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Alzheimer’s

Back Clinic and Spine Specialist. Alzheimer’s disease has exploded into a global health crisis. According to the National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer’s disease “is by far the most threatening epidemic that we have in our nation.”The National Institute on Aging estimates that as many as 5 million Americans over 65 have some form of the disease.

The Alzheimer’s Association states that as many as one in three older people will die from Alzheimer’s disease or dementia in the United States. Chiropractic adjustments are designed to release pressure on the spine for proper signaling to the brain. Unfortunately, in older people, glucose does not properly make its way to the brain and sets off a chain of events that can lead to changes to the brain structure that indicate this disease.

Chiropractic treatment and adjustments for older patients, specifically around the cervical area, allows for optimal circulation, glucose, and nerve energy to easily reach the brain. This prevents the formation of Amyloid-beta proteins and the development of the disease.


Functional Medicine for Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

Functional Medicine for Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

Approximately 5 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), one of the most common types of dementia, worldwide. A variety of factors can increase the risk of developing other types of dementia and AD, including poor diet and lifestyle habits. Research studies have also shown that treating the body as a whole may help prevent and, in several cases, even reverse cognitive decline. The goal is to start treatment immediately. In the following article, we will ultimately discuss how a functional medicine approach can help improve AD and other types of dementia.

 

Dementia and Alzheimer�s Disease Overview

 

Our brain is a complex organ made-up of about 100 billion neurons that are constantly communicating with each other. Also known as brain cells or nerve cells, neurons play a fundamental role in our cognitive function, including memory, thinking, and learning. Neurons are constantly repairing themselves, especially during sleep, but when brain cells or nerve cells can’t repair themselves, due to a variety of factors, it can ultimately affect cognition. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with a build-up of compounds, such as active microglial cells, tau proteins, and beta-amyloid plaques, among several others.

 

Because the body can’t break down these compounds, they can start to block the synapses where brain cells or nerve cells communicate with each other. This is believed to be one of the most common causes of AD and other types of dementia. Dr. Dale Bredesen, a renowned expert and neurologist, developed a breakthrough, alternative treatment option for dementia and AD that focuses on reducing glial cells, protein, and plaque build-up in the brain. According to Dr. Bredesen’s research studies, a build-up of these compounds can occur due to toxins, infections, inflammatory biomarkers, and genetics.

 

Bredesen RECODE Protocol� for Dementia and AD

 

A variety of factors can increase the risk of developing other types of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease because these can affect the neuron’s ability to repair themselves, ultimately causing brain cell or nerve cell death. As previously mentioned above, they may also cause an excessive build-up of compounds, including microglial cells, tau protein, and beta-amyloid plaque in the brain. Cognitive decline plays a critical role in changing the way the brain creates synapses and preserves memory. Fortunately, a functional medicine approach can help improve Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia.

 

Dr. Bredesen’s RECODE Protocol� is an alternative treatment option that can help prevent and, in several cases, even reverse cognitive decline in people with other types of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. According to the research studies, Dr. Bredesen’s RECODE Protocol� returned many participants to pre-diagnosis levels of cognition. In other participants, the volume of the hippocampus, the main region of the brain which shrinks in AD and dementia, returned to normal on MRI. By following diet and lifestyle modifications with the RECODE Protocol�, the research study participants recovered their quality of life.

 

Dr. Bredesen�s RECODE Protocol � is an organized, multifactorial approach which shows that prevention and reversal of cognitive decline are possible by:

 

  • Addressing several underlying sources simultaneously
  • Optimizing essential lifestyle factors like diet, exercise, and sleep
  • Designing treatment based on each patient’s personal needs

 

Dr. Bredesen�s RECODE Protocol � follows a functional medicine treatment approach for AD and other types of dementia. Healthcare practitioners trained through the Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM) are seeing positive results in people with dementia and Alzheimer�s disease. IFM healthcare practitioners use functional medicine treatment approaches to identify and address the underlying source of a variety of health issues. IFM healthcare practitioners may be properly suited to apply, and even expand, Dr. Bredesen�s RECODE Protocol � for AD and other types of dementia, among other health issues.

