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Spinal Decompression Surgery: Laminotomy and Laminectomy

Spinal Decompression Surgery: Laminotomy and Laminectomy

Spinal decompression surgery could be a treatment option discussion with a doctor to relieve nerve pain brought on by a spinal condition or disorder. Everything to know about the procedures straight from the experts.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Spinal Decompression Surgery: Laminotomy and Laminectomy
 

Spinal Decompression Surgery Types: Laminectomy or Laminotomy

Both procedures involve the vertebrae�s lamina, which is an arch of bone that protects the spinal canal.
  • In a laminectomy, the lamina is removed almost entirely.
  • In a laminotomy, it is a partial removal.
Despite the removal, the large muscles of the back provide sustained protection for the nerves below. Therefore, the spinal nerves are still safe and secure following the procedures. Which one is right depends on the situation.  
 
  • A laminectomy is usually performed to treat an arthritic condition of the spinal canal like spinal stenosis.
  • Laminotomy is used almost exclusively to remove a herniated disc.
  • A laminectomy removes more bone and sometimes the inner edge of the facet joint.
  • Ultimately, a surgeon will determine which of the two procedures is best for the individual’s needs and condition.

Decompression Surgery

Spinal stenosis or the narrowing of the spinal canal is usually caused by arthritis and overgrowth of the discs and joints. Similar compression issues respond well to non-surgical treatment. But sometimes surgery is necessary to treat uncommon but potentially severe cases. These include patients with:
  • Bowel or bladder problems caused by the pressure on the spinal nerves
  • Leg weakness that gets worse
  • Inability to walk or move for long periods and distance
The objective of spinal decompression surgery is to create space around the spinal cord and surrounding nerves by removing the compressing structure/s. When the cord and/or nerve/s are compressed, physical and neurological symptoms are experienced down the nerve�s pathway. This includes:
  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Electric shock sensations
  • Radiating/spreading pain
  • Weakness
Once the compressed nerves have space to relax and move around symptoms subside.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Spinal Decompression Surgery: Laminotomy and Laminectomy
 

Laminectomy process

  • Lumbar laminectomy is the most common procedure to treat spinal stenosis in the low back.
  • It also helps treat herniated discs by allowing the surgeon to easily access the discs to repair any damage.
  • The surgeon removes the lamina and ligaments that have thickened and are causing problems to create more space in the canal.
  • The surgery enlarges the spinal canal so that pressure is relieved.
  • By removing the source of the pressure, the pain caused by the compressed nerves is alleviated.
  • An open laminectomy creates an incision of a couple of inches and exposes the spine.
  • The muscles of the spine and back are cut through to expose the bone.
  • Another technique that surgeons utilize is operating through a tube.
  • They’ve adapted these techniques to be able to decompress both the right and the left sides although they are only operating on one side.
  • Both procedures, minimal and traditional accomplish the same goals.
  • The difference is the minimally invasive approach involves one or more tiny incisions also known as skin punctures and small instruments designed to separate muscles and soft tissues instead of cutting through them.
  • The traditional approach requires a larger incision and instruments that retract, separate and cut tissues.
 

Laminectomy surgery

  • Laminectomies are performed under general anesthesia using a posterior approach/lying face down during the procedure.
  • It can be open or minimally invasive sometimes called a microlaminectomy.
  • In an open laminectomy, the surgeon makes an incision near the affected spinal area.
  • Once the incision is made, a retractor will move the skin, fat, and muscles to the side so the surgeon can access the spine.
  • Next, they remove or trim the lamina and thickened ligaments to enlarge the space surrounding the compressed nerves.
  • Once done, the retractor is removed and the incision is closed with sutures.
  • Minimally invasive surgery or MIS is performed using special instruments like endoscopes and tubular retractors.
  • These instruments allow for smaller incisions and less cutting.
  • They will also use special eyewear to have a detailed view of the surgical field.
  • Sometimes, the surgeon uses an endoscope or a microscope focused down the tube to perform the surgery.
  • The portion of the lamina is removed, along with any bone overgrowths/osteophytes and ligament tissue.
  • The tubular retractors are taken out so the soft tissue moves back into place, and the incision is closed with dissolving sutures.

Other spinal procedures performed alongside

Laminectomies and laminotomies are typically not performed together. However, a surgeon could perform both if the surgery affects multiple levels of the spine. They can also be combined with other spinal surgeries, that include:

Foraminotomy

  • A foraminotomy is also a decompression procedure. But instead of removing part or all the lamina, the surgeon accesses the nerves through the spine�s foramen or the passageway that nerves pass through on both sides.

Discectomy

  • This decompression surgery involves the removal of all or part of the damaged intervertebral disc and is utilized for herniated discs.

Spinal fusion

  • Fusion is often performed after spinal decompression surgery, as the space that was created by removing spinal structure/s can cause instability to the spine.

Candidates for spinal decompression surgery

Both are common procedures performed by neurosurgeons and orthopedic spine surgeons. Laminectomies are considered one of the most effective treatments for spinal stenosis and spinal canal issues like:
  • Tumors
  • Certain types of infections and abscesses
  • Spinal issues involving bowel/bladder dysfunction
  • The primary reason for laminectomy is spinal stenosis, most common in individuals over the age of 60.
Other considerations and conditions include:
  • Non-invasive treatments that don’t improve the condition that includes medication, massage, and physical therapy
  • Fusion surgery failure
  • Injection treatment failure
  • The presence of tumors in or around the spine
  • An infection like an epidural abscess
  • Neurologic issues
  • Bowel or bladder dysfunction
  • Cauda equina syndrome
Ask questions about the procedure to ensure you are comfortable with the operation. Here are some questions:
  • What are the risks associated?
  • Will the surgery relieve all symptoms?
  • Not having the surgery risks?
  • What is recovery like?
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Spinal Decompression Surgery: Laminotomy and Laminectomy
 

Recovery

  • Open or micro, recovery does take time. Following the doctor�s instructions carefully are essential to make a full, healthy recovery.
  • Individuals should be careful for about a month following the surgery. But does not mean laying down or being sedentary. Movement is crucial to recovery.
  • The patient should not stay in bed or lie on the sofa.
  • Wait a week or two before beginning physical therapy if necessary.
  • Most will have a weak core, poor posture, and poor body mechanics, the goal is to help develop and strengthen these areas.
Things to help with recovery include:
  • Ice/cold packs will help reduce swelling and pain.
  • Try not to sit for too long, as sitting is the least comfortable position after back surgery.
  • Body mechanic awareness means avoiding too much bending or lifting and using the right body mechanics when bending or lifting.
  • Post-operative body movement after surgery is vital and helps prevent post-surgery issues.
Things to do before surgery:

Quitting smoking

  • Especially before surgery. Quitting entirely or at least for at least six weeks before surgery will make recovery easier and healthier.

