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Sticking To A Fitness Regimen: Back Clinic

Sticking To A Fitness Regimen: Back Clinic

Everybody understands that exercise is necessary for optimal physical and mental health. Beginning a workout routine can be simple, but sticking with it long-term is the challenge. Knowing how to stay motivated can be overwhelming when facing various fitness options. Understanding the benefits of exercise and identifying the most significant motivating factors will help stick to the fitness plan.

Sticking To A Fitness Regimen

Benefits of Exercise

The first step is identifying why you want to start exercising and the principal motivator/s. For most individuals exercising regularly helps:

  • Contribute to weight loss
  • Decrease risk of disease
  • Increase lifespan
  • Improve the quality of life
  • Improve mental health

Sticking to a plan tends to dissolve after a few months without serious motivation. It is recommended to focus on making the why as specific and personal as possible. The more specific the why, the less likely the individual will stray from the plan. For example, a middle-aged father wants to get and stay in shape because he wants to keep up with his kids and set a healthy example.

Starting Out

A small amount of regular exercise positively affects the body’s health. This is a common cause of burnout and is not necessary. Those who have never exercised or worked out regularly are often tempted to start with intense hours-long exercise routines.

That means that 30 minutes a day of moderate exercise/activity or 15 minutes a day of vigorous exercise/activity is the recommended amount to see and feel health benefits like improved metabolism and mental health.

  • Getting the body physically fit is a long-distance marathon, not a quick sprint.
  • Consistency is the objective.
  • Increasing the frequency and/or duration of workouts is fine, but doing it in a way where the exercise is still enjoyable and not a chore is recommended.
  • Individuals who work out too hard and need to rest for a few days risk losing motivation.

Daily Activities

Becoming more active throughout the day outside of the workout regimen is recommended to increase physical activity levels and build and reinforce healthy habits. If exercising is too strenuous for the individual, start with increasing physical daily activities. This is an effective way to ease into regular exercise. Examples of physical activities include:

Develop Healthy Habits

Developing healthy habits, physical and nutritional are the goals, which is why it is essential to find an exercise approach that doesn’t lose its appeal and continues to develop. One study found that working out with friends or joining group sports can generate greater enjoyment. There are a variety of activities that can include:

  • Structured workouts
  • HIIT
  • Yoga
  • Pilates
  • Strength training
  • Cycling
  • Running
  • Biking
  • Hiking
  • Organized sports leagues:
  • Soccer
  • Basketball
  • Softball
  • Volleyball
  • Tennis
  • Golf
  • Low-impact options:
  • Walking
  • Stretching
  • Water aerobics

What is essential is to find something that you will want to continue to do.


Personalized Training and Rehabilitation


References

Barranco-Ruiz, Yaira et al. “Dance Fitness Classes Improve the Health-Related Quality of Life in Sedentary Women.” International journal of environmental research and public health vol. 17,11 3771. 26 May. 2020, doi:10.3390/ijerph17113771

Dalle Grave, Riccardo. “Nutrition and Fitness: Mental Health.” Nutrients vol. 12,6 1804. 17 Jun. 2020, doi:10.3390/nu12061804

Higgins, John P. “Smartphone Applications for Patients’ Health and Fitness.” The American journal of medicine vol. 129,1 (2016): 11-9. doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2015.05.038

Yang, Yun Jun. “An Overview of Current Physical Activity Recommendations in Primary Care.” Korean journal of family medicine vol. 40,3 (2019): 135-142. doi:10.4082/kjfm.19.0038

A Look Into Pilates For Back Pain

A Look Into Pilates For Back Pain

Introduction

Many people worldwide know that exercising has impressive benefits that help improve the body’s overall wellness. The body has different muscle groups that have a casual relationship with the vital organs inside the body. Organs like the heart, lungs, gut, and bladder correlate with the different muscles through the nerve roots that connect them. When the body suffers from various factors that affect it, it causes referred pain to the body where one pain is at one location but radiates from the other side. Exercising can help the body recover through physical rehabilitation by reducing inflammation and scarring on the muscle tissues. One of the many exercises that helps strengthen the muscles, increase flexibility, and even improve posture is Pilates. Today’s article looks at Pilates, its benefits, and how it can help alleviate back pain. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal treatments to help many individuals with low back pain issues affecting their bodies. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

Axiom-JapanStudy

What Is Pilates?

 

Have you been feeling sluggish or having low energy throughout the entire day? What about experiencing pain in your lower back? Have you experienced muscle stiffness in certain areas around your body? Many of these symptoms are associated with musculoskeletal issues that correlate with different factors that affect the body; why not try an exercise regime like Pilates? Pilates is a system of exercises that uses a particular machine or body to improve a person’s physical strength and posture while increasing the body’s flexibility and enhancing mental awareness. Joseph Pilates developed Pilates in the early 20th century as an exercise program to help World War I soldiers improve their physical fitness levels. Pilates was used as rehabilitation therapy for injured individuals by incorporating resistance, stretching, and target muscle strengthening. Pilates is now utilized for all individuals with different bodies and fitness levels and can provide tremendous benefits. 

 

What Are The Benefits?

Pilates, like any other form of exercise, has many beneficial properties that help improve a person’s health and wellness. Studies reveal that Pilates helps many individuals, including older adults, by improving their posture by decreasing thoracic flexion while increasing lumbar extension for pain relief. Some of the beneficial properties that Pilates offer to the body include:

  • Increasing core strength: The deep muscles in the abdomen, back, and pelvic regions become stronger and help stabilize the body more.
  • Strengthen muscle groups: Pilates helps make the muscles not only strong but also helps stretch them so that they can look long and lean. This makes the individual look toned.
  • It’s a whole body workout: As many exercises work on specific body parts, Pilates focuses on each muscle part of the body and helps muscle development.
  • Posture Improvement: Pilates help keep the spine aligned while strengthening the body and core. Over time a person’s posture will improve naturally, making them stand taller, stronger, and even more graceful.
  • Increases energy: Like all exercises, Pilates will give a person the energy boost they need. This is due to the focused breathing and increased blood circulation that stimulates the muscles and the spine.

 


Pilates Exercises For Back Pain-Video

Are you looking for a new exercise to tone your muscles? Have you been dealing with pain in your lower back? Do you have muscle weakness in some regions of your body? If you have been experiencing pain-related issues, why not try Pilates? The video above goes through a 10-minute Pilates workout for back pain. Studies reveal that non-specific low back pain is a highly prevalent condition many individuals associate with disability and work absence worldwide. Many environmental factors affect many individuals, causing them to suffer back issues. Pilates can help encourage many individuals to regain their health and wellness by incorporating core strength and stability while improving their posture.


Pilates Alleviate Back Pain

 

Many people don’t realize that some low back pain symptoms are related to poor posture. Poor posture can lead to associated symptoms of headaches, back pain, improper balance, and pelvic issues. What Pilates does is that it creates body awareness and helps improve the lower back muscles by strengthening them and relaxing the stiff muscles. Studies reveal that incorporating Pilates as physical therapy for individuals suffering from low back pain can help address the mental and physical pain aspects with core strengthening, flexibility, and relaxing the tense muscles. Many individuals should never put off exercising when it comes to back pain. Incorporating an exercise routine can benefit the body and prevent future injuries.

 

Conclusion

An exercise regime can provide many beneficial results for those looking for ways to be healthy, those suffering from injuries, or those who want to add something else to their workout routine. Pilates is one of those exercises that incorporates resistance, stretching, and muscle targeting as it is a full-body workout. Pilates is used in rehabilitation therapy for injured individuals and can provide tremendous benefits. Pilates can help many individuals with back issues associated with environmental factors like poor posture. Many individuals that utilize Pilates as part of their exercise regime will begin to feel stronger and healthier as their backs will thank them.

 

References

Baker, Sara. “Pilates Exercise for a Healthy Spine – Spineuniverse.” Spineuniverse, 28 Dec. 2019, www.spineuniverse.com/wellness/exercise/pilates-exercise-healthy-spine.

Kuo, Yi-Liang, et al. “Sagittal Spinal Posture after Pilates-Based Exercise in Healthy Older Adults.” Spine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 May 2009, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19404180/.

Sorosky, Susan, et al. “Yoga and Pilates in the Management of Low Back Pain.” Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine, Humana Press Inc, Mar. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2684152/.

Yamato, Tiê P, et al. “Pilates for Low Back Pain.” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2 July 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8078578/.

Disclaimer

Wrestling Injuries Chiropractic Team

Wrestling Injuries Chiropractic Team

Wrestling is a sport that requires speed, strength, and endurance that involves intense physical contact, pushing and pulling the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints to their limits. Wrestlers’ are constantly contorting their bodies. Pushing the body to its limits increases the risk of developing wrestling injuries that include:

Wrestling Injuries Chiropractor

Wrestling Injuries

The most common injuries usually occur from forceful contact or twisting forces. And if a wrestler has been injured, there is an increase for re-injury. Wrestling tournaments typically take place over days, often with back-to-back matches, which significantly fatigues the body and increases injury risk. The most common wrestling injuries include:

  • Muscle strains of the lower extremities and/or the back.
  • Chronic problems can result from hours in the forward stance posture and repetitive motions.
  • Trigger points.
  • Neck injuries.
  • Ligament knee injuries – Meniscus and MCL tears.
  • Pre-patellar bursitis/Osgood Schlatter’s syndrome from consistently hitting the mat.
  • Ankle injuries.
  • Hand and finger dislocations and fractures.
  • Dislocations and sprains of the elbow or shoulder from take-downs.
  • Cauliflower ear – is a condition that can cause ear deformity and develops from friction or blunt trauma to the ears.
  • Skin infections occur from constant contact, sweating, bleeding, and rolling on the mats. Infections include herpes gladitorium, impetigo, folliculitis, abscesses, and tinea/ringworm.
  • Concussions are usually caused by hard falls/slams or violent collisions with the other wrestler.

