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Magnesium Might Help Combat Insulin Resistance

Magnesium Might Help Combat Insulin Resistance

Introduction

The body requires energy to move around and get to places as fast as possible. The primary energy source is the blood glucose in the body, which helps provide power for the body and the brainmuscle cell tissues, and the blood cells that travel to each body’s organs. When disruptive forces start to affect the body, like chronic stressendocrine disruptors, or lifestyle choices, it can cause the glucose levels to either increase or decrease depending on the severity. When glucose levels become too high, it can cause hyperglycemia or diabetes to develop. When they are too low, it can cause hypoglycemia. The body also suffers when there aren’t enough nutrients, minerals, or vitamins to provide energy to the body as symptoms of fatigue and insulin resistance begin to rise. Fortunately, there are ways to boost the body’s glucose levels naturally. Today’s article focus on a mineral known as magnesium, its benefits, and how it affects insulin resistance in the body. Refer patients to certified, skilled providers specializing in endocrine treatments for individuals with insulin resistance. We guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

01 LaValle Advanced Diagnostics in DM & Stress

What Is Magnesium?

Have you been feeling weird pins and needles sensations in certain parts of your body? Are you suffering from chronic fatigue and muscle cramps? Have you lost your sense of appetite? Or have you felt muscle spasms in your arms or legs? Many of these symptoms are signs that your body is suffering from low levels of magnesium in your body. Research studies have defined magnesium as the fourth most common mineral in the body that provides fundamental functions for regulation. Magnesium can be found in certain foods like leafy greens, chocolate, nuts, fruits, and meats that are riched with this mineral and can be regulated in homeostasis in the intestines, kidneys, and bones in the body. Additional research studies have shown that magnesium is essential for maintaining the body’s normal organ and cellular function. Magnesium also ensures that each organ functions normally and is transported through the entire body by the blood cells. Magnesium also plays a vital role in the body’s energy production as it helps regulate glycemic control.

 

What Are Its Benefits?

As the fourth common mineral in the body, magnesium helps the body in many ways as it provides energy to other organs and body systems. Some of the benefits that magnesium provides, as research has shown, include:

  • Reducing insomnia
  • Prevent metabolic syndrome
  • Reduce migraines and headaches
  • Helps with pregnancies
  • Reduce asthmatic symptoms
  • Relieve muscle cramps

Additional information has shown that magnesium can help those with anxiety by modulating the HPA (hypothalamic pituitary adrenal) axis and substrating the stress response system in the body. Magnesium also plays a role when it comes to glucose levels in the body and affects insulin resistance.

 


An Overview Of Magnesium & Insulin Resistance-Video

Are you feeling migraines and headaches popping up out of nowhere? Have your muscles started to ache and cramped? Have you been experiencing asthmatic symptoms more frequently? Or have your blood glucose levels begun to rise? If you have been suffering from any of these symptoms, you could suffer from magnesium deficiency. The video above explains what happens when the body is experiencing insulin resistance due to magnesium deficiency. Research studies have found that magnesium deficiency is not uncommon worldwide, as early signs of magnesium deficiency can cause nausea, vomiting, and weakness in the body while causing metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, diabetes is one of the most common causes of magnesium deficiency and insulin resistance.


How Does Magnesium Affect Insulin Resistance?

 

Research studies have found that magnesium deficiency in the body can increase the risk of insulin resistance and cause the body to become dysfunctional. When metabolic imbalances are associated with trending low or alert, low magnesium levels in the body, it can increase the serum CRP-hs, cause headaches, weight gain, and an increased risk for metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. The intestines will be impaired in intestinal absorption while the blood glucose levels will increase and cause type 2 diabetes to form. However, additional information has also been provided that when an individual begins to take magnesium regularly, it can help dampen the effects of insulin resistance by regulating the blood glucose levels in the body. Many individuals with pre-existing diabetes can take a bit of magnesium to improve their blood glucose levels and continue on their health journey.

 

Conclusion

Incorporating supplements and minerals like magnesium could help lower the risk of insulin resistance and manage type 2 diabetes. The body needs the energy to function normally and move around constantly. Magnesium is a common mineral that can help regulate the organ’s functions and helps regulate blood glucose levels. When the body starts to suffer from magnesium deficiency, it can cause various issues that can make a person miserable while the body starts to become dysfunctional. Incorporating magnesium as part of a healthy lifestyle for the body can provide the necessary energy that a person needs to function and help them along their health and wellness journey.

