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Ways Chiropractic Treats Whiplash Effectively and Successfully

Ways Chiropractic Treats Whiplash Effectively and Successfully

A whiplash injury can cause pain for months, even years after the accident/incident. It can cause persistent pain in the neck, shoulders, back, as well as, headaches, and sleep problems. Waiting to see if it will go away is not recommended. Chiropractic treatment can effectively and successfully expedite the healing process getting back to normal life as quickly as possible. Chiropractors treat whiplash successfully using a combination of techniques, approaches, and exercises for pain relief, recovery, and long-term spinal health. The extent and severity of the whiplash injury determine what type of chiropractic treatment will be implemented.

The Severity of a Whiplash Injury

Whiplash injuries are often the result of:

  • Automobile accidents
  • Work injuries
  • Sports
  • Amusement park rides

It is primarily an injury of the neck muscles and ligaments, but can also damage the vertebral discs. It is not considered a serious or life-threatening injury, but it can cause long-term complications and severe chronic pain. The biggest risk comes from the delayed presentation of symptoms. It can take days and sometimes weeks for the effects of the injury to present. Individuals that are older or those with arthritis are more likely to have severe and long-term issues.

Other Symptoms

Typical symptoms like neck pain, blurry vision, stiffness, and dizziness are well known. These can range from mild to severe, and last for a few days, weeks, or, in severe cases, years. However, there are some symptoms that most don’t know about and include:

  • Consistent pain in the shoulder and upper back
  • Delayed-onset headaches
  • Trouble sleeping even without pain
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Trouble with memory
  • Irritability
  • Excitability
  • Fatigue/low-energy

Emergency Care

Individuals should be alert for signs/symptoms that the injury requires immediate medical attention. If any of the following are experienced seek immediate care.

  • The arms, shoulders, or legs are numb, tingling, and/or weak
  • The neck pain and stiffness return after going away
  • Bowel or bladder problems could indicate nerve damage
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Ways Chiropractic Treats Whiplash Effectively and Successfully

Chiropractic

Chiropractic treatment depends on the individual case. A doctor of chiropractic will determine the right treatment plan by the:

  • The severity of the pain
  • Location of the injury
  • Accompanying symptoms
  • Medical history

X-rays will be taken of the affected area to rule out any other trauma or injury. The chiropractor will evaluate the entire spine. This is based on how one part of the body influences other areas with the objective being to get the whole body functioning successfully at optimal levels.

Treatment Options

Some of the more common treatments for whiplash include:

Initial

Visiting a chiropractor a short time after the injury means the neck will be inflamed. The doctor will utilize gentle, anti-inflammatory options like:

  • Cold therapy
  • Ultrasound
  • Stretching
  • Electrical therapy
  • Laser therapy

Spinal Manipulation

There are different types of spinal manipulation, these include:

Specific Manipulation

This type involves a gentle but firm thrusting, usually done with the hands to the soft tissue areas. It stimulates the nervous system to realign subluxations, and restore mobility/flexibility of the spinal joints and vertebrae.

Flexion Distraction Technique

This is also a hands-on technique that treats slipped and bulging discs. This type of treatment utilizes a pumping motion on the disc/s and not the spine itself.

Instrument Assistance

This treatment is used for patients with degenerative disc disease. Special instrument assistance is often used in combination with hands-on care.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Ways Chiropractic Treats Whiplash Effectively and Successfully

Massage

Massage promotes healing, reduces pain, and improves blood circulation in and around the affected area. It helps relieve tension/stress in the shoulder and neck.

Stretching and Trigger Point Therapy

The muscles and tendons can become tight. A chiropractor will gently stretch the area to relieve pain, ease tension, and reduce tension headaches. Trigger point therapy uses persistent pressure by the chiropractor’s fingers. It relaxes and releases the tight areas.

McKenzie Exercises

McKenzie exercises help reduce disc tears common to these types of injuries. The chiropractor will show how to perform these simple movements at home as part of the recovery.

What to do outside of the clinic

A chiropractor will offer tips and guidance on how to successfully avoid worsening the injury or create new injury/s. Stretches and exercises will be recommended to strengthen and maintain flexibility. Depending on an individual’s:

  • Overall health
  • Posture
  • Work/Occupation
  • Lifestyle factors
  • They will offer recommendations to avoid long-term issues.

