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Ear Problems: Back Connection Chiropractor

Ear Problems: Back Connection Chiropractor

Ear problems like blockages or congestion can cause irritation and pain, as well as symptoms such as dizziness, ear discomfort, headaches, and sinus pain that can lead to infection. This condition can happen to anyone but is prevalent in children, individuals that live in high altitudes, and individuals who suffer from allergies. Spinal misalignments can cause interference to the nervous system that can create problems elsewhere in the body, like the ears.

Ear Problems: Spine Connection Chiropractor

If there is neck misalignment along with pinched, tangled nerve/s signal transmissions can misfire or cut off messages disrupting the process of draining the Eustachian tube. This creates a buildup of bacteria and fluid, which can cause pain and pressure. Chiropractic decompression treatment uses gentle manipulation of the cervical spine to release the pressure affecting the ear.

Ear Problems

Bacteria or viruses cause ear infections in the middle ear. Infection often results from another illness like cold, sore throat, flu, respiratory disease, or allergies that causes congestion and swelling of the nasal passages, throat, and eustachian tubes.

Eustachian Tubes

The tubes functions include:

  • Regulating air pressure in the middle ear
  • Resupply fresh air in the ear
  • Drain the middle ear

The eustachian tubes are two canals that connect the middle ear to the throat and nasal cavity, known as the nasopharynx. (The eustachian tubes are more narrow in children, which makes them difficult to drain and more likely to get clogged.)When the lining of these canals comes under stress, they can become inflamed/swollen, blocking or filling with fluid causing excessive pressure and pain. This fluid can become infected and cause ear infection symptoms.

If the ear problem is connected to a misalignment of the cervical spine, the following symptoms may be experienced:

  • Loss of hearing
  • Tinnitus
  • Vertigo
  • Aural fullness is the feeling of a plugged or full ear
  • Balance issues
  • Coordination issues
  • Frequent headaches
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Frequent episodes that result in vertigo and ringing in the ears could indicate Meniere’s disease, which affects balance and inner ear function.

Middle Ear Infections

Middle ear infection types include:

Acute otitis media

  • This type of infection happens suddenly.
  • It causes swelling and redness.
  • Fluid and pus become trapped under the eardrum/tympanic membrane.
  • Fever and ear pain can manifest.

Chronic otitis media

  • This type happens frequently or does not go away and can take months to years.
  • This type is usually not painful.
  • The ear canal may have liquid coming out.
  • It can be accompanied by a hole that forms in the eardrum and hearing loss.

Otitis media with effusion

  • Also called serous otitis media.
  • Fluid or effusion and mucus build up in the middle ear after an infection passes.
  • It can feel like the ear is full.
  • This can go on for months.
  • It can affect hearing.

Chronic otitis media with effusion

  • Fluid/effusion stays in the middle ear for an extended time.
  • It can build up over and over, despite no infection.
  • It can also affect hearing.

Misalignment in the upper cervical spine can cause muscles to flex awkwardly/irregularly, disrupting the opening and closing of the eustachian tubes and their positioning. This often causes inflammation along the eustachian canal, upper throat, and nasal cavity. If left untreated, the inflammation can develop into an infection, causing swelling and/or fluid buildup in the inner and middle ear. Common symptoms of middle ear infections in adults include:

  • Pain in one or both ears
  • Hearing is muffled
  • Sore throat
  • Fluid drainage from the ear

Chiropractic Realignment

Treatments are helpful for individuals who want to reduce taking antibiotics, which can minimize immunity by destroying the healthy bacteria in the gut. Chiropractic is a simple and effective way to treat ear problems. Realigning the vertebrae relieves tissue inflammation/swelling around the Eustachian tube to allow drainage, relieve pressure, and restore health.


Spinal Decompression Chiropractor


References

Collins, Rachael, et al. “Paralysis from an ear infection: a severe case of otitis externa leading to acute complete cervical cord syndrome.” BMJ case reports vol. 14,12 e245594. 1 Dec. 2021, doi:10.1136/bcr-2021-245594

Harmes, Kathryn M et al. “Otitis media: diagnosis and treatment.” American family physician vol. 88,7 (2013): 435-40.

Laulajainen Hongisto, Anu et al. “Severe Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Adults.” The journal of international advanced otology vol. 12,3 (2016): 224-230. doi:10.5152/iao.2016.2620

Murphy, D R. “Chiropractic rehabilitation of the cervical spine.” Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics vol. 23,6 (2000): 404-8. doi:10.1067/mmt.2000.108143

Polkinghorn, B S. “Treatment of cervical disc protrusions via instrumental chiropractic adjustment.” Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics vol. 21,2 (1998): 114-21.

Alexander Technique

Alexander Technique

Improving posture can be challenging. Poor posture is often the source of various musculoskeletal issues like chronic pain throughout the body. Poor posture can be so ingrained in the brain that it becomes an unconscious positioning reflex that feels right but could be worsening spinal, hip, and leg problems. The Alexander Technique could be a treatment option that could help long-term.

Alexander Technique

Alexander Technique

The approach focuses on learning mind-body awareness. It is an educational process to teach individuals to become aware of their body positioning and change unhealthy posture/movement habits into healthy ones. The objective is learning to utilize sufficient levels of muscle tension for everyday activities, like sitting, standing up, and walking in a healthy way to maintain optimal health of the musculoskeletal system.

  • The theory is that less tension minimizes wear and tear on the muscles and structures of the spine vulnerable to compression.
  • The fundamental goal of the Alexander Technique is to undo all the unhealthy tension habits to decompress the spine and retrain the mind and body to approach movement and body positioning in a new and healthy way.

Teachings

The technique can be done in a class setting or one-on-one teaching because everyone’s postural and movement habits are unique. A teacher helps identify the tension-inducing postures and educates the individual on how to correct them. Human touch is an integral part of the Alexander Technique. Using their hands gently to adjust the individual to a proper upright position, a teacher helps release pressure from the head, neck, shoulders, and upper back. The individual learns to release the tension throughout their body. The Alexander Technique is a type of hands-on therapy; it is not manipulation or massage. It uses a light touch with no risk of injury to the spine, allowing anyone to participate. However, individuals must be willing to participate/engage in the process to get the benefits. Most individuals can tell if it’s right for them during the first lesson. A typical program teaches:

  • Comfortably sitting up straight.
  • Reducing overuse of superficial musculature.
  • Increasing proprioceptive awareness.
  • Staying alert to the body’s warning of tension and compression.

Tension Build Up

Individuals usually don’t even realize they’re constantly placing pressure on their spine from unhealthy postural habits, building up muscular tension they never knew they created. For example, unhealthy neck position habits include:

  • Pushing the head forward
  • Slumping over
  • Pinning the shoulders back
  • These postures generate/build pressure and tension that radiates outward and down to the large muscles of the spine.
  • Habitual downward pressure can pull and change the spine’s shape, leading to degenerative forms of spinal deformity in severe cases.
  • When the tension is released, the neck and body begin to stand upright comfortably, without pulling down or pulling back.

Frederick Matthias Alexander

Developed the technique in the 1890s to help his muscle tension problems affecting his acting career. When performing, he would stiffen his neck and pull his head back and up, building tension that caused him to tighten his throat and lose his voice. He did not know he was doing this until he performed in front of a mirror and saw his awkward positioning. He realized this and retrained himself to pose naturally, stay relaxed, and be aware of any tension building in the muscles to release it immediately. Alexander Technique educators/practitioners practice all over the world. The American Society for the Alexander Technique or AmSAT website has a Find A Teacher Tool that connects individuals to AmSAT-approved teachers.


Body Composition


Practicing Mindfulness

Developing a mindfulness practice can help identify triggers of negative behavior or thoughts. Just like diet and exercise, practicing mindfulness is unique to everyone. It is recommended to try different things like:

  • Journaling is another way to tune into oneself. Grab a pen and paper, a computer, tablet, or phone, and take a few minutes to write every day.
  • Write one thing that makes you happy.
  • One thing you want to improve.
  • One goal you want to accomplish that day or that week.

Mindful music listening can help reduce stress by allowing the individual to focus their attention when their mind is going in all directions.

  • Instead of turning to the news or email when waking up, grab a cup of coffee or tea and listen to a favorite podcast or music.
  • Put the phone away and listen to your mind and self.

Try to meditate in the morning when waking up. This helps set the day’s goals/plans. Goal-setting mindfulness has been shown to reduce stress levels and anxiety. However, if the morning is not possible then at night before bed can be used to reflect on the day’s activities, what went well, what didn’t, how to improve something, whatever the case, the point is to make time for yourself to reflect, set goals, and develop a plan to achieve those goals.