Injuries can cause wrestlers to alter/change their technique, exacerbating the existing damage and potentially creating new injuries.

Chiropractic Rehabilitation and Strengthening

There can be a variety of pain generators/causes when it comes to wrestling injuries. Joints and muscles can get overstretched, muscles can spasm, and nerves can become compressed and/or irritated. For example, a neck muscle spasm could be caused by nerve irritation from a shifted vertebrae. To determine the specific cause or causes of the injury/pain, a detailed chiropractic examination will be performed that includes:

  • Range of motion testing
  • Ligament tests
  • Muscle palpation
  • Gait testing

Injuries often relate to the proper weight, neuromuscular control, core strength, proper technique, hygiene, and hydration management. Successful treatment depends on identifying the root cause of the wrestling injury. Chiropractic restores proper alignment through massage, specific manual adjustments, decompression, and traction therapies. Adjustments can include the back, neck, shoulder, hips, elbows, knees, and feet. Once correct body alignment is achieved, rehabilitative exercises and stretches are implemented to correct and strengthen muscle function. We work with a network of regional medical doctors specializing in referral situations and strive to return the athlete to their sport as soon as possible.


Wrestling Match


References

Boden, Barry P, and Christopher G Jarvis. “Spinal injuries in sports.” Neurologic clinics vol. 26,1 (2008): 63-78; viii. doi:10.1016/j.ncl.2007.12.005

Halloran, Laurel. “Wrestling injuries.” Orthopedic nursing vol. 27,3 (2008): 189-92; quiz 193-4. doi:10.1097/01.NOR.0000320548.20611.16

Hewett, Timothy E et al. “Wrestling injuries.” Medicine and sport science vol. 48 (2005): 152-178. doi:10.1159/000084288

Mentes, Janet C, and Phyllis M Gaspar. “Hydration Management.” Journal of gerontological nursing vol. 46,2 (2020): 19-30. doi:10.3928/00989134-20200108-03

Wilson, Eugene K et al. “Cutaneous infections in wrestlers.” Sports health vol. 5,5 (2013): 423-37. doi:10.1177/1941738113481179

Dancing For Your Health & Wellness

Dancing For Your Health & Wellness

Introduction

Everyone is trying to find what exercise works for them as they start looking for ways to improve their health and wellness. Many individuals who begin to work out would go with finding a personal trainer or a gym that helps incorporate muscle strength training and cardio training to improve their heart and lung capacity to make the body feel good while strengthening their muscles. One of the unique forms of exercise that involve both the heart and muscles is dancing. Dancing is a great way to not only improve musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health but can help reduce overlapping conditions that a person is dealing with in their bodies. Today’s article looks at how dancing helps with musculoskeletal health, affects the heart and brain, and how chiropractic care goes hand in hand with dancing. We refer patients to certified providers specializing in musculoskeletal and cardiovascular therapies to help those with heart and muscle issues. We also guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is the solution to asking our providers insightful questions. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

03 Minich Nutrition in CVD

 

Dancing For Musculoskeletal Health

 

Have you ever noticed people take a cardio class with music playing in the background and see them happy afterward? How do athletes incorporate cardio into their exercise regime to improve their mobility and flexibility? Or how do particular video games make you get up and move around? All these scenarios imply that cardio exercises like dancing may help improve musculoskeletal function. Dancing is one of the many aerobic exercises that can help improve a person’s social skills and is something that can be taken up early while providing many beneficial qualities like:

  • Increase strength
  • Improve gait and balance
  • Reduce functional loss
  • Reducing the risk of falls
  • Rehabilitating musculoskeletal injuries
  • Stabilize core muscles

For the musculoskeletal system, dance would be considered an isometric exercise involving different muscle groups like the hips, shoulders, back, and abdominals without using the joints. When a person is dancing, each of the various movements is related to strengthening the core muscles by working thoroughly with the abdominals. Dance can even help improve posture by maintaining strength and enhancing stability in the body. Studies reveal that dance’s impact on individuals with chronic issues like Parkinson’s disease associated with motor and non-motor symptoms can increase their quality of life. So what does that mean? It means that dancing, even for just one song, can help with movement and foster balance, flexibility, and muscle endurance through repeated tasks while associating with accessible, social, and attractive aspects of a person’s physical abilities.

 

How Does Dancing Affect The Heart and Brain?

Dancing not only helps with musculoskeletal issues, but it can help improve brain and heart function in the body. Studies reveal that moderate-intensity dancing was inversely associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease mortality. What dancing does to the heart is that it makes the body intake more oxygen to the lungs, which relates to the heart beating faster and circulating the blood to be transported throughout the entire body. But how does dancing correlate to brain health? Let’s look at dance fitness classes, like Zumba, and use it as an example. Studies show that dance fitness classes provide several health benefits that could reduce mood disorders like depression and anxiety while improving cognitive skills. This means that dance fitness classes like Zumba do repetitive movements to the beat of the music that engages the individual to repeat the steps while having fun. When the muscles begin to do repetitive movements, this motor function sends the signal to the brain, making the person remember the movements later, known as muscle memory. When an individual suffers from neurological disorders like dementia or Alzheimers, dancing could potentially be involved with music therapy, allowing the individual to reduce the risk of developing neurological disorders from progressing further.


How Does The Body React To Dancing?-Video

Have you felt terrific after listening to a good song? How about feeling like you just had a workout? Or have you noticed certain areas in your body like your abdominals, legs, and back looked more toned? All these are beneficial signs that you should add dancing to your regime. The video explains what happens to the body when people are dancing. Dancing could potentially be a mediator for many athletes that play sports.

 

 

An example would be football and ballet. How do football and ballet relate to each other? Football utilizes efficient and precise movements that benefit every position on the field, while ballet requires speed to make them flawless on stage. Combining the two, many football players will increase their speed and agility associated with ballet to avoid tackles, jump higher, catch passes and avoid injuries on the field. Dancing is an excellent way to get some cardio exercises in, and combined with other treatments can make a difference in a person.


Chiropractic Care & Dancing

 

Like all athletic individuals, professional dancers utilize various treatments to recover and improve their performance. Treatments like chiropractic care are safe, effective, and widely used by young and professional athletes that want to prevent injuries from progressing. Chiropractic care for professional athletes and the general population can help prevent and treat injuries like back and neck pain or aggravating conditions like sciatica through spinal manipulation. Chiropractic care also helps restore an individual’s original well-being while increasing their strength, flexibility, and mobility. By working with an experienced chiropractor, an individual can regain their stamina by adopting new ways to prevent injuries caused by spinal complications from reoccurring in the body.

 

Conclusion

Dancing for 30 minutes to an hour can be used as part of an exercise regime and could potentially reduce chronic issues that affect the body’s brain, heart, and muscles. Dancing could also enhance a sports athlete’s performance by increasing their agility, endurance, and performance. Combined with chiropractic care, individuals will begin to see improvements in their range of motion, flexibility, and even an increase in their brain function to dance longer and improve their health and wellness. So whether you are a professional or not, dancing is for everyone.

 

Reference

Barranco-Ruiz, Yaira, et al. “Dance Fitness Classes Improve the Health-Related Quality of Life in Sedentary Women.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, MDPI, 26 May 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7312518/.

Ferchak, Dawn. “Belly Dance Your Back Pain Away – Spineuniverse.” Spine Universe, 14 Oct. 2020, www.spineuniverse.com/wellness/exercise/belly-dance-back-pain.

Gyrling, Therese, et al. “The Impact of Dance Activities on the Health of Persons with Parkinson’s Disease in Sweden.” International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being, Taylor & Francis, Dec. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8547839/.

Merom, Dafna, et al. “Dancing Participation and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: A Pooled Analysis of 11 Population-Based British Cohorts.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2016, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26944521/.

Disclaimer

Cheat Meals Healthy

Cheat Meals Healthy

Maintaining a healthy weight is challenging, especially Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, and extended weekends, increasing the risk of binge eating and weight gain. This is where healthy cheat meals and snacks come into play to help individuals stick to their diet while enjoying healthy junk food. Plus, finding the proper high-calorie carb-packed meal can help optimize the body’s hormones to prevent adverse effects on metabolism and hunger.

Healthy Cheat Meals

Cheat Meals

One way to look at a diet and still have the flexibility for sweet or savory foods is to set up the flexibility. To maintain health,  practice portion control and eat healthy foods 80% of the time, allowing a 20% margin for the junk foods. To improve health, eat healthy foods 90% of the time, and allow a 10% margin until a health goal is reached.

Cheeseburger without the Buns and Sweet Potato Fries

  • Try lean meat and replace the regular fries with sweet potato fries.
  • It is high in carbohydrates and calories but still contains plenty of nutrients.
  • Add a little salad, and there is a balanced meal that is the perfect fuel for working out.

Loaded Nachos

  • High in calories and carbs.
  • They can be made healthy with lean ground beef, beans, peppers, cheese, avocado, tomatoes, and jalapeños for a meal that incorporates quality protein and healthy fats.
  • It can be made vegetarian by removing the meat and adding more beans and vegetables.

Fish Tacos

  • Fish tacos are ideal for getting Omega-3s, lean protein, and vitamin D.
  • Easy to put together and can be combined with radishes, cucumbers, red onion, fennel, olives, and lemon juice for added flavor and health benefits.
  • By grilling, the calories will also be cut.

Pancakes

  • Try to always have ingredients on hand to make some pancakes.
  • Bananas, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips, peanut butter, and cinnamon apple sauce can be added.

Dark Chocolate

  • Dark chocolate can be a healthy snack.
  • Dark chocolate contains monounsaturated fats that can help improve cholesterol, blood sugar, and insulin levels.
  • Dark chocolate also supplies vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants for heart and brain health.

