating in various sports would suffer from groin pain due to myofascial trigger points affecting the adductor muscles. Luckily, there are multiple treatments to reduce the pain in the adductor muscles.

 


Hip Adductors: Trigger Point Anatomy- Video

Have you been dealing with groin pain when you are walking? What about experiencing unquestionable thigh pain that affects your daily activities? Or does stretching your inner thigh muscles seem difficult, causing muscle tenderness? Many of these symptoms correlate with groin pain associated with myofascial trigger points affecting the adductor muscles in the inner thighs. The adductor muscles allow mobility function to the thighs and enable the hips to have a wide range of motion. When the adductor muscles are overstretched due to a sudden change of hip rotation or injury has occurred on the thighs can lead to referred pain in the groin and inner thighs and develop myofascial trigger points. The video above shows where the trigger points are located in the hip adductor muscles. The video also explains where the pain is localized in the adductor muscles and the symptoms it produces that can affect the lower body extremities. Fortunately, even though diagnosing myofascial trigger points are a bit challenging, available treatments can manage trigger points along the hip adductors.


Available Treatments To Manage Hip Adductor Trigger Points

When myofascial trigger points affect the hip adductor muscles, many individuals complain about stiffness in their inner thighs and how they feel miserable when they don’t have mobility from their thighs and hips. As stated earlier, trigger points are a bit challenging when diagnosed, but they are treatable when doctors examine patients dealing with myofascial pain in their hips and thigh muscles. Once the diagnosis is complete, doctors work with pain specialists who can locate the trigger points and devise a treatment plan to relieve the pain. Available treatments like trigger point injections can minimize the pain and reduce the chances of trigger points returning. Other available therapies like exercising or stretching, especially for the hips and thighs. Specific exercises for the hips and thigh muscles can help strengthen the adductor muscles from suffering pain and can help reduce the pain symptoms. Another treatment is applying moist heat on the hip adductor muscles to release the tension from the tight muscles and allow mobility back to the hip adductors.  

 

Conclusion

The adductor muscles work with the hips and thighs to allow a wide range of motions and extension to the knees and hips. The hips and the thighs allow stability to the lower body and support the weight to the upper body. When injuries or sudden changes start to affect the adductor muscles, it can lead to symptoms of groin pain associated with myofascial trigger points. Myofascial trigger points produce tiny nodules in the affected muscle that causes referred pain to the muscle group. When this happens, it causes the body to be dysfunctional and can affect a person’s mobility to function in the world. Luckily myofascial trigger points are treatable through various techniques and treatments that can reduce the chances of trigger points from re-occurring in the body.

 

References

Jeno, Susan H, and Gary S Schindler. “Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Thigh Adductor Magnus Muscle.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 1 Aug. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK534842/.

Sedaghati, Parisa, et al. “Review of Sport-Induced Groin Injuries.” Trauma Monthly, Kowsar, Dec. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3864393/.

Shahid, Shahab. “Adductor Longus Muscle.” Kenhub, Kenhub, 30 June 2022, www.kenhub.com/en/library/anatomy/adductor-longus-muscle.

Simons, D. G., and L. S. Simons. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 2:the Lower Extremities. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Takizawa, M, et al. “Why Adductor Magnus Muscle Is Large: The Function Based on Muscle Morphology in Cadavers.” Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 27 Apr. 2012, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22537037/.

van de Kimmenade, R J L L, et al. “A Rare Case of Adductor Longus Muscle Rupture.” Case Reports in Orthopedics, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4397006/.

Disclaimer

The Pectoralis Minor Being Affected By Myofascial Pain

The Pectoralis Minor Being Affected By Myofascial Pain

Introduction

The chest has the pectoralis major muscle that works with the upper half of the body that provides mobility and power. The pectoralis major also surrounds the clavicle skeletal structure and works with the thoracic spine. The chest allows mobility to the arms and stability to the shoulders while working together with the shoulder and arm muscles. Many individuals utilize the upper body more when working out, lifting, or carrying objects from one place to another. This causes the muscle to become overused and succumb to injuries that can affect the functionality of the chest and invoke pain-like symptoms in the body. One of the chest muscles affected by pain is the pectoralis muscles, especially the pectoralis minor muscle. Today’s article looks at the pectoralis minor muscle, how myofascial pain affects the pectoralis minor, and how to manage myofascial pain associated with the pectoralis minor. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in chest pain therapies to aid many people suffering from trigger point pain affecting the minor muscles of the pectoralis. We brief patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their examination when appropriate. We indicate that education is a great solution to asking our providers profound and complex questions at the patient’s request. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., notes this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

how-to-treat-trigger-points-brachioradialis

The Pectoralis Minor Muscle

 

Have you been experiencing pain in your upper-mid back? Do you feel like your chest is feeling compressed constantly? Do you feel the tension in your shoulders that makes it difficult to reach behind your back? Most of these symptoms are signs that many individuals are developing myofascial pain along the pectoralis muscles, especially the pectoralis minor. The pectoralis minor muscle is a thin triangular-shaped muscle below the pectoralis major. It has a crucial part of the chest as it helps stabilize the scapula (the shoulder blades) and is in front of the thoracic wall of the spine. The pectoralis minor is also part of the respiratory muscle group that works with the lungs. The pectoralis minor muscle has many functions for the shoulder blades, which include:

  • Stabilization
  • Depression
  • Abduction or Protraction
  • Internal Rotation
  • Downwards Rotation

When environmental factors begin to affect the lungs and cause respiratory issues in the body, the surrounding respiratory muscle group also gets involved, causing the body to be hunched over.