Losing weight

  • Speak with a doctor about weight. Just 5 pounds can make a significant difference during recovery.

Blood sugar

  • For individuals with diabetes, having an A1C under eight before surgery is ideal.
Every patient�s recovery is different. Recovery time depends on:
  • The complexity of the surgery
  • Personal medical history
  • Health issues
Recovery typically takes about two to four weeks after the surgery. However, it depends on the reason/s for the surgery.

Questions

Post-laminectomy syndrome

  • Post-laminectomy syndrome PLS also known as failed back surgery syndrome is a condition where an individual continues to have pain after surgery. Individuals still having symptoms after should speak with their doctor to determine the next phase of treatment.

How long before exercise?

  • Returning to the gym or getting into an exercise routine will take some time. It is important to follow the doctor�s recommendations and complete the full course of physical therapy before regular exercise activity can resume. Discuss workout plans with the doctor to determine the best timeline for the spine.

Full recovery?

  • Returning to some activity is possible around four weeks after surgery. Full recovery takes longer as each patient�s recovery is unique. Depending on the complexity of the surgery, most return to all activities within 6 to 9 months.

Body Composition Spotlight


 

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*
References
American Association of Neurological Surgeons. �Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery.� (n.d.)�https://www.aans.org/en/Patients/Neurosurgical-Conditions-and-Treatments/Minimally-Invasive-Spine-Surgery Foraminotomy. MedlinePlus. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007390.htm. Reviewed November 27, 2016. Page last updated December 21, 2017. Accessed January 18, 2018. Laminectomy. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007389.htm. MedlinePlus. Reviewed November 27, 2016. Page last updated December 21, 2017. Accessed January 18, 2018. Mayo Clinic. �Laminectomy.� (n.d.)�https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/laminectomy/about/pac-20394533 Mayo Clinic. �Laminotomy.� (n.d)�https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/spinal-stenosis/multimedia/img-20149227
Body Composition Terminology Guide

Body Composition Terminology Guide

The world of health and fitness has evolved with all kinds of technical jargon and terminology that can require a guide to get a handle on things. It can become confusing and terms like Lean Body Mass and Lean muscle can get mixed up. Body composition analysis allows an individual to understand their body in a much clearer way with insight into the body’s health. Here we break down this technical terminology to get a basic understanding of how it is relevant to the body’s health. Think of this as a combination glossary, and action guide. �

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Body Composition Terminology Guide

Guide to Basic Body Composition

Percent Body Fat Body/Fat Percentage

  • Percent Body Fat is a reflection of how much of the body’s weight is made up of fat.
  • It is calculated by dividing the weight of body fat mass by total weight.
  • It helps to track progress whether trying to lose weight or gain muscle.

Takeaway

  • This percentage can be applied to set percent body fat ranges.
  • The healthy ranges are around 10-20% percent body fat for men and 18-28% for women.

Lean Body Mass/Fat-Free Mass Guide

Lean Body Mass is sometimes used interchangeably with Fat-Free Mass.

  • Lean Body Mass is the weight of everything in the body that is not fat.
  • This includes muscles, organs, bones, and body water.
  • Lean Body Mass is not the same as muscle.
  • Lean Body Mass is a collection of different types of body tissues that includes muscle.

Takeaway

  • Lean Body Mass plus Body Fat Mass make up entire body weight.
  • If the Lean Body Mass value is in pounds subtract this number from total body weight to get an approximation of Body Fat Mass.
  • Divide this number by body weight, results are percent body fat.
  • Lean Body Mass is closely related to the total number of calories the body needs every day.
  • The Lean Body Mass forms the core of the body’s metabolism, and this number can be used to help determine unique dietary needs.
  • No more basing nutrition off the 2,000-calorie diet. This is a poor one-size-fits-all approach to food intake.

Skeletal Muscle Mass Guide

  • Skeletal muscle is one of four major muscle types and governs all the movements that are consciously controlled. Everything from texting to deadlifting a barbell.
  • It is the muscle group that grows/builds when exercising.
  • Increased Skeletal Muscle Mass translates into increased strength.
  • When trying to build up the body and grow in size, this is the value to track and watch increase over time.
  • However, muscle is not just for strength.
  • Muscle is made up primarily of protein and can act as protein storage.
  • When the body is under severe stress like a traumatic injury, the recovery process is triggered and needs added protein, up to four times the amount.
  • When the body is not able to get the proper amount of protein from a normal diet, the body begins to get what it needs from the protein storage/muscles.

Basal Metabolic Rate/BMR

  • The Basal Metabolic Rate, or BMR, is the number of calories that the body needs to maintain Lean Body Mass. It is a significant component of overall metabolism.
  • An individual with more Lean Body Mass will have a higher Basal Metabolic Rate.
  • This is the reason why a 250-pound athlete needs to eat more than a 150-pound sedentary adult. Because the athlete has more Lean Body Mass.
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Body Composition Terminology Guide
  • BMR can help make a healthy diet plan designed for fat loss or muscle gain by helping understand how much energy/calories from food the body needs.
  • Multiplying the BMR with activity factor will estimate Total Daily Energy Expenditure or TDEE.
  • Using the TDEE as a baseline an individual can develop a nutritional plan based on body composition goals.

Body Water Guide

  • Body Water includes all the water in the body. This means everything from:
  1. The water in the blood
  2. Water in the organs
  3. The water inside the bones

Body water can be subdivided into two types:

  • Intracellular
  • Extracellular
  • Intracellular means inside the cells and includes the water in the organs, muscles, composing 2/3 of total body water.
  • The remaining 1/3 is extracellular outside the cells and includes the water in the blood.

Takeaway

  • When the body is generally healthy it maintains a healthy balance of intracellular to extracellular water with a ratio of around 3:2.
  • When the balance becomes unbalanced or falls apart water monitoring becomes important.
  • For example, individuals with severe health problems, like kidney ailments/failure, are unable to rid the body of extracellular water. This causes a buildup of water and requires removal through procedures like dialysis.

Dry Lean Mass

  • Lean Body Mass includes everything that�s not body fat and includes body water.
  • When all the water has been taken out what remains is known as Dry Lean Mass.

