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Relieving Gut Issues With Nutraceuticals

Relieving Gut Issues With Nutraceuticals

Introduction

The gut system is a massive ecosystem that helps modulate the body’s immune system and metabolic changes that the body itself is going through. The gut system provides the body with the necessary nutrients to function correctly and transports these nutrients to their respective sections like the endocrine system, the nervous system, and the musculoskeletal system to do their jobs. When gut disorders start to affect the intestinal walls, it can cause the inflammatory cytokines to attack the gut walls due to bacteria and nutrients leaking out of the tight junctions. Fortunately, there are therapeutic ways to help the gut system and prevent inflammation from causing more issues in the gut. Today’s article looks at gut metainflammation and how nutraceuticals can help many individuals with gut metainflammation. Referring patients to qualified, skilled providers who specialize in gastroenterology treatments. We provide guidance to our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

15 - LaValle GI Therapies

What Is Gut Metainflammation?

 

Does your gut system feel sore or tender to the touch? Do ordinary factors like stress, sleep problems, hormone imbalances, and cardiovascular issues affect you more than they should have? Have you experienced inflammatory gut issues like IBS or leaky gut? Having any gut disorder is no laughing matter for your health. When the gut system is experiencing chronic low‐grade inflammatory sequela, this is what gut metainflammation is in the body. Gut metainflammation is defined as an over‐activation of immunity in the gut that leads to increased production of inflammatory cytokines, thus referring to metabolism-induced inflammation. Research studies have shown that when the gut is experiencing metainflammation, it causes a disturbance to the neurometabolic pathways. This causes an increase in the aging processes and metabolic signaling issues the gut is trying to provide for the body. Other research studies have shown that metainflammation is one of the primary markers for metabolic disorders like obesity, type 2 diabetes, and NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease). Gut metainflammation also causes an increase in peripheral and central inflammation that can cause gut disorders like leaky gut to allow bacteria and toxins to enter the bloodstream, thus leading to peripheral and central inflammation of the body.


Treatments For GI Disorders-Video

Have you experienced a leaky gut? Do you feel tired throughout the entire day? Have you experienced any food sensitivities in your gut? These gut issues are due to gut metainflammation that can impact a person’s health and quality of life. When this occurs, the body will become dysfunctional, and other issues will arise unless it is treated right away. The video above shows how treatments are available for alleviating motility disorders and GI disorders affecting the gut system. Utilizing treatments beneficial to the gut system can help dampen the effects of metainflammation and other gut disorders from progressing in the body. Some treatments that can help with draining metainflammation in the gut system can be found by changing dietary lifestyles and incorporating nutraceuticals that are beneficial to the gut.


Controlling Gut Metainflammation Through Nutraceuticals

Research studies have shown that since trillions of microbial cells make up the gut microbiota when factors like obesity, metainflammation, and impaired insulin activity affect the gut, it can cause the immune cells to reactivate and reinforce the inflammatory process to attack the gut system. When the gut system becomes dysfunctional, many individuals try to find ways to alleviate gut inflammation. One of the treatments is by incorporating nutraceuticals to provide relief from gut metainflammation. Research studies have mentioned that combined with functional foods can help provide a positive influence on the body’s metabolism and the gut microbiota. Nutraceuticals help give the body the necessary nutrients it deserves and help dampen any effects from disorders affecting the body’s gut, immune, and metabolic components. Two nutraceuticals can help control gut metainflammation: curcumin and peptides.

 

Curcumin & Peptides For Gut Metainflammaion

From turmeric (Curcuma longa) root/rhizome and used traditionally for dyspeptic conditions, research studies have mentioned that curcumin and its anti-inflammatory metabolites can help influence the gut microbiota. What curcumin does to the gut is that it helps decrease the inflammasome signaling while decreasing oxidative stress via the Nrf2‐keap1 pathway. Curcumin can also help improve flexibility and mobility in the body while inhibiting the activation of a peroxisome proliferator‐activated receptor‐gamma pathway. Additional information has provided that curcumin can help not only reduce oxidative stress and even prevent neurodegeneration.

 

Peptides or BPC‐157 (Body Protection Compound) are derived from human gastric juice that is cytoprotective and anti‐inflammatory that helps support the gut mucosal lining. Research studies have shown that peptides play a critical role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis while being effective in decreasing metainflammatory signaling in the gut microbiota. When there is metainflammation in the gut, peptides can help improve cell survival under oxidative stress conditions by downregulating TNF‐alpha in the body. Incorporating peptides can help improve GI mucosal integrity from meta inflammation and help the gut function normally.

 

Conclusion

The gut is home to trillions of microorganisms that help keep the body’s functionality and regulate immunity from various diseases. When unwanted factors like metainflammation start to infiltrate the gut, it can lead to dysbiosis and wreck the intestinal walls. Nutraceuticals like curcumin and peptides have beneficial properties that help repair the intestinal walls while dampening inflammatory effects from progressing further in the gut system. Incorporating nutraceuticals is helpful for many individuals who suffer from gut disorders and improve their health by replenishing their nutrients in the body.

 

References

Boulangé, Claire L, et al. “Impact of the Gut Microbiota on Inflammation, Obesity, and Metabolic Disease.” Genome Medicine, BioMed Central, 20 Apr. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4839080/.

Di Meo, Francesco, et al. “Curcumin, Gut Microbiota, and Neuroprotection.” Nutrients, MDPI, 11 Oct. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6835970/.

Gubatan, John, et al. “Antimicrobial Peptides and the Gut Microbiome in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.” World Journal of Gastroenterology, Baishideng Publishing Group Inc, 21 Nov. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8613745/.

Laparra, J M, and Y Sanz. “Interactions of Gut Microbiota with Functional Food Components and Nutraceuticals.” Pharmacological Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 13 Nov. 2009, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19914380/.

Scazzocchio, Beatrice, et al. “Interaction between Gut Microbiota and Curcumin: A New Key of Understanding for the Health Effects of Curcumin.” Nutrients, MDPI, 19 Aug. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7551052/.

Scheithauer, Torsten P M, et al. “Gut Microbiota as a Trigger for Metabolic Inflammation in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.” Frontiers in Immunology, Frontiers Media S.A., 16 Oct. 2020, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7596417/.

Tilg, Herbert, et al. “The Intestinal Microbiota Fuelling Metabolic Inflammation.” Nature Reviews. Immunology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 6 Aug. 2019, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31388093/.

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