Dietician Nutritionist

These are a few examples; the objective is to get individuals to learn to create their healthy cheat meals A diet or adjusting for a more nutritional food plan should always start with a nutritionist, dietician, or health care provider. They can help develop a customized plan that fits an individual’s specific needs. It is about finding the balance and creating a positive relationship with food.


Fibromyalgia Food Choices Nutraceutical Options


References

Coelho de Vale R, et al. (2016). The benefits of behaving badly on occasion: Successful regulation by planned hedonic deviations.
doi.org/10.1016/j.jcps.2015.05.001

Kuijer RG, et al. (2014). Chocolate cake. Guilt or celebration? Associations with healthy eating attitudes, perceived behavioral control, intentions, and weight loss. DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2013.11.013

Murray SB, et al. (2018). Cheat meals: A benign or ominous variant of binge eating behavior? DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2018.08.026

Warren JM, et al. (2017). A structured literature review on the role of mindfulness, mindful eating, and intuitive eating in changing eating behaviors: Effectiveness and associated potential mechanisms. DOI:
10.1017/S0954422417000154

Volleyball Strength Workout

Volleyball Strength Workout

Volleyball is a dynamic game that requires players to be fast on their feet. Players have to be able to quickly shift into various position/s, make quick movements in any direction quickly and reach the ball. Volleyball strength workouts focus on power development and maintaining safe positions when exploding through the plays. Many players include resistance training exercises in their training programs to maximize power and set a solid foundation.

Volleyball Strength Workout

Volleyball Strength Workout

A well-rounded volleyball workout will help players strengthen and maintain optimal body health.

Good Mornings

  • This exercise is ideal for gluteal strength, hamstring strength, and improving vertical jumps.
  • It is recommended to do three sets of 10 reps.

Single-Leg Roman Dead Lift to Overhead Press

  • This volleyball workout works the hamstrings and glutes.
  • Helps improve balance and increases jump strength.
  • It is recommended to do three sets of 10 reps.

Lunge With a Twist

  • This volleyball strength workout builds up the legs and stabilizes the ankles to reduce the risk of injury.
  • It also helps with single-leg jumps.
  • It is recommended to do three sets of 16 reps, 8 left – 8 right.

Dumbbell Snatch

  • The dumbbell snatch helps with jumping mechanics’ power development and improves explosiveness.
  • It is recommended to do three sets of 8 reps.

Bicep Curl to Overhead Press

  • This exercise helps prevent shoulder injuries.
  • Attackers develop secondary muscles that strengthen spiking.
  • It is recommended to do three sets of 8 reps.

Medicine Ball Throw Down

  • Another recommended resistance training exercise that can be done is medicine ball throwdowns.
  • The object is to throw a medicine ball down forcefully; the ball bounces, catch and repeat.
  • It is recommended to do two-four sets of 6-10 reps.

Band Reverse Lunge to Overhead Press

  • A recommended exercise that can be done with a resistance band.
  • The exercise does not require a lot of space, so it can be done almost anywhere.
  • It is recommended to do two-three sets of  10-15 reps.

It is recommended to consult a professional trainer that can create a diverse fitness program to make exercising/training/working out much more enjoyable.


Body Composition


How Aerobic and Resistance Training Interact

The body adjusts differently to various types of exercise. Aerobic and resistance training each tells the body to adapt in different ways. Both are important for healthy body composition, and when done in combination, it is known as concurrent training. Aerobic is best for losing fat, resistance training builds muscle that keeps the body functioning throughout the day. However, molecular mechanisms involved in aerobic and resistance adaptations can interfere with each other if not appropriately planned. Two steps to minimize any possible interference and maximize aerobic/resistance benefits:

Nutrition

  • Adequate protein intake is vital for muscular adaptation from resistance training.
  • It stimulates muscle protein synthesis after concurrent training.
  • After workout sessions, consume at least 25g of high-quality protein to achieve strength and hypertrophy improvements.

Recovery

  • When doing both aerobic and resistance training on the same day, maximize recovery time between the sessions.
  • Strength and aerobic fitness gains are low when the two are separated by 6 hours or less.
  • Twenty-four hours between sessions is the recommended time, especially if the priority is on endurance.
References

Camera, Donny M et al. “Protein ingestion increases myofibrillar protein synthesis after concurrent exercise.” Medicine and science in sports and exercise vol. 47,1 (2015): 82-91. doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000390

Cools, Ann M et al. “Prevention of shoulder injuries in overhead athletes: a science-based approach.” Brazilian journal of physical therapy vol. 19,5 (2015): 331-9. doi:10.1590/bjpt-rbf.2014.0109

Pereira, Ana et al. “Training strategy of explosive strength in young female volleyball players.” Medicina (Kaunas, Lithuania) vol. 51,2 (2015): 126-31. doi:10.1016/j.medici.2015.03.004

Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo et al. “Effects of Plyometric Jump Training on Vertical Jump Height of Volleyball Players: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis of Randomized-Controlled Trial.” Journal of sports science & medicine vol. 19,3 489-499. 13 Aug. 2020

Seminati, Elena, and Alberto Enrico Minetti. “Overuse in volleyball training/practice: A review on the shoulder and spine-related injuries.” European journal of sports science vol. 13,6 (2013): 732-43. doi:10.1080/17461391.2013.773090

Silva, Ana Filipa et al. “The Effect of Plyometric Training in Volleyball Players: A Systematic Review.” International journal of environmental research and public health vol. 16,16 2960. 17 Aug. 2019, doi:10.3390/ijerph16162960

Villareal, Dennis T et al. “Aerobic or Resistance Exercise, or Both, in Dieting Obese Older Adults.” The New England journal of medicine vol. 376,20 (2017): 1943-1955. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1616338

Healthy Sleep, Physical Activity, and Muscle Recovery

Healthy Sleep, Physical Activity, and Muscle Recovery

Healthy sleep plays a vital role in the body’s overall health, as it ensures muscle growth, recovery, and illness prevention. This is especially true for home D.I. Yers’ fitness enthusiasts, weekend warriors, athletes, and physically active individuals. When sleeping, the body goes into recovery mode, releasing hormones and other chemicals to repair and restore muscle. A healthy night’s sleep provides the rest the mind and body need to perform at optimal levels.

Healthy Sleep, Physical Activity, and Muscle Recovery

Healthy Sleep

Sleep is vital for recovering from workouts. This could be construction work, exercise, gardening, sports, landscaping, any activity that uses bodyweight or works against some form of resistance. The muscles cannot repair themselves properly without proper sleep. Sleep aids the muscles in releasing protein-building amino acids, helping them grow in size and strength.

  • Growth hormone is released during non-REM sleep that stimulates tissue growth and repairs muscle.
  • During REM or rapid eye movement sleep, blood pressure drops, breathing slows and deepens, the brain relaxes, and blood supply to the muscles increases, feeding them oxygen and nutrients.

Unhealthy Sleep

Sleep maintains the muscles’ sharpness, coordination, function, and muscle movement patterns that improve physical performance. The body needs to sleep for at least 7 hours a night for muscles to grow properly. Not getting healthy sleep decreases protein synthesis activity and increases the activity of degradation that leads to muscle loss.

Less Sleep Leads To Eating More

Hormonal changes occur when the body sleeps less, causing individuals to feel hungry more often, increasing the amount of food taken in because after eating, the body does not feel full right away, so the individual continues to eat. Without sleep, the body decreases the production of a hormone that indicates when the body is full and activates a hormone that causes hunger. Insufficient sleep also lowers the body’s sensitivity to insulin. Because of this, the muscle fuel glycogen is not adequately replenished. Without the regular restoration of glycogen, individuals have less energy, insulin sensitivity decreases, increasing the risk of diabetes.

Physical Health

Unhealthy sleep also impacts overall physical health. Individuals that do not get healthy sleep have an increased risk of developing:

  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • High blood pressure
  • Obesity
  • Kidney disease
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Mental health issues
  • Depression

Body Composition


Nutrition Before Bed

Nighttime Snacks

  • Research has found that certain foods that contain tryptophan or melatonin can help with sleep.
  • These include turkey, bananas, milk, rice, grapefruit, oats, cherries, walnuts, and almonds.

Cut Back on Carbohydrates Before Bed

  • Consuming carbohydrate-rich foods before bed can impair growth hormone activation during sleep.

Reduce or Remove Afternoon and Evening Caffeine

  • Caffeine can impair sleep, sometimes without knowing it.
  • Avoid caffeinated foods or beverages before bed.

Eliminate Energy Drinks

  • These drinks can contain elevated levels of caffeine and other substances that can result in overstimulation.
  • This hyper-active state can cause individuals to decline in performance.
  • Overconsumption of energy drinks has been linked to adverse effects, including strokes, seizures, and death.

Eliminate Sugar

  • Sugar raises blood sugar, which triggers the pancreas to release insulin, fueling the cells causing overstimulation.
  • Eliminating sugar after dinner can help the body fall asleep.
References

Dattilo, M et al. “Sleep and muscle recovery: endocrinological and molecular basis for a new and promising hypothesis.” Medical hypotheses vol. 77,2 (2011): 220-2. doi:10.1016/j.mehy.2011.04.017

Morselli, Lisa et al. “Role of sleep duration in the regulation of glucose metabolism and appetite.” Best practice & research. Clinical endocrinology & metabolism vol. 24,5 (2010): 687-702. doi:10.1016/j.beem.2010.07.005

Murray, Bob, and Christine Rosenbloom. “Fundamentals of glycogen metabolism for coaches and athletes.” Nutrition reviews vol. 76,4 (2018): 243-259. doi:10.1093/nutrit/nuy001

Improve Sports Performance

Improve Sports Performance

Athletes or weekend warriors hate to be sidelined from an injury or physical limitation. This is where chiropractic medicine and physical therapy for athletes can strengthen the body for improved performance and injury prevention. Sports chiropractors and physical therapists are trained and certified professionals that have extensive knowledge of the musculoskeletal system, maintaining and rehabilitating the body. This includes:

  • Exercise science
  • Physiological factors
  • Nutrition
  • Sports psychology

Treatment techniques include:

  • Massage
  • Electrotherapy
  • Muscle strengthening
  • Water therapy
  • Core stability training

Improve Sports Performance

Sports medicine professionals include medical doctors, sports chiropractors, physical therapists, athletic trainers, and massage therapists. They are trained in:

  • Assessment and diagnosis
  • Treatment
  • Rehabilitation
  • Management
  • Referral
  • Health coaching
  • Injury prevention

Chiropractic physical therapists restore function and mobility, manage or alleviate pain, and return individuals to their lifestyle and athletes to their sport. They understand training demands and advise on injury prevention, relieving pain, and optimizing performance.