 

Furthermore, several diet and lifestyle modifications may ultimately help prevent and, in several cases, even reverse dementia and AD, including:

 

  • Eating a whole-food low glycemic diet, made-up of predominately plant-based foods with 10-15 servings of non-starchy vegetables per day. Moreover, eat lean proteins, such as legumes and cold-water, low-mercury fish. Eat healthy fats, such as nuts, seeds, and olive oil.
  • Getting plenty of sleep. When you sleep at night, your body can also heal damaged cells and ultimately boost your immune system.
  • Getting plenty of exercise and physical activity boosts your metabolism, improves mood, promotes better sleep and much more.
  • Limiting exposure to toxins. Toxins, such as heavy metals, chemicals, mycotoxins, and even some medications, can cause cognitive decline.
  • Avoiding stress. Chronic stress can cause hormonal and neurotransmitter changes in the body, causing brain degeneration and atrophy.
  • Avoiding alcohol. Alcohol is a toxin that affects the liver�s ability to metabolize toxins and it is also commonly associated with brain atrophy.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Insights Image

Approximately 5 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), one of the most common types of dementia, worldwide. A variety of factors can increase the risk of developing other types of dementia and AD, including poor diet and lifestyle habits. Research studies have also shown that treating the body as a whole may help prevent and, in several cases, even reverse cognitive decline. The goal is to start treatment immediately. In the following article, we will ultimately discuss how a functional medicine approach can help improve AD and other types of dementia.Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 

Approximately 5 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or one of the most common types of dementia. According to researchers, a variety of factors can ultimately increase the risk of developing AD and other types of dementia, including poor diet and lifestyle habits. Research studies demonstrated that treating the body as a whole may prevent and, in several cases, even reverse cognitive decline. The goal is to start treatment early. In the article above, we discussed how a functional medicine approach can help with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

References:

  1. Parke, Emily. �The Functional Medicine Approach to Cognitive Decline.� Dr. Emily Parke – Arizona Wellness Medicine, LLC, 6 Dec. 2018, www.dremilyparke.com/2018/12/06/functional-medicine-cognitive-decline/.
  2. Litwin, Ken A., et al. �The Bredesen Protocol� & Functional Medicine � A Powerful Combination to Prevent & Treat Cognitive Decline.� Kara Fitzgerald ND Naturopathic Doctor, 29 Mar. 2019, www.drkarafitzgerald.com/2018/06/20/the-bredesen-protocol-functional-medicine-a-powerful-combination-to-prevent-treat-cognitive-decline/.
  3. Carpathia Collaborative Staff. �Preventing and Reversing Cognitive Decline.� Carpathia Collaborative, 29 July 2019, carpathiacollaborative.com/blogposts/cognitivedecline.

 

Additional Topic Discussion: Chronic Pain

Sudden pain is a natural response of the nervous system which helps to demonstrate possible injury. By way of instance, pain signals travel from an injured region through the nerves and spinal cord to the brain. Pain is generally less severe as the injury heals, however, chronic pain is different than the average type of pain. With chronic pain, the human body will continue sending pain signals to the brain, regardless if the injury has healed. Chronic pain can last for several weeks to even several years. Chronic pain can tremendously affect a patient’s mobility and it can reduce flexibility, strength, and endurance.

 

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention.

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with a variety of food sensitivities and intolerances. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs.

 

Gut Zoomer for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Gut Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate gut health associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The Vibrant Gut ZoomerTM offers a report that includes dietary recommendations and other natural supplementation like prebiotics, probiotics, and polyphenols. The gut microbiome is mainly found in the large intestine and it has more than 1000 species of bacteria that play a fundamental role in the human body, from shaping the immune system and affecting the metabolism of nutrients to strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier (gut-barrier). It is essential to understand how the number of bacteria that symbiotically live in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract influences gut health because imbalances in the gut microbiome may ultimately lead to gastrointestinal (GI) tract symptoms, skin conditions, autoimmune disorders, immune system imbalances, and multiple inflammatory disorders.