References

Becker, Jordan J et al. “Preliminary evidence for feasibility, efficacy, and mechanisms of Alexander technique group classes for chronic neck pain.” Complementary therapies in medicine vol. 39 (2018): 80-86. doi:10.1016/j.ctim.2018.05.012

Cacciatore et al., Improvement in automatic postural coordination following Alexander technique lessons in a person with low back pain. Physical Therapy Journal, 2005; 85:565-578. Accessed January 5, 2011

Chin, Brian et al. “Psychological mechanisms driving stress resilience in mindfulness training: A randomized controlled trial.” Health psychology: official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association vol. 38,8 (2019): 759-768. doi:10.1037/hea0000763

Little P, Lewith G, Webley F, et al. Randomised controlled trial of Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage (ATEAM) for chronic and recurrent back pain. The BMJ. 2008;337:a884. doi: doi.org/10.1136/bmj.a884.

Paolucci, Teresa et al. “Chronic low back pain and postural rehabilitation exercise: a literature review.” Journal of pain research vol. 12 95-107. December 20 2018, doi:10.2147/JPR.S171729

Flexibility and Range of Motion

Flexibility and Range of Motion

Flexibility and range of motion are essential elements for an individual’s overall health, physical fitness, and quality of life. Healthy flexibility helps the body:

  • Maintain a physically active lifestyle.
  • Maintain strength.
  • Improve endurance.
  • Prevent injury.

Flexibility and Range of Motion

Flexibility and Range of Motion

Joint stiffness and pain can make it challenging to engage in everyday activities and maintain mobile, physical, emotional, and internal health. To keep the body flexible and moving, individuals need to use their entire body and range of movement. Becoming sedentary affects the body’s flexibility, leading to slowed/blocked blood circulation, nerve energy signal disruption, and sickness. To improve flexibility and range of motion, it is recommended to include:

  • Stretching the body
  • Regular exercise and physical activity
  • Yoga
  • Healthy diet
  • Healthy weight
  • Proper sleep

For individuals with stiffened muscles and joints, chiropractic medicine can increase the body’s flexibility, improving the range of motion in the joints. Chiropractic optimizes the function of the joints, improving mobility with less pain. When living with arthritis, chiropractic is an excellent therapy to decrease pain and activate the body’s natural healing abilities. Chiropractic adjustments align the spine and improve nervous system function.

Nerve Pressure

Nerve pressure can cause pain or tingling sensations that can become difficult to manage. A shifted misaligned spine can compress nerve endings, causing pain that presents with or without movement. Getting the body in motion and moving around is essential to treat stiffness and joint pain. The objective of chiropractic is to align the spine and body and relieve pressure on the nerves helping the body gain back its flexibility and range of motion. Once the body is adjusted, the nerve endings are no longer irritated, relieving the pain. Chiropractic uses various techniques to deal with areas of compression, including stretching, percussive massage, low-laser therapy, ultrasound, and strengthening exercises.

  • Chiropractic adjustments relieve pain and improve mobility.
  • Strengthening exercises to keep the spine in proper alignment.
  • Exercising keeps the adjustments in place.

A careful assessment of the condition will determine the cause of stiffness and joint immobility. Chiropractic can treat the joints, bones, and muscles to improve flexibility manage muscle spasms and soft tissue tenderness to alleviate symptoms restoring and improving range of motion. Chiropractic adjustments are combined with therapeutically designed stretches and exercises to perform at home, along with an anti-inflammation diet and supplements.


Body Composition


Zinc

Zinc is an essential nutrient that provides overall immune function. It is a powerful antioxidant that helps prevent and reduce oxidative stress and inflammation responses. Various bodily chemical reactions require Zinc. Zinc is necessary for muscle protein synthesis and hormone regulation. Zinc deficiency is common in older individuals and has been connected with degenerative diseases that include:

Sources of Zinc include:

  • Nuts
  • Legumes
  • Chicken
  • Red meat
  • Oysters
References

Green, S et al. “Physiotherapy interventions for shoulder pain.” The Cochrane database of systematic reviews vol. 2003,2 (2003): CD004258. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD004258

Hartvigsen, Jan et al. “What low back pain is and why we need to pay attention.” Lancet (London, England) vol. 391,10137 (2018): 2356-2367. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(18)30480-X

Kavuncu, Vural, and Deniz Evcik. “Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.” MedGenMed: Medscape general medicine vol. 6,2 3. 17 May. 2004

Page, Carolyn J et al. “Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.” International journal of rheumatic diseases vol. 14,2 (2011): 145-51. doi:10.1111/j.1756-185X.2011.01612.x

Wessels, Inga et al. “Zinc as a Gatekeeper of Immune Function.” Nutrients vol. 9,12 1286. 25 Nov. 2017, doi:10.3390/nu9121286

Exercising To Detoxify and Cleanse The Body

Exercising To Detoxify and Cleanse The Body

Detoxifying does not necessarily mean juicing and going on a diet. Detoxing is about cleansing the whole body of environmental pollutants, food waste, bacteria, and toxins. Things like medications and alcohol also need to be flushed from the body. When the body becomes unhealthy and overweight, it can put its systems in a chronically stressed state, leading to nerve energy production failure, fatigue, a weakened immune system, and disease. The body constantly works to cleanse itself. Exercise helps expedite the process.

Exercising To Detoxify and Cleanse The Body

Exercise To Detoxify

Exercise removes harmful toxins by getting the lungs and the blood pumping and increasing sweat production, which encourages detoxification. More blood circulating throughout the body allows the liver and the lymph nodes to flush out toxins properly. With exercise, fluid intake increases, allowing more sweat production to release toxins. Drinking more water during workouts also helps the kidneys function at optimal levels to flush out toxins, fats, and waste.

Aerobics

Any low-intensity aerobic exercise that increases heart rate and increases heavier breathing is recommended as long as the breathing is within the fat-burning heart rate. Exercises can be anything from:

Bouncing/Rebounding

Bouncing on a mini-trampoline, also known as rebounding, is another form of exercise that promotes toxin release. The low-impact motion stimulates the lymphatic system. Lymph nodes filter substances and fight off infections by attacking bacteria/germs that travel into the lymph fluid. Twenty minutes on the trampoline two or three times a week to detoxify.

Yoga

There are yoga poses that help to detoxify specific organs. Yoga can help the body cleanse inside and generate more energy.

Revolved Chair Pose

This pose stimulates the liver, spleen, digestive system, improves spinal alignment, and tones the abdominals.

  • Start with the feet together or hip-width apart, depending on what is most comfortable.
  • Bend the knees as if sitting in a chair.
  • The knees should be aligned with the center of the feet.
  • Place the palms of the hands together in a prayer position at the center of the heart.
  • Bring the elbow to the opposite knee.
  • Squeeze the shoulder blades together.
  • Allow the chest to open up.

Wide-Legged Forward Bend

This pose improves circulation, stretches, and strengthens the low back, hips, hamstrings, and calves.

  • Step with the feet 3 to 4 feet apart.
  • Hands-on hips.
  • Lift tall through the whole torso.
  • Fold slowly over the legs.
  • Bend from the hip joints without rounding the lower back.
  • If the back starts to round, stop folding forward.

Sweating and Detoxing

Sweat is one of the body’s primary ways of eliminating toxins. However, more sweat does not mean more toxins are being flushed. Excess sweat could be caused by the body overheating and can lead to dehydration. This is why it’s vital to maintain the body’s hydration levels while working out. Fluids like juice and sports drinks can help maintain hydration, but they contain sugar and other ingredients that could interfere with thorough detoxifying.


Body Composition


Before Starting A Detox Diet

Individuals are recommended to talk with their doctor, nutritionist, health coach about detox diet methods to lose and maintain weight.

Talk with a doctor

  • Seek consultation with a physician before starting any body detox cleanse, especially if there are underlying medical conditions like diabetes or kidney disease.
  • For individuals struggling with obesity, a physician can recommend alternative diet approaches and exercise programs.

Realistic expectations

  • Detox diets work primarily through caloric restriction like a conventional diet.
  • Individuals could feel better from a body cleanse because they will likely be avoiding processed foods and empty calories.

Adopt a long-term frame of mind

  • Diet and exercise to achieve and maintain a healthy weight is a lifelong journey.
  • Detox diets can be a helpful tool to get going in the right direction.
References

Ernst, E. “Alternative detox.” British medical bulletin vol. 101 (2012): 33-8. doi:10.1093/bmb/lds002

Klein, A V, and H Kiat. “Detox diets for toxin elimination and weight management: a critical review of the evidence.” Journal of human nutrition and dietetics: the official journal of the British Dietetic Association vol. 28,6 (2015): 675-86. doi:10.1111/jhn.12286

Obert, Jonathan et al. “Popular Weight Loss Strategies: a Review of Four Weight Loss Techniques.” Current gastroenterology reports vol. 19,12 61. 9 Nov. 2017, doi:10.1007/s11894-017-0603-8

Taking It Slow After Spine Surgery

Taking It Slow After Spine Surgery

Taking it slow after spinal surgery is recommended to optimize a full recovery. What usually happens is that an individual starts feeling normal/better, so they begin to engage in a few daily activities. Then pain presents, letting the individual know that they have done too much too soon. The pain does not necessarily signal re-injuring the area, but recovery should be treated seriously. More than 50% of patients have successful spine surgery, but repeat surgeries do not tend to be quite as effective. Doing too much too early during recovery can result in severe re-injury or creating new injuries. So when can an individual get back to everyday life?