Body Composition

Successfully regaining fitness after an injury

It is difficult to predict how long it will take to regain a previous level of fitness after an injury. Retraining to peak condition depends on the injury and how much damage was done. A key factor is to not adopt a sedentary lifestyle. Muscle memory can help as the muscles have special cells in the fibers that can recollect previous movements. This means when back to working out after an extended layoff, the body is able to regain the lost muscle. Some tips to help get back into shape:

  • Ease back into working out to avoid/worsen the injury
  • Wait a month before starting a less-intense version of a regular workout
  • Join a group/fitness class or a health exercise group

Patience and persistence are essential to regaining fitness successfully.

Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP, CIFM, CTG*
email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com
phone: 915-850-0900
Licensed in Texas & New Mexico

References

Dagenais, Simon, and Scott Haldeman. “Chiropractic.” Primary care vol. 29,2 (2002): 419-37. doi:10.1016/s0095-4543(01)00005-7

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0020138396000964

Ritchie, Carrie et al. “Medical and allied health service use during acute and chronic post-injury periods in whiplash injured individuals.” BMC health services research vol. 20,1 260. 30 Mar. 2020, doi:10.1186/s12913-020-05146-0

Ferrari, Robert, and Anthony Science Russell. “Survey of general practitioner, family physician, and chiropractor’s beliefs regarding the management of acute whiplash patients.” Spine vol. 29,19 (2004): 2173-7. doi:10.1097/01.brs.0000141184.86744.37

Whiplash, How Long Does It Last?

Whiplash, How Long Does It Last?

Motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries, work injuries, and falls are a few causes of whiplash. It is a condition that affects over 1.5 million individuals. It can cause serious side effects that can last for months and sometimes years. If not treated, the symptoms can worsen and lead to chronic conditions and pain.  

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Whiplash, How Long Does It Last?

Mild Whiplash

Mild whiplash can last around three months. During this time individuals might notice other symptoms other than neck pain that includes:

  • Dizziness
  • Headaches
  • Tinnitus
  • Insomnia
  • Concentration problems

In certain cases, these symptoms happen immediately or they can be delayed.  

Severe Whiplash

Severe whiplash means symptoms last longer than three months. The side effects can progressively go away or may not disappear at all. Severe whiplash falls in the whiplash classification of three to four. This indicates that there is a:

  • Loss of motion
  • Neurological problems
  • Fracture/s

 

Taking time off work for a whiplash injury depends on how severe the condition is. For mild symptoms, individuals are recommended to take about a month off to fully recover. If the condition is extreme, it could take a few years. For some individuals, the injury prevents them from working, and they have to leave their job.  

Tinnitus

After a whiplash injury, some individuals develop tinnitus. This is a condition that results from the jolted ligaments and can irritate the surrounding nerves. This can cause an irritating ringing noise in the ears. How long tinnitus lasts depends on the severity of the injury. It can present every so often or could remain for several months even years.  

Recovery Time

For most individuals, it takes around 4-6 weeks for a full recovery. This could last longer if the injury is not healed properly.

 

Chronic whiplash can present shooting pain throughout the body and prevents individuals from living a normal life. For chronic conditions chiropractic and physical therapy are highly recommended. Treatment could be difficult at first, but improvements will follow as long as the individual stays consistent with the therapy to completely heal the injury.  

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Whiplash, How Long Does It Last?

Treatment Options

 

The first recommendation will be to rest the body. This gives the body time to recover and also prevents worsening the injury. Ice packs and heating pads can help reduce swelling and pain.  

Chiropractic

Chiropractors are experts in the musculoskeletal system. They inspect the whole body looking and feeling for misalignments, knotted muscles, swollen tendons, and ligaments that were stretched/pulled beyond their normal range. Various types of adjustments can be used. The most common are flexion-distraction and instrument-assisted.

  • Flexion-Distraction adjusting requires the chiropractor’s hands. They feel around the problem area and press their hands to slide the joint back in place.
  • Instrument-Assisted – utilizes a special tool, like an activator. The device helps the chiropractor delve deeper into the area than their hands. This helps them locate problems that could be hidden.
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Whiplash, How Long Does It Last?