 


Dunwoody Labs: Comprehensive Stool with Parasitology | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


GI-MAP: GI Microbial Assay Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

 

Proudly,�Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

 

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

 

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

 

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

 


 

 


 

Modern Integrated Medicine

The National University of Health Sciences is an institution that offers a variety of rewarding professions to attendees. Students can practice their passion for helping other people achieve overall health and wellness through the institution’s mission. The National University of Health Sciences prepares students to become leaders in the forefront of modern integrated medicine, including chiropractic care. Students have an opportunity to gain unparalleled experience at the National University of Health Sciences to help restore the natural integrity of the patient and define the future of modern integrated medicine.

 

 

Functional Endocrinology: Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults

Functional Endocrinology: Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults

Do you feel that you must have sweets after meals? Do you get light-headed if you miss a meal? Or feel that craving for sweets during the day? Does your body feels shaky jittery or have tremors? If you are experiencing any of these situations, you may be experiencing LADA.

LADA

Autoimmune diabetes is a heterogeneous disease that can arise at any age. Anyone with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes who does not necessitate insulin therapy for at least six months after being diagnosed may have LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood). LADA is a slowly progressing form of autoimmune diabetes, and it has been estimated that 20% of people are diagnosed with having non-obesity-related type 2 diabetes.

LADA occurs when the pancreas stops producing adequate insulin and slowly damages the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, harming the body�s function. It is clear, however, that the frequency of autoimmune diabetes among adults can be underestimated, and clinical features such as age and severity of symptoms are of no help in identifying patients that have LADA since there is still more research being done to treat LADA. The body mass index and C peptide levels in the general population can increase with age, and these parameters are of limited use in identifying LADA patients.

Different Types of Diabetes

In a person, diabetes is a condition that impairs the body’s ability to process blood glucose, and roughly the estimated number of people over 18 years of age that are diagnosed and undiagnosed with diabetes is about 30.2 million. Without ongoing, careful management, diabetes can lead to a build-up of sugars in the blood, which can increase the risk of dangerous complications, including stroke and heart disease.

There are different kinds of diabetes, including LADA, that can occur, and managing the condition depends on the type of diabetes an individual has.

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is also known as juvenile diabetes, and the body does not produce enough insulin, and the blood glucose level remains high in the body. People with type 1 diabetes are insulin-dependent and must take artificial insulin daily to stay alive. The immune system attacks a cluster of cells known as islets in the pancreas that would typically produce insulin and stopping or slowing down the insulin production in the body.

Pathophysiology-of-type-1-diabetes

When a person receives a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes from healthcare professionals, the islet cells are responsible for insulin secretion from the pancreas may continue to produce the insulin hormone for a while before ceasing. It can also lead to the production of LADA if it is not being monitored.

The physical effects of type 1 diabetes include:

  • Increased hunger and thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Blurry vision
  • Tiredness and fatigue
  • Weight loss without an apparent trigger or causes.

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common forms of diabetes and can appear at any age, affecting over 30 million Americans. It happens when the blood sugar levels rise due to problems with the use or production of insulin.

ThinkstockPhotos-77742505

Studies show that most people do not experience the symptoms in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, and they might have symptoms for many years. For those that do have type 2, diabetes may have acanthosis nigricans. Acanthosis nigricans is a skin condition that causes the skin to become thicker and darker. It often appears mostly on the neck, elbows, knees, knuckles, the folds around the neck and the groin.

Other early symptoms of type 2 diabetes that an individual may have included:

  • Frequent bladder, kidneys, or skin infections
  • Cuts that take longer to heal
  • Fatigue
  • Extreme hunger
  • Increased thirst
  • Urinary frequency
  • Blurred vision

Mixed Diabetes (Type 1.5)

Mixed diabetes or LADA is an autoimmune condition that shares the characteristics of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in adults. It is diagnosed during adulthood and sets in the bloodstream gradually; however, unlike type 2, LADA is an autoimmune disease and is not reversible if the person changes their diet and lifestyle. �It can be triggered by the damage done to the pancreas from the antibodies against the insulin-producing cells.