 

Myofascial Pain Affecting The Pectoralis Minor

 

When environmental factors begin to affect the lungs, it causes the respiratory muscles to contract and become compressed. This is just one of the many factors that can affect the pectoralis minor muscle. The other factor is that the pectoralis minor muscle may be short in the chest and when individuals try to reach behind their backs. This causes the pectoralis minor muscle to to be overstretched and develop myofascial pain or trigger points along the muscle fibers. The book, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction,” written by Dr. Travell, M.D., described the pain from myofascial pain associated with the pectoralis minor to be similar to cardiac pain. This is known as referred pain caused by myofascial pain syndrome and it can be a bit difficult to diagnose since it can mimic other chronic issues. Studies reveal that shortening or any sort of tightness of the pectoralis minor is one of the potential biomechanical mechanisms that is associated with an altered scapular alignment which causes pain and shoulder movement impairments. Overusing the pectoralis minor muscles creates tiny nodules that can affect the stability of the shoulders and causes upper-mid back problems in the thoracic region of the spine.

 


 An Overview Of Trigger Points On The Pectoralis Minor- Video

Have you been experiencing difficulty inreaching behind your back? Do you feeling your body becoming more hunched over than usual? Or have you been experiencing chest pain constantly? These pain-like symptoms are caused by myofascial pain associated with the pectoralis minor muscle. The pectoralis minor muscle helps with the stability of the shoulders and studies reveal that when the presense of myofascial trigger points are linked to shoulder and upper body disorders, it can increase the risk of overlapping conditions that trigger points can mimic. Myofascial trigger points are a common complaint as it can significantly impact a person’s daily activites by causing the taut muscle band to be tender or hypersenitive. When this happens, it can lead to issues of muscle imbalance, weakness and impaired motor function. Thankfully, there are various techniques that can help reduce the pain symptoms and issues in the pectoralis minor muscle, while mananging the trigger points. The video above explainshow to tell when your chest muscles are tight and various tests to know when the pectoralis muscles (both the minor and major) are being affected by trigger points.


Managing Myofacial Pain Associated With Pectoralis Minor

 

When dealing with chest pains associated with myofascial pain along the pectoralis minor, there are many techniques they can incorporate to prevent myofascial pain from causing further damage to the muscle itself and the surrounding muscles. Various chest stretches can help gently loosen the stiff muscles, warm the pectoralis minor, and improve mobility to the chest and shoulders. Correct posture can help prevent the body from being hunched over constantly and let the surrounding muscles and the pectoralis minor relax. If the pain is unbearable, studies reveal that treatments like dry needling and palpations on the pectoralis minor muscles can help manage the pain caused by trigger points. This kind of treatment allows the muscle to release the trigger point and, combined with a hot or cold pack, can reduce the chances of myofascial pain from forming again in the muscle.

 

Conclusion

Underneath the pectoralis major muscle, the pectoralis minor is a thin triangular-shaped muscle that helps stabilize the shoulder blades and is located in the front of the thoracic wall of the spine. This tiny muscle is part of the respiratory muscles that have a causal relationship with the lungs and can succumb to environmental factors that can lead to the development of myofascial pain or trigger points on the pectoralis minor. Myofascial pain associated with the pectoralis minor muscle can mimic cardiovascular issues and invoke pain in the muscle. Fortunately, various treatments can help relieve and manage myofascial pain from re-occurring in the pectoralis minor.

 

References

Bagcier, Fatih, et al. “Three Simple Rules in Pectoral Muscle’s Trigger Point Treatment, Which May Be a Cause of Chest Pain: Position, Palpation, and Perpendicular Needling.” American Board of Family Medicine, American Board of Family Medicine, 1 Nov. 2020, www.jabfm.org/content/33/6/1031.long.

Baig, Mirza A, and Bruno Bordoni. “Anatomy, Shoulder and Upper Limb, Pectoral Muscles.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 11 Aug. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK545241/.

Morais, Nuno, and Joana Cruz. “The Pectoralis Minor Muscle and Shoulder Movement-Related Impairments and Pain: Rationale, Assessment and Management.” Physical Therapy in Sport : Official Journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2016, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26530726/.

Ribeiro, Daniel Cury, et al. “The Prevalence of Myofascial Trigger Points in Neck and Shoulder-Related Disorders: A Systematic Review of the Literature.” BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, BioMed Central, 25 July 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060458/.

Travell, J. G., et al. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual: Vol. 1:Upper Half of Body. Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Disclaimer