Performance Treatment

Chiropractors and physical therapists provide:

  • Pre and post-surgery consultation
  • Pre and post-surgery treatment
  • Pre and post-surgery exercise programs and rehabilitation therapy
  • Instrument-guided soft tissue mobilization
  • Myofascial release
  • Joint mobilization
  • Muscle strengthening
  • Strength Training Workouts
  • Stretching regimen
  • Trigger point release
  • Plyometrics
  • Sport-Specific Training

Benefits

Body Analysis

  • A chiropractic physical therapist will go through a series of examination routines to test and assess the body’s functionality and mobility, looking for areas of pain and weakness.

Personalized Treatment Plan

The analysis data helps to develop a customized treatment plan that looks at:

  • Weaknesses
  • Painful areas
  • Physical and positional demands of their specific sport.

Alleviate Pain

  • This is done through:
  • Therapeutic exercises
  • Manual techniques
  • Instrument-assisted manipulations with:
  • Percussive massagers
  • Ultrasound
  • Taping
  • Electrical stimulation
  • To relieve pain, restore muscle, and joint function.

Improve mobility

  • Stretching and strengthening exercises restore mobility.

Avoid Surgery and/or Expedite Recovery After Surgery

  • Effective physical therapy can eliminate the need for surgery, hasten recovery, and reduce healthcare costs.
  • Expedite rehabilitation and recovery post-surgery.

Prevention Techniques

Chiropractic physical therapy provides tools and exercises to maintain:

  • Strength
  • Balance
  • Fitness
  • To prevent new injuries or injury recurrence.

A customized chiropractic physical therapy program can help individuals return to a high level of performance from a team of professional chiropractors physical therapists. Individuals learn activities and lifestyle changes that will help prevent further injury and improve health and wellbeing.


Body Composition


Skipping Rest Days

Not listening to the body and taking time to recover can have serious consequences. When the body is not allowed to rest, recovery inflammation is not given the time to heal. This can lead to injuries, a weakened immune system, and the potential for muscle mass loss. During periods of intense stress, like an intense workout, the body’s immune system does not fully function. This means the body is compromised when fighting germs and viruses and constantly taking medications. This is why prioritizing rest is necessary. Another side effect of skipping rest days is burnout. Burnout is the feeling that anything is better than working out. It typically happens when individuals forget or choose not to take time off and rest for life outside of fitness.

References

Cullen, Michael-Flynn L et al. “Passive Recovery Strategies after Exercise: A Narrative Literature Review of the Current Evidence.” Current sports medicine reports vol. 20,7 (2021): 351-358. doi:10.1249/JSR.0000000000000859

Levy, Emily, and Thomas Chu. “Intermittent Fasting and Its Effects on Athletic Performance: A Review.” Current sports medicine reports vol. 18,7 (2019): 266-269. doi:10.1249/JSR.0000000000000614

Reinke, Simon et al. “The influence of recovery and training phases on body composition, peripheral vascular function and immune system of professional soccer players.” PloS one vol. 4,3 (2009): e4910. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0004910

Resnik, Linda, and Janet K Freburger. “Health Services Research: Physical Therapy Has Arrived!.” Physical therapy vol. 95,12 (2015): 1605-7. doi:10.2522/ptj.2015.95.12.1605

Suchomel, Timothy J et al. “The Importance of Muscular Strength: Training Considerations.” Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.) vol. 48,4 (2018): 765-785. doi:10.1007/s40279-018-0862-z

Exercising To Detoxify and Cleanse The Body

Exercising To Detoxify and Cleanse The Body

Detoxifying does not necessarily mean juicing and going on a diet. Detoxing is about cleansing the whole body of environmental pollutants, food waste, bacteria, and toxins. Things like medications and alcohol also need to be flushed from the body. When the body becomes unhealthy and overweight, it can put its systems in a chronically stressed state, leading to nerve energy production failure, fatigue, a weakened immune system, and disease. The body constantly works to cleanse itself. Exercise helps expedite the process.

Exercising To Detoxify and Cleanse The Body

Exercise To Detoxify

Exercise removes harmful toxins by getting the lungs and the blood pumping and increasing sweat production, which encourages detoxification. More blood circulating throughout the body allows the liver and the lymph nodes to flush out toxins properly. With exercise, fluid intake increases, allowing more sweat production to release toxins. Drinking more water during workouts also helps the kidneys function at optimal levels to flush out toxins, fats, and waste.

Aerobics

Any low-intensity aerobic exercise that increases heart rate and increases heavier breathing is recommended as long as the breathing is within the fat-burning heart rate. Exercises can be anything from:

Bouncing/Rebounding

Bouncing on a mini-trampoline, also known as rebounding, is another form of exercise that promotes toxin release. The low-impact motion stimulates the lymphatic system. Lymph nodes filter substances and fight off infections by attacking bacteria/germs that travel into the lymph fluid. Twenty minutes on the trampoline two or three times a week to detoxify.

Yoga

There are yoga poses that help to detoxify specific organs. Yoga can help the body cleanse inside and generate more energy.

Revolved Chair Pose

This pose stimulates the liver, spleen, digestive system, improves spinal alignment, and tones the abdominals.

  • Start with the feet together or hip-width apart, depending on what is most comfortable.
  • Bend the knees as if sitting in a chair.
  • The knees should be aligned with the center of the feet.
  • Place the palms of the hands together in a prayer position at the center of the heart.
  • Bring the elbow to the opposite knee.
  • Squeeze the shoulder blades together.
  • Allow the chest to open up.

Wide-Legged Forward Bend

This pose improves circulation, stretches, and strengthens the low back, hips, hamstrings, and calves.

  • Step with the feet 3 to 4 feet apart.
  • Hands-on hips.
  • Lift tall through the whole torso.
  • Fold slowly over the legs.
  • Bend from the hip joints without rounding the lower back.
  • If the back starts to round, stop folding forward.

Sweating and Detoxing

Sweat is one of the body’s primary ways of eliminating toxins. However, more sweat does not mean more toxins are being flushed. Excess sweat could be caused by the body overheating and can lead to dehydration. This is why it’s vital to maintain the body’s hydration levels while working out. Fluids like juice and sports drinks can help maintain hydration, but they contain sugar and other ingredients that could interfere with thorough detoxifying.


Body Composition


Before Starting A Detox Diet

Individuals are recommended to talk with their doctor, nutritionist, health coach about detox diet methods to lose and maintain weight.

Talk with a doctor

  • Seek consultation with a physician before starting any body detox cleanse, especially if there are underlying medical conditions like diabetes or kidney disease.
  • For individuals struggling with obesity, a physician can recommend alternative diet approaches and exercise programs.

Realistic expectations

  • Detox diets work primarily through caloric restriction like a conventional diet.
  • Individuals could feel better from a body cleanse because they will likely be avoiding processed foods and empty calories.

Adopt a long-term frame of mind

  • Diet and exercise to achieve and maintain a healthy weight is a lifelong journey.
  • Detox diets can be a helpful tool to get going in the right direction.
References

Ernst, E. “Alternative detox.” British medical bulletin vol. 101 (2012): 33-8. doi:10.1093/bmb/lds002

Klein, A V, and H Kiat. “Detox diets for toxin elimination and weight management: a critical review of the evidence.” Journal of human nutrition and dietetics: the official journal of the British Dietetic Association vol. 28,6 (2015): 675-86. doi:10.1111/jhn.12286

Obert, Jonathan et al. “Popular Weight Loss Strategies: a Review of Four Weight Loss Techniques.” Current gastroenterology reports vol. 19,12 61. 9 Nov. 2017, doi:10.1007/s11894-017-0603-8

Planks For Spine Support and Back Pain Prevention

Planks For Spine Support and Back Pain Prevention

Regularly doing planks can support/strengthen the spine and prevent back pain no matter the fitness level. It’s estimated that 70% of adults will experience back problems and pain. One of the best ways to keep the spine healthy is by strengthening the core muscles. The more these muscles are built up, the healthier the body will become. The plank position activates the entire core taking the pressure off of the spine.

Planks For Spine Support and Back Pain Prevention

Core Anatomy

The core is the center of the body. It contains all the muscles surrounding the torso. These muscles work together to:

  • Stabilize the body during movement.
  • Prevent injury when engaged in physical activity/exercise.
  • Provide spinal support.

The core is split into two groups of muscles: The inner core and the outer core.

Inner Core

The inner core consists of:

Multifidus Muscles

Quadratus Lumborum

  • The deep abdominal muscle in the lower back sits on either side of the lumbar region of the spine.

Transversus Abdominis

  • Located between the lower ribs and the top of the pelvis.

Pelvic Floor

  • This base group of muscles stretches from the tailbone to the pubic bone.

Diaphragm

  • A dome-shaped muscle that rests below the lungs.

Outer Core

Rectus Abdominis

  • These are more commonly known as the abs.

External Obliques

  • These muscles are located on either side of the rectus abdominis.

Internal Obliques

  • These muscles are located below the external obliques, inside the hip bones.

Erector Spinae

  • These muscles surround the spine and extend up both sides of the vertebral column.