Type-2-diabetes-symptoms-There-are-two-main-types-type-1-and-type-2-800690

If a person has LADA, their beta cells stop functioning much more quickly than type 2 diabetes. Researchers have found out that an estimated 10 percent of people who have diabetes will have LADA. It stated that the treatment for LADA patients is far less elucidated than the cases for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Finding a treatment strategy for LADA can reduce the decline of beta-cell function, ensures adequate metabolic treatment so far.

Some of the symptoms that LADA patients may have include:

  • Frequent thirst
  • Increased urination, including at night
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Blurred vision
  • Tingling nerves

If LADA is left untreated, it can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, which is a condition where the body can not utilize sugar as fuel due to the absence of insulin and starts burning fat. It produces ketones, which are toxic to the body.

Type 3 Diabetes

Type 3 diabetes is known as brain diabetes and has an established linked to Alzheimer’s disease. This type of diabetes is triggered by a type of insulin resistance and an insulin-like growth factor dysfunction that occurs specifically in the brain, causing dementia.

images.jpeg

Alzheimer�s disease has characteristics histopathological, molecular, and biochemical abnormalities in the brain’s cell structure. Since it has been linked with type 3 diabetes, characteristic features of type 3 diabetes include impairments in insulin actions and signaling that result in chronic hyperglycemia, irrespective of subtype, etiology, pathogenesis, or insulin availability.

Conclusion

Autoimmune diabetes can affect anyone at any age. It can damage the pancreas walls to stop producing insulin to the body, causing problems for an individual. LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) is an autoimmune disease that has the characteristics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes that are in adults. There is still more research being done to treat LADA, and there are products that can help support sugar metabolism and maintain blood sugar levels to a healthy range.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott�s declaration on our website to get full details on this historic moment.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Barhum, Lana. �Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Early Signs, and Complications.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 16 Apr. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317462.php.

Castro, M. Regina. �Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA): What Is It?� Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 10 May 2019, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-1-diabetes/expert-answers/lada-diabetes/faq-20057880.

de la Monte, Suzanne M, and Jack R Wands. �Alzheimer’s Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes-Evidence Reviewed.� Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Diabetes Technology Society, Nov. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769828/.

Felman, Adam. �Type 1 Diabetes: Overview, Symptoms, and Treatment.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 19 Nov. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323729.php.

Hals, Ingrid K. �Treatment of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults: What Is Best?� Current Diabetes Reviews, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30009709.

Leonard, Jayne. �Acanthosis Nigricans: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, and Pictures.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 21 Dec. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324062.php.

MSN, Rachel Nall RN. �Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatment, and Early Diagnosis.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 8 Nov. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323627.php.

Pozzilli, Paolo, and Silvia Pieralice. �Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults: Current Status and New Horizons.� Endocrinology and Metabolism (Seoul, Korea), Korean Endocrine Society, June 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6021307/.

Prelipcean, Maria S. �What You Need to Know About Type 1.5 Diabetes.� Healthline, 2 Nov. 2018, www.healthline.com/health/type-1-5-diabetes.

Watson, Kathryn. �Type 3 Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease: What You Need to Know.� Healthline, 16 Oct. 2019, www.healthline.com/health/type-3-diabetes.

Wint, Carmella, and Marijane Leonard. �What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacid.� Healthline, 4 Dec. 2018, www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/ketoacidosis.

Alzheimer’s Disease Annual Death Toll Nearly Doubles

Alzheimer’s Disease Annual Death Toll Nearly Doubles

Alzheimer’s disease claims nearly twice as many American lives annually as it did just 15 years ago, a new report shows.

“And that’s frankly alarming,” said Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs and outreach at the Alzheimer’s Association, which produced the report. “Now, a lot of people will think it’s because we’re living longer,” he added. “And there is some truth to that. But there’s also an assumption that we should just expect to get Alzheimer’s disease as we get older. And that’s not true.

“Most people do not get Alzheimer’s, even if they live into their 80s or 90s. It’s not normal. It’s not something that we should accept. We’ve definitely got to do something about it,” Fargo said.

