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The Critical Link To Crohn’s Disease and The Gut

The Critical Link To Crohn’s Disease and The Gut

Do you feel:

  • Inflammation in your gut?
  • Pain from the left side under the ribcage?
  • A sense of fullness after 1-4 hours after eating?
  • Excessive belching, burning, or burping after eating a meal?
  • Excessive usage of antacids?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might be experiencing Crohn�s disease and how it is affecting your gut system.

The human body and the gut microbiome have a wonderful connection as they help balance each other out. The human body protects the organs and the systems from harmful factors that are from the outside, while the organs and the systems help make sure that the body is functioning properly. With the gut system, it helps the body by providing food to be digested and can help transfer hormones from the gut to the brain. Even though the gut can help make sure the body is functioning correctly, it can be prone to dysfunctions from factors that can harm the gut system. Inflammation, intestinal permeability, and other harmful factors can cause the gut not to work properly. It can cause many problems that can hurt the body, and if it is not treated, it can turn into chronic illnesses.

Crohn�s Disease and The Gut

A recent study that was published in 2019, researchers have discovered that there is a critical link between IL-1? (interleukin-1?) and the gut microbiome. What IL-1? is, is that it is a protein that controls the inflammation in the gut. Researchers were shocked about this information and were able to find that by blocking the IL-1? protein since it is a pro-inflammatory protein in the gut, it can cause a significant decrease in the severity of intestinal inflammation of Crohn’s disease.

The photo of internal organs is on the women's body against gray background, Viscera on Human

Surprisingly there are some more research and information about the effects of anti-ILalpha treatment for helping out the body. The research shows that a study was being controlled by changing the body�s intestinal microbial ecosystem and even correcting mucosal dysbiosis. What this treatment does is that it decreases the ratio of Proteobacteria to be Bacteroidetes, while also decreasing the Helicobacter species as well as increasing Mucispirillum schaedleri and Lactobacillus salivarus. With these microflora modifications being linked, they can provide similar biological effects that steroids have been able to produce in the body, thus considering to be the gold standard for treatment.

With these findings, they show the diversity and balance of how the gut microbiome plays a huge role not only in gastrointestinal health but also playing a role in the health of the immune system and the inflammatory response in the body. Even though this study has been tested on subjects and further research is still needed, it gives many researchers hope for finding some therapeutic targets for any patients that may be suffering from any of these deliberating conditions. The findings can provide the rationale for medical researchers to help conduct a clinical trial for blocking IL-1? for patients that have IBD.

Studies on Crohn�s Disease

Studies have shown that IBD, Crohn�s disease, and ulcerative colitis, are autoimmune conditions that causes multiple triggers that will chronically stimulate the immune system over a long period in the body. These autoimmune conditions can cause the immune system to become overburden and be unable to function properly. What comes with these autoimmune conditions is chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation has become the result of function loss, thus leading the body to have chronic gastrointestinal ailments.

These can be characterized by diarrhea, severe abdominal pain, and other crippling manifestations that can greatly affect a patient�s quality of life and overall health and wellness. Studies have shown that there is no surprise that the microbial composition of the GI tract can play a huge role in the development of IBD. The studies found that imbalance or dysbiosis are associated with an increase in intestinal inflammation that may cause IBD. Research has shown that the intestinal microbiome can greatly impact the body�s immune health since 70% of the immune system lies within the GI tract.

Studies have demonstrated that there are events, both chemical and molecular, that can shift the microbiome and exacerbate disease activity in patients that have IBD. Although there is a contrast for healthy individual’s gut microbiomes that are shown to be much more stable. Furthermore, the science shows that E. coli can proliferate in IBD during flare-ups in the body. When this happens, it can further contribute to the patient’s symptoms and the progression of the disease.

