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Heart Health

Heart Health. The heart beats about 2.5 billion times over an individual’s lifetime, pushing millions of gallons of blood to every part of the body. This steady flow carries oxygen, fuel, hormones, other compounds, and essential cells. It also takes away the waste products of metabolism. However, when the heart stops, the essential functions fail.

Given the heart’s never-ending workload, it can also fail. It can be brought down by a poor diet, lack of exercise, smoking, infection, unfortunate genes, and more. One of the key problems is atherosclerosis. This is the accumulation of cholesterol-rich plaque inside the arteries. This plaque can limit blood flow through the arteries, coronary arteries, and other arteries throughout the body. When a plaque breaks apart, it can cause a heart attack or stroke.

Although many develop some form of cardiovascular disease (diseases affecting the heart and blood vessels) as they get older, a healthy lifestyle, especially when starting early, goes a long way to prevent cardiovascular disease. In addition, lifestyle changes and medications can help heart-harming illnesses, like high blood pressure or high cholesterol, before they cause damage. And there are medications, operations, and devices that can help support heart health if damage occurs.


Heart Health, The Spine, and The Chiropractic Connection

Heart Health, The Spine, and The Chiropractic Connection

Heart health and proper function circulate millions of gallons of blood to the entire body. The circulation moves:
  • Oxygen
  • Fuel
  • Hormones
  • Essential cells
  • Other compounds
  • Removes metabolic waste products
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Heart Health, The Spine, and The Chiropractic Connection
 
If the heart stops, vital functions can fail almost instantly. Family history and genetics play a role in the development of heart disease, but lifestyle choices also play a part. Heart health disease prevention focuses on: Chiropractic treatment can help improve overall heart health.

Heart Health

If every nerve was disconnected, the heart would continue to beat. There is a small node of the heart muscle that rhythmically contracts and relaxes inherently, and sets the heartbeat pace. It can be thought of as a natural pacemaker and is called the sinoatrial node.  
 
In an average adult, the node maintains a rhythm of around 70 beats per minute. This natural pacemaker keeps the heart working, while the nerves that accelerate and decelerate (the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves) can affect the sinoatrial node affecting the heartbeat.  

Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Nerves

The sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves are located in the thoracic and upper cervical spine. With chiropractic, any spinal misalignments, pressure, stress, and restrictions are properly addressed, and able to normalize the cardiac rhythm and heart rate. Corrective treatment of the cervical spine will also help lower blood pressure and remove any stress on the cardiovascular system. Heart and spinal health are vital, contact a local chiropractor today.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Heart Health, The Spine, and The Chiropractic Connection

Healthy Body Composition

 

Aerobic Training Strengthens The Heart

Aerobic exercise will strengthen the heart, as well as, train the heart to be more efficient in circulating blood. The chamber of the heart that pumps blood to the rest of the body literally gets larger and squeezes out more blood with each pump, meaning the stroke volume gets increased. This improves cardiac output, which is the quantity of blood pumped by the heart per minute. A strong, efficient heart is the objective to live a long and healthy life. When the heart is stronger and pumps more blood it doesn�t have to beat as much and as rapidly. Lowering the resting heart rate is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Cardiac adaptations are helped with an increase in blood volume that happens with aerobic exercise training. What happens is the expanded blood volume improves the heart�s contractility/fill capacity pumping more blood per beat. The heart contracts to move blood throughout the body. By making it stronger and more efficient, the heart�s responsibilities are lightened by decreasing the different types of resistance.

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*
References
Yang, Jian et al. �Physical Exercise Is a Potential “Medicine” for Atherosclerosis.��Advances in experimental medicine and biology�vol. 999 (2017): 269-286. doi:10.1007/978-981-10-4307-9_15
High Blood Pressure and Chiropractic Management

High Blood Pressure and Chiropractic Management

The heart never stops working. The efficiency of the heart and how it operates depends on various factors related to individual health. High blood pressure management can include chiropractic treatment for proper spinal alignment. This promotes improved nervous system function, regulation, and optimal blood flow throughout the body. High blood pressure is also known as hypertension, often it has no symptoms, and if left untreated, it could lead to heart conditions like heart disease and stroke. Blood pressure is the force the heart exerts on the arteries each time it contracts and relaxes. It is measured with a blood pressure cuff or monitor.
  • Normal is around 120/80 mmHg
  • A blood pressure reading of 130/90 mmHg or more, is categorized as high blood pressure.
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 High-Blood Pressure and Chiropractic Management

High blood pressure

Any type of heart condition can place added strain on the body and can lead to poor quality of life, disease, and be fatal. When the body’s ability to pump the proper amount of blood gets compromised the body suffers from a lack of oxygenated blood. These issues can go undiagnosed for years. Often high blood pressure does not get associated with any specific symptoms other than general poor health. When left untreated, high blood pressure can lead to issues like:
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Kidney disease
  • Dementia
Prevention and regular monitoring are crucial for staying on top of any potential heart issues.

Heart conditions

Different heart conditions can cause pain in the chest, upper back, and shoulder(s):
  • Angina is when the heart muscle does not get enough blood causing chest pain.
  • A heart attack occurs when there is reduced or complete loss of blood supply from the blockage of an artery.
  • Pericarditis is the inflammation of the thin layers that surround the heart.
Heart conditions are commonly associated with chest pain but remember that chest pain is not always present or severe. Pain-related to the heart can also be felt in other areas, like the shoulder or upper back.

Risk factors

Risk factors associated with high blood pressure include:
  • An unhealthy diet high full of processed foods, sugar, and salt
  • Age
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Stress
  • Genetics
  • Metabolic disease/s like:
  1. Obesity
  2. Kidney disease
  3. Diabetes
The most common treatment for high blood pressure is medication. However, this does not address the root cause of the issue in relation to individual lifestyle and underlying imbalances of the body that include the spine.
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 High-Blood Pressure and Chiropractic Management

Lifestyle

Lifestyle adjustments should be the first line of defense for managing, and reversing heart health issues. High blood pressure management includes:
  • Focus on nutrition
  • Exercise
  • Stress management

Chiropractic

Chiropractic is a specialized approach that focuses on identifying and addressing the root cause of musculoskeletal health issues and optimized organ function through restored impaired nerve function. Spinal misalignment can cause nerve signals to be impaired/damaged which can affect the heart and overall health. A chiropractic physician can help reduce the strain on the body�s functions by restoring nerve function/energy/blood flow with spinal adjustments that bring the body back into proper alignment. One primary cause of high blood pressure is over-activation of the autonomic nervous system, which regulates the stress response. When spinal alignment is achieved, there is improved regulation to prevent unnecessary spikes in stress affecting body homeostasis and organ function. Chiropractic can help an individual achieve the best possible heart health. Once the diagnosis is found, an effective customized treatment plan will be developed.
 

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Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*
References
Win, Ni Ni et al. �Effects of Upper and Lower Cervical Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability in Volunteers and Patients With Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled, Cross-Over, Preliminary Study.��Journal of chiropractic medicine�vol. 14,1 (2015): 1-9. doi:10.1016/j.jcm.2014.12.005
Astragalus and The Immune System

Astragalus and The Immune System

Do you feel:

  • Dizziness when standing up quickly?
  • A slow start in the morning?
  • Edema and swelling in ankles and wrist?
  • Muscle cramping?
  • Tired or sluggish?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then there might be some dysfunction in your body�s system, including the immune system. Why not try the Chinese herb, astragalus to help alleviate the symptoms.

Astragalus

In traditional Chinese medicine, the herb astragalus has been used for thousands of years and has been known to strengthen chi or qi life force in the body. This herb has been known to be typically employed in conditions that are related to general weakness in the body like fatigue, anemia, a poor appetite, cardiovascular diseases, and other conditions that can weaken the body. Surprisingly though, astragalus can be used to optimize kidney health and, with the combination of ginseng and echinacea, can boost up the body’s immune system. There is a variety of astragalus that are native to Northeast Asia, and its roots need to be dried and powdered to be transformed to be consumed as a capsule or as a tea.

Astragalus Beneficial Properties

Studies have found that astragalus�s beneficial pharmacological effects might contain phytochemical components, which include a host of saponins polysaccharides and flavonoids that the body’s immune system needs to function correctly. Another study found that astragalus contains about twenty trace minerals that are highly important for the body. With astragalus extract, it has immune-modulating properties in vivo and in vitro in both animals and humans, and research shows that the herb stimulates and influences on the immune response cytokines while also leaving the inflammatory cytokines unaffected.

Some of the beneficial properties that astragalus can have on the body are still being researched; however, this Chinese herb can help the body to function correctly and are effective.

Improving the Immune System

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Studies have shown that astragalus contains some beneficial plant compounds that may enhance the body’s immune system. Studies show that the primary role for the immune system is that it helps protect the body from foreign pathogens like harmful bacteria and viruses that can cause a person to be ill. Research has found out that there is some evidence that astragalus can increase the body�s production of white blood cells, which will help prevent illnesses from entering the body. In other research studies, it has been found that astragalus root has been known to help the body kill bacteria and viruses caused by infections. Even though the research may be limited, there are still studies that show that astragalus can fight off viral infections like the common cold and liver infections in the human body.

Improving the Heart Function

Research shows that astragalus may be able to improve heart function by widening the blood vessels and increasing the amount of blood that is being pumped from the heart. In a clinical research study, it showed that patients were given at least 2.25 grams of astragalus for two weeks and have experienced a more significant improvement in their heart function. In another study, it shows that astragalus may help reduce the symptoms of myocarditis, which is an inflammatory condition in the heart.

Improving Kidney Function

Astragalus can help support kidney health in the body by improving the blood flow to the kidneys and measuring the protein in the urine. A study has shown that proteinuria is a condition where there is an abnormal amount of protein that is found in urine, and it can be a sign that the kidneys are not functioning normally or may be damaged. Surprisingly, there was another study that showed that astragalus could improve proteinuria symptoms in individuals that have kidney disease. Studies have even found that astragalus may also help prevent infections for anyone who has a reduce kidney function and reducing the risk of a kidney disorder known as nephrotic syndrome.

Conclusion

Astragalus is a unique herb that can help the body’s immune system to function correctly. Even though there is a limited amount of research on this herb, but the beneficial properties it provides in the body are truly amazing. Astragalus can be consumed by capsules or even be brewed as a tea, so that way, people can enjoy the beneficial properties and that their body is performing excellently in health and wellness. Some products offer support to the body’s immune system and help target the amino acids that are intended to support the intestines while offering more support to the metabolic system.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Block, Keith I, and Mark N Mead. �Immune System Effects of Echinacea, Ginseng, and Astragalus: a Review.� Integrative Cancer Therapies, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2003, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15035888.

Fu, Juan, et al. �Review of the Botanical Characteristics, Phytochemistry, and Pharmacology of Astragalus Membranaceus (Huangqi).� Phytotherapy Research: PTR, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25087616.

Gao, Xing-hua, et al. �Saponin Fraction from Astragalus Membranaceus Roots Protects Mice against Polymicrobial Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation and Puncture by Inhibiting Inflammation and Upregulating Protein C Pathway.� Journal of Natural Medicines, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19548065.

Meixner, Makayla. �Astragalus: An Ancient Root With Health Benefits.� Healthline, 31 Oct. 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/astragalus.

Nalbantsoy, Ay?e, et al. �Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties in Mice and in Vitro Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Cycloartane Type Saponins from Astragalus Species.� Journal of Ethnopharmacology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 31 Jan. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22155389.

Peng, T Q, et al. �Effect and Mechanism of Astragalus Membranaceus on Coxsackie B3 Virus RNA in Mice.� Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi Zhongguo Zhongxiyi Jiehe Zazhi = Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Nov. 1994, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7703635.

Piao, Yuan-lin, and Xiao-chun Liang. �Astragalus Membranaceus Injection Combined with Conventional Treatment for Viral Myocarditis: a Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.� Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25098261.

Team, DFH. �Astragalus: Funny Name Serious Results.� Designs for Health, 9 Oct. 2018, blog.designsforhealth.com/astragalus-funny-name-serious-results.