The Cost of Alzheimer’s Disease

The report also found that more than 5 million American seniors aged 65 and older now live with the memory-robbing disease. That represents approximately 10 percent of all the nation’s seniors, and that number is projected to jump to nearly 14 million by 2050. In fact, nearly half a million seniors are expected to develop the disease in 2017 alone.

Another 200,000 Americans under the age of 65 also struggle with the disease, the report found. And those statistics come with a hefty price tag: It costs $259 billion a year for Alzheimer’s care. That amount is expected to reach $$1.1 trillion by 2050, the report estimated.

Dr. Anton Porsteinsson is director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Care, Research and Education Program at the University of Rochester School of Medicine in Rochester, N.Y. He said the rising numbers likely reflect a number of different factors in play.

“Partly, it is due to increasing numbers of older individuals, partly due to success in treating other leading causes of death, and partly due to increasing awareness that AD [Alzheimer’s] is a lethal disease,” Porsteinsson said.

Among the report’s additional findings: Alzheimer’s is now the fifth leading cause of death among seniors; the sixth leading cause of fatalities among all Americans; and the only disease among the nation’s top 10 biggest killers for which there is no prevention, no way to slow progression and no cure.

“And the costs are now completely out of control,” added Fargo, with the total annual cost for Alzheimer’s and dementia care in excess of a quarter trillion dollars.

Another highlighted concern: the “especially burdensome” ordeal Alzheimer’s caregivers experience while attending to the needs of loved ones as the patient suffers across-the-board mental and physical decline.

In 2016, more than 15 million Alzheimer’s caregivers provided just over 18 billion hours of unpaid care, valued at $230 billion.

Alzheimer’s Disease: Mental and Physical Decline

And those caregivers suffer their own health consequences: More than a third (35 percent) report their health has worsened since assuming caregiver duties, compared with 19 percent of caregivers for older people without dementia. Depression and anxiety also plague dementia caregivers more often, the report found. Still, the report was not entirely bleak, spotlighting growing efforts to identify telltale signs of developing disease.

The goal is to hone in on neurological signs — including changes in brain size, shifts in spinal fluid content, and/or the growth of nerve plaques in the brain — that could allow rapid detection of pre-symptomatic Alzheimer’s.

“It’s a window into the future,” Fargo said. “If you ask where Alzheimer’s disease research is headed, that’s where it’s headed.” “We believe that in the coming years we’ll have tests that you can do in the doctor’s office that will let you know your risk for Alzheimer’s,” he noted. And that, he suggested, “could open the door for prevention.”

Fargo noted that, even in the absence of effective treatments or a cure, early diagnosis would be a boon for research and would give patients a head start on planning for their future. Yet, Porsteinsson suggested that the future of these telltale signs, known as biomarkers, remains unclear.

“Biomarkers are particularly important when it comes to research and development of future potential treatments,” he said.

On the other hand, he stressed that “the utility of biomarkers in current care is intensely debated.

“The biomarkers are expensive,” Porsteinsson noted. “And it is a question how much a positive or negative finding will change approach to care. “Having said that,” he added, “it often matters greatly to patients and their families to know exactly what they have and what to expect.”

SOURCES: Keith Fargo, Ph.D., director, scientific programs and outreach, Alzheimer’s Association, New York City; Anton Porsteinsson, M.D., professor, psychiatry, and director, Alzheimer’s Disease Care, Research and Education Program, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, N.Y.; March 7, 2017, 2017 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss options on the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900

Additional Topics: Understanding Mild Brain Injury

Brain injuries are common complications in our modern world. Approximately 2 million individuals experience a head injury in the United States alone each year. Although most brain or head injuries are not considered life threatening, they could sum up to billions of dollars in annual revenue. Brain injuries are often categorized according to patient response. Only 1 out of 4 reported brain injuries are considered moderate or severe.