When a person is trying to get healthier, the best way to do it is by avoiding pro-inflammatory foods that can cause the gut to have inflammation. Studies have found that processed foods, sugars, and trans fats can cause inflammation. The best way to be healthy is to increase the intake of an anti-inflammatory diet that is rich in antioxidants, have high omega-3s, and have a high dosage of prebiotic and probiotic supplements. With these healthy options, they can assist with the inflammatory response within the GI tract to help reduce the IBD flare-ups. With certain bacteriophages, they have been shown to infect and inhibit the growth of E. coli, which surprisingly has also been shown to help reduce the symptoms and can even potentially slow the progress of IBD.

Conclusion

With more and more research discovering the link between Crohn�s disease and the gut system is truly remarkable as researchers and scientists are finding ways to calm down and even prevent inflammation from happening. By eating healthy, nutritious food that contains antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties can help the body dampen the effects of inflammation and improve the overall health and wellness of the body. Some products are here to help the body and provide support to the gastrointestinal system.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Jurgelewicz, Michael. �New Study Demonstrates Fasting-Mimicking Diet Reduces Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathology.� Designs for Health, 15 Mar. 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/974.

Jurgelewicz, Michael. �New Study Demonstrates Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Can Reach Remission with Diet Alone.� Designs for Health, 4 Jan. 2018, blog.designsforhealth.com/si-42214/new-study-demonstrates-patients-with-inflammatory-bowel-disease-can-reach-remission-with-diet-alone.

Jurgelewicz, Michael. �New Study Identifies How the Microbiome Is Disrupted in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.� Designs for Health, 7 June 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1036.

Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi, and Takanori Kanai. �The Gut Microbiota and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.� Seminars in Immunopathology, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, Jan. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4281375/.

Menghini, Paola, et al. �Neutralization of IL-1? Ameliorates Crohn’s Disease-like Ileitis by Functional Alterations of the Gut Microbiome.� PNAS, National Academy of Sciences, 26 Dec. 2019, www.pnas.org/content/116/52/26717.

staff, Science X. �Researchers Discover Critical Link to Controlling Inflammation in Crohn’s Disease.� Medical Xpress – Medical Research Advances and Health News, Medical Xpress, 16 Dec. 2019, medicalxpress.com/news/2019-12-critical-link-inflammation-crohn-disease.html?utm_source=nwletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily-nwletter.

Team, DFH. �Discovery of a Critical Link between Crohn’s and the Gut Microbiome.� Designs for Health, 5 Mar. 2020, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1208.


Modern Integrative Wellness- Esse Quam Videri

The University offers a wide variety of medical professions for functional and integrative medicine. Their goal is to inform individuals who want to make a difference in the functional medical fields with knowledgeable information that they can provide.

The Amazing Benefits That Aloe Vera Has

The Amazing Benefits That Aloe Vera Has

Do you feel:

  • A sense of fullness during and after meals?
  • Digestive problems subside with rest and relaxation?
  • Crave sweets during the day?
  • Eating sweets does not relieve the craving for sugar?
  • Stomach pains, burning, or aching 1-4 hours?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then something is disrupting your gut system. Why not try some aloe vera to dampen the symptoms.

Aloe Vera

Whenever someone thinks of aloe vera or aloe itself, the mind goes to sunburns and inflamed redden skin in general. Aloe vera has claimed its way to fame by soothing sunburnt skin; however, this long-celebrated medicinal plant has many properties and potential applications that go way beyond soothing inflamed skin.

aloe-vera-cgdeaw_ss_full_width

Throughout the recent years, there was a surge in research about the gut microbiome and how it both affects and is affected by various diseases. The various research showed that SCFAs (short-chain fatty acids) producing a byproduct of colonic bacteria and fermenting dietary fibers, thus having critical signaling functions and playing a role in the gut-associated immune response. Studies have shown that butyric acid or butyrate may be beneficial for brain health in the body. Furthermore, the study also mentioned how SCFAs could contribute to reducing the inflammation in the gut while also associating between high-fiber diets and reducing the risk of colon cancer.