Lean Body Mass – Body Water = Dry Lean Mass

  • This amounts to the protein content of the muscles and the mineral content of the bones.
  • Most Dry Lean Mass will be found in these areas.

Takeaway

  • Water monitoring can help track real, physical changes in the body.
  • Lean Body Mass contains body water, and body water levels can be influenced by different factors like a recent workout or being low on carbohydrates.
  • Changes in body water are considered technical changes in Lean Body Mass.
  • When building muscle, the body is actually building new physical protein stores and reflects in Dry Lean Mass.
  • An increase in Lean Body Mass can signal muscle growth, or not.
  • However, an increase in Dry Lean Mass is a more favorable indicator that there is muscle growth.

Visceral Fat

  • Two major categories of body fat.
  • Subcutaneous fat is the fat under the skin and is the type that can be seen.
  • The second type is called visceral fat.
  • This fat collects inside the abdomen and wraps around the internal organs.
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Body Composition Terminology Guide

Takeaway

  • Just because it cannot be seen does not mean it is not there.
  • If it is there it is something definitely worth knowing about.
  • This is because visceral fat is not just extra pounds but an active organ that secretes harmful hormones into the body that triggers never-ending inflammation.
  • The more visceral fat, the greater risk of inflammation.
  • Inflammation over time places added stress on the heart that can lead to cardiovascular problems.

Get Tested Today

Hopefully, this guide has clarified some of the common body composition terminology. This is a basic overview designed to provide essential information about body composition and how it applies. A general understanding can help in making healthy lifestyle choices, like deciding to lose weight or dietary adjustments.


Body Health


 

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*

References

Westerterp, Klaas R. �Exercise, energy balance, and body composition.� European journal of clinical nutrition�vol. 72,9 (2018): 1246-1250. doi:10.1038/s41430-018-0180-4

Borga, Magnus et al. �Advanced body composition assessment: from body mass index to body composition profiling.��Journal of investigative medicine: the official publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research�vol. 66,5 (2018): 1-9. doi:10.1136/jim-2018-000722

Sleeping With Sciatica and A Better Night’s Rest

Sleeping With Sciatica and A Better Night’s Rest

Trying to get a proper night’s rest and healthy sleep with sciatica can be difficult. Here we discuss how to combat sciatica discomfort for a better night�s rest. The sciatic nerves are the two largest nerves in the body. They run from the low back through the:
  • Hips
  • Buttocks
  • Down each leg into the feet
 
When the nerve gets:
  • Irritated
  • Inflamed
  • Pinched
  • Compressed
Sciatica can cause pain, tingling, numbness in the butt, lower back, leg, calf, and foot. It is a common condition that affects many individuals.

Is It Sciatica

Sciatica happens when the nerve becomes pinched from a bulging or herniated disc. In rare cases, the pain can result from a tumor putting pressure on the nerve or damage to the nerve caused by disease. The location and intensity of the pain depend on where the injury or damage occurred and how bad it is. Sciatica pain can be described as:
  • Dull
  • Sore
  • Numbing
  • Jolting
  • Throbbing
  • Hot
  • Stabbing
  • Radiating
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Sleeping With Sciatica and A Better Night's Rest
 
For many sciatica usually resolves within a matter of weeks. However, once sciatica has presented future episodes are almost guaranteed to resurface and if not treated properly can lead to more serious problems.

Symptoms

The sciatic nerve/s can affect several areas of the body, making symptoms vary. The most common include:
  • Lower back pain starts at the low back, runs along the hips and buttocks down each leg.
  • Pain radiates/spreads down the butt/leg area sometimes described as a shooting pain and usually occurs on just one side.
  • Pain while sitting for long periods of time places pressure on the gluteal muscles, lower back, and nerves. This can cause or worsen the condition. When having to sit for a while, it is recommended to get up every hour or so and walk/move around. This gets the blood flowing and stretches out the tightened muscles.
  • Hip pain, as the sciatic nerves run through the hip joint and in some cases can cause pain to settle in the hip. Injuries in the hip can mimic the symptoms of sciatica. If there is hip pain that does not improve with time get checked by a doctor to rule out other causes like osteoarthritis, bursitis.
  • Numbness, some experience weakness in the legs and an altered sensation of numbness. This is caused by a herniated disc in the lower lumbar region.
  • Burning/tingling like a pins and needles sensation, especially in the feet and toes.
 

Conditions/Causes

There are several conditions that can cause sciatica:
  • Degenerative Disc Disease is where the discs of the spine deteriorate and become susceptible to painful herniation.
  • Spondylolisthesis is a painful condition where the lower vertebrae slip forward onto the bone directly below impinging the sciatic nerve.
  • Muscle Spasms and involuntary contractions of the muscles can cause sciatica if they compress the nerve.
  • Pregnancy sciatica is not uncommon. As the baby grows it places pressure on the nerve causing aches and pains.
  • Lumbar spinal stenosis is when the spaces in the low back begin to narrow compressing and irritating the nerve.
  Risk factors include:
  • Age, as the spine gets older it becomes more susceptible to herniated discs and bone spurs, which are leading causes of sciatica.
  • Obesity and excess weight create added stress on the spine, which can inflame the nerves.
  • Occupation/work that requires standing/sitting for long periods or if a lot of heavy lifting is involved there is added pressure on the back increasing the risk for back problems.
  • Individuals with diabetes have an increased risk for nerve damage. When nerves are damaged, they can cause radiating pain.

Night Time

Sleeping at night can be a challenge, especially not being able to get into a comfortable position. Sleep deficits and insufficient sleep can reduce the body�s tolerance to pain and worsen inflammation. Many wake up with increased symptoms. This is likely due to the fact that when the body is laying down the discs draw in and absorb fluid, which results in increased pressure within the disc, creating more pressure on the nerve. But there are some things to do to lessen pain and get a good night�s sleep. This includes changing sleep position, stretching, and practicing healthy sleep hygiene.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Sleeping With Sciatica and A Better Night's Rest
 

Sleeping Positions

  • Sleeping on the back is considered the best sleeping position for sciatica because it eases pressure on the low back and discs where the nerves are located.
  • Sleeping on the side can be more comfortable and is a good position because it doesn�t place direct pressure on the muscles, discs, or sciatic nerve. But, it is important that the mattress is supportive enough to keep the spine aligned. If more support is needed place a pillow between the legs.
  • Sleeping with the knees elevated can help take the pressure off the low back. To achieve this place a pillow under the knees or, with an adjustable bed, use it to elevate the foot of the bed.
  • Sleeping with a body pillow provides extra comfort and helps the body remain in a certain position throughout the night. These pillows come in a variety of shapes, sizes.
 

