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The Gut-Skin Connection On Relieving Psoriasis

The Gut-Skin Connection On Relieving Psoriasis

Introduction

The skin and the gut have a unique connection. The gut system is home to trillions of microorganisms that help metabolize the body’s homeostasis while keeping the immune system functioning for the body to be working correctly. The skin has its set of functions as well as it is the largest organ and helps protect the body from external factors from harm. When these disruptive factors start to affect either the gut or the skin, it can lead to numerous conditions that cause the body to be dysfunctional. When the gut becomes affected by these disruptive factors, it can cause gut disorders and inflammation, affecting the skin and causing disruptions. Today’s article will discuss a skin disorder known as psoriasis and how the gut-skin connection is affected by psoriasis. Referring patients to certified, skilled providers who specialize in gastroenterology treatments. We provide guidance to our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

16B - Smith Module IV GI Health and The Skin Part I

What Is Psoriasis?

 

Do you have severe itching along your face and arms? Do certain foods seem to aggravate your digestive tract or skin? Or have you experienced any gut disorders that are affecting your wellbeing? Many of these symptoms are signs of inflammatory issues affecting the gut and are associated with a skin disorder known as psoriasis. Research studies have defined psoriasis as a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is an autoimmune process in which abnormal differentiation and hyper-proliferation of the epidermis occur with redness and scaling. Psoriasis affects about 2% of the general population in the world and is an autoimmune process driven by abnormally activated helper T cells. Additional studies have mentioned that psoriasis is sustained by inflammation that causes the keratinocyte proliferation to be uncontrollable and has dysfunctional differentiation. The inflammatory pathways activate psoriasis in different body locations, causing the individual to become miserable because they are itching and becoming miserable.


An Overview Of Psoriasis-Video

Do you have scaly, patchy lesions in certain areas of your body? Do you feel any gut issues affecting you constantly? Do you feel inflammatory effects disrupting your gut and skin? Many of these conditions are signs that you are experiencing gut disorders associated with a skin disorder known as psoriasis. The video above explains how the gut and skin are affected due to psoriasis and how to heal it naturally. Research studies have mentioned that when the individual is suffering from psoriasis-prone skin, it is due to the alternation of the gut microbiota. When a person scratches the area where psoriasis is formed, it might damage the skin and cause the bacteria to colonize while invoking inflammation to occur in the affected area. Additional research has found that gut disorders like IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) and psoriasis are interlinked due to the increased interaction of inflammatory receptor pathogens disrupting the body’s immune cells.


How The Gut-Skin Connection Is Affected By Psoriasis

 

The gut is home to trillions of microorganisms that help metabolize the body’s homeostasis while regulating the immune system. Since the body inhabits microorganisms in various locations, including the skin and gut, it helps maintain homeostasis. The skin helps protect the body from external factors and has bidirectional communication with the gut system. However, like with any autoimmune process, it always starts with the gut. Research studies have mentioned that psoriasis is a multifactorial chronic skin disease that infiltrates the body’s immune cells, causing an increase in skin inflammation and making a person’s life miserable. With the gut system also being inflicted by inflammatory markers, many suffering individuals will experience IBD, SIBO, and other gut disorders that can disrupt the body. Additional information has shown that changes in the microflora in the gut-skin axis from genetic or environmental factors can contribute to various diseases. But when these factors begin to cause an increase in inflammatory markers in the body, it can affect a person’s quality of life through habits that make them miserable.

 

Conclusion

The body needs the gut and skin to maintain homeostasis and metabolize the immune system. The gut microbiota helps transport the nutrients that the body needs and regulates the body’s immunity, while the skin protects the body from outside factors while being the largest organ. The gut and skin have a bi-directional connection that allows them to keep the body from suffering from dysbiosis. When disruptive factors affect either the gut or the skin, it can lead to many disorders and make a person’s life miserable. The skin suffers from a condition known as psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory disease that causes itchy, patchy lesions that can affect the areas around the body. Psoriasis is associated with gut disorders, as many factors aggravate the inflammatory markers and can be a nuisance if not treated early. Incorporating small changes that benefit both the gut and skin health can help relieve the individual from psoriasis and bring back their quality of life.