Taking It Slow After Spine Surgery

Surgery Recovery

Recovery after back surgery is different for everyone. Low back lumbar fusion surgeries usually require more recovery time than lumbar non-fusion surgeries, like:

  • Laminectomy – when the lamina portion of a vertebra is removed.
  • Microdiscectomy – the removal of abnormal disc material
  • Cervical spine surgeries.

Individuals who have undergone a procedure where two or more vertebrae have been surgically fused should expect a longer recovery. A typical timeline for lumbar fusion usually involves around three months. What happens is individuals want to get up and move, doing household activities almost immediately because they feel so good, but this is because of the pain medications. Strong pain medication use ends by four to six weeks. It is not until after 12 weeks or three months with post-operative chiropractic rehabilitation and physical therapy that individuals are encouraged to engage in specific physical activities that will optimize the healing process.

Taking It Slow With Certain Activities

Specific activities should not be engaged in after lumbar fusion surgery, as it requires a higher level of caution during recovery.

No Bending, Lifting, and Twisting

Bending, lifting, and twisting all require the direct use of the back muscles. Performing these movements can cause serious damage and hinder proper healing. Therefore it is recommended not to bend, lift, or twist for six weeks.

No Taking Baths or Swimming

Taking showers can be done right away with protective plastic or a sponge bath for a few days after surgery, but it is advised not to take baths or go swimming for three weeks.

No Cardiovascular Exercise

While the back may be feeling better after the spine surgery, cardiovascular exercise is not recommended for at least six to 12 weeks as it is too strenuous on the back. Light walking is fine, but the doctor and a chiropractor and physical therapist will develop a controlled, progressive exercise program for the individual. The program usually starts between 6 weeks and three months after surgery. This can include working out on an elliptical machine, a stationary bike, or easy treadmill walking.

Listening to The Body

The doctor will be clear about what can and can’t be done immediately following back surgery. Therefore it is crucial to follow the instructions to avoid any complications and listen to the body. Don’t push through activity or try taking on too much. Give the body and spine time to heal, taking it slow. There is time to get back to normal activities, but if re-injury or new injuries occur, rehabilitation/recovery could become the regular activity.


Body Composition


Malnutrition

Malnutrition is defined as deficiencies, excesses, or imbalances in an individual’s energy intake and/or nutrients. Protein-energy deficiency is one of the most common forms of malnutrition, and this health condition has an immediate and negative impact on body composition. The deficit wreaks havoc on skeletal muscle mass as the body progressively goes into starvation mode, breaking down the protein stored in the muscle for fuel.

Micronutrient deficiency is a lack of minerals and vitamins that support vital bodily processes like cell regeneration, immune system health, and eyesight. Common examples include iron or calcium deficiencies. Micronutrient deficiency has the most significant impact on normal physiological functions, processes and can happen in conjunction with a lack of protein-energy. This is because most micronutrients are obtained from food. Nutritional deficiencies of specific micronutrients can affect processes like building and repairing muscle; protein deficiency has a more pronounced effect on body composition because lowered protein intake can lead to muscle mass loss. Malnutrition and nutritional deficiencies in adults include:

  • Not enough energy to get through the day.
  • Unintended weight loss.
  • Physical function, including handgrip strength and physical performance, diminishes.
  • Serious medical conditions can result from fluid accumulation like edema.
References

Daniell, James R, and Orso L Osti. “Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Review Article.” Asian spine journal vol. 12,2 (2018): 372-379. doi:10.4184/asj.2018.12.2.372

Exercises For An Aching Back

Exercises For An Aching Back

Reaching, twisting, walking, and driving are everyday activities that require upper and lower back strength. An aching back can easily affect daily activities, generate frustration, anger, and affect all-around health. The more back muscle strength an individual has, the more they can accomplish far more without injury. Immense power is not required to protect the body from a back injury. All that is needed is regular, consistent physical activity and exercise. A balance of body strength is vital for preventing injury. However, overdoing one fitness exercise or physical activity can imbalance musculature, leading to injury. Because the back/spine is the central part of the body, complete and proper care is necessary for optimal health and wellness. For individuals experiencing sore, aching, and tired muscles, here are some exercises that will help in the process.

Exercises For An Aching Back

Alternating Arm and Leg Extensions

Alternating extensions help build strength and coordination in the core areas. The back muscles increase their efficiency by creating muscle memory that supports the work shared by all the torso muscles. Upper and lower back muscles must work together to maintain a healthy balance and not overwork each other, causing strain and fatigue.

  • Start by placing hands and knees on the floor with the head directly between shoulders and facing toward the floor.
  • Feet are directly in line behind the buttocks and resting on the floor.
  • Hips and shoulders rest above the knees and hands.
  • Raise the right hand straight ahead with the arm at full length.
  • At the time same time, raise the left leg straight behind the body.
  • Try to keep the arm and leg as straight as possible.
  • Hold for 10 seconds.
  • Switch sides.
  • Repeat three to eight times, depending on strength level.
  • If it is difficult, a modified option is to raise the arm and leg separately.

Plank Hold

These can help build back muscles and strengthen the arms, legs, and the front torso area. Plank holds are a recommended starting point. Plank holds can be done on the elbows, palms of the hands, or closed fist hands. The key is to keep the shoulders, hips, and ankles straight like a wood plank parallel to the floor.

  • Place hands and feet directly on the floor like doing a push–up.
  • Toes should be on the floor.
  • Keep the abdominals tight and buttocks lifted to prevent straining the lower back.
  • Face straight down.
  • Hold for a count of 10.
  • Repeat three times.
  • For those with an aching back, keeping the hips level with the shoulders could be challenging at the beginning.
  • With practice, it will become easier; then, the individual is recommended to increase the length of time until 30 seconds is achieved.
  • Then increase the challenge to try more than three repetitions.
  • A modification for beginners is to start with the body resting on the floor, stomach down.
  • Then raise the body into the start position from the floor.

Hip Raises

Hip raises help to strengthen the lower back muscles to unite and support the lower half of the body. Training the body to work cooperatively is critical for reducing the aching and pain from muscle imbalance.

  • Rest the body flat on the floor, facing upward.
  • Place the hands flat at the body’s sides.
  • Knees should be about shoulder-width apart.
  • Keep the feet flat on the floor
  • Pull the feet toward the buttocks.
  • Look straight up.
  • Raise the hips as high as possible while pressing down with the hands.
  • Hold for 10 seconds.
  • Complete five to eight reps.

Cross Body Standing Lateral Arm Raises

Lateral raises or side lateral raises help strengthen and tone the shoulder muscles and the upper back muscles.

  • Begin with a single one-pound weight.
  • Face forward.
  • Stand with the feet shoulder-width apart.
  • Bring the weight to rest near the left hip bone.
  • Gently raise the weight across the body to arrive just above the right side with the arm at full length.
  • Make sure that shoulders and hips are stationary and that only the arms move. Do not twist.
  • Hold for 10 seconds.
  • Repeat three to eight times.
  • Switch sides.
  • Modification can be done by sitting in a comfortable chair with proper posture in a chair instead of standing.
  • If weights are too challenging to work with initially, complete the exercise with only the hands placed with the palms flat and together.

Aerobic Activity

This helps circulate blood throughout the body, helping to reduce muscle soreness. A few gentle and aerobic activities can include:

  • Brisk walking.
  • Stair climbing.
  • Bicycling, elliptical, or rowing machine workout.
  • Physical activity that keeps blood moving throughout the body. Examples include yoga, gardening, and dancing.

While the back is healing, go at a gentle even pace for any activity. Jerking and quickly stopping can be hard on joints and discs. When injured, the other muscles try to compensate to avoid causing a flare-up that could worsen the injury and/or create a new injury.

Aching Back Muscles

Strength-building exercises are great for preventing injury and avoiding re-injury. However, avoid overreaching or overstretching with any of the activities. Continuous aching or painful back muscles could indicate something else is occurring that could be:

  • A pinched nerve.
  • Shifted/misaligned discs.
  • Disc herniation.
  • The beginning of an arthritic condition causing inflammation.
  • Back muscle tear/s.
  • Pregnancy.

Body Composition


Sarcopenia – Loss of Skeletal Muscle Mass and Strenght Causes

Decreased Physical Activity

  • Physical inactivity is one of the primary contributors to sarcopenia.
  • Sedentariness can exacerbate the effects of sarcopenia.
  • Regular resistance exercise can help maintain muscle mass and build muscular strength.