Planks and Back Pain Prevention

When the core is not strong enough, the spine and back muscles overcompensate to keep the body standing correctly. Studies have shown how planks effectively activate the muscles responsible for spinal stabilization. The exercise targets the entirety of the core and strengthens the shoulders and glutes. Strengthening these muscles improves posture, helping to alleviate back problems and pain. However, it’s recommended to talk to a doctor before beginning a plank regimen if back pain is present. If done incorrectly, they could aggravate the back muscles.

Proper Form

Choose an area clear of furniture where the whole body can stretch out. Follow these steps:

  • Begin with hands and knees on the floor.
  • Extend the legs back while keeping the elbows directly below the shoulders and the wrists below the elbows.
  • Keep the head down, looking at the space just above the hands.
  • Engage the abs and keep the body rigid.
  • Imagine a perfectly straight line from the neck to the toes.
  • Hold the position for 10 to 60 seconds, depending on fitness level.
  • Lower the body gently to the floor.
  • Make sure not to curve the back as curving means that the abdominal muscles are being engaged, and tilting the head up can strain the neck.
  • Both can lead to injury, which is why maintaining proper form is essential.

Plank Variations

There are variations of this exercise for different levels of physical fitness. Once the modified and full plank has been mastered, various planks can target other areas of the body. These include:

Side Plank

  • These involve shifting the weight to one forearm while extending the other arm into the air.

One-arm Plank

  • These involve lifting one hand off the ground, then alternating.

Single-leg Plank

Walking Plank

Reverse Plank

Anybody can work up to a plank at any age at any fitness level; it just takes time. Once achieved, it is a great way to keep the body’s core strong, healthy and helps prevent back problems.


Body Composition


Band Lateral Raise

The lateral band raise is an excellent workout for the shoulders. It works out the lateral deltoid, anterior deltoid, and serratus anterior.

  • Grasp one band in one hand.
  • Step on the free end with the opposite foot.
  • Right hand and left foot and vice versa.
  • Slowly extend and raise the arm until they are parallel to the floor.
  • Lower the arms in the same manner.
  • If the shoulders are healthy and strong enough, try adding dumbbells or kettlebells to increase the resistance.
References

Calatayud, Joaquín et al. “Tolerability and Muscle Activity of Core Muscle Exercises in Chronic Low-back Pain.” International journal of environmental research and public health vol. 16,19 3509. 20 Sep. 2019, doi:10.3390/ijerph16193509

World Health Organization. (2013) “Low back pain.” www.who.int/medicines/areas/priority_medicines/Ch6_24LBP.pdf

Youdas, James W et al. “Magnitudes of muscle activation of spine stabilizers in healthy adults during prone on elbow planking exercises with and without a fitness ball.” Physiotherapy Theory and practice vol. 34,3 (2018): 212-222. doi:10.1080/09593985.2017.1377792

Getting Fit and Staying Active

Getting Fit and Staying Active

Many individuals are trying to get fit and stay active through physical activity and exercise. Getting back to a previous fitness routine is an achievable and realistic goal. Fitness means having the energy and strength to perform physical activity and the body feeling as good as possible. Getting fit improves total health. But it does not require training like an athlete. Just walking for a half-hour every day can help individuals reach an adequate fitness level that helps them feel better and increase energy levels.

Getting Fit and Staying Active

Benefits of Getting Fit

Getting the body fit and in shape:

  • Increases endurance
  • Increases muscle strength
  • Delivers oxygen and nutrients to tissues
  • Improves cardiovascular health
  • Helps release toxins
  • Improves overall energy levels
  • Improves sleep
  • Handle stress better

Being fit allows the body to work harder without as much work, the mind is better focused, the body burns more calories, even when at rest, and proper weight is maintained. Fitness reduces the risk of falls, heart attack, diabetes, high blood pressure, and certain cancers.

How Much Physical Activity Is Needed?

Experts say the goal should be one, or a combination, of these:

  • Moderate aerobic activity, like brisk walking, for at least 2½ hours a week.
  • It is up to the individual how many days to exercise, but it is best to be active at least three days a week.
  • Activity is recommended at least 10 minutes at a time. For example, an individual could:
  • Take a 10-minute walk three times a day, five days a week.
  • Take a half-hour walk three days a week.
  • On the other four days, take a 15-minute walk.
  • Take a 45-minute walk every other day.

Vigorous exercise is recommended at least three days a week for at least 10 minutes at a time. This activity makes the body breathe harder and increases heart rate. More vigorous activities, like running, could be included for at least one hour a week. This can be spread out 75 minutes, whichever way is more convenient for the individual. For example, an individual could:

  • Run for 25 minutes 3 times a week.
  • Run for 15 minutes 5 times a week.

Children as young as preschool age need activity as well. Encourage children ages 6 to 17 to engage in moderate to vigorous exercise for at least 1 hour every day.

Types of Physical Activity

Aerobic fitness

  • This makes the body breathe faster and makes the heart work harder.
  • Activities include walking, running, cycling, and swimming.
  • It is also known as cardio or cardiovascular training.

Muscle fitness

  • Muscle strength means building stronger muscles and increasing the length of time they can be used.
  • Activities like weight lifting, push-ups, squats, and resistance bands can improve muscular fitness.

Flexibility

  • Flexibility is the ability to move the joints and muscles through their full range of motion.
  • Stretching exercises can help generate flexibility.

Being More Physically Active

Moderate physical activity is safe for most individuals, but it’s recommended to talk to a doctor before engaging in physical activity/exercise. To help get started:

Make physical activity part of everyday

  • Make a regular habit of using stairs, not elevators, and walking, bicycling to do errands near home.

Start walking

  • Walking is a great fitness activity that most individuals can do.
  • Make it a habit to take a daily walk with family, friends, coworkers, or pets.

Find a workout partner

  • Working out with a partner can make exercising more enjoyable.

Find fun activities that you can stick with

  • Vary activities, so they don’t become boring and monotonous.
  • Use a calorie-burning application to determine how many calories are burned during exercise and daily activities.

Body Composition


Damaged Collagen

There are several reasons the body’s collagen production can slow down or become less efficient. The quality of the collagen made can decrease as well. Environmental factors can be avoided to protect collagen production; however, damage from disease and natural processes is inevitable. Aging is the most common cause of decreased natural collagen. As the body ages, collagen production and quality decrease. This leads to thinner, more fragile skin and achy joints. Certain chronic diseases like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis cause collagen deficiency, leading to issues that include:

  • Joints
  • Blood vessels
  • Organs
  • Skin

To avoid collagen damage, avoid environmental factors like:

  • Smoking
  • UV exposure can accelerate the average rate of collagen damage that comes with aging.
  • UV exposure damage can also play a role in certain skin cancers.
  • Excessive sugar and fat intake increases inflammation and decreases protein synthesis.
References

American College of Sports Medicine, et al. (2009). Position stand: Exercise and physical activity for older adults. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 41(7): 1510–1530.

Anspaugh DJ, et al. (2011). Building muscular strength and endurance. Wellness: Concepts and Applications, 8th ed., pp. 111–137. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2004). Strength training among adults aged 65 or older. MMWR, 53(2): 25–28.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2008). 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (ODPHP Publication No. U0036). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available online: www.health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/default.aspx.

Williams MA, et al. (2007). Resistance exercise in individuals with and without cardiovascular disease: 2007 update: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology and Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism. Circulation, 116(5): 572–584.

Mini Workouts Over The Day Just As Effective

Mini Workouts Over The Day Just As Effective

Trying to fit exercise into a busy day can be a struggle to find a 30–45-minute window. However, research has found that mini workouts and accumulated exercises over the day are as effective as one complete session. Studies show that short workout sessions take the place of one long workout by breaking up the routine into several small ones and are just as effective.

Mini Workouts Over The Day Just As Effective

Time of Exercise

According to the CDC and its Physical Activity Guidelines, adults should focus on a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise weekly, along with strength training at least two days per week. The workouts should focus on total-body targeting the major muscle groups. However, a long session can be broken up into several mini workouts to achieve the same benefits and achieve the same number of minutes.

Benefits of Mini Workouts

The benefits of short, multiple exercise sessions are that they provide increased flexibility in an individual’s daily schedule, allowing them to focus on their health while navigating family, work, and other obligations. Performing mini-workouts throughout the day makes it easier to stay committed to an exercise program, experience the benefits, and achieve their health goals.

Increase Brain Health and Mood

  • Shorter duration workouts save time, allow multiple forms of exercise into a single day, and improve neurological, physical, and psychological benefits.
  • Performing an exercise as short as 3–5 minutes throughout the day can benefit the brain and mood.

Lower Blood Pressure

  • A study compared the effects of short aerobic exercise sessions and continuous exercise on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure.
  • The study found that doing three 10-minute walks during the day morning, midday, and late afternoon lowered blood pressure more than doing one 30-minute walk in prehypertensive individuals.

Easier to Exercise

  • Performing high-intensity workouts for a long time is not easy, even for seasoned athletes.
  • This is why mini workout sessions appeal to fitness fans of all levels.
  • Decreasing the time allows the individual to exercise at higher intensities.

Reduce the Stress of Working Out

  • Incorporating shorter workouts can reduce the stress or fear that individuals have towards working out.
  • When looking at fitness from this perspective, shortened workouts naturally become a part of the day that helps relieve stress.

Achieve Fitness Goals

  • Shorter workouts allow individuals with busy schedules to focus on what they can perform in controlled sessions throughout the day without feeling overwhelmed by committing to an entire workout session.
  • Mini workouts are easy to schedule, more sustainable to perform, and easier to commit to long-term.
  • They allow for more focused and intensive exercise, especially when easily distracted.

Plan Ahead and Follow Through

The recommended way to accumulate a balance of strength, cardio, and mobility exercises throughout the day is to set up a plan. Find a routine that is enjoyable and not a chore, then set up the office space, work area, home to accommodate the exercises. For cardiovascular and strengthening benefits, an example of Tabata or HIIT workout.