Aloe Vera�s Prebiotic Effects

Other studies showed that aloe vera has impressive prebiotic effects when it is being incubated within the human gut bacteria cultures. When a culture of mixed bacteria is being incubated with aloe vera, it shows a linear increase in butyric acid and an increase production of acetic acid when Bifidobacterium infantis is incubated with aloe vera. Studies show that when people have an increased intake of their dietary fibers, it can bring negative consequences to their bodies. The research talks about how having an increase in fiber is an obvious way to help support SCFAs, but for people who want to increase their fiber intake, they should consume aloe vera.

Aloe’s prebiotic effects are fantastic due to the chemical structure of some of its components. Surprisingly the aloe vera gel is about 55% polysaccharides and contains a compound called acemannan. With acemannan and the other polysaccharides in the aloe plant, many researchers have believed that these components are a significant contributor to aloe’s prebiotic and gut supportive effects. Since acemannan contains sugar molecules that are being linked to glycosidic bonds, they cannot be digested by human enzymes. However, with the body�s intestinal bacteria, studies have found that it can cleave the bond that acemannan has created and making acemannan digestible for the colonic flora. Another compound that aloe has is known as barbaloin. This compound contains other bonds that are inaccessible to the human digestive enzymes but is cleavable by the GI flora in the body.

Aloe Helping with Insulin

Aloe supplements can provide beneficial properties to battle against diabetes. A study from India stated that individuals who tale aloe vera gel powder for three months showed a substantial improvement in their glycemic control and cardiometabolic health.

Earlier studies have found out that aloe supplementation can improve the biomarkers of cardiometabolic health in the body as well. The study found that individuals who are pre-diabetic or have metabolic syndrome were given the standardized aloe extract for about eight weeks, and the results were astounding. The results showed that the consumed aloe supplement leads to a significant reduction in total cholesterol and LDL-C in the body as well as fasting glucose and fructosamine. Consuming aloe can cause a reduction in insulin in the body so people can start feeling better.

There is a more recent study that confirmed that aloe supplementation helps improve glycemic control and lipid profiles for pre-diabetic individuals. The results showed a decrease in triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL-C, as well as an increase in HDL in the body. Research found out that low-carbohydrate and the ketogenic diets are highly effective for improving blood glucose and insulin, especially for anyone who has type 2 diabetes. By adding aloe supplementation, it can be a powerful adjunct, especially for those who have a difficult time sticking to a strict low-carb regimen when a person’s dietary change is absent.

Conclusion

Aloe vera is an exotic plant that has many beneficial properties that can not only reduce red, inflamed skin but can provide support to the gut system and help individuals who may be pre-diabetic. Aloe vera can help the body’s gut system by making sure that no disruption and inflammation can affect the intestinal barrier, causing leaky gut. By consuming aloe vera in plant form or even using it as a supplement can provide fantastic health benefits for the body. Some products can be taken with aloe vera in order to make sure the gastrointestinal is being healthy by supporting the metabolic system and the gastrointestinal. These products offer hypoallergenic nutrients, enzymatic cofactors, and phytonutrients for overall health and wellness.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Quezada, Maria Paz, et al. �Acemannan and Fructans from Aloe Vera (Aloe Barbadensis Miller) Plants as Novel Prebiotics.� Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 26 Oct. 2017, pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jafc.7b04100.

Alinejad-Mofrad, Samaneh, et al. �Improvement of Glucose and Lipid Profile Status with Aloe Vera in Pre-Diabetic Subjects: a Randomized Controlled-Trial.� Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders, BioMed Central, 9 Apr. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4399423/.

Bourassa, Megan W, et al. �Butyrate, Neuroepigenetics, and the Gut Microbiome: Can a High Fiber Diet Improve Brain Health?” Neuroscience Letters, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 20 June 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4903954/.

Choudhary, Monika, et al. �Hypoglycemic and Hypolipidemic Effect of Aloe Vera L. in Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetics.� Journal of Food Science and Technology, Springer India, Jan. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3857397/.

Devaraj, Sridevi, et al. “Effects of Aloe vera supplementation in subjects with prediabetes/metabolic syndrome.” Metabolic syndrome and related disorders�vol. 11,1 (2013): 35-40. doi:10.1089/met.2012.0066

Jurgelewicz, Michael. �Diversity Is the Key to a Healthy Gut.� Designs for Health, 5 Apr. 2018, blog.designsforhealth.com/diversity-is-the-key-to-a-healthy-gut.