 

References

Al Alawi, Abdullah M, et al. “Magnesium and Human Health: Perspectives and Research Directions.” International Journal of Endocrinology, Hindawi, 16 Apr. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5926493/.

Boyle, Neil Bernard, et al. “The Effects of Magnesium Supplementation on Subjective Anxiety and Stress-A Systematic Review.” Nutrients, MDPI, 26 Apr. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5452159/.

Gröber, Uwe, et al. “Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy.” Nutrients, MDPI, 23 Sept. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4586582/.

Kostov, Krasimir. “Effects of Magnesium Deficiency on Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes: Focusing on the Processes of Insulin Secretion and Signaling.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences, MDPI, 18 Mar. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6470576/.

Razzaque, Mohammed S. “Magnesium: Are We Consuming Enough?” Nutrients, MDPI, 2 Dec. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6316205/.

Schwalfenberg, Gerry K, and Stephen J Genuis. “The Importance of Magnesium in Clinical Healthcare.” Scientifica, Hindawi, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5637834/.

Wang, Jinsong, et al. “Dietary Magnesium Intake Improves Insulin Resistance among Non-Diabetic Individuals with Metabolic Syndrome Participating in a Dietary Trial.” Nutrients, MDPI, 27 Sept. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820051/.

Disclaimer

Diabetes & Stress Are Connected In The Body

Diabetes & Stress Are Connected In The Body

Introduction

As the world is in constant motion, many people have to endure stressful situations affecting their bodies and health. The body needs hormones like cortisol to keep functioning as it affects the immune, nervous, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal systems, to name a few. Another essential function the body needs is glucose, which requires energy to be in constant motion. Situations that cause the cortisol levels and glucose levels to rise in the body can lead to chronic issues like diabetes and chronic stress. This causes the individual to be miserable and be in a serious situation if it is not controlled right away. Today’s article examines how cortisol and glucose affect the body and the interwoven connection between stress and diabetes. Refer patients to certified, skilled providers specializing in stress management and endocrine treatments for diabetic individuals. We guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is critical for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

01 LaValle Advanced Diagnostics in DM & Stress

How Does Cortisol Affect The Body?

 

Have you been experiencing sleeping problems at night? What about frequent headaches that are a nuisance throughout the entire day? Or have you noticed excessive weight loss or weight gain around your midsection? Some of these symptoms are signs that your cortisol and glucose levels are high and can affect your body. Cortisol is a hormone produced in the endocrine system and can be beneficial or harmful to the body if it is not regularly checked. Research studies have defined cortisol as one of the prominent glucocorticoids secreted out due to the response of the body’s biochemicals, characterized by the HPA (hypothalamic‐pituitary‐adrenal) axis helps cognitive events. However, when the cortisol levels turn chronic in the body due to circumstances that cause the body to become dysfunctional, it can significantly impact a person and cause an imbalance in the HPA axis. Some of the symptoms that chronic cortisol leads to the body can include:

  • Hormonal imbalances
  • Insulin resistance
  • Weight gain
  • Increases in visceral “belly” fat
  • Increased cortisol output
  • Immune problems
    • Allergies and Asthma
    • Inflamed Joints
    • Poor exercise recovery

Additional information has provided that the presence of cortisol in the body can help increase blood glucose availability to the brain. With cortisol providing organ functionality, the blood glucose provides energy for the body.

 

How Cortisol & Glucose Work In The Body

Cortisol helps stimulate mass glucose mobilization in the liver, allowing block protein synthesis to push amino acids into sugar for the body. This is known as fatty acid liberation biotransformed into glucose. When this happens, it helps stimulate visceral fat storage if excess glucose is not utilized, thus causing weight gain. Research studies have shown that a lack of cortisol can cause a decrease in hepatic glucose production in the body. This will cause hypoglycemia, where the body doesn’t have enough glucose in its system. Additional research shows that cortisol responds to any stressor that affects a person with low glucose levels but can also become positive after a glucose load. Managing the body’s glucose and cortisol levels can help progress the development of diabetes.