  • Five exercises.
  • Two minutes on each exercise with a work-rest ratio of 30 seconds on, 30 seconds off.
  • Depending on an individual’s fitness level, the work-rest ratio can be modified.
  • To improve mobility and strength, use weights or resistance bands.
  • Focus on proper form.

Try shorter workouts for a quick burst of exercise:

  • Pick two to three exercises like bicep curls, shoulder presses, bodyweight squats, calf raises, lunges, or planks.
  • Set a watch for 3 minutes.
  • Perform 30 seconds of one exercise.
  • Switch to another exercise for 30 seconds.
  • Alternate until the 3 minutes are up.

Body Composition


Bodyweight Workout 1

  • Ten bodyweight squats.
  • Ten pushups.
  • Twenty jumping jacks.
  • Twenty-second plank.
  • Ten glute bridges.
  • Twenty seconds of rest.
  • Repeat as many times as possible in 10 minutes.

Bodyweight Workout 2

  • Thirty seconds of bodyweight squats.
  • Thirty seconds of jumping jacks or high knees.
  • Thirty-second plank.
  • Thirty seconds of rest.
  • Repeat 4–5 times.

Yoga Stretching

References

How much physical activity do adults need? (2015, June 4) cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/adults/

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2014, October 10). Depression and anxiety: Exercise eases symptoms mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/in-depth/depression-and-exercise/art-20046495

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2015, April 16). Exercise and stress: Get moving to manage stress mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/exercise-and-stress/art-20044469

PUSH Fitness: What Is It? | El Paso, TX (2021)

Introduction

In today’s podcast, Dr. Alex Jimenez and PUSH Fitness owner, Daniel Alvarado discuss how PUSH was created and demonstrate how the right motivation can help people achieve their goals as well as, improving their overall health and wellness.

 

Discussion

Dr. Alex Jimenez and PUSH Fitness owner, Daniel Alvarado introduce today’s podcast.

 

[00:00:01] Daniel Alvarado: You know what keeps them moving and growing and living? Tell me. It is another catfish or that predator. So we never have predators in our lives. We stay stuck, and we don’t progress anything. So every time we ask God to take away the stress or God take away this issue. We’re asking God to make us weaker, not stronger. OK. Because instead of asking like, “Hey God? Make me more creative. Make me more passionate, make me more patient.” We ask for, hey, take away this, but then we still want everything else that comes along with it. How does that work? It’s not easy.

 

[00:00:41] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I don’t know. I mean, if you think about it’s from the first time we’re born. It’s not easy. You got to be one in a trillion sperm, really, and only God is very clear that if you don’t get to that egg first, you’re done. So from the moment where we’re given a chance, we’re on the point of destruction from the beginning. Exactly. So, in essence, why did that sperm get to that egg? So you can pass and fight through it.

 

[00:01:19] Daniel Alvarado:  All right, so then you think of everything else as far as how people complain, how people say, you know, I want more money, I want this, but they don’t look at everybody’s backstory, the backend and the behind the curtains. They think, “Oh man, Jimenez, you are a doctor?” You don’t know how many times you’ve lost and rebuilt your practice or if you’re a gym owner and you haven’t made it. You don’t know how often you have to go in at 4:00 in the morning to get a workout in because you have to train people all day long to ensure that this business stays afloat. You know, people don’t see the back. You see, they’re quick to say, Oh, must be easy. No, it’s not easy until you step into the person’s shoes because you’re the one that has to sign the checks. You’re the one that has to stay up at night and figure out payroll. You’re the one that has to be creative and figure out how you’re going to make ends meet. You are the one that constantly has to be on it. You know, as much as you want to kick back and say whatever and do this, and I would love to work out four or five hours a day. That’s my passion and your passion.

 

[00:02:23] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: It’s my passion too.

 

[00:02:24] Daniel Alvarado: And can we? No, right. What do we have to do? Do we have to be meticulous? We have to be disciplined and ensure we have a proper order to stay on top of the schedule. Yes or no? Absolutely. Exactly. You know, so I’m saying at the end of the day that if you don’t have something chasing you, I mean, you become fat and dormant and become lazy.

 

[00:02:45] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I think nature is designed to eliminate you. Alex would say, you know, it’s survival, the fittest limiting the species or whatever he’d call it when he’s in biochemistry. You see, I got to tell you it’s not easy to be a business owner. It’s not. It’s not easy when you have no sleep. Ever since I’ve known you, you’ve put the time in from early hours, and you here at 4:30 in the morning and here what time it is? Now you’re here, and we’re here sharing some stories. You know, it’s one of those things where it’s going to be nonstop all our lives. But here’s the thing if you don’t do it, it doesn’t stimulate you to become good at what you do, right? You become lethargic. Everything goes bad. You slowly begin the process of ceasing to exist. 

 

[00:03:36] Daniel Alvarado: Right. So we all need rest to rejuvenate. Get creative. It’s scientifically proven. You need that to reset. You have to. Otherwise, you burn out. Right? But after how many days of rest, one or two where you get this disconnect spastic. Then afterward, you are like, “Alright, cool. I rested enough.” So you don’t stay stuck there.

 

[00:04:04] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: No, and I pray for vacation, right? And when I get it, after about three days, I’m like, OK, all right. I’m done.

 

[00:04:10] Daniel Alvarado: Let’s go.

 

[00:04:11] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah, OK, what I’m going to break. What am I going to do? That’s how we are.

 

[00:04:15] Daniel Alvarado: Exactly. But that’s what makes you so successful.

 

[00:04:17] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah. Well, it drives us, and it drives us to create who we are. And it also gives us a vision as to what we’re going to do. When we start this podcast, you know, Daniel, we want to get or tell the people a bit of the story of what you do and tell them about, you know, where you’ve been and what’s been happening with you. OK. So for me, it’s very important to share with the people what is happening. I’ve always been one to say, you know, I see how hard you work, and I see how much effort you put into things. But I’d like to know a bit of you as to what made you and what kind of makes you click a little bit. When I discuss these things, I want to ask you what made you begin PUSH? What made you start this massive organization?

 

How PUSH Fitness Started

PUSH Fitness owner, Daniel Alvarado explains how PUSH started.

 

[00:05:16] Daniel Alvarado: I want to reach the masses of people and help people. So in all reality, my sister, my brother-in-law, my brother, we’ve all come from platforms as far as I’m speaking, preaching, singing, whatever it is. I was always kind of the black sheep. And I mean it in a good way because I wasn’t trained differently. I just was very rebellious. That makes any sense. I wanted to create my own. So if someone is going right, I go left. If the people go right, I go left. I was always trying to find a different way, and I was stubborn enough to become the most successful by the end. But that’s what allowed me to create this place to reach the masses of people and have my platform of change in people’s lives.

 

[00:06:14] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Let me ask you when you first started PUSH; what was your reason you started it out? You were always into fitness ever since I’ve known you; you’ve always been into a deep understanding. You see, I love sharing that story with people about when I first met you; you were driven. I mean, you were hunting for knowledge. You were trying to figure out what it was that made people tick, and you wanted to teach people… A little cocky, I’d say. But being 18 years old, I mean, who isn’t right at that age? You haven’t been thumped in the head a couple of times. But you did, and you shared it with people, and you did that. But what made you? What drove you? Because I got to tell you, I’m a big believer, Daniel, about when you evaluate families, I see how hard your dad works. I see how your mom’s incredible in terms of what she does. She wins these CrossFit competitions just on meer drive. You have to turn off the lights to get her off the wall because she keeps on going, right? I mean, what is it that what do you feel drove you and what started the whole philosophy of trying to help people out?

 

[00:07:24] Daniel Alvarado: I mean, you put in my parent’s work ethic; they just never stop. They still don’t stop and try to move forward despite what life throws at them, and they’re successful in their way. They never stop working towards their marriage, towards their love, towards serving each other. They showed me that we always have to help people, and they serve each other. They serve at the church, and they serve wherever they go. No matter where my dad is, he’s always trying to help. It doesn’t matter. You try to take out your trash can and table; whatever it is, he will help. But that’s where I learned it from him. You don’t just go anywhere and just be wherever you go. You always serve. And that’s my interfaith mentality. You know, it’s biblical. Wherever you are, we are supposed to serve people as husbands and wives. We’re supposed to serve each other. That’s what makes us so successful. You know, you look at Jesus in the Bible, and what do you do? You serve people. He helped people. Not the norm. The most unorthodox, nonreligious people. You know, all the people there that needed the most help, not the most religious. And I think that’s what I love to do. I love helping the people that need the most help. The unconventional. Not the people that are all ready to let go. I mean, don’t get me wrong, I do love helping them. But I guess I like helping the unorthodox.

 

[00:09:08] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah. You know what, when you mentioned that about your dad, one of the things I noticed is that I came here to work out at around six o’clock in the morning and it was freezing outside, literally freezing. You had a flat tire. Your dad was lifting in the car by himself to get that tire up. Yeah, it was crazy. By the time I got there, I was like, Is this guy working on it? There was no jack, and he was picking up the car himself. He’s pushing that thing up and lifting the vehicle to fit the tire on. I was like; You got to be kidding me. You didn’t even know until I told you, and you said, “Man, my dad never asked for help.”, you know, he does it. That’s one of the things you said, and that’s who we are. We are our parents. We eventually become our parents to some extent, and that’s very much how you are. Your philosophies have guided the PUSH fitness entourage, and the people who come here have been like extreme athletes. Tell me a bit of that in terms of what drove you to pick athleticism as your way of serving.

 

[00:10:11] Daniel Alvarado: I think I’ve seen the potential of what people can be pushed to if you believe in them. Often, people will, you know, people do believe in themselves, but it’s amazing what you see people become or individuals or athletes. When you say, Hey, I believe you. Someone that is not your mom, not your dad, because it’s kind of expected. You know, not that they have to tell you that, but you know, it’s kind of sometimes expected. You’re right. Yes, exactly. But then you have this stranger saying, I believe you genuinely wholeheartedly, and it brings out that much more in you. I know that’s how I was, and I still remember various times where you tapped me on the shoulder and said, you know. What are you doing? You can, and I’m very different; I don’t need someone to preach to me. It might get going, and that gets you going to move on to the next level of the mountain. And that’s what I love seeing as a potential that you could bring down in all individuals.