Pogribna, M., et al. �Effect of Aloe Vera Whole Leaf Extract on Short Chain Fatty Acids Production by Bacteroides Fragilis, Bifidobacterium Infantis, and Eubacterium Limosum.� Society for Applied Microbiology, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 19 Mar. 2008, sfamjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1472-765X.2008.02346.x.

Sivaprakasam, Sathish, et al. �Benefits of Short-Chain Fatty Acids and Their Receptors in Inflammation and Carcinogenesis.� Pharmacology & Therapeutics, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4942363/.

Team, DFH. �Alternative Applications for Aloe.� Designs for Health, 5 Mar. 2020, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1209.

Team, DFH. �Could Increased Fiber Worsen Constipation?� Designs for Health, 10 Oct. 2018, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/759.

Team, DFH. �Influence of Ketogenic Diets on Blood Glucose and Insulin.� Designs for Health, 8 May 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1014.


Modern Integrative Wellness- Esse Quam Videri

The University offers a wide variety of medical professions for functional and integrative medicine. Their goal is to inform individuals who want to make a difference in the functional medical fields with knowledgeable information that they can provide.

Bifidobacteria and The Gut System

Bifidobacteria and The Gut System

Do you feel:

  • Stomach pains, burning, or aching 1-4 hours after eating?
  • Digestive problems subside with rest or relaxation?
  • Indigestion and fullness last 2-4 hours after eating?
  • Excessive belching, burping, or bloating?
  • Abdominal distention after certain probiotics or natural supplements?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then it might be due to a decrease in your gut system’s Bifidobacteria.

The body’s microbiome is home to numerous bacterial species that help contribute to their unique health-promoting properties. These bacterial species help the body by making sure that each organ and body system is working like a clock. When the body contains harmful pathogenic bacteria, it can cause the body to dysfunction, and chronic illnesses will start to form and even harm the body.

Research studies have found out that the number of bacteria species that are in the human gut microbiota could probably exceed 104. This means that there are at least ten times more bacterial cells in the human gut than the number of human cells. There are even over 100 times the amount of the genomic microbiome as the human genome. Surprisingly though, there are even more studies that have found that there is an equal ratio of humans to bacteria cells.

Bifidobacteria

Regardless of the number, the gut microbiome still has the most abundant microorganisms in the body. When the gut and the body are well balanced, there are a variety of microbes that can give the body both fortified and strengthen that can support the immune system, fight off the inflammation that has entered the body. The microbes can provide the gut a barrier against pathogens, and help metabolize as well as producing critical nutrients for the body to function. With the numerous amounts of bacteria species in both the gut and the body, there is one of the bacterial species in the body that is highly important for a healthy body. It is known as Bifidobacteria, and these bacterial species play a massive role in the body’s microbiome.

bifidobacterias in the gut

Bifidobacteria is an indigenous genus species that are an abundance of this bacterial species that lie in the gut, and their numbers, as well as their species, can be altered with age. Bifidobacteria is prominently dominated in the intestines. Surprisingly though, the Bifidobacteria species can be found in breastfed infants and are in the intestines. Since the fucosylated oligosaccharides in breast milk help the infant grow, it will substrates for B. longum. With the Bifidobacteria colony in infants have become well-colonized until the species B. catenulatum and B. adolescentis is there in the adult years, and it seems that B. longum remains to be an abundance throughout the human life span.

Bifidobacteria Benefits in Infants

When a woman becomes pregnant, Bifidobacteria becomes the first genus of bacteria that is being transferred. This bacterium ensures that it is being transferred from the mother’s vaginal canal, breast milk, placenta, and amniotic fluid to the infant that is growing in the mother. When this is taking process, it highlights the importance of vaginal birth and breastfeeding to establish a healthy, growing microbiome. Research shows that this establishment of Bifidobacteria in an infant can delay if the mother of the growing child has a polymorphism in the FUT2 (Fucosyltransferase 2) gene. What this gene does is that it encodes enzymes to transfer fucose to glycans in breastmilk, then the glycan is then metabolized by the Bifidobacteria for the body to grow and be healthy.