How Cortisol Is Linked With Type 2 Diabetes- Video

Have you experienced stressful situations that cause your muscles to tense up? How about feeling your blood sugar either spiking up or down? Do you feel inflammatory effects all over your body that makes them ache? Stress can cause harmful effects to the body, activating inflammation, increasing sympathetic tone, and reducing glucocorticoid responsiveness. Stress can also be linked to diabetes, as the video above shows how the stress hormone cortisol is linked with type 2 diabetes. Research studies have mentioned that cortisol can become negatively associated with the mechanics of insulin resistance, increasing the beta-cell function and increasing the insulin released in the body. This can become dangerous for many individuals that have pre-existing diabetes and have been dealing with stress constantly. 


The Interwoven Connection Between Stress & Diabetes

 

The interwoven connection between stress and diabetes is shown as research studies have found that the pathophysiology of anxiety and diabetes has increased insulin resistance risk for the body. When a person is dealing with chronic stress, it can cause them to have many issues like:

  • Cold intolerance
  • Diminished cognition and mood
  • Food sensitivities
  • Low energy throughout the day

When this happens, the body is at a high risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Research studies have mentioned that type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. The glucocorticoid in the body can become excessive to affect the cells, causing dysfunctionality. Additional research studies have shown that any perceived stress can become a vital risk factor that not only affects the body, like hypertension, BMI (body mass index), or diet quality but can cause a rise in type 2 diabetes. When individuals find ways to lower their chronic stress, it can help manage their glucose levels from reaching critical levels.

 

Conclusion

The body’s chronic stress can cause insulin resistance and cause diabetes to become pre-existing. The body needs cortisol and glucose to keep functioning and have the energy to move. When people start to suffer from chronic stress and diabetes, it can become challenging to manage; however, making minor changes to the body like finding ways to lower stress, eating healthy foods, and monitoring glucose levels can help the body reset the glucose and cortisol levels to normal. Doing this can relieve many individuals who want to continue their health journey being stress-free.

 

References

Adam, Tanja C, et al. “Cortisol Is Negatively Associated with Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight Latino Youth.” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Endocrine Society, Oct. 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3050109/.

De Feo, P, et al. “Contribution of Cortisol to Glucose Counterregulation in Humans.” The American Journal of Physiology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 1989, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2665516/.

Hucklebridge, F H, et al. “The Awakening Cortisol Response and Blood Glucose Levels.” Life Sciences, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1999, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10201642/.

Joseph, Joshua J, and Sherita H Golden. “Cortisol Dysregulation: The Bidirectional Link between Stress, Depression, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Mar. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5334212/.

Kamba, Aya, et al. “Association between Higher Serum Cortisol Levels and Decreased Insulin Secretion in a General Population.” PloS One, Public Library of Science, 18 Nov. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5115704/.

Lee, Do Yup, et al. “Technical and Clinical Aspects of Cortisol as a Biochemical Marker of Chronic Stress.” BMB Reports, Korean Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Apr. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4436856/.

Thau, Lauren, et al. “Physiology, Cortisol.” In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL), StatPearls Publishing, 6 Sept. 2021, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538239.

Disclaimer

Is Fructose Bad for Your Health?

Is Fructose Bad for Your Health?

Fructose is one of the main components of added sugar. It is a simple type of sugar that makes up about 50 percent of table sugar or sucrose. Table sugar is also made up of glucose or the main energy source of the human body. However, fructose needs to be turned into glucose by the liver before it can be used as fuel for energy by our cells. Fructose, sucrose, and glucose are all naturally found in fruits, vegetables, dairy products, and whole grains as well as in many processed foods. The effects of this simple sugar on our health have been a controversial topic for many years. Research studies are starting to demonstrate the connection between fructose and obesity, diabetes, and even cancer.

 

What is Fructose?

 

Fructose, also referred to as fruit sugar, is a monosaccharide or simple sugar like glucose. It’s naturally found in fruits, most root vegetables, agave, and honey. Moreover, it’s commonly added to processed foods as high-fructose corn syrup. The fructose used in high-fructose corn syrup mainly comes from corn, sugar beets, and sugar cane. High-fructose corn syrup is made from cornstarch and it has more of this simple sugar than glucose, compared to regular corn syrup. Fructose has the sweetest taste of the three sugars. It is digested and absorbed differently by the human body. Because monosaccharides are simple sugars, they don’t need to be broken down to be used as fuel for energy by our cells.