Team, NCBI. �Astragalus Membranaceus. Monograph.� Alternative Medicine Review: a Journal of Clinical Therapeutic, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2003, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12611564.

Wang, Deqing, et al. �Study of the Effects of Total Flavonoids of Astragalus on Atherosclerosis Formation and Potential Mechanisms.� Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3306992/.

Wu, Hong Mei, et al. �Interventions for Preventing Infection in Nephrotic Syndrome.� The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 18 Apr. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22513919.

Yang, Qing-you, et al. �Effects of Astragalus on Cardiac Function and Serum Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Level in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.� Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi Zhongguo Zhongxiyi Jiehe Zazhi = Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20929124.

Zhang, Hong Wei, et al. �Astragalus (a Traditional Chinese Medicine) for Treating Chronic Kidney Disease.� The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 22 Oct. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25335553.


Modern Integrative Wellness- Esse Quam Videri

The University offers a wide variety of medical professions for functional and integrative medicine. Their goal is to inform individuals who want to make a difference in the functional medical fields with knowledgeable information that they can provide.

Metabolic Syndrome: Home Solutions

Metabolic Syndrome: Home Solutions

Metabolic Syndrome affects many people. In fact, more than a quarter of the United States has it! Metabolic Syndrome is not a disease, but instead a cluster of disorders. These disorders on their own are not necessarily alarming but when you have more than one, the body starts to feel the repercussions.

Symptoms

Those with metabolic syndrome often suffer from frequent headaches, inflammation, nausea, fatigue, joint pain, and many more. On top of these symptoms, metabolic syndrome can put individuals at a higher risk for Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease, Stroke, Obesity, Sleep Apnea, and Kidney Disease.

Risk Factors

Individuals who have an “apple or pear” body shape, are at an increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome. There are no “obvious” signs of metabolic syndrome, but rather one with metabolic syndrome has 3/5 of these risk factors.

  • A fasting blood glucose level of 100 mg/DL
  • High Blood Pressure, measuring 130/85
  • High Triglycerides
  • Low HDL (Good Cholesterol)� measuring <40mg/DL Men & <50mg/DL Women
  • Excess Waist Fat (>40in Men & >35in Women)

What Can You Do About It?

Of course, no one wants to be left feeling sick and stranded. There are ways to help prevent metabolic syndrome at home. Below there are five tips for each risk factor and how to prevent/reduce your symptoms.

A Fasting Blood Glucose Level Of 100 mg/DL

  • Ketogenic Diet
  • Increase Fiber
  • Control Portions
  • Set “Carb Goals”
  • Choose complex carbs over simple carbs

High Blood Pressure, measuring 130/85

  • Reduce Sodium
  • Lower caffeine
  • DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension)
  • Boost Potassium
  • Read Food labels

High Triglycerides

  • Limit sugar intake
  • Increase fiber
  • Establish a regular eating pattern
  • Eat more “tree nuts” ( almonds, cashews, pecans)
  • Switch to unsaturated fats

Low HDL ( Good Cholesterol) measuring <40mg/DL Men & <50mg/DL Women

  • Reduce Alcohol
  • Do not smoke
  • Choose better fats
  • Purple Produce (antioxidants to help inflammation)
  • Increase fish consumption

Excess Waist Fat >40 in Men & >35 in Women

  • Ketogenic Diet
  • Exercise Daily
  • Walk after dinner
  • Grocery Shop without Aisles
  • Increase in Water Consumption

Solutions

Aside from doing these tricks and tips at home, a doctor or health coach will be able to further assist one in healing. The main goal is to take these symptoms and disorders and correct them before they become a full-blown diagnosis.

Rather than just running a basic blood panel, they now have tests that allow us to see multiple different levels and numbers. these elaborate blood tests provide great insight to allow us to see the full picture. By completing these labs, it allows the doctor to evaluate the patients better and provide a more specific treatment plan.

In addition to detailed lab work, there are all-natural supplements that have been shown to help improve these symptoms along with proper diet and exercise. Some of these supplements include Vitamin D, Berberine, and Ashwagandha.

On top of these things, there is also an app that is available to download. This app is called, “Dr. J Today”. This app connects you directly to our clinic and allows us to monitor your diet, supplements, activity, BMI, water weight, muscle mass, and more! This app also gives you a direct portal to message Dr.Jimenez or myself.

As stated before, our main goal is to help you decrease your symptoms before they turn into a full-blown diagnosis. One thing we want to surround our patients with is knowledge and a team atmosphere. With the right team, anything is possible and better health is more attainable than you think!

Having Type 1 Diabetes, I have experienced metabolic syndrome before. It is one of my least favorite feelings that exist. I want our patients to know that they do not have to feel that way and there are treatment plans that can help! I will help to create a personalized plan that is tailed to you, so success is the only option. – Kenna Vaughn, Senior Health Coach�

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

References:
Mayo Clinic Staff. �Metabolic Syndrome.� Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 14 Mar. 2019, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/metabolic-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20351916.
Sherling, Dawn Harris, et al. �Metabolic Syndrome.� Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 22, no. 4, 2017, pp. 365�367., doi:10.1177/1074248416686187.

Stroke! What To Do In The Event Of? F.A.S.T

Stroke! What To Do In The Event Of? F.A.S.T

Research has found about 35% of Americans experience symptoms of a warning stroke. However, only 3% seek out immediate medical attention. A stroke occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is blocked or reduced, which deprives brain tissue of oxygen and nutrients. Within minutes, brain cells start to die.

Adults who have had a sign of a�temporary blockage aka, a Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) waited/rested until symptoms had subsided instead of calling 911. This is according to the research from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA).

Only a formal medical diagnosis with brain imaging can determine whether someone is having a TIA or stroke. If you or someone experiences warning signs that come on suddenly or go away,�CALL 911 IMMEDIATELY!

Stroke: Early Signs

  • Ischemic strokes occur when a clot blocks blood flow to the brain.
  • This type may be treated immediately with a special clot-busting drug
  • A device called a stent retriever may also be used to remove the clot and help prevent long-term disability.
  • TIA precedes about 15% of strokes
  • People who have had TIA are at greater risk for stroke within three months

Use The Acronym F.A.S.T. To Help Remember Common Signs:

  • Face Drooping
  • Arm Weakness
  • Speech Difficulty
  • Time To Call 911

Other Warnings Signs:

  • Confusion
  • Dizziness
  • Loss Of Balance/Coordination
  • Numbness Or Weakness Of Face, Arm or Leg, Particularly On One Side Of The Body
  • Trouble Speaking Or Understanding
  • Trouble Walking
  • Unexplained Severe Headache
  • Vision Loss In One Or Both Eyes

stroke signs fast response el paso tx.

Injury Medical Clinic: Stress Management Care & Treatments

Naturally Enhancing the Gut-Brain-Heart Connection

Naturally Enhancing the Gut-Brain-Heart Connection

A majority of individuals today are aware about the gut-brain connection and how approximately 90 percent of their body’s serotonin is really generated in the gastrointestinal, or GI, tract as well as the way the gut-brain axis is associated with depression. Overall gut health involving a healthy population of gut microbiota can affect many facets of our well-being, therefore, it’s no mystery that the connection between the gut and chronic health issues, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, are also significantly strong.

 

Berberine, an ancient mixture frequently utilized in a variety of medicinal herbs throughout several traditional treatments has been demonstrated to benefit as well as link the gut and the heart. Berberine is an isoquinoline derivative alkaloid found in numerous herbs. Although these berberine-containing herbs aren’t traditionally utilized in food preparations, the active ingredient has been identified and may be isolated from a variety of plant sources, such as Coptis chinensis, or Coptis or Goldthread, Hydrastis canadensis, or goldenseal, Berberis aquifolium, or Oregon grape, Berberis aristata, or Tree Turmeric, Berberis vulgaris, or Barberry, and Arcangelisia flava.

 

Berberine is most favorably known for its function in gut health, demonstrating activity which can help support gut microbial balance. In fact, scientists have shown a growing interest in many plant-derived compounds which affect bacterial direction and berberine is a pioneer in the group. Additionally, its a botanical proven to influence blood glucose, blood lipids and also the immune system. Researchers today have learned how berberine can provide these tremendous benefits.

 

Gut Health Equals Heart Health

 

According to evidence from a 2016 research study, the gut’s immune system is fundamental towards preventing a variety of diseases and it may often contribute to metabolic disorders. However, it might also help provide a treatment goal when observing systemic inflammation in insulin resistance. Moreover, modified gut immunity has been linked with changes to the gut microbiota, intestinal barrier function, gut-residing immune cells, and resistance to antigens which enter the gastrointestinal, or GI, system. Although this has been previously believed to raise the danger of esophageal ailments including, pathogenic infections and chronic inflammation, which may ultimately lead to chronic health issues.

 

In our currently hectic and stressful world, a growth in the numbers of chronic disease has begun to negatively affect our overall health health. The best instance of this increase in chronic illness is type 2 diabetes, abbreviated in this article as T2DM, which often coexists with hypertension and causes individuals to pursue nutritional advice in order to achieve healthy blood sugar levels. The information viewing T2DM alone are shocking. As of 2015, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported that over 30 million people in the United States had diabetes, where approximately three times as many had pre-diabetes. According to statistics, 70 percent of individuals with pre-diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes.

 

Natural remedies and botanicals utilized as herbal treatments which have been previously used to promote healthy blood sugar levels have been strongly evaluated in order to determine their safety and effectiveness. Numerous berberine research studies are being conducted, though these are mostly in vitro, or in cell cultures. A majority of in vivo research studies have used animals for the analysis. Despite the quality and size of those research studies, virtually all of the outcome measures throughout the last two decades are positive. One research study from 2012 looked at in vitro results to thoroughly assess the assumed mechanism of action by which berberine affects fat storage. The outcome measures using clinical therapeutics of berberine to observe participants with metabolic syndrome appeared promising.

 

Another research study evaluated and analyzed the use of berberine in human cell cultures to ascertain how it influenced preadipocyte, a precursor to fat cells, comparison and fat hormone as well as cell activity in patients with metabolic disease. The researchers demonstrated that preadipocyte differentiation was restricted by berberine, while leptin, adiponectin, PPAR?2, or the nuclear receptor known as the master regulator of fat cell biology and target of many diabetes drugs and/or medications, and C/EBP?, a protein necessary for fat cell differentiation, diminished. After several months, participants demonstrated a drop in their BMI and leptin/adiponectin ratio, showing that berberine could boost insulin sensitivity by limiting fat storage, which may also have beneficial effects in the regulation of blood lipid levels.

 

Concerning how berberine affects cardiovascular biomarkers, many assessments can be found in the literature. The administration of berberine in one analysis generated a substantial decrease in total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, with a marked rise in high-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, a meta-analysis of this anti-diabetic, hypolipidemic and anti-inflammatory effects of berberine were reviewed in twenty-seven randomized controlled clinical trials. The researchers have concluded that berberine is safe and effective due to its support of the cardiovascular system and the maintenance of healthy blood sugar levels, without any severe adverse reactions found in some of the other research studies. Berberine has also been demonstrated to restrict complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, leading to a growth of 5′ adenosine monophosphate, or AMP and 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, or AMPK activation. This seems to have a direct impact on energy metabolism as well as that in other structures and functions.

 

The neurological health effects of berberine have also been considered, particularly from the modulation of the dopaminergic system. Berberine has also demonstrated a possibility in the successful management of seizures, diabetes-induced memory malfunction and hyperexcitability. One animal research study investigating obsessive-compulsive disease found that berberine can promote anti-compulsive and/or anxiolytic effects because of its ability to boost brain monoamine levels. Another review from 2016 demonstrated berberine’s ability to reduce oxidative stress and supply neuroprotective benefits. The review further cites research studies which examine the botanical’s function in the evolution of amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. Berberine has found its function in the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular as well as brain worlds. Truly offering a wholesome dose of gut-heart-brain link, berberine is definitely one to consider.