Decrease in motor neurons

  • Aging is accompanied by a loss of motor neurons caused by cell death.
  • This can lead to a decrease in muscle fibers and size.
  • This decrease leads to:
  • Impaired performance
  • Reduced functional capacity
  • Decreased ability to perform everyday tasks.

Increase in Pro-inflammatory Cytokines

  • Poor diet and exercise also promote the storage of visceral fat.
  • This type of fat tissue produces pro-inflammatory cytokines.
  • This can accelerate muscle breakdown.
  • Obesity and muscle weakness are associated with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines.
References

Alfuth, M, and D Cornely. “Chronischer lumbaler Rückenschmerz : Vergleich zwischen Mobilisationstraining und Training der rumpfstabilisierenden Muskulatur” [Chronic low back pain : Comparison of mobilization and core stability exercises]. Der Orthopade vol. 45,7 (2016): 579-90. doi:10.1007/s00132-016-3233-1

Kim, Beomryong, and Jongeun Yim. “Core Stability and Hip Exercises Improve Physical Function and Activity in Patients with Non-Specific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” The Tohoku journal of experimental medicine vol. 251,3 (2020): 193-206. doi:10.1620/tjem.251.193

Smith, Benjamin E et al. “An update of stabilization exercises for low back pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis.” BMC musculoskeletal disorders vol. 15 416. 9 Dec. 2014, doi:10.1186/1471-2474-15-416

Suh, Jee Hyun et al. “The effect of lumbar stabilization and walking exercises on chronic low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.” Medicine vol. 98,26 (2019): e16173. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000016173

Kettlebell Strengthening For Back Pain Safety

Kettlebell Strengthening For Back Pain Safety

Kettlebell training for the back muscles and back pain prevention can be part of a recommended treatment plan. When experiencing low back pain, many sports medicine experts recommend kettlebell exercise to strengthen the core and posterior chain. However, if not used correctly, kettlebell exercises can worsen back pain.

Kettlebell Strengthening For Back Pain Safety

Kettlebell

They are made of cast iron or steel and are named for resembling a tea kettle with an oversized handle. They can be used in one and two-handed movements.

Exercises and Movements for Back Pain

For individuals that are not experiencing back pain, kettlebell training can be excellent for maintenance and injury prevention. They strengthen the core and back muscles.

  • The kettlebell swing is an essential exercise and is one of the most important exercises when dealing with back pain issues.
  • A kettlebell is placed on the floor about 12 inches in front while standing with the feet a little wider than hip-distance.
  • The hips become the hinge.
  • Extend the arms down to the bell and grip it.
  • Begin swinging it up and down through the legs and then upward and outward to chest level.
  • The shoulders are to stay relaxed.
  • The hips are used to thrust and create momentum to swing the kettlebell.
  • Keep the spine neutral throughout the exercise to prevent injury.
  • The arms are to hold the bell only.
  • Don’t swing with the arms or shoulders, but push through with the hips.
  • The exercise can be swung up over the head but is not recommended for those with back pain.

Benefits

  • They are portable and don’t require a lot of space.
  • With kettlebells, an individual can train more easily than with barbells.
  • Kettlebell workouts provide strength training and cardiovascular fitness.
  • Once the proper technique is learned, individuals can set up a regular regimen at home.

Proper Form and Mistakes

Proper form is crucial. The primary movement most individuals have difficulty with is getting the proper hinging motion at the hip. Most individuals flex at the lower back and place increased pressure on the discs. Proper hip hinge motion means:

  • Keeping the low back straight
  • Flexing at the hip
  • Pushing back out with the buttocks when performing the swing motion.
  • When done correctly, an individual should be able to stop at any stage and hold that position.

Posture Form Tips

Form issues with kettlebells include:

Hip Hinge

  • When picking up the kettlebell, remember to hip hinge instead of squatting to maintain the back in a neutral position.
  • Drive the hips back in the same way when sitting down on a low chair.

Arching the back

  • If the pelvis is tilted too far forward, the back arches a lot.
  • This can narrow where the nerves leave the spine in the low back.
  • Keep the abdominals tight to prevent the pelvis from tilting forward.

Using the incorrect weight can also cause problems; this could be going too heavy or too light.

  • Too heavy increases the risk of straining the body and back.
  • A kettlebell that is too light does not provide the correct resistance to strengthen the muscles.
  • Another common mistake is overtraining. Specifically, individuals over 50 whose bodies don’t recover as quickly.
  • Individuals over 50 are recommended to spread out the workout days with more than one rest day.

Common Injuries

Proper training before working with kettlebells is highly recommended, especially for those already dealing with back pain. Individuals are encouraged to work with a physical therapist, sports chiropractor, or personal trainer who can teach proper techniques and specific exercises, observe the individual’s process, and make corrections. Improper technique can lead to:

  • Muscle strains.
  • Muscle spasms.
  • Compressed or pinched nerves.
  • Added stress to pre-existing low back conditions.
  • Impact injuries to the wrist and forearm.

Body Composition


Exercise Ball Pikes

Exercise ball pikes are an advanced total body workout. Muscle groups worked out include:

  • Deep abdominals
  • Hip abductors
  • Quadriceps
  • Deltoids
  • Scapula stabilizers
  • Pectoralis major/minor

To do the exercise:

  • Start in a pushup position with the arms on the floor in front.
  • Lift the legs, so the tops of the feet rest on the exercise/stability ball.
  • Knees should be bent to start the movement.
  • Extend the legs out as straight as possible.
  • Hold the position for a few seconds.
  • Return to the starting position.
References

Common Injuries Associated with Kettlebells: ACSM’s Health & Fitness Journal (March/April 2017) “Managing Risks of Training with Kettlebells to Achieve Optimum Benefits.” journals.lww.com/acsm healthfitness/Fulltext/2017/03000/MANAGING_RISKS_OF_TRAINING_WITH_KETTLEBELLS_TO.6.aspx

Posture Exercises To Do At Work

Posture Exercises To Do At Work

Posture exercises: It is easy to get into the bad habit of poor/improper posture, especially at work where an individual gets into a groove and continues without thinking about their posture. Not until discomfort and pain begin to present do individuals start thinking about what is causing the issues. This usually includes:

  • Back pain
  • Shoulder pain
  • Neck pain
  • Tight/Compressed spine

They don’t realize that all these issues are brought on by prolonged sitting and practicing improper posture.  Individuals that practice proper posture:

  • Sleep better
  • Move better
  • Have reduced to no aches and pains
  • Digestion improves
  • Organ function improves
  • Have better overall health

Being aware of proper posture is the first step in being able to maintain it. When you feel the spine starting to curve, shoulders hunching, or the back sway, stop and take a moment to reposition the body back into proper alignment.

Posture Exercises To Do At Work

Seated Posture

Proper posture means sitting, standing, or walking in a position with little to no strain on the body’s muscles and ligaments. Good seated position means:

  • Sitting with the back straight and shoulders back.
  • Having all of the natural curves of the spine in alignment.
  • Keeping the knees bent at a right angle with the feet flat on the floor.
  • The weight is distributed evenly to both hips.
  • Keep the arms at 90 degrees to the torso, using the armrests or on a desk.
  • When looking at a computer monitor, keep it at a position where you are looking straightforward.
  • Use a chair with lower back support.
  • Even when sitting with good posture, it’s important to avoid sitting in the same position for more than 30 minutes.
  • Regularly stand up, walk around, and stretch out.

Posture Exercises

Posture exercises will help to strengthen the back, neck, and shoulders. They also help as a reminder for maintaining good posture throughout the day.

Shoulder Lift and Release

When sitting down for long periods, individuals tend to develop hunched shoulders. It is caused by an imbalance of muscles in the neck and upper back. Specific muscles in the neck, specifically the pectoralis major and minor, become shortened and tight. The other muscles in the upper back, the trapezius,latissimus dorsi, and rhomboids, weaken and stretch out. These muscles can be stimulated by stretching throughout the day.

  • Sit in your chair with your feet flat on the floor and spine straight.
  • Pull the shoulders up towards the ceiling.
  • Hold them there for three to five seconds.
  • Let the shoulders drop.
  • It is recommended to repeat 5 to 6 times every hour.

Shoulder rolls

Another exercise for avoiding rounded/hunched shoulders.

  • Sit in your chair with your feet flat on the floor and spine straight.
  • Take a breath in.
  • Lift the shoulders towards the ears.
  • Move the shoulders back.
  • Squeeze the shoulder blades together.
  • On the exhale, finish the rotation by dropping the shoulders back to a neutral position.
  • Repeat 5 to 6 times every hour.
  • The exercise can be done in the opposite direction.

Neck rolls

Forward head posture, aka text neck, can develop. Neck rolls are recommended throughout the day.