 

[00:11:32] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: When you see it, pretty much you’ve been able to see everyone crack. What is it you look for when you see them kind of hit that wall when you start working with an individual with a specific set, whatever sport they’re in, or whatever their dreams are? Weight loss or whatever it is. What is it you look for?

 

[00:11:50] Daniel Alvarado: To see the reason why they’re quitting. Are they genuinely tired, or have they been babied so much by society that they don’t know how to push for themselves anymore? It’s a sensitive society nowadays; you can’t push kids because they get their feelings hurt or feel this way or that way. And sometimes it’s like you got to wake your butt up; if not, you will not make it in this life. Nothing comes easy, and I think we’re expecting things to become easy because we’re, you know, microwave generation, where everything wants to be done so quickly. So I look for the reason as to why they’re quitting. This is genuinely why they are tired, and are they going to throw up? All right. But you remember firsthand that when I worked out with you, I went to the restroom and threw up. I came right back. Why? Because it’s what you build with that person that respect, you know, why would you want someone who is an equivalent you when he gets hard, you know?

 

[00:12:59] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Yeah, exactly right.

 

[00:13:00] Daniel Alvarado: How are you going to count on them? How do you depend on them? When it gets tough, they are going to jump off the wagon; that’s it. You are left alone.

 

The Right Motivation

PUSH Fitness owner, Daniel Alvarado explains to Dr. Alex Jimenez how the right motivation can influence not only kids but adults as well.

[00:13:09] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know you’re given responsibility. A huge one with a lot of the El Paso kids in whatever sports they do and whatever the sport, whether it be agility, sport-based or just some sort of sport-based system where they’re just kind of, you know, let’s say, hockey or even things like tennis or golf. But they all have a moment of reaching within. I love how you do that in terms of going ahead and seeing the depths of what is wrong with them, and you can connect with them like no other. I’ve noticed that every single time with my kids, too, when you train them. Did you ask why? So really, at that point, you know, no one cares what you know, they care that you care and that caring allows them to open up, huh?

 

[00:13:55] Daniel Alvarado: Right? Yeah, it does. You know, it makes them feel like, you know, I do have it in me. I need a quit babying in myself. And I need to get up and get after this because no one will give it to me, and I got to get up after it and work for it. Period.

 

[00:14:11] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I would tell my daughter when they would come in and say, “You know what? I’m not coming in, you know, I’m not going today.” And I said, All right, well, let me call Daniel. “No!” Now they sense the obligation and trust you have put into their hearts like no other? Because that’s what they want. They want someone to believe in them.

 

[00:14:35] Daniel Alvarado: Exactly, to push them.

 

[00:14:37] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: That’s why the push to PUSH, you know, there’s another way there’s the adage the push. You know, these are vital points. Do you have to deal with the mind-stuff while working with them? How do you work on developing a child’s mind or working them through their mental impediments or their mental kind of dynamics to make them better of who they are? If that makes sense. 

 

[00:15:04] Daniel Alvarado: You had to build a foundation with them. First, you had to build trust with them. You can just go in and yell at them, Hey, let’s go. Move your butt! You know, you can’t do that. You have to build a relationship first, have them trust you, and understand why you’re pushing them. And then when they’re at the brink of giving up, and you yell at them, and they know why you’re screaming at them. A good parent after they spank them and ground them. They’ll tell them the reason why they did that. But they don’t stop loving them. They appreciate it because they know they’re wrong. Right? It’s the same concept here. Obviously, I yell at them after they know, like, hey yeah, I was sulking, and you start feeling sorry for myself and get after it, right?

 

[00:15:53] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: You know, from my own experience with what you did. You see, you have a lot of moms watching you train their kids. Moms are sharp. There’s nothing more intelligent than a mother in this world. And they intuitively, they understand, and they feel the depths of the change in the child. Right? So when they see the depths of the difference in the child, they trust you. And this is in mass because I have like a whole wall of families, moms, dads. They bring their kids no matter what. Tired, cold, sleet, rain, snow. They bring their kids here to train with you and your entire crew with the philosophies of pushing to those limits. You know, how does that feel when you see those kids excel?

 

[00:16:45] Daniel Alvarado: I feel proud. I’m pretty much over the moon because you see the hard work you took to instill that time into them and make sure their full potential came out. So it’s rewarding, and it’s inexplicable.

 

[00:17:03] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Let me ask you this. You’re not young, and you’re in your 30s, which is a very young age. However, you’ve lived long enough to see some of these kids go on in to do their thing. Tell me how that feels in terms of you watching them develop in terms of their they’re who they are, and what they develop because of the foundation, or at least influenced by the foundation of just don’t give up and keep on pushing through it. How does it feel? What do you think?

 

[00:17:36] Daniel Alvarado: In a lot of sense, a lot of pride, because you can see what they could have been in there, what they couldn’t have been in times. Some kids do come from poor extremities. And so to see them excel believing themselves, go to college, get a successful job, and be something of a higher profession that otherwise they thought they couldn’t build or settle for less and not letting them settle for less is amazing. That’s why I keep doing what I’m doing.

 

[00:18:17] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Do these kids keep calling you and talking to you personally?

 

[00:18:21] Daniel Alvarado: Yeah, they do. They still keep up with me as far as what they’re doing, how they’re doing. They’ll come in and work out. So, you know, to share with me everything. It’s fun. You build that long-lasting relationship.

 

[00:18:35] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: If you could come up with a couple of words indicating what makes PUSH unique and you can look deep inside your heart and figure out what it would be a word to get an obituary being read about you. What would they say about PUSH and you, huh? Would you want them to say?

 

[00:18:55] Daniel Alvarado: Honestly, that they had somebody other than their parents believe in them.

 

[00:19:03] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: That’s amazing. That’s a considerable component of everything that’s going on. When do you think someone actually should be coming out to this place and enjoying the kind of lifestyle that this place, you know, helps enhance their lives with? When is that time?

 

[00:19:21] Daniel Alvarado: Whenever. Whenever you want to be a better version of yourself.

 

[00:19:25] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: What do you think people sometimes think about, you know, why shouldn’t they come in? What should not be an impediment of them coming in here?

 

[00:19:35] Daniel Alvarado: Their image. They can’t do it, that they’re not like, you know, they’re obese, having problems, low back problems, and looking foolish. You know, the whole thing is that in the day, we’ve all looked foolish to an extent or another. But the point is if I always assumed what others thought and paid attention to how I felt this was for members and not being good enough, then I wouldn’t be where I’m at.

 

[00:20:03] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: I tell you, I’ve learned a lot from you, and if anything, my kids have learned a lot from you by just your persistence. You know, I can honestly tell you that my son is better as an athlete because of your relationship with you. But let me ask you, what kind of physical and emotional changes have you watched your clients attain their goals?

 

[00:20:34] Daniel Alvarado: Hearing people say. “He saved me from diabetic medications.” We hear people say like I would have died, been in this obese state, and you saved my life. And that’s how do you not get emotional with things like that? How do you not get emotional and people saying, like, you know, I thought I couldn’t walk or had this muscle imbalance, or how do you say where I have this one client that couldn’t build muscle? I can’t remember the terminology, but the fact that she can build muscle now, where the doctor told her she wouldn’t be able to squat a bar, and now she’s squatting over one hundred and thirty-five pounds, that’s phenomenal. How does that not keep you motivated to get up every day when you don’t feel like getting up? You know, and I’ll repeat it, in King David’s words. You know when you had to encourage yourself because somebody is not always there to inspire you. So you do have to encourage yourself so you can be the best or somebody else that needs it more than you. Ultimately, someone has more complicated than you, and you can always help somebody under you.

 

Conclusion

Dr. Alex Jimenez recaps today’s podcast.

 

[00:21:52] Dr. Alex Jimenez DC*: Well, Daniel, you said it is very short and essential keywords. You know, we appreciate you. We’re here at the push fitness center. You know you got some information there that you can use to find Mr. Alvarado. The PUSH fitness center is a monster center with many people who care and change people’s lives. Suppose you guys have any questions, comments, or ideas about what we do for people. Let us know, and we’re here to serve as Daniel is. Thank you very much, brother, and I appreciate everything you’ve done. And God bless, brother.

 

[00:22:32] Daniel Alvarado: God bless. Thank you.

 

Disclaimer

 

Exercises For An Aching Back

Exercises For An Aching Back

Reaching, twisting, walking, and driving are everyday activities that require upper and lower back strength. An aching back can easily affect daily activities, generate frustration, anger, and affect all-around health. The more back muscle strength an individual has, the more they can accomplish far more without injury. Immense power is not required to protect the body from a back injury. All that is needed is regular, consistent physical activity and exercise. A balance of body strength is vital for preventing injury. However, overdoing one fitness exercise or physical activity can imbalance musculature, leading to injury. Because the back/spine is the central part of the body, complete and proper care is necessary for optimal health and wellness. For individuals experiencing sore, aching, and tired muscles, here are some exercises that will help in the process.

Exercises For An Aching Back

Alternating Arm and Leg Extensions

Alternating extensions help build strength and coordination in the core areas. The back muscles increase their efficiency by creating muscle memory that supports the work shared by all the torso muscles. Upper and lower back muscles must work together to maintain a healthy balance and not overwork each other, causing strain and fatigue.

  • Start by placing hands and knees on the floor with the head directly between shoulders and facing toward the floor.
  • Feet are directly in line behind the buttocks and resting on the floor.
  • Hips and shoulders rest above the knees and hands.
  • Raise the right hand straight ahead with the arm at full length.
  • At the time same time, raise the left leg straight behind the body.
  • Try to keep the arm and leg as straight as possible.
  • Hold for 10 seconds.
  • Switch sides.
  • Repeat three to eight times, depending on strength level.
  • If it is difficult, a modified option is to raise the arm and leg separately.