 

Natural foods that are high in fructose can include:

 

  • apples
  • apple juice
  • pears
  • prunes
  • dry figs
  • sorghum
  • asparagus
  • Jerusalem artichokes
  • chicory roots
  • leeks
  • onions
  • caramel
  • licorice
  • molasses
  • agave syrup
  • honey

 

Similar to glucose, fructose is absorbed directly into the bloodstream through the small intestine. Healthcare professionals have found that fructose has the least impact on blood sugar levels. It increases blood sugar levels much more gradually than glucose does and it doesn’t seem to immediately affect insulin levels. However, although this simple sugar has the least impact on blood sugar levels than any of the other simple types of sugars, it may ultimately cause more long-term negative effects on the human body. Fructose needs to be turned into glucose by the liver before it can be used as fuel for energy by our cells. Eating excess fructose can increase triglycerides and lead to metabolic syndrome.

 

Why is Fructose Bad for You?

 

When people eat a diet that is high in calories and processed foods with lots of high-fructose corn syrup, the liver can become overwhelmed and start turning fructose into fat. Research studies are starting to demonstrate the connection between this simple sugar and an increased risk of developing a variety of health issues, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and even cancer. Many healthcare professionals also believe that eating excess fructose is one of the main causes of metabolic disorders. However, there currently isn’t enough evidence to demonstrate the full extent to which fructose can contribute to these health issues. Nevertheless, numerous research studies have justified these controversial concerns.

 

Research studies have demonstrated that eating excess fructose can increase LDL or bad cholesterol which may lead to fat accumulation around the organs and heart disease. As a result, evidence showed that the deposition of fat in the liver due to the negative effects of this simple sugar can also result in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Eating excess fructose may also affect body fat regulation. Other research studies have demonstrated that because fructose doesn’t suppress appetite as much as other types of sugars do, it can promote overeating which may lead to obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, evidence has demonstrated that fructose can increase uric acid levels and cause gout.

 

For information regarding if fructose is bad for your health, please review the following article:

Health implications of fructose consumption: A review of recent data

 


 

AS PREVIOUSLY MENTIONED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE, FRUCTOSE IS ONE OF THE MAIN COMPONENTS OF ADDED SUGAR. IT IS A SIMPLE SUGAR THAT MAKES UP APPROXIMATELY 50 PERCENT OF TABLE SUGAR OR SUCROSE. TABLE SUGAR ALSO CONSISTS OF GLUCOSE OR THE MAIN ENERGY SOURCE OF THE HUMAN BODY. HOWEVER, FRUCTOSE NEEDS TO BE CONVERTED INTO GLUCOSE BY THE LIVER BEFORE IT CAN BE UTILIZED AS FUEL FOR ENERGY BY OUR CELLS. FRUCTOSE, SUCROSE, AND GLUCOSE ARE ALL NATURALLY FOUND IN SEVERAL FRUITS, VEGETABLES, DAIRY PRODUCTS, AND WHOLE GRAINS AS WELL AS IN MANY PROCESSED FOODS. THE EFFECTS OF THIS SIMPLE SUGAR ON OUR HEALTH HAVE BEEN A CONTROVERSIAL TOPIC FOR MANY YEARS. RESEARCH STUDIES ARE STARTING TO DEMONSTRATE THE CONNECTION BETWEEN FRUCTOSE AND OBESITY, DIABETES, AND EVEN CANCER. IN THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE, WE DISCUSS IF FRUCTOSE IS BAD FOR YOUR HEALTH. DRINKING SMOOTHIES ADD A HEALTHY NUTRITIONAL BOOST.� -�DR. ALEX JIMENEZ D.C., C.C.S.T. INSIGHTS

 


 

Image of sweet and spicy juice recipe.

 

 

Sweet and Spicy Juice

Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes

� 1 cup honeydew melons
� 3 cups spinach, rinsed
� 3 cups Swiss chard, rinsed
� 1 bunch cilantro (leaves and stems), rinsed
� 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled, and chopped
� 2-3 knobs whole turmeric root (optional), rinsed, peeled, and chopped

Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately.