  • Lean your head towards the right shoulder.
  • Relax the neck and let your head roll towards your chest.
  • Continue rolling your head towards the left and up and around back to the starting position.
  • Perform at least 3-4 neck rolls every few hours.
  • Repeat the exercise and change direction.

Trapezius stretch

The trapezius is a major muscle group in the upper-middle section of the back and the neck. The trapezius is responsible for moving the shoulder blades and extending the neck. Stretching these muscles regularly will help maintain good posture.

  • Sit in your chair with the spine straight and feet flat on the ground.
  • Place the right hand over the top of your head.
  • Gently pull your head towards the right shoulder.
  • Perform one to three times for each side.
  • Hold the pose for 30 to 60 seconds.

Arm rotations

This exercise can help maintain back and shoulder alignment. This can be performed sitting or standing.

  • Stretch out the arms to the sides with palms facing downward.
  • While keeping the spine straight, move the arms in small circles.
  • Perform ten repetitions rotating the arms forward, then backward.
  • Perform 3-4 sets.

Doing these posture exercises at your workstation regularly will help improve and maintain proper posture and minimize the risk of back, neck, and shoulder pain.


Body Composition


Fitness for Long-Term Health

Muscle building isn’t only for bodybuilders and athletes. Everyone can benefit from building their Lean Body Mass for long-term health. It is crucial to monitor Lean Body Mass changes by having body composition measured. Body composition analysis divides the body’s weight into various components.

  • Fat Mass
  • Lean Body Mass
  • Basal Metabolic Rate
  • This will give a clearer picture of overall fitness and health.

Building Lean Body Mass is an investment in the body’s future. The more LBM that is built, the more is in reserve when the body needs it. But before adding protein shakes and resistance workouts to the daily regimen, there needs to be a plan. The first step to building healthy lean body mass is to measure how much there is with a body composition analysis.

References

Biswas A, Oh PI, Faulkner GE, et al. Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults. Ann Intern Med. 2015;162:123-132. doi:10.7326/M14-1651. Accessed January 7, 2017.

Ergonomics for Prolonged Sitting. UCLA Spine Center Web site. spinecenter.ucla.edu/ergonomics-prolonged-sitting. Accessed January 7, 2017.

Florido R, Michos E. Sitting Disease: Moving Your Way to a Healthier Heart. U.S. News & World Report. health.usnews.com/health-news/patient-advice/articles/2015/09/14/sitting-disease-moving-your-way-to-a-healthier-heart. Published September 14, 2015. Accessed January 7, 2017.

Fortner, Miles O et al. “Treating ‘slouchy’ (hyperkyphosis) posture with chiropractic biophysics®: a case report utilizing a multimodal mirror image® rehabilitation program.” Journal of physical therapy science vol. 29,8 (2017): 1475-1480. doi:10.1589/jpts.29.1475

Levine JA. What are the risks of sitting too much? Mayo Clinic Web site. www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/expert-answers/sitting/faq-20058005. Published September 4, 2015. Accessed January 7, 2017.

O’Connor B. Sitting Disease: The New Health Epidemic. The Chopra Center Web site. www.chopra.com/articles/sitting-disease-the-new-health-epidemic. Accessed January 7, 2017.

Wolfe, Robert R. “The underappreciated role of muscle in health and disease.” The American journal of clinical nutrition vol. 84,3 (2006): 475-82. doi:10.1093/ajcn/84.3.475

Chiropractic Wrist and Hand Adjustments

Chiropractic Wrist and Hand Adjustments

The hands are used for all kinds of tasks/chores day and night. Using the hands requires the wrists. When wrist pain presents, it can make life unbearable, causing individuals to make all kinds of awkward and unhealthy habits that can worsen and cause further injury. Chiropractic wrist and hand adjustments are recommended for this type of injury. A majority of wrist injuries are the result of micro-stress/repetitive tearing use. Repetitive stress injuries often require a multifaceted treatment approach. This is why chiropractic is so effective, in that it treats the symptoms and the causes to get back to work, school, and normal life quickly.

Chiropractic Wrist and Hand Adjustments

Wrist Tendonitis

Wrist tendonitis happens when a tendon becomes inflamed. This is common among athletes, store workers, clerks, warehouse workers, hair stylists/barbers, etc. Individuals that are constantly using their hands, wrists, and arms have an increased risk of developing tendonitis. And without proper treatment and rest, the inflammation continues and worsens. Chiropractic wrist adjustments for wrist tendonitis include:

  • Diagnosis and assessment.
  • Swelling and pain are alleviated using ice, bracing, ultrasound, laser therapy, and other inflammation-reducing techniques.
  • Once the inflammation has been brought down, massage therapy is incorporated to keep the tendons loose and relaxed.
  • Physical therapy and manual manipulation will restore mobility and flexibility to the wrist.
  • When the pain is completely reduced and mobility is restored, chiropractic wrist adjustments will break down the scar tissue to prevent future injury.
  • The chiropractor will recommend ergonomic tips and exercises to prevent flare-ups.

Wrist Crepitus

Another common issue that can be painful is crepitus, which is a popping, clicking, and/or cracking in the wrist when moving the hand. Different causes depend on the type the popping/clicking/cracking. If it occurs without pain, more than likely, it is the gases escaping from the wrist joint. This is normal and is not something to worry about. However, a chiropractor can help if it becomes burdensome. Another cause is when a tendon extends or contracts over the bone with certain types of movements. This type of popping often results in pain and should be addressed by a professional to prevent further damage. Both issues are commonly treated with wrist adjustments.

Dislocated Wrist

A dislocated wrist needs immediate medical care from the emergency room. The wrist needs to be reset and given time to recover/heal before a chiropractor can work on it to repair any issues that the dislocation caused. There are benefits from chiropractic after a serious wrist injury that includes:

  • Pain relief
  • Function restored
  • Mobility restoration
  • Proper wrist alignment
  • Scar tissue removal
  • Strength training
  • Aching, popping, and cracking relief

Chiropractic Wrist Adjustment

Wrist adjustments depend on the injury/condition that the individual is going through. A chiropractor uses different approaches and techniques that return the joints to the proper alignment. Wrist adjustments are usually done by hand and are gentle. This is because the bones and tendons do not need major force to correct. Chiropractors focus on the wrist the same way they focus on the whole body.

  • They relieve pain and swelling first.
  • They determine what caused the injury.
  • Then focus on strengthening the joint.
  • Develop a prevention regimen to keep it from recurring.

Body Composition


Complete Body Measurement

Getting body composition tested will help progress to optimal health by the results, not the weight scale. Determining progress with metrics like this and lean body mass equips individuals with the knowledge needed to get the results faster and smarter. The quickest and easiest way to determine body composition is to use the InBody. This means focusing on body fat percentage instead of weight. The devices being used today are extremely accurate at giving reliable body fat percentage results. Get a complete readout of your body that includes:

  • Muscle mass
  • Fat mass
  • Body water
  • Body fat percentage

Getting as much information as possible using optimal tests will help with goal planning and achieving optimal health.

References

Hulbert, James R et al. “Chiropractic treatment of hand and wrist pain in older people: systematic protocol development Part 2: cohort natural-history treatment trial.” Journal of chiropractic medicine vol. 6,1 (2007): 32-41. doi:10.1016/j.jcme.2007.02.011

Prasad, Ganesh, and Mustafa J Bhalli. “Assessing wrist pain: a simple guide.” British journal of hospital medicine (London, England: 2005) vol. 81,5 (2020): 1-7. doi:10.12968/hmed.2019.0051

Sadowski, M, and D Della Santa. “Les syndromes douloureux du poignet” [Wrist pain]. Revue medicale suisse vol. 2,92 (2006): 2919-23.

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0161475408002947

Herniated Disc Pain Stretches and Exercises

Herniated Disc Pain Stretches and Exercises

Here are a few recommended stretches and exercises for relieving herniated disc symptoms. The vertebrae are the small bones that make up the spine. They have cushion discs between each one. These are the intervertebral discs and are the body’s shock absorbers. The discs can be thought of as small balloons that are filled with an elastic gel-type material. There are twenty-three of these cushions.

Functioning as the body’s shock absorbers transferring various forces, weight, and stress from vertebra to vertebra, so that no one is overburdened taking on all the impact the body goes through. But like any machine, the discs can wear down over time, and sustain injury. When this happens the cushioning gel can leak out and press on the nerve roots emerging from the spine. This type of injury is a herniated disc.11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 El Paso, TX. Herniated Disc Pain Stretches and Exercises

Herniated Disc Treatment

A herniated disc can lose its height because of fluid and water loss.

This loss affects the bone structures bringing them closer together affecting the ligaments that connect each segment. The ligaments become loose and do not provide the same stability. Ligaments cannot be strengthened with exercise making it more important to strengthen the muscles around the spine to make up for this stability loss. Depending on the severity of the injury, the displaced disc can cause pressure to build upon the nerves, resulting in pain and other discomforts. This comes from the loss of the disc’s cushion causing the vertebrae to rub against each other. Stretches and exercises designed for herniated discs can work in conjunction with conservative treatment to relieve the pain and discomfort.