Stretches

Stretching can provide relief. It�s important to stretch to keep the body flexible and to prevent pain. Gentle stretches before bed, and after waking up will loosen the muscles and ligaments surrounding the spine and joints.
  • Reclining pigeon pose is a yoga pose that opens the hips and eases lower back pain.
  • Lying on the back with both knees bent.
  • Lift the right leg and place the ankle on the top of the left knee. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.
  • Repeat with the other leg.
  • Sitting pigeon pose stretch is similar to the reclining pigeon but is done while sitting.
  • Sitting on the floor with knees bent. Keep balance by placing the hands on the floor.
  • While seated, place the right ankle on the top of the left knee.
  • Lean forward and move the upper body forward. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds.
  • Repeat with the other leg.
  • Forward pigeon pose is a more advanced version of the pigeon stretch.
  • Start in a plank or push-up position.
  • Move the right leg in front so that the right knee is toward the right wrist and the right foot toward the left wrist.
  • Stretch the left leg out behind. The top of the foot should be on the ground and toes flat against the floor.
  • Shift the weight forward onto the hands or elbows. Feel the stretch in the right glute.
  • Repeat steps with other leg.
  • The knee�to the opposite shoulder is a simple stretch that is easy and pain-relieving.
  • Lie on back with legs extended.
  • Bend the right leg, grasp the knee and pull it toward the abdomen.
  • Straighten the leg and then repeat these steps with the left leg.
  • Do three times on each side.
  • Sitting spinal stretch can help open the vertebrae to relieve sciatica pain.
  • Sit on the floor with the legs extended.
  • Bend the right knee so that the foot is next to the inside of the left knee. Keep the right foot flat on the ground.
  • Move the left arm around so that the elbow is on the outside of the right knee. Place right hand behind for balance.
  • Gently turn toward the right, looking behind. Hold the position for 15 to 30 seconds.
  • Repeat with the other leg.
  • Standing hamstring stretch can ease pain in the hamstrings.
  • Stand and place one heel on an elevated surface, like a chair.
  • Fully extend the knee and flex the ankle by pointing the toes toward the ceiling.
  • Bend forward at the hips keeping the spine in a neutral position. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds.
  • Repeat with the other leg.
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Sleeping With Sciatica and A Better Night's Rest
 

Sleep Hygiene

Proper sleep hygiene helps prepare for a good night�s sleep. Here are some tips to help improve sleep hygiene.
  • A nighttime routine will help unwind the body before bedtime. Start the routine 30 minutes before planning to go to sleep. Some things to do to help unwind:
  • Take a warm bath
  • Listen to relaxing/soothing music
  • Meditation
  • Reading
  • Get a new mattress. An old, sagging mattress can worsen sciatica and strain the back. The best mattresses for sciatica pain combines contour comfort to ease pressure points at the hips and shoulders with the proper support to keep the spine aligned.
  • Eye masks can help with artificial light which can fool the mind along with the circadian clock into thinking it�s daylight. Keeping out unwanted light all night can help.
  • Avoid blue light too close to bedtime like lamps and device screens. These are great for the day, as they help boost attention, reaction time, and mood. But at night it can be disruptive. Turn off electronics at least 30 minutes before bed to help the body adjust.
  • Room temperature control has found that most sleep better in a cool room. The optimal temperature is between 60 and 67 degrees.
  • Avoid exercise close to bedtime. Working out before bed can interfere with sleep. This is because exercise releases adrenaline keeping the mind and body alert.
  • Avoid stimulants before bedtime like caffeine, sugar, etc. which will keep the body up.
 
 

Medical Intervention

Sciatica pain can be mild or severe. Stretching or changing up sleeping position can help ease discomfort. But if the pain is severe or chronic, and if it prevents getting a good night�s sleep, consult a chiropractic professional.

InBody Spotlight


 

Sleep And Body Composition

A lack of sleep makes it harder to gain muscle and harder to lose fat.
  • Sleeping less means fewer opportunities to secrete growth hormone and develop muscle
  • Testosterone is negatively affected by lack of sleep
  • Sleeping less can increase cortisol levels, impairing muscle development
  • Irregular sleep throws off the body’s cycles, making the body feel hungrier
  • Sleeping less is linked to eating more snacks, increasing energy levels
  • Lack of sleep can cause reductions in Basal Metabolic Rate by 20%, reducing total energy output
  • Being tired reduces spontaneous movements, reducing total energy output
If trying to get into shape and change body composition, sufficient sleep is vital. Any positive changes to get more sleep are going to have positive changes in efforts to change body composition.

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*
References
Siengsukon, Catherine F et al. �Sleep Health Promotion: Practical Information for Physical Therapists.��Physical therapy�vol. 97,8 (2017): 826-836. doi:10.1093/ptj/pzx057
Enjoy the Hobbies You Love Without Back and Neck Pain

Enjoy the Hobbies You Love Without Back and Neck Pain

We all have our hobbies that we are passionate about, love doing, and could see turning into a second career. However, certain hobbies can generate stress on the spine. This often leads to a decrease in being able to participate in these activities, which can lead to various health issues. Maintaining the body’s physical fitness and keeping the spine healthy is key to being able to continue without neck or back pain. Hobbies are an important part of life. Individuals need to enjoy what they love from sports activities to music to arts and craft projects. Having activities/hobbies help:
  • Boost mental health
  • Relieve stress
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Promotes weight loss
  • Meditative qualities
Here�s how to make sure the hobbies/activities are fun and safe.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Enjoying the Hobbies You Love Without Back and Neck Pain
 

Protecting the Neck

Poor posture is one of the leading causes of neck and back pain. Looking down or being in a standing/sitting hunched position regularly increases the load/stress on the neck increasing the chances for strain, injury, headaches, and chronic pain. In the neutral position, the skull weighs around 10-12 pounds. When leaning the head forward weight increases from let’s say 27 pounds at a 15-degree angle to 60 pounds at a 60-degree angle. The strain on the cervical vertebrae, joints, and muscles can be immense. A good example is text-neck. This has become a normal thing when using a smartphone, gaming, or other similar activities. Studies suggest that the average individual spends three to five hours a day on a smartphone or tablet. This means three to five hours of extra weight on the cervical spine. Engaging in a hobby that requires an individual to look down constantly in a similar fashion can lead to serious and chronic neck pain along with other cervical issues.  
 