 


 

Image of red peppers.

 

 

Red peppers have almost 2.5 times more vitamin C than oranges

 

Citrus fruits like oranges are a great source of vitamin C, however, there are other fruits and vegetables that offer an even better boost of this essential nutrient. Just half a red pepper, eaten raw, offers more than your requirement of vitamin C for the day, according to healthcare professionals. Cut it into crudit�s for a healthy mid-morning or afternoon snack. Red peppers are also rich in a variety of other essential nutrients, including vitamin A, B6, folate, and antioxidants!

 


 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas*& New Mexico*�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

 

References:

 

  • Gunnars, Kris. �Is Fructose Bad for You? The Surprising Truth.� Healthline, Healthline Media, 23 Apr. 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/why-is-fructose-bad-for-you#section1.
  • Nall, Rachel. �Is Fructose Bad for You? Benefits, Risks, and Other Sugars.� Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 28 Nov. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323818.
  • Groves, Melissa. �Sucrose vs Glucose vs Fructose: What’s the Difference?� Healthline, Healthline Media, 8 June 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/sucrose-glucose-fructose.
  • Rizkalla, Salwa W. �Health Implications of Fructose Consumption: A Review of Recent Data.� National Center for Biotechnology Information, BioMed Central, 4 Nov. 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2991323/.
  • Daniluk, Julie. �5 Health Benefits of Red Peppers. Plus, Our World’s Healthiest Pizza Recipe.� Chatelaine, 26 Feb. 2016, www.chatelaine.com/health/healthy-recipes-health/five-health-benefits-of-red-peppers/.

 

Functional Neurology: Sugar and Brain Health

Functional Neurology: Sugar and Brain Health

Do you often feel low brain endurance for focus and concentration? Do you often crave sugar and sweets in the afternoon? Or do you feel energized after meals? Glucose, or sugar, is the main source of energy in the human body. And, because the human brain has so many nerve cells or neurons, it is one of the most energy-demanding organs, which utilizes about one-half of all the energy from glucose in the human body. Sugar is important but too much of it can also have its downsides. �

 

Brain functions, such as memory, thinking, and learning, are relatively associated with glucose levels and how efficiently the brain utilizes this essential energy fuel source. If there isn�t enough glucose, or sugar, in the brain, by way of instance, neurotransmitters, or the human brain�s chemical messengers, don’t develop properly and the communications between neurons can ultimately break down. Additionally, dysglycemia, a common health issue caused by abnormal blood glucose levels, can cause loss of energy for brain function and has also been associated with poor attention and cognitive function. �

 

�The human brain is dependent on sugar or glucose as its main energy fuel source,� stated Vera Novak, MD, Ph.D., an HMS associate professor of medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. �It just simply cannot be without it.� �

 

What is Dysglycemia?

As previously mentioned, brain structure and function, such as cognition, can be affected by dysglycemia, or blood glucose abnormalities, in older adults. Researchers conducted a cross-sectional and longitudinal cohort research study, analyzing the association of dysglycemia with brain health. The researchers found that dysglycemia is associated with an increased number of brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities volume, and decreased total white matter, gray matter, and hippocampus volume cross-sectionally. According to the research study, there was also a decrease in gray matter volume longitudinally. Dysglycemia was ultimately associated with reduced language performance, speed, and visuospatial function. �

 

�Our results suggest that dysglycemia affects brain health in elderly survivors, evidenced by higher cerebrovascular disease, lower white, and gray matter volume as well as language, visuospatial function, and cognitive speed,� stated the authors.

 

Dysglycemia can cause changes in blood glucose levels which may cause a variety of health issues. Dysglycemia is also not necessarily defined by specific blood sugar levels. Instead, having an abnormally low, high, or unstable blood glucose levels suggests an underlying health issue that requires further investigation. Moreover, while type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the most common causes of dysglycemia, other examples of blood sugar level abnormalities can include gestational diabetes and pre-diabetic conditions as well as drug-related and genetically related abnormalities of the blood sugar levels. �

 

Furthermore, dysglycemia can be a result of hereditary or environmental factors, or it can even be a combination of both. Genes can predispose a person to ultimately develop dysglycemia over time, just as much as several lifestyle habits can, too. A poor diet high in unhealthy fats, sugars, and processed foods can commonly cause a person to develop dysglycemia. Lacking certain vitamins and minerals that enhance the human body�s sensitivity to insulin can also cause dysglycemia. �

 

Dysglycemia and Brain Health

Although the brain needs glucose or sugar, too much of this energy fuel source can also have several side-effects. A 2012 research study on animals conducted by researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles demonstrated a positive relationship between the consumption of fructose, another form of sugar, and the aging of cells. A 2009 research study, also utilizing animal models and conducted by a team of scientists at the University of Montreal and Boston College, connected excess glucose consumption to memory and cognitive deficiencies. Further research studies are still required. �

 

The effects of glucose and other forms of sugar on the human brain may be the most profound in diabetes, a group of health issues in which high blood glucose levels persist over a prolonged period of time. Type 1 diabetes is a health issue in which the immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone utilized by the human body to maintain and regulate blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes, caused by dietary and other environmental factors, is a health issue in which cells become overwhelmed by insulin and fail to properly respond and they ultimately become insulin resistant. �

 

Long-term diabetes, either type 1 or type 2, can have many consequences for the brain cells, or neurons, as well as the brain. High blood glucose levels can affect the brain�s functional connectivity which connects brain regions that share functional properties and brain matter. It can also cause the brain to atrophy or shrink and it can lead to small-vessel disease, which restricts blood flow in the brain, causing cognitive difficulties and it can cause the development of vascular dementia. �

 

In her laboratory, Novak evaluated several ways to prevent these effects in people with type 2 diabetes. One of these ways involves a nasal spray known as intranasal insulin (INI). When used, INI enters the brain and binds to receptors in its memory networks, including the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and insular cortex. As signaling within these memory networks become more efficient, cognitive functions in these areas, such as learning and visual perceptions of spatial relationships, improve. �

 

�Type 2 diabetes accelerates brain aging,� says Novak, �which, in turn, accelerates the progression of functional decline. With intranasal insulin, we�re hoping to find a new avenue for treatment to slow down these effects or prevent them altogether.� �

 

In a pilot research study, Novak and her colleagues found that a single dose of INI had a positive effect on memory, verbal learning, and spatial orientation. She is now planning the first clinical trial of INI in older adults with type 2 diabetes. The results of the clinical trial are especially relevant because of the high prevalence of dementia and significant cognitive decline among older adults with diabetes. Sugar, or glucose, is fundamental, however, it must be controlled for overall brain health. �

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez Insights Image

Glucose, or sugar, is an important source of energy fuel for every cell in the human body, especially the brain. However, excess amounts of blood glucose, or sugar, levels can be more harmful than beneficial and it can ultimately cause a variety of brain health issues, including neurological diseases like dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Dysglycemia, or abnormal blood glucose, or sugar, levels, is a common condition in diabetes. Managing and regulating glucose, or sugar, in patients with diabetes is essential to promote overall brain health and wellness, according to research studies. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 


 

Neurotransmitter Assessment Form

Neurotransmitter Assessment Form AE260 (1)

 

The following Neurotransmitter Assessment Form can be filled out and presented to Dr. Alex Jimenez. Symptoms listed on this form are not intended to be utilized as a diagnosis of any type of disease, condition, or any other type of health issue. �

 


 

Do you often feel low brain endurance for focus and concentration? Do you often crave sugar and sweets in the afternoon? Or do you feel energized after meals? Glucose, or sugar, is the main source of energy in the human body. And, because the human brain has so many nerve cells or neurons, it is one of the most energy-demanding organs, which utilizes about one-half of all the energy from glucose in the human body. Sugar is important but too much of it can also have its downsides. �

 

Brain functions, such as memory, thinking, and learning, are relatively associated with glucose levels and how efficiently the brain utilizes this essential energy fuel source. If there isn�t enough glucose, or sugar, in the brain, by way of instance, neurotransmitters, or the human brain�s chemical messengers, don’t develop properly and the communications between neurons can ultimately break down. Additionally, dysglycemia, a common health issue caused by abnormal blood glucose levels, can cause loss of energy for brain function and has also been associated with poor attention and cognitive function. �

 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.�

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez �

 

References:

  • Marchione, Victor. �Cognition and Brain Structure Affected by Dysglycemia in Older Adults: Study.� Bel Marra Health – Breaking Health News and Health Information, Bel Marra Health, 10 Jan. 2017, www.belmarrahealth.com/cognition-brain-structure-affected-dysglycemia-older-adults-study/.
  • Edwards, Scott. �Sugar and the Brain.� Sugar and the Brain | Department of Neurobiology, neuro.hms.harvard.edu/harvard-mahoney-neuroscience-institute/brain-newsletter/and-brain-series/sugar-and-brain.