Stretches and Exercises for Pain Relief

Consult a medical spine specialist/chiropractor before beginning a stretch and exercise regimen. This is because the herniation can become worse or additional injury/s can occur without proper instruction. Once the injury and clinical considerations have been addressed, gentle stretches and exercises can help reduce the pain and other symptoms. Strengthening the back and hamstring muscles reduces pressure on the spinal column helping to prevent pain and promotes healing by:

  • Increasing blood flow to the spine
  • Building strength to support the spinal muscles
  • Decreases stress on the spine
  • Helps relieve the pain
  • Improves abnormal postures and awkward body positions

Equipment is not necessary but there are few items that can help the process.

  • Yoga mat for hard floors
  • A resistance band, a towel will work
  • Yoga blocks
  • Stable upright chair
  • Stopwatch/Timer a phone timer will work

Cervical/Neck Stretches and Exercises

A herniated disc in the neck is usually caused by a forward head posture and a swayback or excessive curvature of the spine.

Isometric hold

  • Sit straight
  • Relax the shoulders
  • Place one hand on the forehead
  • Push head into the hand without moving the head
  • Hold for 5 to 15 seconds.
  • Repeat 15 times

Chin tuck

  • Lie on your back on a flat surface
  • Place arms at sides
  • Tuck the chin in and down toward the chest until a stretch is felt
  • Hold for 5 to 10 seconds
  • Repeat 15 to 20 times

Lumbar/Low Back Stretches and Exercises

Back flexion stretch

This stretch extends the back muscles to relieve low back pain.

  • Lie flat on your back
  • Pull the knees toward the chest and wrap your arms around the knees
  • Lift head straight up off the floor until there is a stretch across the mid and low back
  • Hold for 10 seconds
  • Repeat 5 to 10 times

Piriformis stretch

This stretches the small muscle in the buttocks helping to relieve low back pain and helps with sciatica.

  • Lie flat on your back on the floor or yoga mat
  • Bend the knees
  • Plant feet on the floor
  • Pick up one leg and rest the ankle on the other leg’s bent knee
  • Reach one arm through the leg and use both hands to grasp the bent leg
  • Pull the leg toward the chest until there is a stretch in the buttock
  • Hold for 30 seconds
  • Repeat on the other leg

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 El Paso, TX. Herniated Disc Pain Stretches and Exercises

Prone extension stretch

This stretch helps reposition the disc back to its proper position, expediting the healing process. Start slowly and if pain presents, stop immediately.

  • Lie face down on the floor or yoga mat
  • Place the forearms on the floor next to the body
  • The elbows should be at a 45- degree angle
  • Slowly prop the body up, being sure to keep the hips on the floor
  • Keep pressing upward until the elbows are at a 90-degree angle
  • Hold the position for 10-15 seconds
  • Return to  starting position
  • Repeat the stretch 10 times
  • Gradually increase the upward position hold time until it can be maintained for 30 seconds

 

Performing these stretches and exercises or similar types will help with herniated injury recovery and prevent worsening or creating new injuries.


Body Composition


Benefits of yoga

Yoga benefits mental and physical health. Yoga helps improve individual physical health. Specific poses can help:

  • Improve balance
  • Flexibility
  • Build/Tone muscle
  • Prevent injury
  • Improve sense of well-being

Yoga stretches the muscles while relieving physical and emotional stress. Practicing yoga regularly can prevent obesity, and reduce the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Yoga can help decrease leptin which is a hormone that helps control appetite. This is important for individuals going through chronic stress who are twice as likely to develop metabolic syndrome.

Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, CTG*
email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com
phone: 915-850-0900
Licensed in Texas & New Mexico

References

Court C, Mansour E, Bouthors C. Thoracic disc herniation: Surgical treatment, Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research, 104(1)S31-@40, 2018, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877056817303419.

Nerve Flossing Exercises for Sciatica

Nerve Flossing Exercises for Sciatica

Traditional medical treatment for sciatica can sometimes be not as effective or ineffective for individuals, but nerve flossing is an option that could help. Flossing is not something individuals expect to hear from a medical professional treating their sciatica. However, when sciatica does not respond to common treatment methods like light physical activity or medications, a physician, chiropractor, or physical therapist might suggest combining traditional treatment with nerve flossing to alleviate sciatic nerve pain.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Nerve Flossing Exercises for Sciatica

Nerve Flossing

The nerves can get jammed/stuck between the tissues and are not able to move, flex as they should. Nerve flossing involves performing gentle exercises to mobilize and stretch the nerves that help reduce irritation, inflammation, and improve mobility, especially in the hips. Nerve flossing is also known as:

The exercises can be done at home with no equipment and simple instructions. When used in combination with other treatments, like chiropractic and physical therapy the effectiveness is increased. Consult with a doctor or doctor of chiropractic for an accurate diagnosis, because what is causing sciatica helps significantly to determine the best treatment plan.

Guidelines

These are simple exercises but they are still exercises that require following safety guidelines to prevent injury or pain. These include:

  • The body will need time to adjust to new exercises so individuals should start slow
  • Only a few repetitions should be done at a time
  • Gradually increase
  • Stop if pain presents with any of the exercises and report the pain to a doctor or chiropractic physical therapist to see if there is a problem with how the exercises are being performed or if the exercises should be done later on after further treatment.
  • Focus on staying relaxed, as tensing up the muscles decreases the effectiveness
  • Breathing properly is key. Individuals unknowingly stop breathing when doing exercises, which is not healthy. Breathe deep in and out.

Nerve Exercises

True nerve flossing is an active movement with motion otherwise, it is just stretching.

Mobilizing floss

  • Lie on the floor with both knees bent, feet flat on the floor, and with space at hip-width
  • A flat pillow can be used for the head if it makes it more comfortable
  • Tuck the chin in and be sure to keep the upper body relaxed throughout the exercise
  • Pull the right leg in towards the chest
  • Keep holding behind the right knee
  • Slowly straighten the leg until there is a comfortable stretch
  • Slowly return the knee to the starting position
  • Breathe deeply, slowly, and try not to press the lower back into the floor
  • Lower the leg back towards the chest then lower it back to the starting position
  • Perform with the left leg
  • Complete five repetitions on each side
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Nerve Flossing Exercises for Sciatica

Seated nerve floss

  • Sitting upright in a chair, knees spaced hip-width, feet flat on the floor, and face forward
  • Extend the left leg
  • Flex the foot toward the body
  • Extend the head up and back looking up at the ceiling
  • Gently lower head and leg down, tucking the chin into the chest while bending the leg slightly backward
  • Extend and lower head at the same time when extending and lowering the leg
  • Perform 10 repetitions
  • Switch legs and repeat the exercise
  • Perform exercise 2–3 times every day

Hamstring floss

  • Stand up straight, raise the right leg onto a step or other stable surface while keeping the leg straight and toes pointed up
  • Keeping the back straight, tilt the head and neck forward until there is a slight pull/stretch in the back
  • Point the toe and bring the chin to the chest
  • Flex the foot and return
  • Repeat five times
  • Return to starting position
  • Switch legs
  • Repeat three sets on each leg
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Nerve Flossing Exercises for Sciatica

Exercise for Piriformis Syndrome

The piriformis muscle joins the base of the spine to the upper leg. Because this muscle is so close to the sciatic nerve, any type of irritation or compression of the sciatic nerve can also cause piriformis syndrome. Piriformis syndrome can cause radiating pain to the:

  • Hips
  • Buttocks
  • Hamstrings
  • Pain when sitting down or walking upstairs

Nerve flossing can also help relieve the symptoms increasing flexibility and range of motion.

Mobilizing stretch

  • Lie flat on the floor on the back
  • Extend both legs
  • Bend the right leg and bring it up
  • Hold the right knee and foot
  • While holding, gently pull the leg across the right side of the body and up toward the right shoulder
  • Return to the original position
  • Repeat five times
  • Gently lower the right leg
  • Switch legs
  • Complete five repetitions on each side two to three times a day

Risks

These exercises are not about pushing the body to its limits or in a way that causes pain. They are designed to rehabilitate, stretch, and strengthen the sciatic nerve making risks for further injury minimal. If there are still concerns about the safety of nerve flossing exercises, check with a doctor, doctor of chiropractic, or physical therapist. If there is severe nerve damage or undiagnosed acute pain, nerve flossing could worsen symptoms. Nerve flossing for acute cases of nerve irritation is not recommended as this can cause nerve root aggravation with the stretching/pulling.

Flossing for Sciatica

More research is needed on how nerve flossing can best help sciatica. It is an easy, natural, medication-free treatment that can help soothe irritated and compressed nerves, improve mobility, and flexibility.