 

References

Chen, Lihui, et al. “Skin and Gut Microbiome in Psoriasis: Gaining Insight into the Pathophysiology of It and Finding Novel Therapeutic Strategies.” Frontiers in Microbiology, Frontiers Media S.A., 15 Dec. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7769758/.

De Francesco, Maria Antonia, and Arnaldo Caruso. “The Gut Microbiome in Psoriasis and Crohn’s Disease: Is Its Perturbation a Common Denominator for Their Pathogenesis?” Vaccines, MDPI, 5 Feb. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8877283/.

Ellis, Samantha R, et al. “The Skin and Gut Microbiome and Its Role in Common Dermatologic Conditions.” Microorganisms, MDPI, 11 Nov. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6920876/.

Nair, Pragya A, and Talel Badri. “Psoriasis.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 6 Apr. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK448194/.

Olejniczak-Staruch, Irmina, et al. “Alterations of the Skin and Gut Microbiome in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences, MDPI, 13 Apr. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8069836/.

Rendon, Adriana, and Knut Schäkel. “Psoriasis Pathogenesis and Treatment.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences, MDPI, 23 Mar. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6471628/.

Disclaimer

A Healthy GI Can Relieve Atopic Dermatitis

A Healthy GI Can Relieve Atopic Dermatitis

Introduction

The skin is the largest organ in the body and encounters numerous factors that can either benefit or harm the body. The skin helps protect the organs and intestines in the gut system, keeps the musculoskeletal system structure functional, and even helps the nervous system send out signals for motor-sensory functions to the rest of the body. The skin is associated with the gut system as the gut microbiota host trillions of beneficial gut flora that send out nutrients to help promote tissue growth, improve the body’s immunity, and metabolize skin health by protecting it from disruptive pathogens. When these pathogens cause inflammatory issues in the gut system, it can affect the body’s skin, brain, and immune health by making them dysfunctional. Today’s article will look at a skin condition known as atopic dermatitis, how it affects the gut-skin system, and what treatments are available for relieving gut issues and atopic dermatitis in individuals. Referring patients to certified, skilled providers who specialize in gastroenterology treatments. We provide guidance to our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

16A - Smith Module IV GI Health and The Skin Part I

What Is Atopic Dermatitis?

 

Have you experienced inflammation around your gut or in certain areas of your skin? Do issues like SIBO, IBD, leaky gut, or bloating become more frequent? Do certain foods trigger inflammatory markers in your skin and gut? The numerous signs and symptoms are due to a skin disorder known as atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis or eczema is a pruritic, hereditary skin disorder. The lifetime prevalence is 10% to 20%, with many cases starting as a baby and rising to 20% to 40% as adults continue to have atopic dermatitis. Research studies have defined atopic dermatitis as one of the most common skin diseases that cause chronic inflammation in the skin. The pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis is both complex and multifactorial. It involves the elements of barrier dysfunction, alterations in cell-mediated immune responses, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, and environmental factors that cause flare-ups. Additional research studies have mentioned that the pathology of atopic dermatitis is being looked at as the skin’s structural abnormalities and immune dysregulation play their roles as this condition progress. Other genetic changes have also been identified, altering the skin’s barrier function, resulting in an atopic dermatitis phenotype. The imbalance of Th2 to Th1 cytokines is observed as it alters cell-mediated immune responses. Atopic dermatitis can promote IgE-mediated hypersensitivity in the skin as part of its development. This can also be due to the environmental factors that be the causing development of atopic dermatitis.

 

How Does It Affect The Gut-Skin Connection?

Since atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, many factors do come to play in its development. For example, food allergies cause atopic dermatitis in 25% to 50% of children. Some of the food allergens that are commonly linked to atopic dermatitis include:

  • Eggs
  • Soy
  • Milk
  • Wheat
  • Fish
  • Shellfish
  • Peanuts

One of the other factors that can cause the development of atopic dermatitis is gut issues. Research studies have shown that any alterations in the gut microbiome due to atopic dermatitis affect the immune system balance in the body. When the gut microbiome becomes altered, it affects metabolite production and reduces the body’s immune system. When bacteria overgrowth in the GI tract, it has been suggested as a causative factor in allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis. Another factor is when individuals consume trans fats, which increase the development of atopic dermatitis since they interfere with the metabolism and use of essential fatty acids.