Plank Hold

These can help build back muscles and strengthen the arms, legs, and the front torso area. Plank holds are a recommended starting point. Plank holds can be done on the elbows, palms of the hands, or closed fist hands. The key is to keep the shoulders, hips, and ankles straight like a wood plank parallel to the floor.

  • Place hands and feet directly on the floor like doing a push–up.
  • Toes should be on the floor.
  • Keep the abdominals tight and buttocks lifted to prevent straining the lower back.
  • Face straight down.
  • Hold for a count of 10.
  • Repeat three times.
  • For those with an aching back, keeping the hips level with the shoulders could be challenging at the beginning.
  • With practice, it will become easier; then, the individual is recommended to increase the length of time until 30 seconds is achieved.
  • Then increase the challenge to try more than three repetitions.
  • A modification for beginners is to start with the body resting on the floor, stomach down.
  • Then raise the body into the start position from the floor.

Hip Raises

Hip raises help to strengthen the lower back muscles to unite and support the lower half of the body. Training the body to work cooperatively is critical for reducing the aching and pain from muscle imbalance.

  • Rest the body flat on the floor, facing upward.
  • Place the hands flat at the body’s sides.
  • Knees should be about shoulder-width apart.
  • Keep the feet flat on the floor
  • Pull the feet toward the buttocks.
  • Look straight up.
  • Raise the hips as high as possible while pressing down with the hands.
  • Hold for 10 seconds.
  • Complete five to eight reps.

Cross Body Standing Lateral Arm Raises

Lateral raises or side lateral raises help strengthen and tone the shoulder muscles and the upper back muscles.

  • Begin with a single one-pound weight.
  • Face forward.
  • Stand with the feet shoulder-width apart.
  • Bring the weight to rest near the left hip bone.
  • Gently raise the weight across the body to arrive just above the right side with the arm at full length.
  • Make sure that shoulders and hips are stationary and that only the arms move. Do not twist.
  • Hold for 10 seconds.
  • Repeat three to eight times.
  • Switch sides.
  • Modification can be done by sitting in a comfortable chair with proper posture in a chair instead of standing.
  • If weights are too challenging to work with initially, complete the exercise with only the hands placed with the palms flat and together.

Aerobic Activity

This helps circulate blood throughout the body, helping to reduce muscle soreness. A few gentle and aerobic activities can include:

  • Brisk walking.
  • Stair climbing.
  • Bicycling, elliptical, or rowing machine workout.
  • Physical activity that keeps blood moving throughout the body. Examples include yoga, gardening, and dancing.

While the back is healing, go at a gentle even pace for any activity. Jerking and quickly stopping can be hard on joints and discs. When injured, the other muscles try to compensate to avoid causing a flare-up that could worsen the injury and/or create a new injury.

Aching Back Muscles

Strength-building exercises are great for preventing injury and avoiding re-injury. However, avoid overreaching or overstretching with any of the activities. Continuous aching or painful back muscles could indicate something else is occurring that could be:

  • A pinched nerve.
  • Shifted/misaligned discs.
  • Disc herniation.
  • The beginning of an arthritic condition causing inflammation.
  • Back muscle tear/s.
  • Pregnancy.

Body Composition


Sarcopenia – Loss of Skeletal Muscle Mass and Strenght Causes

Decreased Physical Activity

  • Physical inactivity is one of the primary contributors to sarcopenia.
  • Sedentariness can exacerbate the effects of sarcopenia.
  • Regular resistance exercise can help maintain muscle mass and build muscular strength.

Decrease in motor neurons

  • Aging is accompanied by a loss of motor neurons caused by cell death.
  • This can lead to a decrease in muscle fibers and size.
  • This decrease leads to:
  • Impaired performance
  • Reduced functional capacity
  • Decreased ability to perform everyday tasks.

Increase in Pro-inflammatory Cytokines

  • Poor diet and exercise also promote the storage of visceral fat.
  • This type of fat tissue produces pro-inflammatory cytokines.
  • This can accelerate muscle breakdown.
  • Obesity and muscle weakness are associated with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines.
References

Alfuth, M, and D Cornely. “Chronischer lumbaler Rückenschmerz : Vergleich zwischen Mobilisationstraining und Training der rumpfstabilisierenden Muskulatur” [Chronic low back pain : Comparison of mobilization and core stability exercises]. Der Orthopade vol. 45,7 (2016): 579-90. doi:10.1007/s00132-016-3233-1

Kim, Beomryong, and Jongeun Yim. “Core Stability and Hip Exercises Improve Physical Function and Activity in Patients with Non-Specific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” The Tohoku journal of experimental medicine vol. 251,3 (2020): 193-206. doi:10.1620/tjem.251.193

Smith, Benjamin E et al. “An update of stabilization exercises for low back pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis.” BMC musculoskeletal disorders vol. 15 416. 9 Dec. 2014, doi:10.1186/1471-2474-15-416

Suh, Jee Hyun et al. “The effect of lumbar stabilization and walking exercises on chronic low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.” Medicine vol. 98,26 (2019): e16173. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000016173

Finding The Right Physical Activity, Exercise For You

Finding The Right Physical Activity, Exercise For You

Finding the right physical activity that elevates heart rate and maintains it for 30 minutes a day increases the amount of oxygen delivered to the heart, brain, and muscles. Some form of aerobic activity will keep individuals moving in a healthy direction. ​This benefits the:

  • Heart
  • Muscles
  • Mood
  • Self-esteem
  • Amount of energy

It helps to lower:

  • Blood pressure
  • Cholesterol
  • Blood sugar
  • Body fat
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Fatigue

Finding The Right Physical Activity, Exercise For You

Finding What Works For You

Doctors and health experts agree that individuals need to perform normal/moderate activity balanced with vigorous/intense activity. Some ideas for both types include:

Moderate Intensity Activities

General moderate exercises:

Many activities in the moderate-intensity list can be increased to a vigorous level by doing them faster or harder.

Vigorous Intensity Activities

General vigorous exercises:

Outdoor Moderate Activities

Moderate exercises:

Outdoor vigorous activities:

Vigorous exercises:

  • Sports – soccer, field hockey, tennis, basketball, flag football, volleyball
  • Hiking
  • Cycling
  • Mountain biking
  • Skating and skateboarding
  • Horseback riding

House and Yard Work/Chores

Moderate house and yard work exercises:

  • Sweeping
  • Vacuuming
  • Mopping
  • Washing the car by hand
  • Sweeping the garage, walkways, sidewalk, or patio
  • Mowing the lawn
  • Raking the lawn
  • Labor intense gardening

Vigorous house and yard work exercises:

  • Shoveling dirt, rocks, etc
  • Carrying groceries upstairs
  • Carrying boxes
  • Moving furniture
  • Cleaning and organizing the house

Mix it up

Finding the activities that work for you are important. But mix them up, so you don’t get bored and tired of them. For example, if getting bored with walking, try a light aerobics class, dancing, or something similar.

  • Try new routes for walking and biking.
  • Change the room for exercising or stretching.
  • Exercise at different times, so it doesn’t just become a chore.
  • Mix up the amount of time exercising. Do a full 30 minute or longer workout one day, then break the workout into smaller 15, 10, 5-minute workouts other days.
  • Having options allows you to pick and choose what suits your mood and schedule.

Job Physical Activity

If job occupation includes sitting for long periods, try adding short bursts of activity throughout the day:

  • If the commute permits, walk, jog, or bicycle to work.
  • Park several blocks away or the furthest in the parking lot to get some walking in.
  • Use the stairs instead of the elevator for a few floors.
  • Get coffee or use the bathroom on another floor using the stairs the farthest from the office.
  • Need to talk to a coworker, take a walk to their office or station instead of e-mail or phone.
  • Finding breaks to take quick walks and stretch out.

Get Involved In Competition

Competition can motivate individuals as it:

  • Requires specific and measurable goals to work toward. An example could be training to walk or run a race.
  • Learning the details of an event and preparing/training can generate or restore the excitement and challenge of the activity.
  • Instead of entering a competition, an individual can help with organizing and planning. This can provide friendship with other individuals interested in the same activity that can lead to working out together and staying motivated.

CrossFit Training

CrossFit training is a combination of various exercises to work out various muscle groups. CrossFit can be beneficial because:

  • It prevents boredom by providing a variety of workouts.
  • It helps maintain balance among various muscle groups.
  • For example, runners that have powerful leg muscles cross-train to strengthen the upper body.
  • It reduces the risk of injuries because the combination of exercises allows muscles to recover while working out a different set of muscles.

Whatever the case, it’s all about finding what works for you. But the objective is to keep the body moving to maintain overall health.


Body Composition


Why the brain needs sugar?

The brain needs half of the body’s energy supply because of its complex system. The brain needs glucose for brain cell energy. As neurons cannot store energy, they need a constant fuel supply to function properly. The ability to think, learn and recall information is connected with the body’s glucose levels. When blood glucose levels are low, the ability to think clearly is slowed down as the production of neurotransmitters is reduced, leading to communication disruption. Natural sugars can increase brain health for optimal functioning. When consuming naturally occurring sugar like apples and bananas, sugar is released incrementally into the bloodstream. This maintains energy levels at a steady pace, and the body does not crave more sugar.

References

Berg JM, Tymoczko JL, Stryer L. Biochemistry. 5th edition. New York: W H Freeman; 2002. Section 30.2, Each Organ Has a Unique Metabolic Profile. Available from: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK22436/

Ainsworth BE, et al. (2011). Compendium of Physical Activities Tracking Guide. Columbia, SC: Prevention Research Center, Norman J. Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina. Available online: prevention.sph.sc.edu/tools/compendium.htm.