 

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Dr. Alex Jimenez’s Insight

Research studies have found that the relationship between a healthy gut, brain and heart is fundamental towards overall well-being. Natural remedies and botanicals, such as berberine, can help promote as well as support this gut-brain-heart connection, while other alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can restore balance and encourage the human body’s natural healing abilities by correcting spinal misalignments of the spine. Furthermore, by establishing the proper relationship between the brain, the spinal chord and the rest of the body, chiropractic care can help regulate the proper structure and function of each system in the human body.

 

With the increasing number of gut health issues, it’s become a priority to find safe and effective treatment options to properly address these common problems. More and more research studies have found a connection between the gut, brain and heart. As previously mentioned, by both supporting and promoting the well-being of the gastrointestinal, or GI, system, the structure and function of a variety of other systems can be sustained. Natural remedies and botanicals, such as berberine, have been utilized for centuries as herbal treatments, however, other alternative treatment options can also be used to help improve gut health. Chiropractic care is a well-known, alternative treatment option which has been demonstrated to help promote the natural healing of the human body through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations as well as other therapeutic techniques to correct spinal misalignments, or subluxations. Moreover, a doctor of chiropractic, or chiropractor, can recommend a series of lifestyle modifications, including exercise and nutritional advice, in order to help further improve the overall health and wellness of the human body. Maintaining the well-being of the gut can help boost brain and heart health as well.

 

Berberine Warnings

 

In large doses, berberine may lead to gastrointestinal irritation. Thus, it’s typically administered in divided doses and taken with a meal. In addition, researchers have revealed that berberine can limit particular cytochrome enzymes that also target a lot of different kinds of drugs and/or medications, including certain antibiotics. Inhibiting cytochrome enzymes influences the liver’s detoxification system, which will be required to metabolize and, finally, clear drugs and/or medications. For this reason, it’s essential to carefully monitor those patients that are using berberine if other medicines are used concomitantly. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic as well as to spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900�.

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

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Additional Topics: Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes for disability and missed days at work worldwide. As a matter of fact, back pain has been attributed as the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience some type of back pain at least once throughout their life. The spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments and muscles, among other soft tissues. Because of this, injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.

 

 

 

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EXTRA IMPORTANT TOPIC: Low Back Pain Management

 

MORE TOPICS: EXTRA EXTRA:�Chronic Pain & Treatments

 

Physiology of Calcium for Heart Health | Wellness Clinic

Physiology of Calcium for Heart Health | Wellness Clinic

Calcium is one of the most omnipresent mineral in the human body. An average-sized adult’s body, for instance, can contain approximately 1000 to 1200 grams of calcium, which is generally, invisibly integrated into bones and teeth by the widely available type of mineral, identified as calcium-hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) crystals. The rest circulates throughout the blood and soft tissues, as it plays fundamental roles in cell conduction, muscle function, hormone regulation and vitamin K-dependent pathways, as well as for proper cardiac and blood vessel function.

 

What role does calcium play in heart health?

 

Several research studies indicate that just about 30 percent of the United States population consumes the Recommended Dietary Allowance of calcium, which calls for approximately 1000 to 1200 milligrams on a regular daily basis. Furthermore, humans can absorb only about 30 percent of calcium from foods, based on the particular source. The body will in turn, demineralize its own skeletal system to maintain the proper serum calcium levels in scenarios where dietary calcium is inadequate and/or absorption is decreased, and/or excretion is increased.

 

Epidemic of Osteopenia/Osteoporosis

 

Starting at around the age of 50 years old, postmenopausal women lose about 0.7 to 2 percent of their bone mass each year, while men over age 50 years lose 0.5 to 0.7 % annually. Between ages 45 and 75 years of age, women lose 30 percent bone mass, whereas men lose 15 percent.

 

According to the US Surgeon General’s Report, one in two Americans over the age of 50 are expected to have an increased risk of developing osteoporosis. Osteoporosis causes 8.9 million fractures annually, with an estimated cumulative cost of incident fractures predicted at US $474 billion over the next 20 years. Among mature women over the age of 45, osteoporosis accounts for more days spent in the hospital than many other conditions and diseaes, such as diabetes, myocardial infarction (MI), chronic obstructive airway disease and even breast cancer. Fragility fractures are the primary cause of hospitalization and/or death for US adults age 65 years and older; and 44 percent of nursing home admissions are caused by fractures.

 

A Mayo Clinic study noted that compared to 30 years ago, forearm fractures have increased more than 32 percent in men and 56 percent in women. The authors of the research study concluded that dietary changes, such as inadequate calcium and extra phosphate, were considerably associated with increased fractures. Public health approaches are critical to prevent symptomatic bone disease, however, widespread psychiatric prophylaxis is prohibitively costly and carries potentially serious adverse effects.

 

Cardiovascular Disease and Bone Disease

 

Strong epidemiological associations exist between decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and increased risk of the cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD death. For instance, individuals with osteoporosis have been reported to have a higher risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD), as well as cardiovascular disease. This issue will be magnified if the remedies for osteoporosis (eg, calcium supplements) separately increase the risk of MI.

 

Issues with Dairy as Primary Source of Calcium

 

Dairy foods and drinks account for about 70 percent of dietary calcium intake among Americans. Dozens of epidemiological and randomized controlled trials in adults and children have utilized dairy products as the main source of calcium, and have credited dairy intake with preventive benefits on study end points such as bone mass, fractures and osteoporosis. A current meta-analysis of over 270,000 people revealed a strong trend for dairy intake protecting against hip fracture; the relative risk (RR) of hip fracture each day glass of milk was 0.91, 95 percent CI 0.81 to 1.01.

 

In most industrialized countries, milk is frequently the most cost-effective strategy for achieving recommended levels of calcium consumption in a population level. However, legitimate concerns exist regarding potential deleterious effects of chronic dairy intake on health. Dairy foods, on a time scale, are relative new-comers to the hominin diet. Domestication of cattle, sheep and goats first happened approximately 11,000 to 10,000 years ago. Furthermore, it seems that an estimated 65 percent of the global population expresses the pheno-type of lactase non-persistence.

 

Consumption of cow’s milk has been inconsistently associated with cataracts, ovarian and prostate cancers, and Parkinson’s disease, as it’s also been implicated in certain autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Overall, the evidence for dairy-induced human diseases seems to be consistent for prostate cancer and for type 1 diabetes. A recent study of over 106,000 adults followed for 20 years showed that drinking three or more glasses of milk per day was associated with increased risks for bone fracture and higher mortality rates in comparison to ingesting more than 1 glass of milk every day. By comparison, for the women in that study, daily serving of cheese and/or other fermented milk products such as yogurt was associated with a 10 to 15 percent decrease in the rates of mortality and hip fractures (p<0.001). However, this was an observational study with inherent constraints such as residual confounding and reverse causation. In conclusion, solid results cannot be drawn in the data.

 

The sugar in milk, lactose, is broken down in the gastrointestinal tract into d-galactose and d-glucose. D-Galactose has been proven to increase inflammation and oxidation in adult humans, and in mature animals this sugar triggers accelerated ageing, neurodegeneration, and a shortened life span. Therefore, cow’s milk, even though rich in many nutrients,including sodium, has issues that leave it less than ideal as a dietary staple for most adults. On the contrary, fermented milk foods, such as cheese and yogurt, appear to be safer than milk, perhaps because the mostor all of d-galactose has been metabolized by bacteria, to make these staple food products.

 

Calcium, as with many other vitamins and minerals, is a fundamental compound needed to support the proper function of the human body, particularly when it comes to cardiovascular disease and heart health. Although these results have been displayed in several research studies, it’s essential to consult a healthcare professional to discuss your nutritional options. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

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By Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

Additional Topics: Wellness

 

Overall health and wellness are essential towards maintaining the proper mental and physical balance in the body. From eating a balanced nutrition as well as exercising and participating in physical activities, to sleeping a healthy amount of time on a regular basis, following the best health and wellness tips can ultimately help maintain overall well-being. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards helping people become healthy.

 

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TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: About Chiropractic

 

 

Heart Health Benefits of Coenzyme Q10 | Wellness Clinic

Heart Health Benefits of Coenzyme Q10 | Wellness Clinic

Coenzyme Q10, or CoQ10, ranks among the best selling nutritional supplements, with global sales forecast to reach $849 million by 2020, according to a recent study. Researchers report that Coenzyme Q10 may have important benefits for those who have cardiovascular disease, or CVD, from reducing the risk of repeated heart attacks and improving outcomes in patients with heart failure, to reducing high blood pressure, or BP, and helping combat side ramifications of cholesterol-lowering statins.

 

What are the heart health benefits of Coenzyme Q10?

 

There’s also evidence that CoQ10 might have “important protective heart health effects” that might help prevent CVD, the world’s leading cause of death, reports a recent study published in Cardiovascular Pharmacology: Open Access. As these are fascinating findings, messaging to individuals around CoQ10, especially in the popular media, is frequently confusing, resulting in less than optimum results and inadequate supplement option. Here’s a guide to the most recent discoveries about the heart health benefits of CoQ10 and how to make smart choices in selecting supplements.

 

What is Coenzyme Q10?

 

Found in almost every cell of the body, Coenzyme Q10 is a fat-soluble, vitamin-like substance that helps convert food into energy. A potent antioxidant that protects against harm from toxic free radicals, CoQ10 is naturally created by the human body and can also be found in many foods, with high levels found in organ meats, like liver or kidneys; as well as in sardines, mackerel, chicken, cauliflower, broccoli and asparagus.

 

What are the Different Forms of CoQ10?

 

There are two kinds of CoQ10: ubiquinone and ubiquinol. Ubiquinol, the active antioxidant form of Coenzyme Q10, is created within the human body from ubiquinone. As we age, the amounts of both kinds drop. As early as age 20, the quantity of ubiquinone our own bodies produce starts to drop. Compounding the issue, the entire body also loses its ability to generate ubiquinol out of ubiquinone. Most dietary supplements comprise ubiquinone and therefore are relatively economical, whilst ubiquinol nutritional supplements, which may be of most benefit as we age, may be harder to find and more expensive.

 

A simple blood test can be obtained to measure CoQ10 levels. A shortage of this antioxidant may result in oxidative stress, which raises the risk of a variety of disorders, including cardiovascular disease. Recent research links low blood levels of CoQ10 with reduced levels of heart-protective “good” cholesterol which in turn can further increase risk for heart disease. Cholesterol-lowering statins may also reduce blood levels of CoQ10.

 

What’s the Physiological Role of Coenzyme Q10?

 

Coenzyme Q10, or CoQ10, best referred to as ubiquinone, can possibly enhance function by means of many different mechanisms. CoQ10 is a highly lipophilic molecule made up of a 1,4-benzoquinone. The Q describes the quinone chemical groups and the 10 describes the amount of isoprenyl chemical subunits in its tail. CoQ10 belongs to a group of chemicals which are characterized by their quinone moieties along with the length and composition of their hydrophobic tails. Even though being a frequent element of most cellular membranes, CoQ10’s most prominent role is to facilitate the production of ATP by participating in redox reactions within the electron transport chain in the mitochondria. Over the electron transfer chain, CoQ10 accepts electrons from complexes I and II and transports them to complex III. Now, it is ready to be decreased by complexes I and II again.

 

Along with its crucial role as a component of the electron transport chain, CoQ10 can be safely considered to be a potent antioxidant. CoQ10 was shown to inhibit the peroxidation of cell membrane lipids and reduces the oxidation of circulating lipolipids. In vitro analysis demonstrated that supplementation with CoQ10 inhibited low-density lipoprotein oxidation into a significantly greater level compared with other natural antioxidants, such as ?-carotene or ?-tocopherol. In apolipoprotein E–deficient mice fed with a high fat diet, CoQ10 supplementation decreased the concentration of lipid hydroperoxides in atherosclerotic lesions and reduced the size of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta.

 

As well as its antioxidant action, Coenzyme Q10 also appears to enhance endothelial function. In vitro investigations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed that Coenzyme Q10 supplementation reduced oxidized low-density lipoprotein–triggered endothelin-1 (a known potent vasoconstrictor) secretion. Furthermore, CoQ10 supplementation enhanced nitric oxide bioavailability and decreased cytochrome c (necessary for activation of proapototic proteins) secretion.