Studies have found that in some Bifidobacteria species like B. breve, have antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties that are vital for the life stages of the human body where the immunity may be weak or even compromised. For infants, the Bifidobacteria species are even more valuable, since they help with the development of a new immune system and are not able to transfer antibiotic resistance. This can be concerning for some probiotic species in the body. With the B. breve bacteria species, however, studies have found out that these bacterial species are significant for preventing numerous gastrointestinal conditions for children.

Bifidobacteria Benefits in Adults

When it comes to the Bifidobacteria in adults, their bacterial quantities decrease due to natural aging. However, the Bifidobacteria still provides an equal amount of beneficial properties that exert a numerous amount of biological activities that can prevent some of the most common gastrointestinal conditions. Studies have shown that Bifidobacteria can show promising results in the prevention of colorectal cancer and can be used as an adjunct therapy. The studies even show how Bifidobacteria can display anti-mutagenic activity, protecting DNA from carcinogen-induced damage, and even inhibited the genotoxic effects of carcinogens.

Another study has even shown that Bifidobacteria can prevent and mitigate diarrhea that is caused by Clostridium difficile. The results show that Bifidobacteria therapy can significantly reduce the quantity of Clostridium difficile and dropping the clostridial toxin titres.

Conclusion

Bifidobacteria is a large genus of bacteria that is responsible for maintaining a healthy body and gut system. When the body is dealing with inflammation or having stomach issues, then the bifidobacterial genus will be affected as well. This bacteria is in the human body from infancy to adulthood, and it will decrease naturally through aging. Some products are specialized to help the gastrointestinal system and the gut system by offering hypoallergenic nutrients, enzymatic cofactors, metabolic precursors, and phytonutrients that the body needs.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Arboleya, Silvia, et al. �Gut Bifidobacteria Populations in Human Health and Aging.� Frontiers in Microbiology, Frontiers Media S.A., 19 Aug. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4990546/.

Bozzi Cionci, Nicole, et al. �Therapeutic Microbiology: The Role of Bifidobacterium Breve as Food Supplement for the Prevention/Treatment of Paediatric Diseases.� Nutrients, MDPI, 10 Nov. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6265827/.

O’Callaghan, Amy, and Douwe van Sinderen. �Bifidobacteria and Their Role as Members of the Human Gut Microbiota.� Frontiers in Microbiology, Frontiers Media S.A., 15 June 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4908950/#!po=8.75000.

Team, DFH. �The Basics of Bifidobacteria.� Designs for Health, 5 Sept. 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1100.

Thursby, Elizabeth, and Nathalie Juge. �Introduction to the Human Gut Microbiota.� The Biochemical Journal, Portland Press Ltd., 16 May 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5433529/.

Wei, Yanxia, et al. �Protective Effects of Bifidobacterial Strains Against Toxigenic Clostridium Difficile.� Frontiers in Microbiology, Frontiers Media S.A., 8 May 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5952185/.


Modern Integrative Wellness- Esse Quam Videri

The University offers a wide variety of medical professions for functional and integrative medicine. Their goal is to inform individuals who want to make a difference in the functional medical fields with knowledgeable information that they can provide.

Vitamin D and The Gut Connection

Vitamin D and The Gut Connection

Do you feel:

  • Digestive problems subside with rest and relaxation?
  • Excessive belching, burping, or bloating?
  • An overall sense of bloating?
  • Inflammation in your bones or joints?
  • That bowels do not empty completely?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might be experiencing gut and bone tissues in your body due to a vitamin D deficiency.

There is a global epidemic that has been linked to many autoimmune diseases that have affected the human body. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to many chronic diseases like type 1 diabetes to IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) and can affect the gut microbiome. With new research studies taking a look at how high doses of vitamin D supplementation can help the gut microbiome, it is fascinating seeing what the new results show how vitamin D is a high essential to provide optimal support to a healthy body and gut.