Individuals are spending more time at home and getting more serious about their hobbies. This is fantastic, however, these individuals need to take time to stretch out, and get some physical activity into their hobby routine. Just like taking frequent walk-around, stretch out at work breaks, so to do hobbyists need to step back from their projects to keep a healthy balance. The position of the neck and the way it is held for activities like:
  • Sewing
  • Carpentry
  • Gardening
  • Painting
  • Pottery
  • Knitting
  • Music
Hobbies like this can increase the risk of neck pain, so the key is prevention, paying attention to head posture every now and again, and taking stretching breaks.

Proper Posture Makes a Difference

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Enjoying the Hobbies You Love Without Back and Neck Pain
 
Many individuals stand and sit when working on their hobbies. This is quite common and is encouraged when doing these absorbing activities. But being immersed in these activities, most forget to check their posture when doing so. This is what leads to problems that at first are shrugged off as just soreness. Eventually, the individual begins to engage in bad/awkward posture habits that avoid the pain and think this will help. This worsens the problems and promotes further strain/injury. Leaning, bending, reaching, and twisting curves the spine increasing the load and stress. Performing these actions over and over for extended periods means:
  • Strain
  • Low back pain
  • Muscle spasms
  • Sciatica
  • Leg pain
  • Foot pain
Slouching is another posture problem that increases the likelihood of lower back pain. Slouching causes gaps between the lower back vertebrae. This stresses the facet joints or the connections between the vertebrae. The soft tissues elongate/stretch and lengthen like muscles and connective tissue. What elongation does is:
  • Cause the tissues to attempt to snap back to the original shape. This can cause painful spasms.
  • Muscles that are constantly elongated become weaker with time.
The longer an individual sits, stands, and slouches impacts the body’s health negatively, leading to a chain of health problems. Maintaining proper posture and keeping the spine straight minimizes the strain on muscles and the vertebrae. Prevent pain and discomfort.  
 

Ergonomics at the House

Ergonomic stressors include:
  • The force/s required to perform and complete a physical chore/task.
  • Adopted static and awkward working postures to complete task/s
  • The repetitiveness of the task/s
Any of these factors or combination places a higher risk for discomfort, pain, and injury. The immediate surroundings like the bench, work area, craft room, etc. and how the individual moves or does not move, and interacts in these areas is the focus of ergonomics. Proper ergonomics will help protect the spine, as well as the rest of the body. Improper ergonomics can cause damage like muscle strain, repetitive movements, and incorrect posture. Taking a look at the hobby workspace the ergonomics, and making any necessary adjustments can help prevent strain/injury.

Proper seating

Make sure the right type of chair, stool, bench, etc is being utilized. Adjustable types that have neck and lower back support are the way to go. Make sure the base is stable, the seat is comfortable and adjustable. Backrests and armrests can help maintain proper posture.

Correct table/desk/workstation height

Various drafting tables and lap desks have adjustable surfaces to adjust the height for working with a proper ergonomic posture. If the work surface is not adjustable adjust the chair or make adjustments as needed. The hips should be higher than the knees to take the strain off the sacrum and lower back. The upper back should be straight, with the shoulder blades together creating a supportive platform for the neck and head.

Tools

Using the best tools for working and organization will help avoid injuries and constant awkward positions like leaning/reaching over and around the workspace. Look for tools that can be adjusted to different heights, resistance levels, etc. depending on what is needed and what will reduce any strain.

Vision

If an individual needs to lean in to get a closer look then vision could be the problem. If an individual wears glasses it could be time for a check-up. Or if an individual does not wear glasses, it could be time to see an optometrist. Non-prescription magnifiers could be the answer.  
mobility flexibility el paso tx.
 

Stretching Regularly

Working too long in one position can be detrimental to overall health. It is very understandable when individuals get into the zone, working on something creative, and not wanting to stop the flow. However, frequent breaks are vital. Stretching regularly and getting up to move around is key to staying healthy.

Neck Stretch

  • Stretch the neck by turning the head from side to side in a gentle fashion.
  • Tip the head to each side so the ear almost touches the shoulder.
  • Lower the head so that the chin almost touches the chest.
  • Turn the to look diagonally down at the armpit. This stretches the trapezius and levator scapulae muscles.
  • Hold the stretches for 10-15 seconds.
  • Always perform slowly and gently.

Lower Back Stretch

15 minutes a day of stretches will maintain the health of the spine. If pain or discomfort becomes frequent or unmanageable, seek professional help. Physical therapists and chiropractors are trained in orthopedic issues and ergonomics without prescription. Call a doctor or physical therapist to find out if treatment is necessary. Following these guidelines can help keep hobbies fun and without pain.

Lower Back Pain Skate Boarding Injury Treatment


 

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*
The Spinal Muscles: An Extensive Guide

The Spinal Muscles: An Extensive Guide

The spinal muscles and ligaments work in conjunction to help support the spine, maintain an upright posture, and control movements during activity and rest. The muscles are named based on shape, location, or a combination. Further categorization factors include muscle functions like flexion, extension, or rotation. Skeletal muscle is a form of striated muscle tissue that is voluntarily controlled by the somatic nervous system. Striated means it is striped in appearance. Most skeletal muscles are attached to bones by collagen fibers known as tendons.  
Vertebral Muscle Types Location
Forward flexors Anterior
Lateral flexors Lateral
Rotators Lateral
Extensors Posterior
 
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 The Spinal Muscles: An Extensive Guide
 
It has the fastest contraction rate of all muscles. Before muscle/s contract, a nerve impulse starts in the brain and runs through the spinal cord to the muscle. For the muscles to contract and work properly they need energy/fuel. Mitochondria produce Adenosine triphosphate chemical cells that are needed for energy. Adenosine triphosphate is made as the mitochondria burn glucose or sugar. The blood vessels deliver the oxygen and nutrients that the mitochondria need to maintain a steady supply of adenosine triphosphate.  