Body Composition

Tracing sources of fatigue

There is a difference between being tired after a long day working, playing, etc, and being tired on a regular daily basis. This can be referred to as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, a clinical condition where fatigue lasts longer than 6 months. With acute, non-clinical fatigue, it is typical to experience many of the symptoms that hamper an individual’s ability to function. Symptoms can include:

With hectic schedules, sources of fatigue begin to pile up along with unhealthy diet choices that stem from:

  • No time for a well-balanced breakfast
  • No time, or forgetting to make a healthy lunch equals
  • Fast food patterns
  • Unhealthy snacks

Disclaimer

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the musculoskeletal system’s injuries or disorders. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP, CIFM, CTG*
email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com
phone: 915-850-0900
Licensed in Texas & New Mexico

References

Anikwe EE, Tella BA, Aiyegbusi AI, Chukwu SC: Influence of Nerve Flossing Technique on acute sciatica and hip range of motion, International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research, 4(2) May – August 2015, www.ijmbr.com

Jeong UC, Kim CY, Park YH, Hwang-Bo G, Nam CW. The effects of self-mobilization techniques for the sciatic nerves on physical functions and health of low back pain patients with lower limb radiating pain. J Phys Ther Sci. 2016;28(1):46-50. doi:10.1589/jpts.28.46

Avoiding Back Injuries At Work

Avoiding Back Injuries At Work

High-impact labor jobs can cause back pain, as well as jobs that require sitting all day. Nowadays, everyone is at risk of developing some form of back pain at their place of work. Here are a few tips for avoiding back injuries at work. It does not matter what an individual does for a living, or how it is done. Sitting, standing, lifting, bending, twisting, reaching, pulling, and pushing, all can have a negative impact on the spine’s health and the muscles in the back.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Avoiding Back Injuries At Work
 
According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or OSHA, work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a common reason for missing work or restricting work time. Back pain and injury prevention/avoiding is the goal along with seeking the proper treatment as soon as possible.  

The Risk for Back Pain

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders that affect the spine are a worldwide problem. The World Health Organization has stated in the United States that there is an estimated 149 million workdays lost every year because of back pain, with total costs estimated to be around 100-200 billion a year. And the World Health Organization identified low back pain as the leading cause of disability in the world. The National Institute for Occupations Safety and Health, which is a division of the CDC, listed five primary risk conditions for work-related musculoskeletal disorders:
  • Regularly lifting of objects
  • Regular exposure to whole-body vibration like using a jackhammer or driving a forklift
  • Regular reaching overhead work
  • Working with the spine in a chronic flexion position
  • Repetitive work/tasks
 

Office Back Pain

Individuals that stare at screens most of the day means their spines are at risk for cervical spinal flexion. This can lead to neck, shoulder, and upper back pain. And sitting for long bouts of time with poor posture adds tremendous pressure and weight on the low back. When the body is seated for a long time, the body is not utilizing its core abdominal muscles and back muscles that keep the body and foundation strong and flexible. The more these muscles are under-utilized the more the body begins to fall into the vicious cycle of slouching, slumping, poor posture, and increased stress on the back muscles.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Avoiding Back Injuries At Work
 

Avoiding Back Injury

With advancements in medicine, there are solutions for relieving pain and getting an individual back to regular work activity. Basic ways for avoiding injuries and keeping the spine healthy.
  • Lifting with the legs and not the back
  • Maintaining healthy weight
  • Healthy diet
  • Stretching before physical activity and also during work will keep the muscles active and optimal circulation
  • Overall physical fitness like taking a walk
  • Knowing when to rest giving the body a break
  • Focus on recovery during off-hours

Working with Spine Specialists

If the pain is constant or there is a high possibility of an injury, see a medical professional. The correct diagnosis leads to the right treatment, which can include:
  • Rest
  • Physical therapy
  • Chiropractic
  • Pain management
  • Medication
  • Injections
  • Surgery
 
There is no one-size-fits-all approach. Every individual will have a personalized treatment plan. A multi-approach is recommended, and the most therapeutic for long-term benefits. One treatment option to be very cautious about is opioids. A review in BMJ suggests opioids do not help individuals get back to work faster, and pain control is only short-term. Back pain inflammation is better addressed through anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy, and exercise. If pain or a back problem currently exists, see a doctor, chiropractor, or spine specialist and find out about treatment options and avoiding back problems.

Body Composition


 

How Aging Affects the Body

The body’s muscles are constantly being broken down and repaired. When the muscles are used, microscopic tears happen from the regular wear and tear. This means rebuilding those tears with protein. However, as the body gets older, it stops rebuilding the muscles as efficiently. With time, there is a reduction in overall muscle mass and strength. That loss can come from a combination of factors including:
  • Hormone changes – for example, testosterone gradually decreases
  • Physical inactivity
  • Comorbid conditions like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer
But this reduction in muscle mass doesn�t just happen to the elderly. Research has shown that strength and development in an individual’s 20s peaks and begins to plateau in their 30s. For many, decreased strength translates to being less active, and routine activities become more difficult to execute. Inactivity means fewer calories burned, muscle development decrease, and negative changes to body composition including muscle loss, and percent body fat increase.  

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*  
References
�Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders & Ergonomics.� Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.�www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/health-strategies/musculoskeletal-disorders/index.html OSHA Technical Manual,�Section VII, Chapter 1: Back Disorders and Injuries. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.�www.osha.gov/dts/osta/otm/otm_vii/otm_vii_1.html#3 �Cervical spine joint loading with neck flexion.��Ergonomics. January 2020.�pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31594480/ �Back to Health.��Safety & Health.�The National Safety Council, Itasca, IL.�www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/18897-back-to-health
Body Awareness, Position, Movement, and Chiropractic Adjusting

Body Awareness, Position, Movement, and Chiropractic Adjusting

Individuals do not have a poor posture on purpose. It becomes a habit that just goes on until discomfort or pain present. Body awareness is known as proprioception. Proprioception is known as muscle sense or joint position sense. This is the subconscious nature of the body’s understanding of its position in space and the ability to position ourselves comfortably. Achieving proper and healthy posture means there needs to be a constant mindset of staying aware of how the body is positioned. Then regular adjustments of body position are required to maintain healthy body awareness and from getting into bad habits. To illustrate this consider walking forward in complete darkness. The body knows its relative position even without seeing and understands its existence in space. This is a function of the brain.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Body Awareness, Position, Movement, and Chiropractic Adjusting
 
It is part of the subconscious and so have little to no control over it. Because of this individuals begin to lapse into poor poster habits. An example tilting the head when looking forward or all the way down when checking the phone. Over time, these bad habits contribute to spinal misalignment. This is where chiropractic can help individuals realize their proprioception tendencies and actively relearn and strengthen positive body awareness and break away from negative postural habits.  

Body Awareness Habits

Laying the groundwork for correction of body awareness involves understanding the body’s unconscious habits and the damage that is occurring. Chiropractic is highly effective for outlining what is happening with the help of radiological imaging and spinal curvature benchmarks. Once an individual begins to understand how their posture and spine health are being affected, they can make adjustments to combat this. This requires constant vigilance by the individual to actively realize and correct proprioception.  
 

Optimal Body Exercises

For individuals that have engaged in dysfunctional habits for years, a chiropractor may recommend optimal loading exercises. This process involves teaching how to better balance the body for optimal posture development. For example, a chiropractor will have a patient strengthen a weak leg that is shifting the body’s weight to the other dominant leg that results in unbalanced weight distribution causing hip and back pain. Another example of optimal loading may include executing a series of motions/movements with the non-dominant side. The goal of optimal loading is to train the brain to balance the body in a healthier fashion, instead of reverting to a bad habit.  
11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Body Awareness, Position, Movement, and Chiropractic Adjusting
 

Ergonomics

Ergonomics can also help correct dysfunctional proprioception. They can help to address specific defaults of the subconscious. For example, the positioning of a computer screen at the correct height and angle can improve the habit of turning or tilting the head. Another example is utilizing custom foot orthotics to balance the feet and prevent pronation. A chiropractor can determine exactly where the ergonomic intervention will have a significant effect in correcting dysfunctional proprioception.  
 

Chiropractic Relief

Chiropractic postural adjustments, optimal loading exercises, and ergonomics are all recommended tools in rehabilitating and preventing bad posture habits. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic will explore every possible approach to help patients understand and overcome the body�s bad habits, and help them achieve optimal spine health.

Body Composition


 

Muscles get weaker with too much sitting

When sitting the gluteal muscles, abdominal muscles, and legs become dormant. Sitting for extended periods day after day causes these muscles to begin to degenerate. Metabolism is linked with body composition. Having more muscle increases metabolism and helps the body burn more calories. Any muscle loss, especially from the lower body which is the largest muscle group, can lead to progressive fat gain if the diet is not adjusted. With time gradual muscle loss from the lower body can hurt functional strength, and older age increases the risk of falls and affects the quality of life.  