Vitamin D and Its Benefits

Vitamin D is an essential vitamin as it can be produced by the human body through sun exposure and can boost their vitamin D intake even more through certain kinds of food and supplements. Vitamin has many beneficial properties like maintaining bone health and healthy teeth while protecting the body against diseases and conditions that can harm the body. There are more benefits that vitamin D have as well as the many multiple roles that are fantastic for the body; some include:

  • Supporting healthy bones and teeth
  • Providing support for healthy immune, brain, and nervous system
  • Helps regulate insulin levels and helps manage diabetes
  • Providing support for a healthy cardiovascular system and a healthy lung function
  • Can influence the gene expression that is being involved in cancer development

Vitamin D can also be in the form of sun exposure and helped the body get the needed supplement into itself. Even though everyone should at least go outside to get at least some sunlight into their body, although healthcare professionals do advise that prolonged exposure of the sun’s rays can cause skin damage and other chronic illnesses.

Vitamin-D-Deficiency

Studies have shown that UV light from the sun can be linked to the body’s gut microbiomes. When there is vitamin D deficiency in the body, there is a higher risk of developing diseases like IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) and multiple sclerosis. There are even more studies on how vitamin D can even affect various autoimmune diseases and provide anti-inflammatory effects on the gut. The research shows that vitamin D can help regulate gastrointestinal inflammation, especially Crohn�s disease.

The Different Studies of Vitamin D and The Gut

There was another study on how vitamin D can not only improve the gut flora in the body but also give hope to people who have metabolic syndrome. The study showed that if there is an insufficient supply of vitamin D can aggravate the gut flora, causing it to be imbalanced while also contributing to a full-scale fatty liver as well as metabolic syndrome. The research study also stated that vitamin D deficiency could decrease the body’s production of defensins, which are anti-microbial molecules that are essential to maintain healthy gut flora.

Surprisingly though, a study has found that the hormonal activity of vitamin D can be found in the cells in the human body. It can provide beneficial effects to not only the gut homeostasis and its immunity but also provide beneficial effects to the kidneys, muscles, and different organs; what is surprising, though, is limited research on how vitamin D influences the gut flora. One study shows how there is evidence about the extraskeletal effects of vitamin D have been accruing and being partially mediated through the gastrointestinal microbiome, while also being linked. While another study showed how high doses of vitamin D could affect the composition of an adolescent girl’s gut microbiome. The research shows how high dose supplementation of vitamin D can alter adolescent’s gut microbiome composition and even dampen the effects of inflammatory bowel disease in their gut as well. Vitamin D is gaining a following as a study has shown that vitamin D can help the body’s blood levels that are 60-80ng/ml and help the person have a healthy sleep pattern, which is perfect for anyone who might be suffering from insomnia.

Conclusion

Vitamin D is essential to the body since it not only promotes healthy teeth and healthy bones, but it can even help promote gut health. Even though there is limited research on how vitamin D can promote a healthy gut, studies are still being done, and the research will show how the gut microbiome and vitamin D are connected. By eating foods that are rich with vitamin D can help not only the gut but the entire body. When the body has a vitamin D deficiency, it can cause significant problems for the body due to inflammation as well as developing chronic illnesses that can harm the gut as well. Some products can provide support to the gastrointestinal system as well as making sure that it contains collagen proteins, enzymatic cofactors, hypoallergenic nutrients, metabolic precursors, and phytonutrients to support a healthy gut.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Ware, Megan. �Vitamin D: Benefits, Deficiency, Sources, and Dosage.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 24 Aug. 2009, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/161618.

Bashir, Mina, et al. �Effects of High Doses of Vitamin D3 on Mucosa-Associated Gut Microbiome Vary between Regions of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.� European Journal of Nutrition, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, June 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26130323.