 

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Tests Should Be Required Before Using Alzheimer’s Drugs

Tests Should Be Required Before Using Alzheimer’s Drugs

A drug used to treat Alzheimer’s disease should not be prescribed to people with milder mental impairment without first giving them a genetic test, researchers urge during a new study.

The drug is donepezil (brand name: Aricept). Donepezil could speed mental decline in someone with mild cognitive impairment who has a specific genetic variation, according to Sophie Sokolow, an associate professor at the UCLA School of Nursing.

She and her colleagues found that patients with the K-variant of the butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) gene who took donepezil deteriorated faster than those who took a placebo.

Donepezil is approved in the United States to treat Alzheimer’s disease but not mild cognitive impairment — the stage between normal age-related decline and dementia. However, doctors often prescribe it “off-label” for patients with mild cognitive impairment, the study authors said.

For this study, the researchers examined data from a U.S. government-funded study published in 2005 that assessed donepezil as a possible treatment for mild cognitive impairment.

The findings reinforce the importance of physicians discussing the possible benefits and risks of donepezil with their patients, the researchers said in a university news release.

The study was published recently in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Funding was provide by the U.S. National Institute on Aging.

SOURCE: UCLA School of Nursing, news release, Feb. 24, 2017

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss options on the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900

Additional Topics: Understanding Mild Brain Injury

Brain injuries are common complications in our modern world. Approximately 2 million individuals experience a head injury in the United States alone each year. Although most brain or head injuries are not considered life threatening, they could sum up to billions of dollars in annual revenue. Brain injuries are often categorized according to patient response. Only 1 out of 4 reported brain injuries are considered moderate or severe.

 

blog picture of cartoon paperboy big news

 

TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: New PUSH 24/7�? Fitness Center

 

 

Alzheimer’s Patient Drugs Can Increase Risk of Pneumonia

Alzheimer’s Patient Drugs Can Increase Risk of Pneumonia

Alzheimer’s patients given sedatives such as Valium or Xanax may have an increased risk for pneumonia, a new study warns.

People with Alzheimer’s disease are often given these drugs, called benzodiazepines, over the long term, the researchers said. Examples of benzodiazepines include alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), and lorazepam (Ativan).

“An increased risk of pneumonia is an important finding to consider in treatment of patients with Alzheimer disease. Pneumonia often leads to admission to hospital, and patients with dementia are at increased risk of death related to pneumonia,” Dr. Heidi Taipale, of Kuopio Research Center of Geriatric Care at the University of Eastern Finland, and co-authors wrote.

For the study, the researchers reviewed data from nearly 50,000 Alzheimer’s patients in Finland. The patients’ average age was 80 and about two-thirds were women. The study found that people with Alzheimer’s who took benzodiazepines were 30 percent more likely to develop pneumonia than those who weren’t given the sedatives.

Increased Risk of Pneumonia in Patients Taking Drugs

The risk of pneumonia was highest in the first 30 days after starting the drugs, the findings showed. The researchers said their findings are consistent with previous studies. Because benzodiazepines are sedating, it’s possible that people taking them may breathe saliva or food into the lungs, increasing the risk of pneumonia, the study authors suggested.

Taipale’s team said the benefits and risks of these drugs — including pneumonia — need to be carefully considered before giving them to someone with Alzheimer’s disease. The study was published April 10 in the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

The study is “a good reminder to clinicians to ‘first do no harm’ when prescribing these drugs for frail older women and men with dementia,” Dr. Paula Rochon and her co-authors wrote in an accompanying editorial in the journal. Rochon is from Women’s College Hospital and the University of Toronto.

Non-drug “approaches should be the starting point when managing neuropsychiatric symptoms in this patient population, which should help to limit inappropriate use of these drugs,” the editorial authors said.

SOURCE: CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), news release, April 10, 2017

News stories are written and provided by HealthDay and do not reflect federal policy, the views of MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss options on the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900

Additional Topics: Understanding Mild Brain Injury

Brain injuries are common complications in our modern world. Approximately 2 million individuals experience a head injury in the United States alone each year. Although most brain or head injuries are not considered life threatening, they could sum up to billions of dollars in annual revenue. Brain injuries are often categorized according to patient response. Only 1 out of 4 reported brain injuries are considered moderate or severe.