The Posterior Cervical and Upper Thoracic Spinal Muscles

  1. Semispinalis Capitus – controls the head rotation and backward pulls
  2. Iliocostalis Cervicis – extends the cervical vertebrae
  3. The Longissimus Cervicus – extends the cervical vertebrae
  4. Longissimus Capitus – controls the head’s rotation and backward pulls
  5. Longissimus Thoracis – controls the extension/lateral flexion of the vertebral column and rib rotation
  6. Iliocostalis Thoracis – controls the extension/lateral flexion of the vertebral column and rib rotation
  7. Semispinalis Thoracis – extends and rotates the vertebral column
 

Muscles of the Spinal Column

 

Cervical muscles

Cervical Muscles Function Nerve
Sternocleidomastoid Extends and rotates the head and flexes the vertebral column C2, C3
Scalenus Flexes and rotates the neck Lower cervical
Spinalis Cervicis Extends and rotates the head Middle/lower cervical
Spinalis Capitus Extends and rotates the head Middle/lower cervical
Semispinalis Cervicis Extends and rotates the vertebral column Middle/lower cervical
Semispinalis Capitus Rotates the head and pulls backward C1-C5
Splenius Cervicis Extends the vertebral column Middle/lower cervical
Longus Colli Cervicis Flexes the cervical vertebrae C2-C7
Longus Capitus Flexes the head C1-C3
Rectus Capitus Anterior Flexes the head C2, C3
Rectus Capitus Lateralis Bends the head laterally C2, C3
Iliocostalis Cervicis Extends the cervical vertebrae Middle/lower cervical
Longissimus Cervicis Extends the cervical vertebrae Middle/lower cervical
Longissimus Capitus Rotates the head and pulls backward Middle/lower cervical
Rectus Capitus Posterior Major Extends and rotates the head Suboccipital
Rectus Capitus Posterior Minor Extends the head Suboccipital
Obliquus Capitus Inferior Rotates the atlas Suboccipital
Obliquus Capitus Superior Extends and bends the head laterally Suboccipital
 
CervicalMusculatureDiagram ChiropractorElPaso

Thoracic Muscles

Thoracic muscles Function Nerve
Longissimus Thoracis Extension, lateral flexion of the vertebral column, and rib rotation Dorsal primary divisions of the spinal nerves
Iliocostalis Thoracis Extension, lateral flexion of the vertebral column, and rib rotation Dorsal primary divisions of the spinal nerves
Spinalis Thoracis Extends the vertebral column Dorsal primary divisions of the spinal nerves
Semispinalis Thoracis Extends and rotates the vertebral column Dorsal primary divisions of the spinal nerves
Rotatores Thoracis Extends and rotates the vertebral column Dorsal primary divisions of the spinal nerves
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 The Spinal Muscles: An Extensive Guide
 

Lumbar muscles

Lumbar muscles Function Nerve
Psoas Major Flexes the thigh at the hip joint and the vertebral column L2, L3, sometimes L1 or L4
Intertransversarii Lateralis Lateral flexion of the vertebral column The ventral primary division of the spinal nerves
Quadratus Lumborum Lateral flexion of the vertebral column T12, L1
Interspinales Extends the vertebral column Dorsal primary divisions of the spinal nerves
Intertransversarii Mediales Lateral flexion of the vertebral column Dorsal primary divisions of the spinal nerves
Multifidus Extends and rotates the vertebral column Dorsal primary divisions of the spinal nerves
Longissimus Lumborum Extends and rotates the vertebral column Dorsal primary divisions of the spinal nerves
Iliocostalis Lumborum Extension, lateral flexion of the vertebral column, and rib rotation Dorsal primary divisions of the spinal nerves
Blog Image  Psoas Muscle
 

Muscle Fascia Fibrous Tissue

  • Fascia is the thickened connective tissue that surrounds a muscle or muscle group. Superficial fascia is directly under the skin.
  • Epimysium surrounds the skeletal muscle.
  • Perimysium is the sheath that groups the muscle fibers into bundles.
  • Endomysium is another type of connective tissue that sheaths each muscle fiber.
  The cause of back pain and spinal muscle spasm/s can be caused by overuse, automobile accident, personal, work, or sports injury. The root cause of muscle spasm/s is usually a consequence of an injury to a structure within the lumbar spine. If there have been one or more episodes of muscle spasm in the low back, chances are it will re-occur. The muscles in the low back work together with the abdominal muscles. The spinal muscles add stability by maintaining an erect spine and maintain balance.

Back Pain Specialist

 

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*
A Chiropractor’s Guide to Back Spasms

A Chiropractor’s Guide to Back Spasms

Back spasms can be compared to a Charley horse in the back. These are a common complaint in doctors’ clinics throughout the country. Spasms can accompany back pain and neck pain, they can be the result of a traumatic event, like a slip and fall accident or an automobile accident. Here is why they occur and what to do about them. �

 

trapezius anatomy muscles isolated on white d illustration

 

Back Spasms

A back spasm is an involuntary and sustained contraction of one or more muscles of the spine. Spasms can occur without pain when the muscle/s shift, and pulse. But it’s when pain accompanies the spasm that it can become an issue that can lead to a chronic condition.

Example: Runners get the feeling of having a Charley horse in the calf muscle. Having a back spasm is the same. Spinal muscle spasms could be an indication of something serious, like a micro tear around a spinal disc that can generate inflammation to cause the muscles to tense up.

However, with most cases, a back muscle spasm is a symptom of a mild muscle injury, like a sprain. It can be hard to diagnose the pathology of a muscle spasm. One theory is that if there is a noxious stimulus coursing through the body, specifically the back, it can disrupt/disturb the muscles. When this happens the muscles brace/bunch up together to protect the spine. Here’s are five muscle spasm types that can cause back and neck pain.

Cervical Spine

If there is a spasm in the neck, it’s more than likely a contraction of the trapezius muscle. This is the muscle group that runs down the neck into the middle or thoracic spine/back.

neck anatomy

Back spasms in the cervical spine could indicate a contraction of the sternocleidomastoid. This is located at the base of the skull on both sides of the head. When these muscles spasm, the pain is usually localized or in one area that leads to muscle irritation. However, if the spasm is a symptom of underlying inflammation or nerve irritation, then the pain could radiate and spread down.

Thoracic Spine

The trapezius starts at the neck to the last vertebra of the thoracic spine or the middle-back. Therefore, a back spasm can affect the neck as well as the middle of the back as well. Spasms in the midback can also result from a contraction of the rhomboid muscle. These connect the shoulder blades to the rib cage and spine.

Because there is less movement in the middle-back, the muscles in this area are less likely to spasm, compared to the cervical/neck area and the lumbar/low area.

Lumbar Spine

Spasms in the lower back occur from a contraction of the erector spinae muscles. These are the large group of stabilizing muscles that are on either side of the spine or the latissimus dorsi. These muscles are commonly referred to as lats. They are one of the largest muscle groups in the body and cover the middle and lower back.