Anti-Inflammatory Diet

Adding more anti-inflammatory foods to the diet will reduce and alleviate inflammation and swelling. Some of these foods include:

  • Avocados
  • Blueberries
  • Mushrooms
  • Olive oil
  • Salmon
  • Strawberries
  • Turmeric

Vitamins

A full recovery can take longer if the body lacks essential nutrients. These nutrients are what helps the body create enzymes that repair the damaged tissues, bones, tendons, etc. If the body does not have enough it will not heal properly. Essential vitamins to take for injuries include:

These can be taken in supplement form or through food sources.


Body Composition

The body loses muscle every minute of life. This is because the muscles, like the other tissues in the body they depend on cell turnover and protein synthesis. This means that the body continually breaks down the protein in the muscles and rebuilds them. This is how the body is supposed to function and part of what keeps it alive. Skeletal muscle can be grown and developed with proper nutrition. This includes eating sufficient protein to provide the necessary amino acids and regular physical activity.

The reverse is also true becoming less physically active and the individual’s diet no longer supports the development of increased muscle tissue the body enters a catabolic/tissue-reducing state known as muscle atrophy. Muscles that are partially used meaning using less than 20% of their maximum force begin to atrophy over time. Muscles that are completely unused, like when bedridden with very little movement, can degrade around 1/8th of strength per week.  

Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP, CIFM, CTG* email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com phone: 915-850-0900 Licensed in Texas & New Mexico

 

Pastakia, Khushnum, and Saravana Kumar. “Acute whiplash-associated disorders (WAD).” Open access emergency medicine: OAEM vol. 3 29-32. 27 Apr. 2011, doi:10.2147/OAEM.S17853

Is Whiplash Serious: Open Access Emergency Medicine. (2011)“Acute whiplash Associated Disorders.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4753964/

How the Neck Works: UpToDate. (2020) “Patient education: Neck pain (Beyond the Basics). https://www.uptodate.com/contents/neck-pain-beyond-the-basics

How Does Pain Become Chronic?

How Does Pain Become Chronic?

How does pain become chronic? Pain can be a complex condition, as it involves both physiological and psychological components. When an individual experiences an injury, the damaged tissues trigger and send pain signals to the brain. This is how the body alerts that there is something wrong, and thus prevents further damage. Those pain signals travel to the brain, stimulate the nerves, and cause a sensation known as pain.

 

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 How Does Pain Become Chronic?

Nerves and the brain

Nerves control the body�s functions like the organs, sensation, and movement. The nervous system receives information and generates the correct response. Two major types of nerves are sensory and motor. Sensory nerves relay information like touch, temperature, and pain to the brain and spinal cord. Motor nerves relay signals from the brain back to the muscles, which causes them to contract voluntarily or reflexively.

The peripheral nervous system is the combined millions of nerves throughout the body. The peripheral nervous system’s nerves relay signals/messages to the central nervous system, which is comprised of the brain and spinal cord. �

When pain becomes chronic the brain fails to process these signals correctly and the individual continues to feel pain after the injury has healed or improved. As time goes on the nerves that send the pain signals are more methodical in their signaling. This means more signals than normally will be sent and are far more intense. Conditions like cancer and diabetes can cause tissue and nerve damage throughout the body.

Acute vs. Chronic

Acute pain has a short duration of around three months or less. The causes are usually clear and not as difficult to diagnose. The underlying factor/s like an injury is resolved the pain also goes away. As the pain is gone, the individual no longer has problems carrying out daily activities. A few causes of acute pain are:

  • Surgical procedures
  • Dental procedures
  • Bone fractures
  • Burns
  • Open wounds
  • Childbirth

Chronic pain is defined as pain that lasts three to six months with some conditions going for years. Individuals can experience chronic pain weeks and months possibly years after the injury took place. And it can happen without any apparent cause. Many cases often involve more than one factor. This causes significant problems with daily activities. When pain becomes chronic it is often associated with conditions like cancer, diabetes, and arthritis.

CP and CPS

Chronic pain is defined as any type of pain that persists for six months or longer. Chronic pain syndrome is a collection of conditions that are associated with chronic pain. These conditions can make the pain worse or cause other complications like sleep problems, anger, anxiety, and depression. �

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 How Does Pain Become Chronic?

