BOOK ONLINE 24/7

Stop Suffering!

  • Quick n' Easy Online Appointment
  • Book Appointment 24/7
  • Call Office: 915-850-0900.
*
Monday8:30 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday8:30 AM - 7:00 PM
Wednesday8:30 AM - 7:00 PM
Thursday8:30 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday8:30 AM - 7:00 PM Open now
Saturday8:30 AM - 1:00 PM
SundayClosed

Doctor Cell Emergencies 915-540-8444

BOOK ONLINE 24/7
Functional Medicine

Notice: As part of our Acute Injury Treatment Practice, we now offer Functional Medicine Integrative Assessments and Treatments* within our clinical scope for chronic degenerative disorders. Learn More* Call Us Today: 915-850-0900

Functional Medicine Explained

Bisphosphonate-Related Proximal Femoral Fractures

Share

With the increase of osteoporosis in older adults, the diagnosis and treatment�of abnormal hip fractures, such as�bisphosphonate-related proximal femoral fractures,�has become more important. According to Dr. Edward J. Fox, MD, obesity is often managed through the long-term�use of bisphosphonate treatment, which can inhibit�osteoclast-mediated bone regeneration. Over the prolonged utilization of bisphosphonate, patients� may develop atypical proximal femoral fractures.

Understanding Atypical Femur Fractures

Atypical femur fractures are characterized as stress fractures which commonly occur in the proximal one-third of the diaphyseal bone, although they might also occur more distally, developing in the lateral cortex and slowly progressing medially. “With irregular fractures, a small ‘beak’ of bone can form on the lateral surface of the femur and that is where the fracture generally begins,” explains Dr. Fox. This contrasts with stress fractures which occur laterally in the medial portion of the bone.

As a result, when a patient with osteoporosis reports feeling hip and knee pain without previous damage or injury, healthcare professionals will ask about bisphosphonate treatment. It is essential for the�doctor to request x-rays of the hip and femur shaft for proper diagnosis.�It is also important to request x-rays of the opposite femur, as atypical bisphosphonate-related proximal femoral fractures frequently occur bilaterally. Dr. Edward J. Fox urges patients to discontinue bisphosphonate use in the case of hip fractures,�followed by the subsequent use of crutches or a walker. Patients will eventually be able to resume regular physical activities.

 

Approximately more than 250,000 hip fractures occur in the United States, causing significant patient disability. The variety of hip fractures in older adults, including bisphosphonate-related proximal femoral fractures, often need several treatment approaches which depend on different considerations, such as the mechanism of injury, location and degree of the fracture, as well as the patient’s age and overall health and wellness.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

 

The precise mechanism of injury by which bisphosphonates cause atypical femur fractures is unknown. Research studies have demonstrated that the suppression of osteoclast activity prevents the clearance of bone fragments which build up on the bone surface during regular daily tasks; decreasing the strength of the bones which lead to fracture. “We all know that the threat of those fractures increases with the extended duration of bisphosphonate exposure, particularly after five decades. Bisphosphonates are stored with a half-life of at least eight decades in bone matrix. To reduce over-exposure and risk of atypical fracture, passing medication discontinuance has been speculated to be beneficial,” explained Dr. Fox

Dr. Edward J. Fox, MD, stated that until research studies find the exact mechanism of injury and treatment for bisphosphonate-related proximal femoral fractures, healthcare professionals should continue to determine the best treatment option for each patient, carefully weighing the benefits and risks of individual patients. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic as well as to spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900�.

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

Additional Topics: Acute Back Pain

Back pain�is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain is the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. The spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Because of this, injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as�herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.

Related Post

 

 

EXTRA IMPORTANT TOPIC: Chiropractic Hip Pain Treatment

Post Disclaimer & Professional Scope of Practice *

The information herein on "Bisphosphonate-Related Proximal Femoral Fractures" is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

We are here to help you and your family.

Blessings

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Published by

Recent Posts

Weight Loss and Whole Body Chiropractic

Chiropractic medicine specializes in the musculoskeletal system. It treats the whole body because if one… Read More

Using Heat and Ice For A Pinched Nerve

Most if not all of us have probably used heat and/or ice on a sprain,… Read More

Rheumatoid Arthritis Flare-Ups Management

Managing rheumatoid arthritis is an ongoing balancing act. Flare-ups can still present despite following the… Read More

Hamstring Syndrome, Sciatica, and Chiropractic

The hamstring muscles are three muscles in the back of the thigh. The sciatic nerve… Read More

Initial Chiropractic Examination

Chiropractic treatment/care is a recommended pain relief option for musculoskeletal automobile, sports, personal - injuries,… Read More

Relaxing The Low Back Muscles

Relaxing the low back muscles. The low back supports the weight of the upper body… Read More

Online History & Registration 🔘
Call us Today 🔘