Gominak, S C. �Vitamin D Deficiency Changes the Intestinal Microbiome Reducing B Vitamin Production in the Gut. The Resulting Lack of Pantothenic Acid Adversely Affects the Immune System, Producing a �pro-Inflammatory� State Associated with Atherosclerosis and Autoimmunity.� Medical Hypotheses, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27515213.

Hewings-Martin, Yella. �Does Sunlight Change Our Gut Microbiome?� MedicalNewsToday, 26 Oct. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326782.

Jurgelewicz, Michael. �New Study Investigates the Effect of High Dose Vitamin D on the Gut Microbiome.� Designs for Health, 14 Feb. 2020, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1201.

Lynch, et al. �Vitamin D and the Gut Microbiome: a Systematic Review of in Vivo Studies.� European Journal of Nutrition, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 1 Jan. 1970, link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00394-018-1842-7.

Tabatabaeizadeh, Seyed-Amir, et al. �The Effects of High Doses of Vitamin D on the Composition of the Gut Microbiome of Adolescent Girls.� Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31987101.

Tabatabaeizadeh, Seyed-Amir, et al. �Vitamin D, the Gut Microbiome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.� Journal of Research in Medical Sciences: the Official Journal of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 23 Aug. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6116667/.

Team, Frontiers. �Vitamin D Improves Gut Flora and Metabolic Syndrome.� ScienceDaily, ScienceDaily, 21 Dec. 2016, www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/12/161221125439.htm.


Modern Integrative Wellness- Esse Quam Videri

The University offers a wide variety of medical professions for functional and integrative medicine. Their goal is to inform individuals who want to make a difference in the functional medical fields with knowledgeable information that they can provide.

 

The 4Rs Program

The 4Rs Program

Do you feel:

  • Like you have been diagnosed with Celiac Disease, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Diverticulosis/Diverticulitis, or Leaky Gut Syndrome?
  • Excessive belching, burping, or bloating?
  • Abnormal distention after certain probiotics or natural supplements?
  • Suspicion of nutritional malabsorption?
  • Do digestive problems subside with relaxation?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might be experiencing gut problems and might have to try the 4R Program.

Food sensitivities, rheumatoid arthritis, and anxiety have been associated with impaired gastrointestinal permeability. These various conditions can happen from many factors that can impact the digestive tract. If left untreated it can potentially be the result of dysfunction of the intestinal permeability barrier, causing inflammation, and severe health conditions that the gut can develop. The 4R program is used to restore a healthy gut in the body and involves four steps. They are: remove, replace, reinoculated, and repair.

Intestinal Permeability

The intestinal permeability helps protects the body and makes sure that harmful bacteria do not enter the gut. It protects the body from potential environmental factors that can be harmful and are entering through the digestive tract. It can be either toxin, pathogenic microorganisms, and other antigens that can harm the digestive tract causing problems. The intestinal lining is consisting of a layer of epithelial cells that are separated by tight junctions. In a healthy gut, the tight junction regulates the intestinal permeability by selectively allowing substances to enter and travel across the intestinal barrier and preventing harmful factors from being absorbed.

blog picture of doctor and elderly patient speak

Certain environmental factors can damage the tight junction, and the result is that it can increase the intestinal permeability, which causes intestinal hyperpermeability or leaky gut in the body. Contributing factors can increase intestinal permeability like an excessive amount of saturated fats and alcohol, deficiencies in nutrients, chronic stress, and infectious diseases.

With an increased intestinal permeability in the gut, it can enable antigens to cross the gut mucosa and enter the bloodstream causing an immune response and inflammation to the body. There are certain gastrointestinal conditions that are associated with intestinal hyperpermeability and if left untreated it can trigger certain autoimmune conditions that can cause harm to the body.

4Rs Program

The 4Rs is a program that healthcare professionals advise their patients to use when they are addressing disruptive digestive issues and help support gut healing.