 


 

Additional Topic Discussion: Chronic Pain

Sudden pain is a natural response of the nervous system which helps to demonstrate possible injury. By way of instance, pain signals travel from an injured region through the nerves and spinal cord to the brain. Pain is generally less severe as the injury heals, however, chronic pain is different than the average type of pain. With chronic pain, the human body will continue sending pain signals to the brain, regardless if the injury has healed. Chronic pain can last for several weeks to even several years. Chronic pain can tremendously affect a patient’s mobility and it can reduce flexibility, strength, and endurance.

 

 


 

Neural Zoomer Plus for Neurological Disease

Neural Zoomer Plus | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate neurological diseases. The Neural ZoomerTM Plus is an array of neurological autoantibodies which offers specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus is designed to assess an individual�s reactivity to 48 neurological antigens with connections to a variety of neurologically related diseases. The Vibrant Neural ZoomerTM Plus aims to reduce neurological conditions by empowering patients and physicians with a vital resource for early risk detection and an enhanced focus on personalized primary prevention. �

 

Food Sensitivity for the IgG & IgA Immune Response

Food Sensitivity Zoomer | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez utilizes a series of tests to help evaluate health issues associated with food sensitivities. The Food Sensitivity ZoomerTM is an array of 180 commonly consumed food antigens that offers very specific antibody-to-antigen recognition. This panel measures an individual�s IgG and IgA sensitivity to food antigens. Being able to test IgA antibodies provides additional information to foods that may be causing mucosal damage. Additionally, this test is ideal for patients who might be suffering from delayed reactions to certain foods. Utilizing an antibody-based food sensitivity test can help prioritize the necessary foods to eliminate and create a customized diet plan around the patient�s specific needs. �

 

Formulas for Methylation Support

 

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN�s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

 

Proudly,�Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

 

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

 

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic�Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

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For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link. *XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

 


 

Maintaining Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Maintaining Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

For people struggling to control their blood glucose levels, the most common concern is, how can you regulate blood sugar levels? Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels can be complicated and unyielding. Along with food and beverages, our blood sugar levels fluctuate in response to a huge variety of unique factors. Exercise, psychological stress, the previous night’s rest, and genetics all play a role in the human body’s effort to closely regulate the degree of glucose circulating in the blood. Additionally, no matter whether or not somebody has a blood glucose dysregulation problem or full-blown diabetes, that morning meal we call breakfast actually sets the stage for your day.

 

What is often known as the “Dawn Phenomenon” occurs between 4:00 AM to 8:00 AM when the human body produces sufficient amounts of glucagon, cortisol and epinephrine to boost blood glucose as a natural procedure before waking up in the morning. And science supports those people who prefer to eat a hearty breakfast as soon as they wake up. One study that monitored the sugar profiles of healthy people during the day saw that the largest increase in blood glucose occurs right after breakfast. Just about every nutritionist, dietitian and endocrinologist recommends eating a high-protein breakfast so as to restrain the naturally-occurring spike in sugar during the daytime. As mentioned previously, these meals, as well as other variables, will dictate the difference in blood glucose levels throughout the day, which directly impacts the way the human body works and an individual’s overall awareness of their health and wellness.