 

How Does CoQ10 Directly Affect Heart Health?

 

Recent research indicates that Coenzyme Q10, either alone or blended with other therapies, may be good for the following conditions. However, as with all supplements, patients should consult a healthcare professional prior to taking CoQ10 to assess if it’s suitable for them.

 

  • Cardiovascular disease, or CVD. Recent studies indicate that CoQ10 supplements can significantly raise HDL-C and ApoA1 levels, even in individuals taking statins, and may decrease risk for CVD. CoQ10 supplementation reduces levels of inflammatory biomarkers shown to be risk factors for CVD, for example high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Finally, low CoQ10 levels have been associated with greater tissue damage to the heart during a heart attack and also the brain during stroke.
  • Statin-related muscle symptoms. Though statin therapy can significantly reduce heart attack and stroke risk, up to 25 percent of individuals quit treatment within six months as a result of unwanted effects, such as muscular aches and weakness. In a 2014 randomized clinical research published in Medical Science Monitor, 75 percent of statin users with muscular symptoms reported reduced pain after taking CoQ10 twice daily for 30 days, compared to zero progress in the placebo group. The researchers reasoned that combining statin treatment with Coenzyme Q10 supplements could cause greater compliance with treatment.
  • Heart failure, abbreviated as HF. CoQ10 was hailed as “the first new medication to improve heart failure mortality in over a decade” after a multi-center randomized study of 420 patients discovered that taking it reduced deaths in patients with acute HF by half, in comparison to a control group. The researchers tracked the patients for two years. The analysis was presented in the Heart Failure 2013 congress in Lisbon and later published in Journal of the American College of Cardiology Heart Failure.
  • After a heart attack. In a randomized clinical trial, patients that received CoQ10 soon after a heart attack had a much lower rate of subsequent cardiac events during the next year than a control group (24.6 percent versus 45 percent). About half the patients in both groups were also taking a statin drug, prompting the researchers to report that, “therapy with Coenzyme Q10 in patients with recent heart attacks could be beneficial in patients with higher risk of atherothrombosis, despite optimum lipid lowering treatment.”
  • High blood pressure. In a study of 12 clinical studies, researchers noted that CoQ10 has the potential to lower systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) by up to 17 millimeter Hg and diastolic pressure by 10 mm Hg without significant side effects.

 

Additional Clinical Research

 

Coenzyme Q10 has persistent and significant antihypertensive consequences in patients with hypertension. The literature is outlined below: (1) Compared to normotensive patients, essential hypertensive patients have a greater incidence (6 fold) of Coenzyme Q10 deficiency recorded by serum levels; (2) Doses of 120 to 225 mg/d of CoQ10, depending upon the delivery procedure or the concomitant ingestion with a greasy meal, are essential to reach a therapeutic level of 3 ug/mL. This dose is generally 3 to 5 mg/kg every day of coenzyme Q10. Oral dosing levels may become lower with nanoparticle and emulsion delivery methods meant to facilitate absorption. Adverse effects have not been characterized in the literature; (3) Patients with the cheapest Coenzyme Q10 serum levels might have the best antihypertensive response to supplementation; (4) The ordinary reduction in BP is roughly 15/10 mmHg and heart rate drops 5 beats/min based on reported studies and meta-analysis; (5) The antihypertensive effect takes time to achieve its peak level at 4 weeks. Then the blood pressure, or BP stays stable during long-term treatment. The antihypertensive effect is gone over two weeks following discontinuation of all CoQ10. The reduction in BP and SVR are connected using the pretreatment and post treatment serum levels of CoQ10. About 50 percent of patients respond to oral CoQ10 supplementation for BP; (6) Approximately 50 percent of patients on antihypertensive drugs may be able to stop between one and three agents. Both entire dose and frequency of administration could be reduced. (7) Doctors administered Coenzyme Q10 with enalapril enhanced the 24 hour ABM better compared to enalapril mono-therapy and also normalized endothelial function; also (8) CoQ10 is a lipid phase antioxidant and free radical scavenger, raises eNOS and NO, reduces inflammation and NF-?B and enhances endothelial func-tion and vascular elasticity.

 

Other positive effects on cardiovascular risk factors include improvement in the serum lipid profile and carbohydrate metabolism with reduced glucose and enhanced insulin sensitivity, decreased oxidative stress, re-duced heartbeat, enhanced myocardial LV function and oxygen reduction and decreased catecholamine levels.�Although these results have been displayed in several research studies, it’s essential to consult a healthcare professional to discuss your options. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

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By Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

Additional Topics: Wellness

 

Overall health and wellness are essential towards maintaining the proper mental and physical balance in the body. From eating a balanced nutrition as well as exercising and participating in physical activities, to sleeping a healthy amount of time on a regular basis, following the best health and wellness tips can ultimately help maintain overall well-being. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards helping people become healthy.

 

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TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: About Chiropractic

 

 

Sesame Seeds Can Protect Heart Health | Wellness Clinic

Sesame Seeds Can Protect Heart Health | Wellness Clinic

Sesame seeds are among the most ancient foods in the world. In fact, sesame plants are the earliest known plant species to be produced mostly for their seeds (pods) and oils instead of for their leaves, fruit or vegetables. Highly appreciated in Asian, African and Mediterranean cultures, sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum) have been used for centuries to flavor foods as well as to provide essential fats and improve skin health.

 

What is the significance of sesame seeds towards health?

 

Sesame has among the highest oil contents of any seed along with a rich, nutty flavor. These flexible seeds have long been used by different civilizations around the world, but many people are unaware of their healthy qualities. Evidence demonstrates the benefits of these very small seeds in helping manage common health issues, such as cardiovascular disease, which gives us a lot of reasons to incorporate them into our everyday diet.

 

Sesame Seed Nutrition Facts

 

Sesame seeds come out of a flowering plant from the genus Sesamum. Sesame seed pods burst open when they reach full maturity. The actual seeds of the sesame plant are utilized to extract the valuable oils. Sesame seeds contain up to 55 percent oil and 20 percent protein, making them a rich supply of both essential fatty acids and certain amino acids. The seeds contain approximately 50 percent to 60 percent of a fatty oil that’s characterized by two positive members of the lignan family: sesamin and sesamolin. Sesame oil also contains two additional phenolic compounds, sesamol and sesaminol, that are formed through the refining procedure. Oil derived from polyunsaturated is high in linoleic and oleic acids, the vast majority of that are gamma-tocopherol, in addition to other isomers of vitamin. Sesame proteins (amino acids) include lysine, tryptophan and methionine.

 

One tablespoon of sesame seeds contains approximately:

 

  • 52 calories
  • 4 grams fat
  • 1 gram carbs
  • 2 grams of protein
  • 4 milligrams copper (18 percent DV)
  • 2 milligrams manganese (11 percent DV)
  • 87 milligrams calcium (9 percent DV)
  • 31 milligrams magnesium (8 percent DV)
  • 3 milligrams iron (7 percent DV)
  • 57 milligrams phosphorus (6 percent DV)
  • 7 milligrams zinc (5 percent DV)
  • 1 milligrams thiamine (5 percent DV)

 

High Supply of Cholesterol-Lowering Phytosterols

 

Sesame seeds rank highest in cholesterol-lowering phytosterols from almost all seeds, nuts, legumes and grains. Phytosterols are plant sterols structurally similar to cholesterol that act in the intestine to reduce cholesterol absorption. Phytosterols displace cholesterol inside the gastrointestinal tract, reducing the heart of accessible absorbable cholesterol. Some research has revealed that among 27 distinct nuts and seeds tested, sesame seeds have come out on top (along with wheat germ) as having the highest phytosterol content of them all. They feature approximately 400 grams of phytosterols with each 200 g of seeds. The phytosterol they supply is called beta-sitosterol, which can be tied to improved prostate health and arterial function.

 

Protect Heart Health

 

Research shows that lignans help improve lipid profiles and may normalize cholesterol and blood pressure levels. Lignans help naturally lower cholesterol in a couple of ways, they can lower both serum liver and blood cholesterol. Researchers occasionally refer to sesame seed phytochemicals as “hypocholesterolemic agents” for this particular reason. Fifty grams of sesame seed powder taken daily for more than five weeks by healthy adults has revealed favorable effects on total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, LDL-to-HDL cholesterol ratios and antioxidant status.

 

In an early study, hypercholesterolemic subjects treated with 32 mg/day of sesamin diminished their levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) following eight weeks, compared to control subjects from whom these levels remained unchanged. In another study, 21 subjects with hypercholesterolemia showed reductions in total cholesterol and LDL by 6.4 percent and 9.5 percent respectively, following the consumption of 40 gram of sesame seeds for four weeks. The decrease in cholesterol vanished, however, once the individuals resumed their normal diet for over four weeks. Sesame ingestion also exerts an antioxidant impact by multiplying the lag phase of LDL oxidation (the stage where oxidation proceeds very slowly).

 

Recent studies have confirmed these findings. Similar persistent reductions in total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, as well as the LDL:HDL ratio are detected when sesame extracts were given to people with elevated blood pressure and also to postmenopausal women. What’s more, in the analysis of hypertensive patients, which contrasted the cholesterol-lowering capability of sesame oil with sunflower and groundnut oils, sesame oil revealed superior antioxidant activity and better protection against lipid peroxidation compared to comparators.

 

Lipid peroxidation is a harmful free radical-generating procedure which frequently precedes the build up of plaque from the arteries (atherosclerosis). Sesame oil has just been shown to directly inhibit atherosclerosis lesion production, while beneficially altering the lipid profile. It’s believed that one potential mechanism whereby sesame lignans exert their beneficial effects may be by working synergistically with vitamin E in the body to improve blood and tissue levels of this biologically significant antioxidant.

 

Boost Blood Pressure

 

Sesame oil is thought to be a powerful antihypertensive as it helps stabilize blood pressure levels. One 2006 study published in The Yale Journal of Biological Medicine investigated the effects of hypertensive adults supplementing with sesame oil daily for 45 days and found that sesame could possibly be a great way to reduce blood pressure. After tracking various health markers of 32 hypertensive patients aged 35 to 60 years that was supplied sesame oil (Idhayam gingelly oil) to utilize it as the only edible oil for 45 days, the investigators discovered that sesame oil helped considerably lower high blood pressure, reduce lipid peroxidation and boost antioxidant status in the majority of individuals.

 

A recent human study to the effects of various edible oils in hypertensive patients being treated with nifedipine, an anti inflammatory therapy, revealed that sesame oil offered better protection, more than blood pressure, lipid profiles, and lipid peroxidation than either sunflower or groundnut oils. Sesame oil also positively improved both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants as well as all the other oils.

 

Other research has shown that the sesame lignans also have a beneficial impact on nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator with anti-atherosclerotic and antithrombotic properties. Dilation of blood vessels makes it a lot easier for blood to flow through, thus lowering the pressure inside the vessels. In one study, sesamol increased the release of nitric oxide in umbilical vein endothelial cells, while another study found that sesamin metabolites enhanced vasorelaxation too. The authors concluded that sesamin’s antihypertensive effects were directly associated with this vessel relaxation.

 

Further Clinical Research

 

Sesame was shown to reduce blood pressure at several small randomized, placebo controlled human research within 30 to 60 days. Sesame lowers BP independently or together with nifedipine diuretics and beta blockers. In several 13 mild hypertensive subjects, 60 mg of sesamin for 4 weeks lowered SBP 3.5 mmHg (de < 0.044) and DBP 1.9 mmHg (p < 0.045). Black sesame meal at 2.52 g/d more than 4 weeks in 15 subjects decreased SBP from 8.3 mmHg (p < 0.05) but there was a non-significant decrease in DBP of 4.2 mmHg[259]. Sesame oil in 35 g/d significantly lowered central blood pressure within 1 hour and also claimed blood pressure reduction chronically in 30 hypertensive areas, reduced heart rate, reduced arterial stiffness, decreased augmentation index and pulse wave velocity, decreased HSCRP, improved NO, diminished endothelin-Iand improved antioxidant ability.

