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Neck Crepitus Cracking, Grinding Sounds

Neck Crepitus Cracking, Grinding Sounds

Neck crepitus is a grinding sound that comes from moving or rotating the neck. Usually, it is not something to worry about, as the body is a sound system that generates various noises. For example, when hungry, the stomach rumbles. After digestion, the body releases the gasses through a burp. The bones can also generate neck cracking or popping sounds with regular movements. This unusual sensation is known as crepitus.

Neck Crepitus Cracking, Grinding Sounds

Crepitus

Crepitus or crepitation is a scientific term that describes joint movements sounds. Sounds can include:

  • Popping
  • Cracking
  • Snapping
  • Grinding

However, crepitus can happen in any moveable joints in the body. An example could be a neck cracking or popping sound when looking over the shoulder.

Why the Neck So Susceptible

The cervical spine consists of seven segments, and each segment has multiple joints that interact with the segments above and below it. The cervical spine is a flexible system that protects the neurologic structures while maintaining head and neck stability. This flexibility and the multiple joints at each level can wear down, leading to arthritis and neck crepitus.

Other Symptoms

Neck crepitus can present without other symptoms. But it can also be associated with other severe symptoms that include:

  • Neck pain
  • Instability
  • Weakness
  • Numbness
  • Diminished manual dexterity
  • Difficulty walking

Risk Increases With Age

Neck crepitus can present at any age; however, the risk increases as the body ages. Some individuals may have neck crepitus symptoms more often. For example, the neck cracking or popping sounds could present just a few times a month. However, other individuals could have cracking, popping sounds daily or even throughout the day. Neck crepitus can increase or decrease in frequency. Symptoms could present for several days before the sensations stop entirely.

Possible Causes

Neck crepitus can have various causes, and multiple factors can also overlap to generate these sensations.

Articular Pressure Changes

Natural lubricating lining and fluid are found within the body’s joints. Small gas bubbles can form within the synovial joints, including the facet joints. When the bubbles collapse, they are released, creating cracking noises in the joints. The sounds can happen with regular everyday movements. This also occurs when a chiropractor or physical therapist performs spinal manipulations.

Tendon or Ligament Movement

Tendons are the tissue that connects the muscles to the bones, and Ligaments connect the bones. A tendon in motion can also make noises when sliding around a bone or over another tendon or ligament. The cracking can be caused by tight tissues and muscles from aging or muscles that have become weak/deconditioned.

Bones Grinding

Osteoarthritis, known as spondylosis in the spine, can cause the facet joints that connect the vertebrae to degenerate. The protective cartilage wears down, and the vertebral bones start to rub against each other. This can produce a grinding noise. However, the grinding can result from disc degeneration, which reduces the cushioning between the vertebrae.

When to Consult A Physician

If neck crepitus presents without other symptoms, it’s usually not serious. When neck crepitus presents with other symptoms, it is recommended to contact a doctor. These symptoms include:

If pain spreads out and runs down the arm or there is difficulty completing fine motor tasks like writing your name or getting dressed, consult a doctor. These symptoms can be caused by spinal cord or nerve root compression. Sometimes, neck crepitus can show up after a different health issue. For example, if an individual notices neck sounds weeks after cervical spine surgery, the spine surgeon can determine if the two are connected. A recent fall or car accident could also cause symptoms to present. If the crepitus presents almost every time with joint movement, there could be compromised joint function.

Treatment and Prevention

There are various treatment options for neck crepitus. It is recommended to start with conservative treatment like physical therapy and chiropractic pain management. Imaging scans are necessary to see if there are signs of compression on the spinal cord or nerves. Treatment objectives are to remove the pressure from the neural structures and restore the spine’s stability. Cervical traction is another form of treatment. Consult a physician, spine specialist, or chiropractor to properly diagnose the issues, figure out what is going on, and develop a personalized treatment plan if necessary.


Body Composition


Sugar Replacements

Sugar substitutes can help with weight control and diabetes by allowing individuals to eat sweets without raising blood sugar levels. Sugar replacements are additives that add sweetness to food without the calories of sugar. Some sugar substitutes are synthetically made, while others are natural. Sugar replacements include:

Sucralose

  • This artificial sweetener comes from sucrose and contains no calories. It is highly sweeter than sugar and can be found in grocery stores.

Fructose

  • This sweetener comes in crystalline form or high-fructose corn syrup, which is often used for baking. Fructose is sweeter than sugar and has been linked to early diabetes.

Stevia

  • This sweetener is extracted from the stevia rebaudiana plant species. It is calorie-free and can help manage and improve cholesterol levels.

Aspartame

  •  Only a tiny amount is necessary, as this artificial sweetener is 200 times sweeter than sugar. It contains four calories per gram.
  • Aspartame has been associated with cancer, dementia, and depression. But research has not found a direct correlation, and currently, recommended amounts are safe to consume.
References

Mohamad, I et al. “Swollen neck and crepitus after bouts of cough.” Malaysian family physician: the official journal of the Academy of Family Physicians of Malaysia vol. 8,3 49-50. 31 Dec. 2013

Nguyen, Andrew B et al. “Crepitus: an uncommon complication of a common procedure.” The Annals of thoracic surgery vol. 91,4 (2011): e63. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2011.01.031

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Chiropractic

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Chiropractic

Asking questions is the best way to learn, of course, and chiropractic patients often ask questions about some of the health issues they face. Some chiropractic patients are curious about back problems, for example, because chiropractors are well known for being extremely knowledgeable when it comes to spine health and the musculoskeletal system. A few chiropractic patients want to know about TMJ disorders.