Removing the Problem

The first step in the 4Rs program is to remove harmful pathogens and inflammation triggers that are associated with increased intestinal permeability. Triggers like stress and chronic alcohol consumption can do much harm to an individual’s body. So targeting these harmful factors from the body is to treat it with medication, antibiotics, supplements, and the removal of inflammatory foods from the diet is advised, including:

  • – Alcohol
  • – Gluten
  • – Food additives
  • – Starches
  • – Certain fatty acids
  • – Certain foods that a person is sensitive to

Replacing the Nutrients

The second step of the 4Rs program is to replace the nutrients that are causing the gut problems through inflammation. Certain nutrients can help reducing inflammation in the gut while making sure that the digestive tract is being supported. There are some anti-inflammatory foods that are nutritious. These include:

  • – High-fiber foods
  • – Omega-3s
  • – Olive oil
  • – Mushrooms
  • – Anti-inflammatory herbs

There are certain supplements can be used to support digestive function by assisting and absorbing the nutrients to promote a healthy gut. What the digestive enzymes do is that they assist in helping to break down fats, proteins, and carbohydrates in the gut. This will help benefit individuals that have an impaired digestive tract, food intolerances, or having celiac disease. Supplements like bile acid supplements can help assist in nutrient absorption by merging lipids together. Studies have stated that bile acids have been used to treat the liver, gallbladder, and bile duct while preventing gallstone formation after bariatric surgery.

Reinoculated The Gut

The third step is of the 4rs program to reinoculated the gut microbe with beneficial bacteria to promote a healthy gut function. Studies have been shown that probiotic supplements have been used to improve the gut by restoring beneficial bacteria. With these supplements, they provide the gut an enhancement by secreting anti-inflammatory substances into the body, help support the immune system, altering the body’s microbial composition, and reducing the intestinal permeability in the gut system.

Since probiotics are found in fermented foods and are considered as a transient since they are not persistent in the gastrointestinal tract and are beneficial. Surprisingly, they still have an impact on human health due to influencing the gut by producing vitamins and anti-microbial compounds, thus providing diversity and gut function.

Repairing the Gut

The last step of the 4Rs program is to repair the gut. This step involves repairing the intestinal lining of the gut with specific nutrients and herbs. These herbs and supplements can help decrease intestinal permeability and inflammation in the body. Some of these herbs and supplements include:

  • – Aloe vera
  • – Chios mastic gum
  • – DGL (Deglycyrrhizinated licorice)
  • – Marshmallow root
  • – L-glutamine
  • – Omega-3s
  • � Polyphenols
  • – Vitamin D
  • – Zinc

Conclusion

Since many factors can adversely affect the digestive system in a harmful way and can be the contributor to several health conditions. The main goal of the 4Rs program is to minimize these factors that are harming the gut and reducing inflammation and increased intestinal permeability. When the patient is being introduced to the beneficial factors that the 4Rs provide, it can lead to a healthy, healed gut. Some products are here to help support the gastrointestinal system by supporting the intestines, improving the sugar metabolism, and targeting the amino acids that are intended to support the intestines.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

De Santis, Stefania, et al. �Nutritional Keys for Intestinal Barrier Modulation.� Frontiers in Immunology, Frontiers Media S.A., 7 Dec. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4670985/.

Ianiro, Gianluca, et al. �Digestive Enzyme Supplementation in Gastrointestinal Diseases.� Current Drug Metabolism, Bentham Science Publishers, 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4923703/.

Mu, Qinghui, et al. �Leaky Gut As a Danger Signal for Autoimmune Diseases.� Frontiers, Frontiers, 5 May 2017, www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2017.00598/full.

Rezac, Shannon, et al. �Fermented Foods as a Dietary Source of Live Organisms.� Frontiers in Microbiology, Frontiers Media S.A., 24 Aug. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6117398/.

Sander, Guy R., et al. �Rapid Disruption of Intestinal Barrier Function by Gliadin Involves Altered Expression of Apical Junctional Proteins.� FEBS Press, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 8 Aug. 2005, febs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1016/j.febslet.2005.07.066.

Sartor, R Balfour. �Therapeutic Manipulation of the Enteric Microflora in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Antibiotics, Probiotics, and Prebiotics.� Gastroenterology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2004, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15168372.