 

In addition sesame lowers serum sugar, HgbAIC and LDL-C, raises HDL, reduces oxidative stress markers and in-creases glutathione, SOD, GPx, CAT, vitamins C, E and A. The active ingredients are organic ACEI’s such as sesamin, sesamolin, sesaminol glucosides, furou-furan lignans which also suppressors of NF-?B. Each of these effects lower inflammation and oxidative stress, improve oxidative defense and reduce blood pressure.

 

Many clinical research and evidence-based findings have demonstrated the benefits of sesame oil for cardiovascular disease, where the consumption of sesame can protect overall heart health as well as lower cholesterol and boost blood pressure levels. Although these results have been displayed in several research studies, it’s essential to consult a healthcare professional to discuss your options. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

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By Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

Additional Topics: Wellness

 

Overall health and wellness are essential towards maintaining the proper mental and physical balance in the body. From eating a balanced nutrition as well as exercising and participating in physical activities, to sleeping a healthy amount of time on a regular basis, following the best health and wellness tips can ultimately help maintain overall well-being. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards helping people become healthy.

 

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TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: About Chiropractic

 

 

Benefit of Seaweed for Heart Health | Wellness Clinic

Benefit of Seaweed for Heart Health | Wellness Clinic

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CVD results in 611,105 deaths every year. The most common types of cardiovascular diseases include angina, high blood pressure, or hypertension, heart attack, and atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular disease can develop because of a variety of factors, but it’s widely considered that your risk of heart health issues could be significantly affected by lifestyle choices, such as that of an improper diet and nutrition.

 

How can seaweed contribute to heart health?

 

Over the past few decades, researchers have indicated that seaweed may have significant effects on cardiovascular disease. Because of its heart health benefits, we ought to be doing more to include these sea vegetables into our diets. Seaweed covers a vast selection of marine macroalgae, which can be categorized into three groups: brown algae (Phaeophyceae), green algae (Chlorophyta) and red algae (Rhodophyta). Many seaweed species possess an assortment of health benefits. They comprise, among other things, beneficial proteins, antioxidants, minerals, trace elements, dietary fiber and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Seaweed is a rich source of proteins known as bioactive peptides. These chemicals have a similar impact to ACE inhibitor drugs and medications, which are prescribed to help lower blood pressure and prevent heart attacks and strokes.

 

Seaweed and Cardiovascular Disease

 

Even though there is not any consensual definition for the word “functional food” globally, this is vastly accepted for foods and food components that have been demonstrated to offer certain health benefits beyond the basic nutrition. The design of functional foods is hence undoubtedly associated to the notion of preventing diseases and/or improving optimal health of consumers, besides the simple nourishment requirements.

 

Seaweed has been a staple ingredient in Asian cultures for centuries. Given the evidence of the beneficial health effects of seaweeds and/or isolates of macroalgae source, there’s a strong case for their inclusion in regular meals (food and beverages), so as to take advantage of their nutrient benefits. It is expected that the joint efforts of business and research in this field will result throughout the forthcoming decades, in a high number of new functional food products reaching to the current market, including those meant to promote heart health.

 

As per a study review (over 100 research studies), published in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists called for “more attempt to exploit the bioactive compounds as well as their potential for utilization and delivery to consumers in food goods. In a study published in the journal Phycologia, researchers suggest that adding seaweed to processed foods may decrease cardiovascular disease. The authors referred their attention to the manufacturers of such foods to fulfill a responsibility for the well-being of their customers.

 

Clinical Research

 

Ole G. Mouritsen, a professor of biophysics at the University of Southern Denmark, and colleagues, examined existing knowledge on the health effects of 35 different seaweed species. In the guide, they provide hints to how both individual consumers and the food industry can use seaweed to create everyday healthier meals. By way of instance, dried and granulated seaweed can substitute some of the flour when producing dry pasta, bread, pizza and snack bars, together with as small as a 5 percent replacement needed. Seaweed salt, according to researchers, can also be a healthier salt. Seaweed’s content of potassium salts does not lead to high blood pressure, unlike the sodium salts, typically used in the processed food.

 

“We all know that many individuals have difficulty distinguishing between healthy and unhealthy food. With the addition of seaweed to processed foods we could produce healthier food. In many cases we also get tastier food, and it may also help reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases,” the researchers stated. “It is difficult to determine how much seaweed an individual should have to benefit from its great qualities. Five to 10 g of dried seaweed daily is my quote,” states Mouritsen, who has authored several books on seaweed as a healthy food source.

 

The development of functional foods using seaweeds for boosting heart health have been particularly examined in meat-based products. In these products, it is very important to improve the fatty acid composition and the material of functional ingredients, while decreasing the contents of cholesterol, fat and salt. Different authors have reported that nutritional worth of meat products can be significantly enhanced by the incorporation of whole seaweeds, without hampering quality and sensory properties. Besides, a remarkable work was done by Schultz-Moreira et al., because combined with describing the enhanced nutritional value of restructured meat once augmented with seaweeds, they also assessed different parameters (e.g., lipid profile, antioxidant enzymes and arylesterase) with effect on cardiovascular disease, as demonstrated in hypertensive rats. Additionally, Lim et al. also revealed that chicken and pork patties fortified with Laminaria japonica could improve postprandial plasma glucose and lipids profiles in borderline-hyperlipidemic adults.

 

For the last decades, development of drinks with seaweeds or extracts has also become the focus of distinct investigations and of many patent registrations. Among those, researchers have patented a beverage containing water-insoluble algal nutritional fibers (0.01% to 20 percent) and citric acid, sugar, fruit juice, plant thickeners and water, which may prevent from distinct diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases. Besides patents, research studies reported the effects of functional drinks. In general, these studies highlighted that beverages made by incorporating macroalgae, particularly using Ecklonia cava, could be of advantage not only because of their minerals and phenolics richness, but also due to their ability to target ACE-I.

 

Further Clinical Research

 

Wakame seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) is the most popular, edible seaweed in Japan. In humans, 3.3 g of dried Wakame for four months significantly reduced both the SBP 14 � 3 mmHg and the DBP 5 � 2 mmHg (p < 0.01). In a study of 62 middle-aged, male subjects with mild hypertension given a potassium-loaded, ion-exchanging, sodium-adsorbing, potassium-releasing seaweed prepara-tion, significant blood pressure reductions occurred at four months on 12 and 24 g/d of the seaweed preparation (p < 0.01). The MAP fell 11.2 mmHg (p < 0.001) in the sodium-sensitive themes and 5.7 mmHg (p < 0.05) in the sodium-insensitive subjects, which connected with PRA.

 

Seaweed and sea vegetables contain most all of the seawater’s 77I minerals and rare earth elements, fiber and alginate in a colloidal form. The primary effect of Wakame seems to be via its ACEI activity from at least four parent tetrapeptides and possibly their dipeptide and tripeptide metabolites, especially those containing the amino acid sequence Val-Tyr, Ile-Tyr, Phe-Tyr and Ile-Try in certain combination. Its long-term use in Japan has shown its effectiveness. Other varieties of seaweed may reduce BP by decreasing intestinal sodium absorption and raising intestinal potassium absorption.

 

Conclusion

 

Seaweeds are a great source of compounds with varied applications, including for heart health and cardiovascular disease, or CVD. This simple fact leaves macroalgae and crude/purified extracts, a possibility of program as ingredients in the formulation of new functional foods in that health field. There’s evidence that diet supplementation with whole macroalgae or products of macroalgae origin can ameliorate several mechanisms underlying the onset and propagation of CVDs. However, we must emphasize that the challenge of working with these components in novel foods should not be restricted to the improvement of the nutritional formulations, but instead, efforts should be done in order to test the promised health benefits of the new products.�The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

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By Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

Additional Topics: Wellness

 

Overall health and wellness are essential towards maintaining the proper mental and physical balance in the body. From eating a balanced nutrition as well as exercising and participating in physical activities, to sleeping a healthy amount of time on a regular basis, following the best health and wellness tips can ultimately help maintain overall well-being. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards helping people become healthy.

 

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TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: About Chiropractic

 

 

Garlic Usage for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention | Wellness Clinic

Garlic Usage for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention | Wellness Clinic

Cardiovascular disease, abbreviated as CVD, is an intricate group of heart-related conditions which are considered to be the top cause of death among Americans and Europeans. Unfortunately, the prevalence of cardiovascular disease is increasing rapidly in developing nations as well. Therefore, finding safe and effective strategies to treat and prevent cardiovascular disease, or CVD, has become a significant priority around the globe.

 

What are some safe and effective treatment strategies for cardiovascular disease?

 

Many factors contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease, which involve high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, and congenital cardiovascular defects. Epidemiological studies investigating CVD risk factors have pointed to the role of elevated serum lipids (including cholesterol and triglycerides), elevated blood pressure, or BP, increased platelet aggregation, increased plasma fibrinogen and coagulation factors, alterations in glucose metabolism, as well as smoking. Reduced risk of CVD is associated with increased serum levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C), normalization of abnormal lipid levels, inhibition of platelet aggregation, and increased antioxidant status, according to some research studies.

 

While these various factors have been determined to lead to cardiovascular disease, dietary factors have been known to play a major role in CVD, where Mediterranean diets, fish, fruit, and whole grains have also been proven to reduce CVD risk. One research study where patients admitted with severe cardiovascular disease were interviewed, found that 78 percent were using natural health products; such utilization was recorded by pharmacists in 41 percent of patients, by doctors in 22 percent and by nurses in 19 percent. Among all the natural health products used to treat cardiovascular disease, garlic (Allium sativa, Family Liliaceae) has been in the top five best selling herbs, and is the most popular herb used by patients with CVD.

 

History

 

Garlic has been a significant element in many cultures for centuries. Ancient Ayurvedic texts consult health benefits of garlic concerning improving blood circulation and strengthening the heart. The Egyptian Codex Ebers (1500 BC) recommended garlic for heart disease, and also for tumors, worms and a number of other conditions. The Greek physician, Hippocrates (400 BC), along with the Roman authority, Pliny the Elder (77 AD), recommended garlic for the cardiovascular system. Clinical work as early as 1926 found garlic to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. These effects were again mentioned in the 1960’s and 1970’s when numerous studies noted a decrease in serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels. However, these early studies were conducted using raw garlic administered at very high doses (between seven and 28 cloves per day).

 

Pharmacology

 

Garlic’s odor problem has led to much work being done to find more palatable and less odorous formulations. The odor, as well as garlic’s cardiovascular effects, is caused by sulfur-containing compounds. Garlic cloves contain nearly all their sulfur at a storage compound called alliin (a name coming from garlic’s botanical name, Allium sativum). Raw garlic also contains an enzyme known as alliinase. When raw garlic is crushed or cut, the alliinase interacts with alliin to make allicin. The distinctive aroma and flavor of garlic is a result of allicin, which is very volatile and unstable, breaking down either in a couple of hours at room temperature or after a few minutes of cooking. An in vitro study found that garlic’s ability to inhibit platelet aggregation wasn’t changed after 3 minutes or less of immersion. After 6 minutes, cloves had no action, whereas some activity was retained by crushed garlic. After 10 minutes, all activity was gone. By microwaving for approximately 2 minutes, all activity was removed from many samples.

 

As allicin breaks down or is metabolized, dozens of other more stable sulfur compounds are formed. A number of them are active. Allicin is converted into polysulfides and ajoene which could be stable for over a year, when garlic is macerated with oil. However, each compound’s precise action remains uncertain. Most regard the sulfur-containing compounds as crucial to the health benefits of garlic, although those compounds are also responsible for garlic’s odor-problems. The ways garlic has been processed direct to preparations with various compounds, which might be inconsistent.