Here are a few of the most common things chiropractic patients want to know about TMJ disorders.

The Most Frequently Asked Questions about TMJ Disorders

 

�TMJ disorder?

A TMJ disorder affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which is the joint where the jawbone connects to the head, just in front of the ear. The bones and muscles of the TMJ allow the jaw to move up and down, and side to side, enabling a person to talk, chew and yawn.

TMJ disorders (TMDs) can cause pain in the jaw joint and in the muscles that control the movement of the jaw.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Chiropractic El Paso, TX.

How common is it?

About 12 percent of the population experiences symptoms of TMJ at any given time, according to the TMJ Association.

The Causes?

There are several known causes of TMJ disorders, including:

  • Trauma to the jaw or temporomandibular joint
  • Infections
  • Dental procedures, especially those that require the mouth be open for a long time
  • Insertion of a breathing tube prior to surgery
  • Arthritis
  • Misalignments of the jaw

Grinding teeth, known as bruxism, may cause TMJ disorders but not everyone who grinds their teeth develops a TMD.

Medical professionals may not be able to determine the underlying cause of TMJ disorders in many cases but chiropractors can treat TMJ disorders even if the cause cannot be determined.

The Symptoms of TMJ disorder?

Many people with TMD describe their symptoms as a dull, aching pain that comes and goes in their jaw joint and in nearby areas. Some people with TMJ disorders do not experience pain but have trouble moving their jaws.

Other common symptoms of TMJ disorders include:

  • Pain or stiffness in the jaw muscles
  • Chronic headaches
  • Neck, shoulder pain
  • Clicking, popping or grating of the jaw joint when the individual opens or closes his or her mouth
  • Limited movement of the jaw
  • �Locking� of the jaw
  • Tinnitus, which includes ear pain, fullness, pressure, and ringing in the ears
  • Dizziness, vision problems
  • A bite that feels �off� when the person closes his or her mouth

Treatment for TMJ disorders?

The best way to treat TMJ disorders is to eat soft foods, ice the affected area with ice packs to ease pain and try to avoid extreme jaw movements, such as chewing gum or yawning.

Does Chiropractic treat TMJ disorders?

Yes, chiropractic safely and effective treats TMJ disorders. A chiropractor will perform a full evaluation of the patient�s temporomandibular joint and surrounding bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments to assess the full scope of the TMJ problem and determine its underlying causes. The chiropractor can then suggest a range of treatment that can include stretches and exercises that alleviate pain and melt stiffness in the jaw joint. The chiropractor can also detect and address any misalignments that may be contributing to TMJ pain.

For more information about the temporomandibular joint, TMJ disorders and chiropractic for TMJ problems, contact a chiropractor with experience in diagnosing and treating TMJ problems.


Reduce *IMBALANCE & PAIN* with Functional Orthotics | El Paso, Tx

 

 

Foot pronation is a natural movement during standing, walking, or running, however, excessive foot pronation can cause postural imbalances which can result in chronic pain, including low back pain and sciatica. Dr. Alex Jimenez, a chiropractor in El Paso, TX, can help diagnose and treat a variety of health issues associated with foot problems through the utilization of functional custom foot orthotics.

Functional custom foot orthotics are specially designed to accommodate every person’s unique foot anatomy. Excessive foot pronation can ultimately lead to poor posture, which can add unnecessary pressure to the spine and it’s surrounding structures. Dr. Alex Jimenez is the non-surgical choice for foot problems and other health issues through the use of functional custom foot orthotics.


Custom Orthotics & Store Bought Insoles

 

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Chiropractic El Paso, TX.

 

Store-bought orthotic insoles are cheap but the cost to you and your health can be very high. Understanding the differences between over the counter and custom made orthotics is important. Foot Levelers customized orthotics provide the highest-quality and most effective orthotic out there.

Foot Levelers custom orthotics are individually designed for your feet. This achieves a balanced foundation and a stabilized pelvis. These orthotics are handmade based on 3D scans or casts, and your doctor�s examination.

Over-the-counter insoles do cost less, but they only support one arch in the foot. When only one arch is supported, the structure can collapse, and that’s when problems can begin in other parts of the body. Over-support of one arch can cause pain and symptoms, instead of relieving them.


 

Orthotics Treat Way More Than Feet

 

Radiculopathy is associated with some of the most significant causes of chronic or acute low back pain. However, it is important to note that the condition itself does not cause pain. Instead, elements of radiculopathy, such as disc herniation, nerve root impingement, and facet arthropathy are actually what causes the pain.

Radiculopathy is a condition of the spine that occurs when a nerve is compressed, causing pain, weakness, tingling, or numbness along the nerve�s course. In the lower back, that course is in the leg. While it is most common in the lower back, radiculopathy can occur in the cervical or thoracic regions of the spine as well.

VasyliMedical Orthotics treat other areas than the feet

 

NCBI Resources

The�temporomandibular joints, TMJ, are the lower jaw hinges that sit on either side of the head in front of each ear. They are responsible for the lower jaw opening, closing, sliding, and rotating. The TMJs are the most body�s most complex joints. The typical person uses them more than 5,000 times a day by talking, laughing, yawning, chewing, eating, smiling, and swallowing.