Causes

Doctors don’t know exactly what causes chronic pain syndrome. It often starts with an injury or painful condition such as:

  • Arthritis
  • Broken bones
  • Back pain
  • Cancer
  • Headaches
  • Joint problems
  • Muscle strains and sprains
  • Repetitive strain injuries
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Nerve injury/damage
  • Lyme disease
  • Ulcers
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Surgery

Diagnosis

A doctor will go over an individual’s medical history, illnesses, or injuries that could have started the pain. They will ask questions to learn more about the type of pain being felt and how long. Questions can include:

  • When did the pain begin?
  • Where on the body does it hurt?
  • What does the pain feel like – Throbbing, Pounding, Shooting, Sharp, Pinching, Stinging, Burning
  • The severity of the pain on a scale of 1 to 10
  • What sets the pain off?
  • What makes it worse?
  • Have any treatments helped?

Imaging tests can show if there is joint damage or other problems:

  • Computed tomography is a powerful X-ray that generates detailed images.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging uses magnets and radio waves to take pictures of the organs and structures.
  • X-rays use radiation in very low doses to create images of the body’s structures.

Talk with a chiropractor to understand how a customized treatment plan for chronic pain is developed.


Chronic Hand Pain Treatment

 


 

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*

How To Become A Chiropractor

How To Become A Chiropractor

How to Become A Chiropractor

A chiropractor is a doctor who specializes in musculoskeletal and nervous system problems. It is the belief of the chiropractic community that problems in these areas can cause adverse health issues, including lowered resistance to disease, illness, and injury.

Chiropractors manipulate the spine to realign spinal joints in their patients. By doing so, patients are expected to experience optimum health without the assistance of drugs or surgery. Instead, chiropractors expect the body will heal itself once the spine and spinal joints are in proper alignment. Additionally, chiropractors consider and address other lifestyle factors which are commonly recognized as significantly affecting health such as diet, rest, exercise, heredity, and environmental factors. They also make other recommendations for changes which are expected to improve the patient�s overall health.

Chiropractors perform many of the same tasks as other general and specialty doctors. Patient health histories are gathered, physical, neurological, and orthopedic examinations are performed, and various laboratory tests, x-rays, and diagnostic imaging tools are used to diagnose and analyze the patient�s condition. Other forms of treatment may be used or recommended by the chiropractor including ultrasound, massage, heat, water, acupuncture, or electric currents. Prescription drugs and surgery are not part of the services provided by chiropractors. Chiropractors may recommend patients to see other doctors or specialists to address health issues or concerns outside of their area of expertise. Some chiropractors choose to specialize in a certain type of practice, such as orthopedics, neurology, sports injuries, internal disorders, diagnostic imaging, or pediatrics.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a job growth increase of 17% in the chiropractic field over the next seven years. An increasing public interest in alternative healthcare methods is beneficial to the chiropractic field. The public is seeking healthy living options which do not include prescription medicines or surgery; instead, a substantial number of people are searching for solutions which emphasize healthy lifestyles. The non-invasive procedures provided by chiropractors in answer to their patients health issues and concerns appeals to the segment of the public looking for these types of answers.

SELECTING THE RIGHT CHIROPRACTIC COLLEGE

Chiropractor students should select a college which offers a strong science degree or pre-medical program. Some colleges may have an affiliation with chiropractic training schools, which all future chiropractors must successfully complete. Research chiropractic schools to determine which one you are most interested in attending; this will help you to determine if the school is linked to any of the colleges you are considering. Courses in biology, chemistry, and physics will be important to individuals looking to work in a medical field. Electives may be concentrated in health, fitness, and nutrition. Students should, if given the opportunity, study topics and courses related to kinesiology and sports medicine. Courses in psychology and sociology will also help students to gain a more comprehensive understanding of people and society, better preparing them to serve the public. Additionally, business courses ensure that future professionals understand how to successfully manage a business in the complex healthcare field, as medical professionals must understand finances, medical insurance processing, business laws, business practices, business ethics, and medical records maintenance.