 

Mechanism of Action

 

In spite of considerable numbers of in vitro research, the component(s) in garlic accountable for its cardiovascular effects remain unclear. Garlic impacts the cardiovascular system via several mechanisms, but a lot of its constituents are biologically active and uncertainty remains about the way they all interact. Ajoene and other compounds inhibit platelet aggregation, which can help prevent cardiovascular disease, or CVD. Allicin has antiplatelet aggregating activity, even though its instability makes it difficult to fully study its clinical effects. Several garlic components inhibit liver enzymes involved in making cholesterol, such as HMG-CoA reductase (the enzyme inhibited by statins), and many others reduced plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels through unclear mechanisms of activity. Garlic also contains antioxidants that could counteract the development of atherosclerosis. Components cause muscle relaxation, which could contribute to decreased hypertension, a common issue along with cardiovascular disease.

 

Various sulfur compounds derived from garlic trigger the release of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from human red blood cells. H2S,�naturally occurring cell signaling molecule, provides protection against oxidative damage, including smooth muscle relaxation, and decreased blood pressure. This new research might lead to a means of standardizing preparations, and sheds light on the potential mechanisms of action of garlic.

 

Clinical Research

 

Many laboratory and animal tests have demonstrated that garlic and its components have biological activities related to cardiovascular disease; nonetheless, controversy continues over the clinical significance of these findings. Results of trials have been conflicting, with early studies frequently finding beneficial effects that were not replicated in more recent trials which were usually of higher methodological quality. The impact of garlic intake or supplementation on serum cholesterol and lipid levels has received the most research.

 

Two meta-analyses published in 1993 and 1996 generated curiosity about garlic because they reported 9 percent and 12 percent reductions in total cholesterol levels. More recent meta-analyses have come to various conclusions; one printed in 2009 concluded that there was no evidence from randomized controlled trial (RCTs) of garlic with any favorable effects on serum cholesterol. However, the research in that meta-analysis was criticized for not being comprehensive. The latest evaluation analyzed literature published up to October 2011 – 12 and contained 26 RCTs reporting the effects of garlic on various serum lipids. In general, garlic considerably reduced serum total cholesterol from 0.28 mmol/L (P = 0.001) and triglycerides by 0.13 mmol/L (P < 0.001). At the exact same time, no significant differences were found for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-C, apolipoprotein B, and overall cholesterol/HDL-C ratio.�The reviewers calculated that the substantial differences were equal to a 5.4 percent decrease in total cholesterol levels to someone with a baseline amount of 5 mmol/L and a 6.5 percent reduction in triglyceride levels for somebody starting with a 2 mmol/L level. The daily doses most widely utilized in the studies reviewed were 10 to 15 mg garlic oil, 900 mg garlic powder, and 1 to 7 g aged garlic extract. Study duration ranged from two weeks to 12 months, with the majority of trials lasting 3 or 6 months.

 

Many studies have analyzed the role of garlic aids in lowering blood pressure. A 1994 meta-analysis of 10 randomized, controlled trials reported an overall significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 5 and 8 mmHg. Another meta-analysis published in 2008 comprised 11 RCTs and reported a general decrease of 4.56 mmHg in systolic blood pressure for people taking garlic (P < 0.001). Diastolic blood pressure did not change significantly compared to placebo. There was a planned sub-group analysis conducted comparing those who were normotensive or hypertensive . The hypertensive subgroup had considerable reductions of 8.4 and 7.3 mmHg for systolic and diastolic blood pressures, respectively. Substantial reductions were not shown by the subgroup that is normotensive. The reviewers noted that discounts of 4 to 5 mmHg systolic and 2 to 3 mmHg diastolic are held to be important. At precisely the exact same time, some RCTs have found no significant differences between classes carrying placebo and garlic.

 

Although a lot of garlic elements have demonstrated antioxidant properties, comparatively few studies are done on the clinical importance of the effects. Another product called aged garlic extract (AGE; brand name Kyolic) is made by soaking garlic slivers in alcohol for 20 months, removing most allicin, and leaving an infusion high in antioxidant capacity. An RCT with 65 patients examined the impact of AGE (250 mg/d) and multivitamins on subclinical atherosclerosis. After 1 year, those in the AGE group had significantly better results than the control group for cognitive markers, vascular function, and progression of atherosclerosis. Another RCT found that people taking 960 milligrams AGE had considerably more reduction in systolic blood pressure (by 10.2 mmHg; P = 0.03).21 However, the total number of clinical studies assessing AGE remains small.

 

Garlic and its elements have been found to affect platelet aggregation and other aspects of blood clotting. Fibrinolysis leads to the breakdown of blood clots, and this process is promoted by various types of garlic preparations. Platelet aggregation has been beneficially affected by garlic in a small number of clinical trials. However, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality evaluation concluded that these results must be taken as preliminary. While most of the studies identified for this evaluation had beneficial outcomes, the studies were all very modest, of limited duration, and some had flaws.

 

Adverse Effects

 

Garlic is well-known for its problematic breath and body odor after oral ingestion. These are the most commonly reported complaints from trial participants. Eating raw garlic and high doses of some supplements can cause mouth and gastrointestinal irritation, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Some individuals are also vulnerable to allergic reactions, one study estimated that 1 percent of people are prone to allergic reactions from garlic.

 

The effects of garlic on platelet aggregation and fibrinolysis may raise the risk of bleeding, but that is mostly theoretical. While few studies or case reports have found such adverse consequences, individuals taking anticoagulants, those scheduled for an invasive process, or those with bleeding problems must be aware of this possible adverse effect. Some case reports of postoperative bleeding have been reported. But a randomized, controlled trial detected no change in bleeding events among individuals taking warfarin when given both garlic (AGE formula) or placebo. In vitro investigations have identified enzymes whose activities are impacted by aged garlic extracts. These results raise concerns that garlic might interfere with the metabolism of various drugs and medications. Though patients didn’t possess decreased serum levels actual interactions have been reported.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Overall, garlic preparations have some significance as a complementary agent in reducing some risk factors related to cardiovascular disease, or CVD. The evidence in studies indicated a range of benefits, but a number of these studies had small numbers of participants, have been of short duration, or had other methodological weaknesses. Higher-quality studies have found more limited benefits. Reductions in blood pressure, triglycerides, and total cholesterol are identified in meta-analyses. Several other effects have been discovered with research. Given its good safety profile, garlic may offer some protection from cardiovascular diseases, according to the research studies and conclusive data. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

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By Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

Additional Topics: Wellness

 

Overall health and wellness are essential towards maintaining the proper mental and physical balance in the body. From eating a balanced nutrition as well as exercising and participating in physical activities, to sleeping a healthy amount of time on a regular basis, following the best health and wellness tips can ultimately help maintain overall well-being. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards helping people become healthy.

 

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TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: About Chiropractic

 

 

Effects of Lycopene in Cardiovascular Disease | Wellness Clinic

Effects of Lycopene in Cardiovascular Disease | Wellness Clinic

Fruits and vegetables are essential sources of vitamins and minerals. Many groups of these plant-based foods provide the body with fundamental nutrients, where some are richer in several varieties of vitamins and minerals, than others. Many fruits and vegetables also provide the body with important antioxidants. Among these antioxidants, lycopene is abundant in red fruits and vegetables, some of which are crowd favorites.

 

What are the benefits of lycopene consumption?

 

Substantial evidence indicates that lycopene, a carotenoid without provitamin A activity found in high concentrations in a small group of plant foods, has significant antioxidant potential in vitro and may play a role in preventing cardiovascular disease as well as prostrate cancer in individuals. Lycopene is believed to possess a cholesterol synthesis-inhibiting effect and might enhance LDL cholesterol, or “bad cholesterol”, degradation. Research studies evaluating its effectiveness in this area can simply answer the question of whether lycopene can help to prevent cardiovascular disease.

 

Lycopene Intake & Absorption

 

Lycopene is a� fat-soluble phytonutrient in the carotenoid family which has received attention because of its potential role in preventing cardiovascular diseases. Although similar in construction to the more studied ?-carotene, lycopene doesn’t have provitamin A activity. Carotenoids and their many conjugated double bonds turns them into potentially strong antioxidants, and lycopene is no exception.

 

Sources include tomatoes, guava, pink grapefruit, watermelon, apricots and papaya in high concentrations. Tomato products, including ketchup, tomato juice, and pizza sauce, are the richest sources of lycopene in the United States diet, accounting for 80 percent of the lycopene consumption of Americans. Tomatoes also contain a significant amount of ?-carotene. In fact, they are the fourth-leading contributor to provitamin A and vitamin A intake in the American diet. Tomatoes are rich in potassium and folate, and there is nearly 3 times as much vitamin C as lycopene in a tomato. In studies of health benefits of tomatoes, an individual has to consider that they are also rich in nutrients aside from lycopene.

 

Absorption of lycopene’s mechanism isn’t fully understood. Studies have demonstrated that lycopene from tomato products appears in the blood flow when a source of fat is included with the meal and if the tomato is warmed. Plasma lycopene concentrations increased only marginally in a group receiving 180 g tomato juice (containing 12 mg lycopene) per day for 6 weeks. This finding has been supported by research studies demonstrating negligible or only slight increases in plasma lycopene concentrations after consumption of various levels of unheated tomato juice. In one study, nevertheless, when tomato juice was absorbed, serum levels of lycopene increased, with an increase within 24 to 48 hours following ingestion. Gartner et al discovered that concentrations of lycopene from the chylomicrons of 5 human subjects increased 3 times as much when they consumed tomato paste as when they consumed raw tomatoes. Thus, the availability and absorption of lycopene depend on the processing and treatment of the food that contains the carotenoid and on the fat content of the meal in which lycopene is consumed.

 

Lycopene and Cardiovascular Disease

 

Several studies examined the connection between dietary intake of antioxidants and lipid peroxidation to attempt to determine which antioxidants may play a role in preventing cardiovascular disease. The hydrocarbon carotenoids, including ?-carotene and lycopene, are transported primarily in LDL cholesterol, which positions them in the prime place to protect LDL cholesterol from oxidation.

 

Romanchik et al isolated LDL cholesterol samples from 5 individuals and enriched them with ?-carotene, lycopene, and lutein to determine whether this would have an impact on LDL oxidation. On copper-mediated oxidation of the LDL, the carotenoids were destroyed until substantial amounts of lipid peroxidation products were transformed, providing evidence that these pigments might be functioning as antioxidants. Although lycopene was the most quickly destroyed of the carotenoids studied, only the LDL cholesterol samples enriched with ?-carotene exhibited increased CD lag time. In another study of LDL from 11 different people, the same researchers actually found increased oxidation of LDL (as quantified by the ferrous oxidation, xylenol orange assay) on enrichment with lycopene and lutein, signaling that the connection between lycopene and LDL cholesterol oxidation is complicated.

 

Lycopene creates a significant reduction in serum lipids, blood pressure and oxidative stress markers. Paran et al evaluated 30 subjects with Grade I hypertension, age 40 to 65, taking no anti-hypertensive or anti-lipid drugs, treated with a tomato lycopene extract (10 mg lycopene) for 2 weeks. The SBP was reduced from 144 to 135 mmHg (9 mmHg decrease, p < 0.01) and DBP fell from 91 to 84 mmHg (7 mmHg decrease, p < 0.01). Similar results were shown by another analysis of 35 subjects with Grade I hypertension on SBP, but not DBP. Englehard gave a tomato extract to 31 subjects over 12 weeks demonstrating that a significant BP reduction of 10/4 mmHg. Patients on various anti-hypertensive agents including ACEI, CCB and diuretics experienced a significant blood pressure decrease of 5.4/3 mmHg more than 6 weeks when administered a standardized tomato extract. Other research studies haven’t shown changes in blood pressure. Lycopene and tomato infusion improve ED and reduced plasma oxidative stress.