The Microbiome Of Atopic Dermatitis-Video

Have you experienced inflammation in your digestive tract or particular areas of your skin? Does your body feel fatigued constantly? Do you have any gut issues or disorders that are affecting your health? Most of these symptoms are signs that you are experiencing atopic dermatitis caused by gut issues. Research studies have found that various factors can trigger atopic dermatitis, affect the immune system, and disrupt the gut microbiota. The video above explains the microbiome in atopic dermatitis and how it affects the gut, skin, and the entire body. Luckily there are available treatments to relieve atopic dermatitis and gut disorders from wreaking havoc on the body.


Treatments For Relieving Atopic Dermatitis & The Gut

 

When a person begins to find treatments for relieving atopic dermatitis usually involves:

  • Early diagnosis.
  • Skin barrier function support.
  • Mitigation of cutaneous inflammation.
  • Concomitant risk stratification

Another way that many individuals can alleviate atopic dermatitis is with a healthy GI tract. This will help many individuals suffering from a food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and environmental allergies to relieve atopic dermatitis from progressing further. A study showed that probiotics and prebiotics are essential in preventing food allergies and eczema. Probiotics and prebiotics help replenish the beneficial bacteria in the gut and regulate the immune system. This prevents atopic dermatitis from stopping progressing and restor the body back.

 

Conclusion

Many factors cause atopic dermatitis progression to become severe, as it is crucial to find the root cause of the flare-ups and alleviate them at the source. Overall having gut issues associated with atopic dermatitis is no laughing matter. When the gut microbiome is being affected by inflammatory disorders, it can disrupt the immune system and cause atopic dermatitis to develop on the skin. Incorporating probiotics and prebiotics can help replenish the gut bacteria and figure out what causes the inflammatory symptoms to spike up from certain foods will benefit the gut and the skin to become healthier.

 

References

Fang, Zhifeng, et al. “Gut Microbiota, Probiotics, and Their Interactions in Prevention and Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis: A Review.” Frontiers in Immunology, Frontiers Media S.A., 14 July 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8317022/.

Kapur, Sandeep, et al. “Atopic Dermatitis.” Allergy, Asthma, and Clinical Immunology : Official Journal of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, BioMed Central, 12 Sept. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6157251/.

Kim, Jung Eun, and Hei Sung Kim. “Microbiome of the Skin and Gut in Atopic Dermatitis (AD): Understanding the Pathophysiology and Finding Novel Management Strategies.” Journal of Clinical Medicine, MDPI, 2 Apr. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6518061/.

Kolb, Logan, and Sarah J Ferrer-Bruker. “Atopic Dermatitis – Statpearls – NCBI Bookshelf.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 13 Aug. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK448071/.

Lee, So Yeon, et al. “Microbiome in the Gut-Skin Axis in Atopic Dermatitis.” Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Research, The Korean Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology; The Korean Academy of Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Disease, July 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6021588/.

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The Gut Skin Connection Affecting Acne

The Gut Skin Connection Affecting Acne

Introduction

The body is always going through many factors that constantly test the durability that can affect the entire microbiome itself. The gut helps the body’s homeostasis by metabolizing the nutrients that provide the energy for functionality. The gut system is home to trillions of microorganisms that communicate to the brain systemendocrine systemimmune system, and skin to ensure that it is healthy. When disruptive factors enter the gut system, they can cause various issues that can make the dysfunctional body while affecting its communication with the body’s axis. Today’s article focuses on a skin condition that everyone has suffered in their lives known as acne and how the gut-skin axis is being affected by acne. Referring patients to certified, skilled providers who specialize in gastroenterology treatments. We provide guidance to our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

16A - Smith Module IV GI Health and The Skin Part I

What Is Acne Vulgaris?