CHIROPRACTIC SCHOOLS

Students must attend chiropractic college in order to enter the profession. Upon completion of the program, students will have earned a doctorate in chiropractic medicine. The Council on Chiropractic Education, or CCE, is the nationally recognized accrediting agency by the United States Secretary of Education which regulates the quality of the curriculum offered at chiropractic colleges. Currently there are 15 CCE accredited chiropractic institutions in the United States. These include, as listed on the CCE website:

Students attend chiropractic college for four years. During this time, students are taught the scientific and academic skills and knowledge required to become experts in the field of chiropractic medicine. The final year is spent in practice, performing the functions of a chiropractic doctor under the supervision of an experienced professional. The curriculum includes intensive study of neuromusculoskeletal conditions, nutritional and holistic health, specialized and focused curriculum in areas of acupuncture and oriental medicine, applied nutrition, and various other disciplines. Students will complete extensive course hours in diagnosis, biochemistry, anatomy, chiropractic technique, and philosophy and ancillary therapeutic procedures.

TAKING THE NATIONAL BOARD EXAM

The National Board Exam for chiropractors is administered by the NBCE. The test is given twice each year. The exam consists of three parts. Part one is 110 multiple choice questions relating to general anatomy, spinal anatomy, physiology, chemistry, pathology, microbiology, and public health. The second part also consists of 110 multiple choice questions, but in the areas of general diagnosis, neuromusculoskeletal diagnosis, diagnostic imaging, and principles of chiropractic, chiropractic practice, and associated clinical sciences. Part three of the test consists of another 110 multiple choice questions and 10 case vignettes covering the areas of diagnosis or clinical impression, clinical laboratory and special studies examination, chiropractic techniques, case management, physical examination, case history, and roentgenologic examination. Each part of the test is timed. Additional specialized testing is offered for applicants who choose to pursue an area of specialization.

LICENSING FOR CHIROPRACTORS

After successful completion of an accredited chiropractic program, graduates will need to obtain a license to practice in their resident state or the state in which they intend to practice. State licensure regulations may vary from state to state. It is important to research your state�s regulations prior to completion of the doctor of chiropractic program to ensure all conditions are met. The Federation of Chiropractic Licensing Boards is a nonprofit organization which provides a link to the licensure information in all states. Locate information for each state through this directory.
The information provided includes licensing fees, renewal requirements, national board testing requirements, security and criminal check requirements, additional certification requirements, continuing education, and malpractice insurance requirements. A link to each state licensing board is also provided.

CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR CHIROPRACTORS

The chiropractic field is experiencing an increase in advancements in technology and knowledge through research and academic exploration. Changing regulations are also an area in which chiropractic doctors will need to remain current. Each state maintains their own continuing education requirements upon which licensing will be contingent. Twenty-four credit hours of continuing education every two years is a common requirement. All programs must be board approved and conducted by approved colleges or chiropractic associations or organizations. Check with your state licensing board to determine if the program has been approved prior to enrollment.

PRACTICING AS A CHIROPRACTOR

After obtaining a doctorate and passing the licensing examination, a new chiropractor has many options ahead of them. Most chiropractors will end up working solo or in a group practice, with about one in three being self-employed. A small group will work in hospitals or physicians� offices. The median pay for Chiropractors in 2016 was $67,520, with the lowest 10 percent earning less than $32,380, and the highest earning more than $141,030. Chiropractors can further increase their salary by building up a strong client base and developing their own practice. Many times, chiropractors will work in the evening or on weekends to accommodate their patients.

DAY TO DAY PRACTICE

Chiropractors will spend a lot of time on their feet as they examine and treat patients. Some of the most important qualities that a chiropractor can have include decision-making, detail-oriented, dexterity, empathy, and interpersonal skills. If the chiropractor is operating his or her own practice, the ability to manage a staff of employees like secretaries and nurses is vital to the success of the practice. An understanding of the current healthcare system is also important, as that will determine what kind of payments a chiropractor may be able to receive, unless they work in a cash-only system. More information can be found in the Occupational Outlook Handbook provided by the BLS.