 

An intriguing nonantioxidant purpose of lycopene was revealed in humans. Fuhrman et al revealed that cholesterol synthesis was decreased by the addition of lycopene to macrophage cell lines and increased LDL cholesterol receptors. Incubation with lycopene in vitro led to a 73 percent reduction in cholesterol synthesis, which has been higher than that achieved with ?-carotene. Additionally, lycopene led to a 34 percent growth in LDL degradation in the cells themselves and approximately a 110 percent increase in the removal of LDL cholesterol in the blood flow. To test their findings in humans, the investigators fed 6 men with 60 milligrams of lycopene per day for 3 weeks (approximately equivalent to the total amount of lycopene in 1 kg tomatoes). They discovered that a decrease in plasma LDL cholesterol with no significant change in HDL cholesterol. Based on the calculations of Peto et al that there is a 3:1 ratio involving the decreased risk of myocardial infarction, where a 30 percent to 40 percent risk reduction in individuals consuming this amount of lycopene. The recommended daily intake of lycopene is approximately 10 to 20 mg in supplement or food form.

 

Lycopene, along with other antioxidants, are fundamental towards the prevention of cardiovascular disease. When levels of LDL cholesterol, or “bad cholesterol” are out of balance, red fruits and vegetables, rich in lycopene, can help improve overall heart health, according to research studies. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

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By Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

Additional Topics: Wellness

 

Overall health and wellness are essential towards maintaining the proper mental and physical balance in the body. From eating a balanced nutrition as well as exercising and participating in physical activities, to sleeping a healthy amount of time on a regular basis, following the best health and wellness tips can ultimately help maintain overall well-being. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards helping people become healthy.

 

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Essential Vitamin Intake for Cardiovascular Disease | Wellness Clinic

Essential Vitamin Intake for Cardiovascular Disease | Wellness Clinic

The American Heart Association, or the AHA, has had a consistent, long-standing focus towards providing the public with the necessary information regarding the role of nutrition reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. Periodic AHA Dietary Guidelines�support a dietary pattern that promotes the consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat or nonfat dairy products, fish, legumes, poultry, and lean meats. An improper nutrition consisting of foods rich in saturated and trans fats, can raise the human body’s “bad” cholesterol levels, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

 

How can vitamins improve the risk of cardiovascular disease?

 

The American Heart Association’s Dietary Guidelines can help with weight control as well as provide a high nutrient density to meet all nutritional needs.�As reviewed in the first AHA Science Advisory, epidemiological and population studies reported that some vitamins, such as vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin D and vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), may beneficially affect cardiovascular disease. Reducing the overall risk of cardiovascular disease�can be achieved by the long-term consumption of dietary patterns consistent with the AHA Dietary Guidelines. Vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin D and vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), each perform a specific function in the prevention and improvement of CVD. The following are described in detail, below.

 

Vitamin C

 

Vitamin C is a powerful water-soluble electron-donor. At physiologic levels, it is an antioxidant, although at supra-physiologic doses such as those achieved with intravenous vitamin C, it donates electrons to different enzymes in a pro-oxidative effect. At physiologic doses, vitamin C recycles vitamin E, improves ED and produces a diuresis. Intake of vitamin C and plasma ascorbate concentration in humans is related to heart rate, DBP and SBP.

 

A review of clinical trials suggest that vitamin C dosing in 250 mg twice daily will lower SBP 5-7 mmHg and diastolic BP 2-4 mmHg in more than 8 weeks. Vitamin C may give rise to a sodium water diuresis, enhance nitric oxide, improve endothelial function, increase nitric oxide and PGI2, decrease adrenal hormone production, improve sympathovagal balance, boost RBC Na/K ATPase, boost SOD, improve aortic elasticity and elasticity, enhance circulation conducive vaso-dilation, reduce pulse wave speed and augmentation index, raise cyclic GMP, trigger potassium channels, reduce cytosolic calcium and reduce serum aldehydes. Vitamin C prevents ED, decreasing the binding affinity of the AT 1 receptor for angiotensin II by disrupting the disulfide bridges, it enriches the antihypertensive effects of drugs and medications in the elderly with hypertension. In patients with hypertension already on maximum pharmacologic therapy, 600 mg of vitamin C lowered the BP in 20/16 mmHg. The lower the first ascorbate serum amount, the greater the blood pressure response. A serum level of 100 ?mol/L is recommended. The SBP and 24 ABM reveal the most important reductions with chronic oral administration of Vitamin C. Block et al within an elegant depletion-repletion study of vitamin C revealed an inverse correlation of plasma ascorbate levels, SBP and DBP. At a meta-analysis of thirteen clinical trials jointly with 284 patients, vitamin C in 500 mg/d in more than 6 weeks decreased SBP 3.9 mmHg and DBP 2.1 mmHg. Hypertensive individuals were found to have significantly lower plasma ascorbate levels in comparison with normotensive subjects (40 ?mol/L vs 57 ?mol/L respectively), and plasma ascorbate is inversely correlated with BP even in healthy, normotensive individuals.

 

Vitamin E

 

Most studies have not shown reductions in BP with most forms of tocopherols or tocotrienols.. Patients with T2DM and controlled hypertension (130/76 mmHg) on prescription drugs and medications with an average blood pressure of 136/76 mmHg were administered mixed tocopherols containing 60 percent gamma, 25 per cent delta and 15 percent alpha tocopherols. The BP really increased by 6.8/3.6 mmHg in the research patients (de < 0.0001) but was significantly less compared to this growth with alpha tocopherol of 7/5.3 mmHg (p< 0.0001). This might be a reflection of drug interactions with tocopherols via cytochrome P 450 (3A4 and 4F2) and reduction in the serum levels of the pharmacologic therapy treatments that were concurrently being granted to the patients. Gamma tocopherol could have natriuretic effects by inhibition of this potassium channel in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle and reduced BP. Insulin sensitivity improves and enhances adiponectin expression through gamma dependent procedures, which have the potential to serum glucose and lower BP. When vitamin E has an effect, it is most likely small and might be restricted to those with cardiovascular disease or untreated hypertensive patients or psychiatric problems, such as hyperlipidemia or diabetes.

 

Vitamin D

 

Vitamin D3 may have an independent and immediate role in the regulation of insulin metabolism and BP. Blood pressure, with its consequences, affects the RAA system, control of adrenal glands, immune system, calcium-phosphate metabolism and ED. The circulating PRA amounts are higher which increases angiotensin II if the vitamin D degree is below 30 ng/mL, increases BP and blunts plasma renal blood flow. The lower the degree of vitamin D, the greater the chance of hypertension, with the lowest quartile of serum Vitamin D with an incidence of hypertension in addition to the maximum quartile. Vitamin D3 markedly suppresses renin transcription. Its function in quantity, electrolytes and BP homeostasis indicates that Vitamin D3 is important in amelioration of hypertension. Vitamin D lowers ADMA, suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines for example TNF-?, raises nitric oxide, improves endothelial function and arterial elasticity, decreases vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy, modulates electrolytes and blood glucose, increases insulin sensitivity, reduces free fatty acid concentration, regulates the expression of the natriuretic peptide receptor additionally reduces HS-CRP.

 

The hypotensive effect of vitamin D has been inversely related to the pretreatment serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3and additive to antihypertensive drugs and medications. Pfeifer et al revealed that supplementation with vitamin D3 and calcium is more effective in reducing SBP. In a study, 148 women with low 25(OH)2D3 levels, the management of 1200 mg calcium and 800 IU of vitamin D3 decreased SBP 9.3 percent more (p< 0.02) in comparison to 1200 mg of calcium alone. The HR fell 5.4 percent (p = 0.02), but DBP wasn’t changed. The scope in BP reduction was 3.6/3.1 to 13.1/7.2 mmHg. The reduction in BP is about serum level of vitamin D3, the dose of vitamin D3 and the level of vitamin D3, but BP is reduced only in patients. Although vitamin D deficiency is associated with hypertension in observational studies, their meta-analysis and randomized clinical trials have yielded inconclusive results. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms may effect the risk of hypertension. A 25 hydroxyvitamin D level of 60 ng/mL is suggested.

 

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)

 

Low serum vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) levels are linked to hypertension in several individuals. One research study conducted by Aybak et al demonstrated that blood pressure was significantly reduced by high dose vitamin B6 at 5 mg/kg daily for 4 wk by 14/10 mmHg. Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) is a cofactor in neurotransmitter and hormone synthesis in the central nervous system(norepinephrine, epinephrine, serotonin, GABA and kynurenine), raises cysteine synthesis to neutralize aldehydes, improves the production of glutathione, blocks calcium channels, enhances insulin resistance, reduces central sympathetic tone and reduces end organ responsiveness to glucocorticoids and mineralo-corticoids. Vitamin B6 is decreased using pyrollactams and chronic therapy. Vitamin B6 has actions to diuretics alpha agonists and CCB’s. The proposed dose is 200 mg/d orally.

 

In conclusion, individuals with cardiovascular disease can benefit from the proper diet and nutrition. Essential vitamins found in the dietary patterns provided by the American Heart Association’s Dietary Guidelines can ultimately help reduce and prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease as well as help improve overall heart health. An improper nutrition consisting of foods rich in saturated and trans fats can increase the prevalence of cardiovascular disease. While diagnosis and drugs/medications can be prescribed to treat cardiovascular disease, a balanced nutrition can have similar effects.� The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

 

By Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topics: Wellness

 

Overall health and wellness are essential towards maintaining the proper mental and physical balance in the body. From eating a balanced nutrition as well as exercising and participating in physical activities, to sleeping a healthy amount of time on a regular basis, following the best health and wellness tips can ultimately help maintain overall well-being. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards helping people become healthy.

 

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TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: About Chiropractic

 

 

How Amino Acids Can Benefit Cardiovascular Disease | Wellness Clinic

How Amino Acids Can Benefit Cardiovascular Disease | Wellness Clinic

Among the numerous risk factors which can lead to cardiovascular disease and hypertension, dietary and nutritional imbalances are among some of the most prevalent causes behind heart health issues, according to various research studies. While vitamin and mineral deficiencies have been commonly linked to the development of CVD and hypertension, other related compound deficiencies may be just as important towards heart health.

 

What’s the significance between amino acids and cardiovascular disease?

 

Many research studies have found a fundamental correlation between the proper intake of amino acids and cardiovascular disease, as well as the increased risk of hypertension. As previously discussed, protein plays a crucial role in almost all biological processes and amino acids are the building blocks of it.�A large proportion of our cells are made up of amino acids, meaning they carry out many important bodily functions, such as giving cells their structure as well as transporting and storing nutrients. Amino acids have an influence on the function of organs, glands, tendons and arteries.

 

Amino Acids for Cardiovascular Disease

 

Researchers believe that almost every disease is the result of imbalances to our metabolism and amino acids are mainly responsible for achieving a balanced metabolism.�The objective is that there is a complete amino acid content, maintained in the correct combination. If the one or more amino acids are not available in sufficient quantities, the production of protein is weakened and the metabolism may only function in a limited way. The following are several of the amino acids necessary to sustain overall health and wellness, improving the risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension.

 

L-Arginine

 

L-arginine and endogenous methylarginines are the precursors for the production of NO, or nitric oxide, which has beneficial cardiovascular effects, mediated through conversion of L-arginine to nitric oxide, or NO from eNOS. Patients with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis have increased levels of HSCRP and inflammation, greater microalbumin, low levels of apelin (stimulates NO in the endothelium), elevated amounts of arginase (breaks down arginine) and increased serum levels of ADMA, which inactivates NO.

 

Under normal physiological conditions, intracellular arginine levels significantly exceed the Km of eNOS that is less than 5 ?mol. But, endogenous NO formation is dependent on extracellular arginine concentration. The intracellular concentrations of L-arginine are 0.1-3.8 mmol/L in endothelial cells while the plasma concentration of arginine is 80-120 ?mol/L that is about 20-25 times greater than the MMC. Despite this, mobile NO formation depends on exogenous L-arginine and this really is actually the paradox. Arginine can be a more powerful antioxidant and blocks the formation of endothelin, reduces renal sodium reabsorption and modulates BP. The NO production in endothelial cells is closely coupled to arginine uptake indicating that transport mechanics play a significant part in the regulation of function. Arginine can raise vascular and NO bioavailability and influence perfusion, function and BP. Molecular eNOS might occur in the absence of tetrahydrobiopterin which stabilizes eNOS, which leads to production of ROS.