 

Have you noticed bumps along your face, especially in the nose, forehead, and cheek regions? How about inflammatory reactions that are affecting your skin? Do issues like GERD, IBS, leaky gut, or SIBO affect your gut? Most of these issues are due to disruptive factors that affect the gut-skin connection and cause a skin condition known as acne vulgaris. Everybody suffers from acne when they are young, and it is a common condition with follicular papules or comedones and inflammatory papules and pustules. Research studies have shown that acne vulgaris is an inflammatory disorder triggered by many factors that can cause it to become aggravated and inflamed. Some of the contributing factors that can cause acne vulgaris to form due to the following:

  • Infection (Propionibacterium acnes)
  • Tissue inflammation
  • Plugging of hair follicles due to epidermal hyperproliferation
  • Hormone imbalance
  • Endocrine disorders
  • Excess sun exposure

Other research studies have shown that other factors like gut disorders can also affect the development of acne vulgaris. Acne vulgaris can be associated with the emotional factors that affect the brain and the gut’s inflammatory factors as they go hand in hand. When a person becomes stressed or anxious, their skin will flare up and develop acne around some skin regions. Additional studies have mentioned that emotional factors like stress and anxiety can alter the gut microbiota and increase intestinal permeability. When gut disorders start to contribute to skin inflammation, it can aggravate acne to develop and form on the skin.


Gut Health & Acne- Video

Have you experienced gut disorders that seem to affect your quality of life? Have you noticed that particular foods you consume are not sitting well in your gut system? How about feeling overly stressed and anxious that acne forms around your face? The video above explains how the gut microbiome affects a person when making dietary changes that can provide beneficial results to the gut microbiota. Research studies have found that the intestinal microbiota is essential for forming acne lesions while being responsible for proper immunity and defense of the microorganisms. The GI tract and acne condition are closely associated because they provide the neuroendocrine and immune functions to the body. 


The Gut-Skin Axis & How It Affects Acne

 

Since the gut is the host to trillions of bacteria, its primary job is to maintain constant communication with the skin to dampen unnecessary inflammatory markers that can cause the skin to break out. Research studies have found that the gut-skin axis, when affected by acne, produces significantly higher metabolites that generate ROS (reactive oxygen species) and induce inflammation in both the gut and skin. Additional research has shown that the gut microbiome plays an essential role in skin disorders and vice versa. When changes affect either the gut or the skin, it can drastically change a person’s outcome in life. Say, for instance, dietary habits that cause inflammation in the gut. This is due to processed foods that cause the gut to become inflamed and make the skin begin the development of acne in different portions of the skin. Research shows that the gut microbiome can vastly influence the immune system by regulating it. This builds a tolerance to dietary changes in the gut to promote acne-free skin. So incorporating a low-glycemic-load diet has been linked to improved acne, possibly through gut changes or attenuation of insulin levels.

 

Conclusion

Overall, the gut plays a massive role in the body in its homeostasis as it helps the body metabolize the nutrients to keep it functioning and moving. The gut microbiota also has bidirectional communication with the skin as common skin disorders like acne tend to show up. Acne is very common amongst individuals, especially in younger individuals, as it can affect their moods and cause changes to their mental health and their gut health. Incorporating small changes like eating healthy food, maintaining a stress-free environment, and even exercising can help not only lower gut inflammation but also clear up the skin from acne.

 

References

Bowe, Whitney P, and Alan C Logan. “Acne Vulgaris, Probiotics and the Gut-Brain-Skin Axis – Back to the Future?” Gut Pathogens, BioMed Central, 31 Jan. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3038963/.

Chilicka, Karolina, et al. “Microbiome and Probiotics in Acne Vulgaris-A Narrative Review.” Life (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 15 Mar. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8953587/.

De Pessemier, Britta, et al. “Gut-Skin Axis: Current Knowledge of the Interrelationship between Microbial Dysbiosis and Skin Conditions.” Microorganisms, MDPI, 11 Feb. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7916842/.

Lee, Young Bok, et al. “Potential Role of the Microbiome in Acne: A Comprehensive Review.” Journal of Clinical Medicine, MDPI, 7 July 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6678709/.

Salem, Iman, et al. “The Gut Microbiome as a Major Regulator of the Gut-Skin Axis.” Frontiers in Microbiology, Frontiers Media S.A., 10 July 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6048199/.

Sutaria, Amita H, et al. “Acne Vulgaris.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 8 May 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459173/.

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