 

Lats Graphic

 

Relieving Spasms

Treatment for muscle spasms depends on how the injury originated. A full medical history is crucial for a doctor, spine specialist, or chiropractor to be able to look at all the angles in determining and diagnosing the root cause.

It could be from just leaning over and picking up a box to sleeping in an improper/uncomfortable position. This type of pain is less concerning as it is more than likely a sprain or strain, and can be treated rather quickly.

However, if the spasms started after being involved in an automobile accident or falling pretty hard, then there could be serious damage to the area. Back spasms that occur after these types of situations require an immediate full neurologic and muscular examination. This along with advanced imaging, like an MRI.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 The Chiropractors Guide to Back Spasms

Specialists

A spine specialist or chiropractor wants to make sure they’re not missing any underlying injuries or instabilities of the spine that would require extensive and possible invasive treatment. Red flag situations include osteoporosis, which is the loss of bone mass or ankylosing spondylitis, which is a form of arthritis that mainly affects the spine.

  • Osteoporosis can cause an underlying compression fracture.
  • Ankylosing spondylitis can cause parts of the spine to fuse together.

Both underlying conditions can cause muscle spasms. However, conservative treatment for most cases is all that is usually needed to relieve muscle spasms of the spine. These include:

  • Anti-inflammation medications and creams
  • Chiropractic manipulation to improve spinal muscles range of motion
  • Heat and ice application
  • Light activities/exercises like walking that don’t include any bending, twisting, and lifting
  • Massage therapy
  • Physical therapy
  • Therapeutic water exercise rehabilitation program
  • Ultrasound
  • Wearing a soft collar for cervical spasms
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 The Chiropractors Guide to Back Spasms

If results do not improve within four to six weeks of conservative treatment, then an MRI or other type of scan of the area will be needed.

All that said preventing back spasms is the way to go. We’ve all heard the phrase to be heart-healthy, which concerns cardiovascular health. Now it’s about being spine healthy. Keeping the abdominal muscles, lumbar extensors, and the erector spinae muscles fit is the key. This can be accomplished with regular stretching and core exercises. Also doing yoga and Pilates will go a long way in minimizing muscle spasms and preventing injuries.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 The Chiropractors Guide to Back Spasms

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Sciatica Chiropractic Treatment Guide

Sciatica Chiropractic Treatment Guide

Dr. Alex Jimenez has great techniques to relieve the discomfort, the inflammation, the swelling, not only does he have a great technique to help with the horrible symptoms of sciatica, he also offers you great information when it comes to foods, anti-inflammatories, and we don’t go to prescription medications. So if you are looking for sciatica relief without the invasive procedures…you need to come see Dr. Jimenez.

Sandra Rubio

Are you currently suffering from debilitating sciatica symptoms? Chiropractic care may help you to find relief for your�sciatic nerve pain.�A doctor of chiropractic, or DC, regularly treats sciatica.

Sciatica is a collection of symptoms rather than a single condition, characterized by pain that originates from the lower back or buttock and travels down one or both legs into the feet. Sciatic nerve pain varies in frequency and intensity; minimum, moderate, severe and intermittent, constant, regular or irregular. Sciatica symptoms can happen when a spine illness, such as spinal stenosis or a bulging/ruptured disk, causes compression into the sciatic nerve or nearby nerves.

When this kind of compression occurs, it could lead to sensations of numbness or shooting pain. From the buttocks, back of the thighs, calves, and toes, sciatica pain may radiate down at times. Sciatic nerve pain is very similar to electrical shocks, and it may be dull, achy, sharp, toothache-like, and have pins�and needles feeling. Other symptoms include numbness, burning, and tingling sensations. Sciatica can be radiating or recognized as neuropathy pain, or neuralgia.

The misconception that sciatica is a disease�is common. However, sciatica is a symptom of a disease. Chiropractic care is a popular treatment which can help treat sciatica. The guide below discusses a comprehensive overview and a chiropractic treatment guide for sciatica.

Common Causes of Sciatica

Sciatica is commonly brought on by compression of the sciatic nerve in the lower back. Disorders known to activate sciatic nerve pain include lumbar spine subluxations, also known as misaligned vertebral bodies, herniated or bulging discs, also known as slipped disks, pregnancy and childbirth, tumors, and even non-spinal ailments such as diabetes, constipation, or sitting on an item�in the back pocket of your�pants.

One�frequent cause of sciatica is piriformis syndrome. Piriformis syndrome involves the piriformis muscle. The piriformis muscle and the thighbone located at the lower part of the backbone�connect and also assists in hip rotation. The sciatic nerve runs along these structures.

This muscle is vulnerable to injury from a difference in leg length, a slip and fall, or hip arthritis. Such circumstances can cause spasm and cramping to develop in the muscle, leading to inflammation and pain which can potentially end up pinching the sciatic nerve. Sciatic nerve wracking may lead to the loss of feeling,�called sensory loss, paralysis of a single limb or group of muscles, called monoplegia, and insomnia.�

Sciatic Nerve Pain Diagnosis

Before you discover you may need to see a healthcare professional for your sciatica symptoms, a chiropractor can be a good choice to start treatment for sciatic nerve pain. You may first want to visit your doctor to go over your symptoms and to find an accurate diagnosis of your condition. As soon as you’ve got a clear identification of the reason for sciatica, there are many conservative, or non-invasive treatment choices for sciatica which you can try, most of which may be used by a doctor of chiropractic, or chiropractor.

The physician’s first step when diagnosing sciatica is primarily to ascertain what is causing the individual’s relapse since there are lots of ailments that cause sciatica. Forming a diagnosis entails a review of the individual’s health history and a physical and neurological evaluation.

Diagnostic testing involves an x-ray, MRI, CT scan and/or electrodiagnostic tests,�including nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. These examinations and evaluations help to detect possible contraindications to other treatments and spinal adjustments. As described above sciatica may have many distinct causes, including the following:

  • Herniated discs
  • Spondylolisthesis
  • Tumors about the sciatic nerve
  • Pelvic injuries
  • Degenerative disc disease

If your healthcare professional says your condition can be treated with chiropractic care, then you may be able to find relief after proceeding with a couple of sessions, possibly more depending on the patient’s source of their symptoms. In the case that chiropractic care isn’t the ideal choice for the illness, your physician can research other treatment options.