 

Individual studies in hypertensive and normotensive subjects of L-arginine of parenteral and oral administrations demonstrate an antihypertensive effect as well as progress in coronary artery blood flow and peripheral blood circulation in PAD. The BP decreased by 6.2/6.8 mmHg on 10 g/d of L-arginine when provided as a nutritional supplement or even organic foods to a group of hypertensive subjects. Arginine produces a significant decrease in BP and improved impact in normotensive and hypertensive individuals that is comparable in magnitude to that plan. Arginine awarded in g/d also significantly reduced BP in women with gestational hypertension without proteinuria, decreased the demand for anti-hypertensive therapy, decreased maternal and neonatal complications and protracted the maternity. The combination of arginine (1200 mg/d) and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) (600 mg bid) administered over 6 mo to hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes, lowered SBP and DBP (p < 0.05), greater HDL-C, diminished LDL-C and oxLDL, decreased HSCRP, ICAM, VCAM, PAI-I, fibrinogen and IMT. An analysis of 54 hypertensive subjects given grams three times every day for four weeks had significant reductions in 24 h ABM. A meta-analysis of 11 trials with 383 subjects administered arginine 4-24 g/d discovered average reduction in BP of 5.39/2.66 mmHg (p < 0.001) in 4 wk. Although these doses of L-arginine seem to be secure, no long term studies in humans have been released at this time and there are worries of a pro-oxidative influence or even an increase in mortality in individuals who might have severely dysfunctional endothelium, advanced atherosclerosis, CHD, ACS or MI. In addition to the path, there is an pathway that is connected to nitrates out of berries, beetroot juice along with the DASH diet which are converted into nitrites by salivary symbiotic, GI and oral bacteria. Administration of extract or beetroot juice at 500 mg/d improve endothelial function and lower BP, increases nitrites, increase peripheral, coronary and cerebral blood flow.

 

L-Carnitine and Acetyl-L-Carnitine

 

L-carnitine is a nitrogenous muscle. Animal studies suggest that carnitine has both hereditary anti-hypertensive effects and anti-oxidant consequences in the heart by up-regulation of both eNOS and PPAR gamma, inhibition of RAAS, modulation of NF-?B and down regulation of NOX2, NOX4, TGF-? and CTGF that reduces vascular fibrosis. While BP and cognitive stress are reduced, endothelial NO function and oxidative defense are improved.

 

Studies on the effects of L-carnitine and acetyl-L-carnitine are limited. In patients with MS, acetyl-L-carnitine, improved dysglycemia and decreased SBP from 7-9 mmHg, but diastolic BP was significantly decreased only in people with sugar. Low amounts are correlated with a nondipping BP routine in Type 2 DM. Carnitine might be beneficial in the treatment of essential hypertension, type II DM with hyperlipidemia, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, CHF and cardiac ischemic syndromes and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant results. Doses of 2-3 grams per day are recommended.

 

Taurine

 

Taurine is a sulfonic acid that is regarded as a conditionally-essential amino acid, which is not used in protein synthesis, but is located free or in easy peptides with its concentration in the brain, retina and myocardium. In cardiomyocytes, it has a role of inotropic factor, an osmoregulator and agent and reflects approximately 50 percent of the amino acids.

 

Human studies have noted that essential hypertensive subjects have reduced urinary taurine as well as other sulfur amino acids. Taurine lowers BP, SVR and HR, reduces arrhythmias, CHF symptoms and SNS activity, raises urinary sodium and water excretion, raises atrial natriuretic factor, improves insulin resistance, raises NO and improves endothelial function. Taurine also decreases A-II, PRA, aldosterone, SNS activity, plasma norepinephrine, plasma and urinary epinephrine, lowers homocysteine, enhances insulin sensitivity, kinins and acetyl choline responsiveness, reduces intracellular sodium and calcium, reduces reaction to beta receptors and has antioxidant, anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory activities, reduces IMT and arterial stiffness and may shield from risk of CHD. There is A urinary taurine associated with greater risk of CVD and hypertension. A study of 31 males with hypertension showed a 26 percent increase in taurine levels and also a 287 percent growth in cysteine levels. The BP reduction of 14.8/6.6 mmHg was proportional to increases in serum taurine and discounts in plasma norepinephrine. Fujita et al revealed a reduction in BP of 9/4.1 mmHg (p< 0.05) in 19 hypertension issues given 6 grams of taurine for 2 days. Taurine has numerous beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system and BP. Taurine’s dose is 2 to 3 g/d at but doses around 6 g/d could be required to reduce BP.

 

In conclusion, amino acids, as well as proteins in this case, are ultimately essential towards improving cardiovascular disease and hypertension. As the essential building block of a majority of the human body’s biological processes, amino acids, as well as the proper consumption of protein, can help maintain a balanced metabolism in order to continue improving cardiovascular disease and hypertension. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

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By Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

Additional Topics: Wellness

 

Overall health and wellness are essential towards maintaining the proper mental and physical balance in the body. From eating a balanced nutrition as well as exercising and participating in physical activities, to sleeping a healthy amount of time on a regular basis, following the best health and wellness tips can ultimately help maintain overall well-being. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards helping people become healthy.

 

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How Protein Can Affect Heart Health | Wellness Clinic

How Protein Can Affect Heart Health | Wellness Clinic

Protein is an essential part of a balanced nutrition. The human�body utilizes protein to build and repair tissues. Protein is also used to make enzymes, hormones, and other fundamental body chemicals. Protein is an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood. However, for many individuals, the source of these proteins can often also be full of saturated fats, and too much of it can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

 

Can protein cause cardiovascular disease and hypertension?

 

Protein can be found in�chicken, pork, fish, beef, tofu, beans, lentils, yogurt, milk, cheese, seeds, nuts, and eggs. The issue with consuming some of these sources of protein that are rich in saturated fats as well is that such can increase the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), or in other words, the “bad” cholesterol. Increased levels of LDL cholesterol have been associated with cardiovascular disease and even hypertension. Research studies focusing on the connection between protein intake and CVD as well as hypertension have been conducted to reveal this correlation.

 

Protein & Cardiovascular Disease

 

Observational and epidemiologic studies have demonstrated a decrease in blood pressure, or BP, and a consistent association between a high protein consumption and incident BP. The protein source is an important element when it comes to the effect of blood pressure in the body; where animal protein has become less effective than non-animal or plant protein, especially that in almonds. At the Inter-Salt Study of over 10,000 subjects, individuals who have a dietary protein consumption of about 30 percent over the average had reduced BP by 3.0/2.5 mmHg compared to those that were 30 percent below the average. However, wild or lean animal protein with essential and less saturated fats and fatty acids may decrease CHD, lipids and BP risk.

 

A meta-analysis supported these findings and also indicated that hypertensive individuals and the elderly have the BP reduction with protein intake. Still another meta-analysis of 40 trials with 3277 patients found reductions in BP of 1.76/1.15 mmHg compared to carbohydrate consumption (p < 0.001). Both vegetable and animal protein significantly and equally reduced BP at 2.27/1.26 mmHg and 2.54/0.95 mmHg respectively. Dietary protein consumption is inversely related to risk for stroke. A randomized cross-over study in 352 adults with pre-hypertension and stageIhypertension found a significant decrease in SBP of 2.0 mmHg with soy protein and 2.3 mmHg with milk protein compared to a high glycemic index diet over each of the 8 wk treatment periods. A non-significant decrease has been in DBP. Another RDB parallel study over 4 weeks of 94 subjects with prehypertension and stageIhypertension found significant reductions on office BP of 4.9/2.7 mmHg in those given a combo of 25 percent protein intake vs the control group awarded 15 percent protein within an isocaloric manner. The protein consisted of pea , 20 percent soy, egg that is 30 percent and isolate. The daily recommended intake of nourishment from many sources is 1.0 to 1.5 g/kg body weight, varying with exercise level, age, renal function and other factors.

 

Fermented milk supplemented with whey protein concentrate reduces BP in. Administration of 20 g/d of hydrolyzed whey protein nutritional supplement rich in bioactive peptides significantly decreased BP more than 6 weeks from 8.0 � 3.2 mmHg in SBP and 5.5 � 2.1 millimeters in diastolic BP. Milk peptides, which equal caseins and whey proteins, are a rich source of ACEI peptides. Val-Pro-Pro and Ile-Pro-Pro awarded at 5 to 60 mg/d have varying reductions in BP using an average reduction in pooled studies of approximately 1.28-4.8/0.59-2.2 mmHg. Yet recent meta-analysis did not reveal significant reductions in BP in people. Powdered fermented milk using Lactobacillus helveticus given at 12 g/d significantly lowered BP from 11.2/6.5 mmHg in 4 weeks. A dose response study revealed reductions in BP. The response is attributed to fermented milk peptides which inhibit ACE.

 

Pins et al administered 20 g of whey protein that is hydrolyzed and noticed that a BP reduction of 11/7 mmHg compared to controls. Whey protein is successful in enhancing arterial stiffness, insulin resistance, glucose, lipids and BP. These data indicate that the protein must be hydrolyzed so as to exhibit an antihypertensive effect, and also the maximum BP reaction is dose dependent. Bovine peptides and whey peptides that are protein-derived exhibit ACEI activity. These components comprise B-caseins, B-lg B2-microglobulin, fractions and serum albumin. ACEI peptides are released by the hydrolysis of whey protein isolates. Marine collagen peptides (MCPs) from deep sea fish have anti-hypertensive activity. A double-blind placebo controlled trial in 100 hypertensive subjects with diabetes who received MCPs twice a day for 3 months had significant reductions in DBP and mean. Bonito protein (Sarda Orientalis), from the tuna and mackerel family has natural ACEI inhibitory peptides and reduces BP 10.2/7 mmHg in 1.5 g/d.

 

Sardine muscle protein, which contains Valyl-Tyrosine (VAL-TYR), significantly lowers BP in hypertensive subjects. Kawasaki et al treated 29 hypertensive subjects with 3 milligrams of VAL-TYR sardine muscle focused extract for four wk and reduced BP 9.7/5.3 mmHg (p < 0.05). Levels of aldosterone and A-Iincreased as serum A-II diminished suggesting that VAL-TYR is a ACEI. BP was considerably lowered in a study using a vegetable drink with protein hydrolysates in 13 weeks.

 

Soy protein reduces BP in patients in most studies. Soy protein consumption was inversely and significantly correlated with both DBP and SBP in 45694 Chinese girls or more of soy protein within 3 years and the association increased with age. The SBP decrease was 1.9 to 4.9 mm reduced and the DBP 0.9 to 2.2 mmHg lower. However, meta-analysis and trials have shown mixed results on BP to reductions of 7 percent to 10 percent for SBP and DBP with no change in BP. The current meta-analysis of 27 trials found a substantial reduction in BP of 2.21/1.44 mmHg. Some studies suggest improvement in ACEI activity, reduction in inflammation and HS-CRP, cognitive function arterial compliance, decrease in tone activity and reduction in both oxidative stress and levels. Fermented soy at roughly 25 g/d is suggested.

 

Besides ACEI consequences, protein consumption may also alter responses and induce a natriuretic. Low protein intake coupled with low omega 3 fatty acid intake can lead to hypertension in animal models. The perfect protein intake, based on degree of activity, renal function, stress and other factors, is about 1.0 to 1.5 g/kg daily.

 

In conclusion, protein is an important part of a balanced diet, however, leaner alternatives containing less amounts of saturated fats are ideal to prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension, promoting overall health and wellness. Many individuals consume higher amounts of proteins than necessary. A healthcare professional specializing in diet and nutrition can help you come up with the best nutritional plan for your and your specific health concerns. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Green-Call-Now-Button-24H-150x150-2-3.png

By Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

Additional Topics: Wellness

 

Overall health and wellness are essential towards maintaining the proper mental and physical balance in the body. From eating a balanced nutrition as well as exercising and participating in physical activities, to sleeping a healthy amount of time on a regular basis, following the best health and wellness tips can ultimately help maintain overall well-being. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards helping people become healthy.

 

blog picture of cartoon paperboy big news

 

TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: About Chiropractic