CHIROPRACTIC SPECIALTIES AND CERTIFICATIONS

Another way for chiropractors to increase their annual earnings or skills would be to specialize in one or more areas. Specializations can help a chiropractor better diagnose and treat chronic illnesses, sports injuries, and/or complex occupational injuries. The American Chiropractic Association and American Board of Chiropractic Specialties (ABCS) lists 14 specialties and provides guidance to maintain standards of chiropractic certification. These include, as listed on the American Chiropractic Association website:

Certifying Body or Bodies Certification Description
American Chiropractic Board of RadiologyDiplomate (DACBR) Chiropractic Diagnostic Imaging (DACBR) Specialist Has additional training in interpreting diagnostic imaging results such as x-rays, CT scans, MRIs, and ultrasounds.
American Chiropractic Rehabilitation BoardDiplomate (DACRB) Chiropractic Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation (DACRB) Specialist Has had extensive postgraduate training in physiologic therapeutics and rehabilitation to better treat injuries that may have resulted from an accident or a sports injury.
American Chiropractic Rehabilitation BoardDiplomate (DACRB) Chiropractic Acupuncture (DABCA) Specialist Treats a wide variety of health conditions that include all body systems and tissues, and focuses special attention on the relationship between the spine, nervous system, and the meridian system.
American Clinical Board of NutritionDiplomate (DACBN)
OR
Chiropractic Board of Clinical NutritionDiplomate (DCBCN)
Chiropractic Nutrition (DACBN/CBCN) Specialist Is trained to encourage and promote a more advanced knowledge and use of nutrition in the practice of chiropractic for the maintenance of health and the prevention of disease.
American Board of Chiropractic InternistsDiplomate (DABCI) Chiropractic Diagnosis and Management of Internal Disorders (DABCI) Specialist Is trained as a holistic primary care physician specializing in modern medical diagnosis, functional medicine, and natural therapeutics.
Academy of Chiropractic Orthopedists Fellow (FACO) Chiropractic Orthopedist (DACO/DABCO) Specialist Has special knowledge of both the normal function and diseases of the bones, joints, capsules, discs, muscles, ligaments, and tendons, as well as their complete neurological components, referred organ systems and contiguous tissues, and is able to diagnose and treat the conditions related to them.
American Chiropractic Neurology BoardDiplomate (DACNB) and sub-specialties:

  • American Chiropractic Academy of Neurology Diplomate (DACAN)
  • American Board of Chiropractic Neurology Diplomate (DABCN)
  • American Board of Electrodiagnostic Specialties Fellow (FABES)
  • American College of Functional Neurology Fellow (FAFCN)
  • American Board of Vestibular Rehabilitation Fellow (FABVR)
  • American Board of Childhood Developmental Disorders Fellow (FABCDD)
  • American Board of Brain Injury & Rehabilitation Fellow (FABBIR)
  • American Board of Neurochemistry & Nutrition Fellow (FABNN)
Chiropractic Clinical Neurologist (DACAN/DACNB) Specialist Is a DC specially trained in the clinical evaluation and treatment of conditions involving the central and peripheral nervous systems.
American Board of Forensic ProfessionalsDiplomate (DABFP) Diplomate of the American Board of Forensic Professionals (DABFP) Performs an orderly analysis, investigation, inquiry, test, inspection, and examination in an attempt to obtain the facts of a case, from which to form an expert opinion.
American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians Diplomate (DACBSP)
OR
Certified Chiropractic Sports Physician (CCSP)
Chiropractic Sports Physician (CCSP/DACBSP) Specialist Is trained in chiropractic sports medicine and exercise science in order to treat sports injuries, enhance athletic performance, and promote physical fitness.
American Chiropractic Board of Occupational Health Diplomate (DACBOH) Chiropractic Occupational Health (DACBOH) Specialist A DC trained in health care diagnosis and treatment choices for workplace neuromusculoskeletal injuries who is able to provide a broad range of work-related injury and illness prevention services for employee populations.
American Board of Chiropractic AcupunctureDiplomate (DABCA) Diplomate of the American Board of Chiropractic Acupuncture (DABCA) Dedicated to promoting high standards of competence and preserving the integrity of using acupuncture as an adjunct therapy to chiropractic treatment.
American Board of Chiropractic Pediatrics Diplomate in Clinical Chiropractic Pediatrics (DICCP) Support members who take care of children in their chiropractic practices, and to promote the acceptance and advancement of pediatric chiropractic care.

These specialty �degrees� are given by their corresponding boards, which also maintain the level of expected qualifications and standards of excellency.