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Many research studies have demonstrated that chiropractic care is safe and effective for the treatment of lower back pain. Chiropractic is a healthcare profession which focuses on the non-surgical treatment of a variety of injuries and/or conditions associated with the musculoskeletal and nervous system, including sciatic nerve pain. Referred to as a collection of symptoms rather than a single health issue, sciatica can be treated by addressing the underlying problem with chiropractic care.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

Chiropractic Care for Sciatica

Chiropractic care is a form of complementary and alternative medicine, CAM, which relies on the idea that the body has an inherent intelligence that is interrupted by spinal ailments. The philosophy also teaches that these disruptions will be the foundation for all illness in the human body.

Chiropractic care�developed from the late 19th century as a means of adjusting spinal dislocations, referred to as subluxations by chiropractors, restoring the body’s natural integrity. Though several chiropractors still adhere to such beliefs, most chiropractors combine many different kinds of treatment modalities used in traditional medicine.

The objective of chiropractic treatment for sciatica is to assist your human body’s capacity to heal itself, without the need for�drugs and/or medications or surgical interventions. It’s based upon the scientific principle that motion contributes to pain,�structure, and function. Chiropractic care is well-known for being non-invasive, or non-surgical and prescription-free.

The treatment modalities utilized on a patient depends on the reason for their sciatica. A sciatica treatment program may include many distinct treatment�modalities, such as ice/cold therapies, ultrasound, TENS, and spinal adjustments as well as manual manipulations. Below, we will describe the treatment modalities used for sciatica.�

Treatment Modalities for Sciatica

Should you find that you need chiropractic care for sciatic nerve pain, your sciatica chiropractic treatment program plan may contain one or more of the following treatment modalities used by chiropractors, including:

  • Ultrasound is mild warmth created by sound waves which penetrate deep into tissues. Circulation increases and helps reduce cramping pain, swelling and muscle spasms.
  • TENS, or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, is a small box-like, stainless-steel, mobile muscle stimulating machine. Variable intensities of electric stimuli control pain and reduce muscle spasms. Many healthcare professionals use versions of this TENS units.
  • Spinal adjustments and manual manipulations are the most common treatment modality used by chiropractors for sciatica. Manipulation helps to restore misaligned vertebral bodies back into their position in the spine and supports the restricted movement of the spinal column. Adjustment helps to decrease nerve-wracking responsible for causing pain, muscle soreness, other ailments, and inflammation. Adjustments should not be painful. Spinal adjustments and manual manipulations are�proven to be secure and effective.
  • A chiropractor may recommend the use of cold or heat therapies to relieve inflammation, stop spasms and loosen tight muscles associated with sciatic nerve pain. These can often be performed at home with proper guidance from a healthcare professional.

During training, students of chiropractic comprehend many modification methods enabling them to take care of various sorts of subluxations, injuries, and disorders. Techniques combine minimal strain and gentle pressure. Mastery of every treatment modality is an art which needs skill and accuracy. Spinal adjustments and manual manipulations are the treatments that distinguish chiropractic care.

Other disorders can lead to sciatica beyond the scope of chiropractic care. After diagnosis,� The person is referred to a different specialization if the doctor of chiropractic determines the patient’s disease requires additional treatment. Sometimes, co-manage is in the patient’s interest, and the chiropractor may continue to treat the patient with another doctor.

Pain relief for sciatica is possible. Seek sciatica chiropractic treatment for your symptoms. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic as well as to spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900�.

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topics: Acute Back Pain

Back pain�is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. The spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Because of this, injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as�herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.

 

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EXTRA IMPORTANT TOPIC: Sciatica Pain Chiropractic Therapy

Sleeping With Low Back Pain Guide | El Paso, TX.

Sleeping With Low Back Pain Guide | El Paso, TX.

Sleeping: Lower back pain makes it hard to fall asleep, and the pain can awake anyone any hour of the night.

To help reclaim your sleep schedule, here are some simple guidelines to sleeping with lower back pain:

Sleeping With Lower Back Pain Guidelines

Sleep On Your Side To Relieve Pain

One of the most common causes of lower back pain is a pulled back muscle. This occurs when a muscle in the lower back is strained or torn as a result of being over stretched. Symptoms typically resolve within a few days, but the intense pain can make it difficult to fall asleep. The longer you lie in bed, the more unconditioned the body becomes, the worse the symptoms become.

No single sleeping position works for everybody with a pulled back muscle. But a good place to start is to test sleeping on your side. When sleeping on your side, try the following:

  • Avoid a tight curled-up fetal position (knees pulled in toward the body), and instead sleep with your body slightly elongated.
  • Slip a slim pillow between your knees to support the natural curvature of your spine.
  • Find a head pillow that holds your head midway between each shoulder. If your pillow is too thin or too thick it can bend your neck at an uncomfortable angle.

There is benefit from wearing a disposable heat wrap to bed, which can help alleviate the pain from a pulled back muscle. These wraps deliver muscle relaxing, low-level heat over the course of several hours. They may help to fall asleep and stay asleep.

Soothing Audio Relaxes The Mind & Body

When the lights go out, almost all of the stimuli that held your attention during the day dissipates. People tend to focus more on their back pain, and as one pays more attention to the pain, the anxiety can rise, which, makes it harder to fall asleep.

Listening to various soothing audio can relieve anxiety and the experience of back pain by redirecting the focus away from symptoms. Nighttime audio options include:

  • Audio Books For Children
  • Classical Music
  • Relaxation Podcasts

Regardless of what kind of audio chosen, make sure it is free of harsh sounds or intense plots. Otherwise there won’t be any sleep.

sleeping el paso tx.

Mattress Quality Matters

On the internet one can discover all sorts of suggestions for extending the life of a sagging mattress. These methods include

  • Sliding Plywood Under The Mattress
  • Ditching The Box Spring

These tricks can work for some, but the best approach is to replace a worn out mattress.

It is important not to neglect the mattress because a sagging mattress can exacerbate lower back pain by placing additional stress on the spinal structures. This can make it harder to fall asleep.

When sleeping with lower back pain, the most expensive mattress is not always the best. Instead, the best mattress is ultimately one that provides the best sleep.

Here are a few tips to help get you started for a proper mattress:

The mattress needs to support the natural curvature of the spine. This means the spine should look similar when lying on you’re back or side as when you�re standing with good posture.

Visit the local mattress store and try out various mattresses. After 15 minutes on a mattress, one can tell if it is a good fit.

Don�t be afraid to take your time.

Sleeping with a partner, consider a larger-sized mattress. This will allow both room to sleep without startling the other.

Hopefully, the aforementioned advice will help you find relief from lower back pain and enjoy more restful sleep.

Chiropractic Clinic Extra: Back Pain Care & Treatments