 

When Maintaining Healthy Blood Sugar Levels is Difficult

 

A consistently higher blood sugar level has a deleterious impact on organ function. Risks for diabetes, further heart disease, stroke, kidney disorders, vision impairment and cardiovascular issues that can result in infections and amputation of recurrence increase when blood sugar is uncontrolled. Intense oscillations in blood sugar may stem from many hormonal imbalances, specifically where there is a lack of insulin manufacturing, as in the case of type I diabetes, or an inability to use insulin correctly, commonly referred to as insulin resistance. Either type of diabetes is recognized and monitored with many evaluations, but the most prevalent one is the HbA1C. As a mark of longer-term glucose levels, the HbA1C suggests the average proportion of the particular hemoglobin subtype A1C that has glucose bound to it, glycated or glycosylated, producing a glycoprotein. Since hemoglobin cells normally die off after 120 days, this process firmly reflects the typical plasma glucose level over in the past 90 days. This diagnostic tool proves more helpful than a diagram of blood sugar, which shows great vacillations through the day. Individuals with diabetes or more lengths of hyperglycemia, as noticed in patients diagnosed with metabolic syndrome, have increased HbA1C levels. It’s projected that in 2015 over 7 million cases of diabetes and insulin resistance went undiagnosed. The famed incidence of those conditions is alarming as the trend is nearing 10 percent of the populace.

 

Regulating Blood Glucose Levels with Nutrition

 

Though genetics�are not something people can control, nutrition, diet and other lifestyle variables are within your reach. Eating a balanced diet of low-glycemic, high fiber, and also low-saturated fat meals is recommended for individuals with glycemic control health issues. Combining foods which contain all three macronutrients, such as proteins, fats, and carbohydrates, can also be valuable in regulating blood glucose levels. This list of foods provides a wonderful start to a healthy diet and a platform for preventing those wild swings in sugar throughout the day:

 

  • All colors and varieties of fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Legumes, such as kidney beans, black beans, chickpeas, and lentils
  • Whole grains, such as brown rice, quinoa, barley, and millet
  • Olive oil
  • Tomatoes
  • Fermented, organic and raw dairy
  • Cold-water wild fish, such as salmon, mackerel and sardines
  • Tempeh, tofu and natto
  • Cage-free, organic eggs
  • Green and black tea

 

Supplemental nutrients and botanicals to help encourage wholesome glucose levels and supply a hypoglycemic effect are currently being studied and comprise of:

 

  • Magnesium
  • Chromium, as chromium picolinate
  • Vanadium
  • Alpha lipoic acid
  • Gymnema sylvestre
  • Fenugreek
  • Bitter melon
  • Cinnamon
  • Berberine

 

Berberine functions on multiple fronts. It was found to substantially improve glucose levels by an average of 9.5 percent down to 7.5 percent, as effective as metformin from 9.15 percent down to 7.7 percent, in a research study to find out its effectiveness and safety in type 2 diabetes patients. Furthermore, it had the effect of enhancing both entire cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the evaluation and analysis.

 

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Dr. Alex Jimenez’s Insight

Diabetes has become one of the fastest growing diseases in the United States, where it is prevalent among both children and adults. With the increase in cases each year, the numbers of individuals seeking treatment and a potential cure are also rising. Fortunately, research studies have found that maintaining healthy blood sugar levels can help stabilize a case of diabetes. Proper nutrition, as well as natural remedies and botanicals, including alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, have been determined to help regulate healthy blood glucose levels, improving an individual’s quality of life.

 

While there are many other ways in which healthy blood sugar levels can be achieved, recent research studies have also determined that chiropractic care may be able to control blood sugar levels, potentially regulating type 2 diabetes. According to these, the key to managing blood glucose levels can be found in the connection between the central nervous system and blood sugar levels in the human body. Chiropractic care focuses on the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations to correct spinal misalignments, or subluxations. It has been demonstrated that spinal misalignments, or subluxations, can interfere with important communications signals from the brain to the spinal chords as well as the rest of the body. By carefully restoring the natural integrity of the spine, chiropractors can help regulate healthy blood sugar levels and improve overall health and wellness.

 

Other Important Lifestyle Factors

 

 

To remain steady on what could be a roller coaster ride of blood sugars, a high priority should be given to a well-balanced diet plan, replete with proper nutrition and supplementation, and the close observation of lifestyle and genetic aspects. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic as well as to spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at�915-850-0900�.

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

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Additional Topics: Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes for disability and missed days at work worldwide. As a matter of fact, back pain has been attributed as the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience some type of back pain at least once throughout their life. The spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments and muscles, among other soft tissues. Because of this, injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.

 

 

 

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EXTRA IMPORTANT TOPIC: Low Back Pain Management

 

MORE TOPICS: EXTRA EXTRA:�Chronic Pain & Treatments