 

blog picture of cartoon paperboy big news

 

TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: New PUSH 24/7�? Fitness Center

 

 

A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect Your Brain Later

A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect Your Brain Later

(HealthDay News) — Healthy aging of the brain relies on the health of your heart and blood vessels when you’re younger, a new study reports.

People with risk factors for heart disease and stroke in middle age are more likely to have elevated levels of amyloid, a sticky protein known to clump together and form plaques in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease, the researchers said.

Amyloid In The Brain

MRI scans revealed larger deposits of amyloid in the brains of seniors who smoked, had high blood pressure, were obese, diabetic or had elevated cholesterol levels when they were middle-aged, said lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Gottesman. She’s an assistant professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

All of these risk factors can affect the health of a person’s blood vessels, otherwise known as vascular health, leading to hardening of the arteries and other disorders.

“Amyloid is what we think, by leading hypotheses, accumulates to cause Alzheimer’s disease. So this suggests that vascular risk in middle age may play a direct role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease,” Gottesman said.

Two or more risk factors nearly tripled a person’s risk of large amyloid deposits. One risk factor alone increased the likelihood of amyloid deposits by 88 percent, the study found.

Obesity

Obesity in particular stood out as a strong risk factor, on its own doubling a person’s risk of elevated amyloid later in life, said Steven Austad, chair of biology of aging and the evolution of life histories at the University of Alabama, Birmingham.

“In terms of one risk factor by itself, that turned out to be the most important one, which is interesting,” Austad said. “Twenty years ago obesity was not the problem that it is now, suggesting that 20 years from now things might be considerably worse.”

Gottesman and her colleagues examined data from nearly 350 people whose heart health has been tracked since 1987 as part of an ongoing study. The average age of the study participants was 52 at the start of the study. Sixty percent were women, and 43 percent were black. The average follow-up time was almost 24 years.

When the participants entered the study, none of them had dementia. About two decades later, they were asked to come back and undergo brain scans to check for signs of amyloid.

The researchers discovered a link between heart risk factors and brain amyloid. The relationship did not vary based either on race or known genetic risk factors for Alzheimer’s.

Poor Blood Vessel Upkeep

Heart risk factors that cropped up late in life were not associated with brain amyloid deposits. What a person does in their middle age is what apparently contributes to their later risk of elevated amyloid, not what happens later, Gottesman said.

The study did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship, but there are several theories why the health of a person’s blood vessels might be linked to Alzheimer’s.

Blood and spinal fluid contain amyloid, and some think that unhealthy blood vessels might allow amyloid to leak out of the bloodstream and into brain tissue, said Austad, a spokesman for the American Federation for Aging Research.

“The idea that the first injury to the brain is really an injury to the blood vessels of the brain has been around for a while, and this would support that, generally,” Austad said. “The amyloid plaques, you’re not seeing them inside the vessels. You’re seeing them outside the vessels, in the brain.”

Blood vessels also play a role in flushing out broken-down amyloid particles that naturally occur in a person’s brain, said Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs and outreach for the Alzheimer’s Association.

“You can imagine if there’s something wrong with your brain’s circulation, it could affect the clearance of this amyloid in some way,” Fargo said.

Hardened arteries also can lead to strokes or mini-strokes that affect the ability to think and remember in some people as they age, which contributes to dementia and Alzheimer’s, Gottesman said.

Based on these findings, people who want to protect their brain health should protect their heart health, and the sooner the better, Fargo said.

“You don’t want to wait until your 60s to start taking care of yourself. It has to be a lifetime commitment,” Fargo said.

The findings were published April 11 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

SOURCES: Rebecca Gottesman, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore; Steven Austad, Ph.D., chair of biology of aging and the evolution of life histories, University of Alabama, Birmingham, and scientific director, American Federation for Aging Research; Keith Fargo, Ph.D., director of scientific programs and outreach, Alzheimer’s Association; April 11, 2017, Journal of the American Medical Association

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