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*  
References
Corliss J. Too much sitting linked to heart disease, diabetes, premature death. Harvard Health Blog. www.health.harvard.edu/blog/much-sitting-linked-heart-disease-diabetes-premature-death-201501227618. Published January 22, 2015. Accessed January 7, 2017. Ergonomics for Prolonged Sitting. UCLA Spine Center Web site. spinecenter.ucla.edu/ergonomics-prolonged-sitting. Accessed January 7, 2017. Florido R, Michos E. Sitting Disease: Moving Your Way to a Healthier Heart.�U.S. News & World Report. health.usnews.com/health-news/patient-advice/articles/2015/09/14/sitting-disease-moving-your-way-to-a-healthier-heart. Published September 14, 2015. Accessed January 7, 2017.
Easiest Exercises on The Spine and Back Muscles

Easiest Exercises on The Spine and Back Muscles

When lower back pain presents many want to retreat to the couch, bed and just lay down, but doctors, chiropractors, physical therapists, and spine specialists do not recommend this course of action. What they do recommend, other than treatment, is to engage in the easiest forms of exercise on the spine and back muscles. �

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Easiest Exercises on The Spine and Back Muscles

Staying sedentary is one of the worst things an individual can do to their back. When the back is aching exercise can usually help. This is because the muscles, ligaments, tendons are being stretched and not just staying still, which lets inflammation build up and swell. Moving keeps the blood flowing, allowing for broader healing and recovery.

However, back pain relief can be a challenge. Various treatment options exist because there are a variety of causes. The key is figuring out which type is best for each individual and their specific condition. An individual needs to know the cause of their type of back pain, as this determines which exercises should or should not be doing. The Pain and Therapy journal evaluated some of the best exercises for lower back pain. �

Physical Therapy Exercises

The McKenzie method can be very effective for acute disc herniation pain and sciatica. This type of exercise is to figure out if there is a specific position that helps the pain become centralized, correct any motion restrictions, and take the pressure off the region that is compressed or inflamed. Physical therapists incorporate McKenzie exercises as part of regular treatment. The strength-building moves are designed to help support the spine and consist of range-of-movement work and sustained positions.

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Easiest Exercises on The Spine and Back Muscles

Home and Studio Workouts

Pilates is one of the easiest exercises for individuals with chronic low-back pain. Like McKenzie exercises, it utilizes sustained positions that strengthen the trunk/core muscles. The muscles are strengthened using small movements. Using the machine called a reformer, has built-in support for the spine. This is considered a low-key, muscle-toning workout that can ease chronic back pain. �

Water Exercise

Water exercises lessen the body’s weight, taking pressure/stress off the spine. Deep-water running with the water at shoulder-height can significantly improve low-back pain. In a study, a group of overweight/obese women worked out twice a week for an hour-long exercise session. After 12 weeks, improvements in pain intensity, personal care, sitting, standing, and sleeping were reported. �

Easiest Office Exercise

One of the easiest exercises is walking. It is great for the body. But the key is to walk more than usual around the office, or wherever work is. This is not about getting the heart rate up. It is about not staying in the same position for too long. When sitting and focused, an individual can stay in an uncomfortable position for some time and just push through it in an attempt to finish up the work.

Using a timer or an application that alerts every hour to get up and stretch is highly beneficial. Walk correctly to the bathroom, or just get up and walk around for a bit gets the blood pumping through the body and the muscles in motion stretching and contracting. �

Stabilization Exercise

Strengthening workouts can be done at home.

  • Stretch while standing against the wall bringing the arms up and down.
  • Pull the elbows down into the back, which stops the hyperactive trapezius from tensing up.
  • Knee to the chest motion while lying on the back
  • Abdominal crunches while balance on an exercise ball
  • Push the head back into the headrest while driving. This helps avoid the forward head posture.

Contact a doctor, chiropractor, or physical therapist that can recommend the best stabilization exercises for the specific pain/condition. �

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 Easiest Exercises on The Spine and Back Muscles

Tai Chi and Qigong

Tai Chi and Qigong are gentle exercises where an individual performs slow, controlled movements emphasizing balance and focus. Both can reduce pain, disability, and other symptoms associated with lower back pain. �


Body Composition Testimonial


 

Exercise After Childbirth

Physical activity for pregnant and post-birth, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends the following. The easiest exercise routines can be resumed gradually after pregnancy, once a doctor confirms it is medically safe, depending on the delivery, and the presence or absence of medical complications.

  • Pelvic floor exercises could be initiated in the immediate postpartum period.
  • Regular aerobic exercise in lactating women has been shown to improve cardiovascular fitness without affecting milk production, composition, or infant growth.
  • Nursing women should consider feeding their infants before exercising in order to avoid exercise discomfort.
  • Nursing women also should ensure proper hydration before engaging in physical activity.
  • Take it slow.

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*

References

Pain and Therapy. (2020) �Rehabilitation for Low Back Pain: A Narrative Review for Managing Pain and Improving Function in Acute and Chronic Conditions.��link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40122-020-00149-5

Spine.�(2016) �Pilates for Low Back Pain: Complete Republication of a Cochrane Review.��pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26679894/

Sacroiliac Joint Stretches and Exercises for Pain Relief

Sacroiliac Joint Stretches and Exercises for Pain Relief

A doctor, chiropractor, or physical therapist could recommend therapeutic stretches along with exercises as part of a sacroiliitis or sacroiliac joint pain treatment plan. Sacroiliitis refers to inflammation in one or both of the sacroiliac joints. This could be caused by:
  • Pregnancy
  • Injury
  • Infection
  • Arthritis
  • Ankylosing spondylitis
Sacroiliac joint pain is a symptom related to sacroiliac joint dysfunction. The symptoms of sacroiliitis and sacroiliac joint pain can be felt in the lower back, buttocks, hips, and legs. These symptoms can be similar to sciatica and can mimic other lower back disorders.  
 
Blog Image  Treating Sacroiliac Diagram
 
Some of the stretches and exercises included are common for treatment plans for various low back conditions/problems. Talk with a chiropractor or doctor to get their recommendation prior to starting any exercise or stretching program.

Stretches

Piriformis stretch

The piriformis muscle extends over the hip and can aggravate the sacroiliac joint when it becomes tight. To help stretch the muscle:
  • Lie on back with knees bent
  • Feet flat on the floor
  • Slowly raise the right leg
  • Bring the right knee toward chest
  • Gently pull the leg in until there is a comfortable stretch in the buttock
  • Exhale during the stretch movement
  • Hold the stretch for 30 seconds
  • Lower leg
  • Repeat on the left leg
  • Repeat each side 3 times daily, as needed
The stretch helps the muscle fibers to lengthen/elongate and relax.  
 

Trunk rotation

Trunk rotation increases flexibility in the low back and hips. This can help relieve pressure on the sacroiliac joints. To do this stretch:
  • Lie on back with knees bent
  • Feet flat on the floor
  • With knees together
  • Slowly rotate to one side
  • Feet, hips, and back should stay on the floor
  • Hold 3-5 seconds
  • Move knees to the opposite side
  • Repeat 5-10 times on each side
 

Bridge

This is a stretch that strengthens the muscles in the lower back, buttocks, and hips.
  • Lie on back with arms at side
  • Knees should be bent, and feet flat on the floor
  • Slowly raise hips while squeezing buttocks and hamstrings
  • Hold raised position for 5 seconds
  • Repeat 10 times
11860 Vista Del Sol Ste. 128 Sacroiliac Joint Stretches and Exercises for Pain Relief
 

Water Therapy and Yoga Exercises

Aquatics and yoga are a gentle and natural form of exercise that is recommended for staying active. Talk to a doctor before starting any exercise program. Aquatic therapy, known now as hydrotherapy/water therapy, is one of the gentlest forms of exercise and is highly effective. Exercising in water creates an almost weightless environment without gravity. Hydrotherapy uses the resistance from the water to improve strength and flexibility without straining the muscles. Regular exercise can cause pain by placing added pressure on the sacroiliac joints. Water therapy conditions the spine and hip muscles without generating muscle stress. Another option for individuals with back pain is yoga. The following poses are recommended and beneficial for the sacroiliac joints:

Child�s pose

This pose stretches the hips and thighs and is a great yoga pose for beginners.  
11860 Vista Del Sol Ste. 128 Sacroiliac Joint Stretches and Exercises for Pain Relief
 

Cobra

Cobra pose can help strengthen and stabilize the sacroiliac joints.
  • Lie flat on the stomach
  • Hands beneath the shoulders
  • Slowly push up as far as the arms extend
  • Bring upper body off the ground
  • Keep the pelvis and legs on the floor
  • When extended, be sure low back and buttocks are relaxed
  • Hold for 15 to 30 seconds
  • Gently lower to the floor
 

Triangle pose

Triangle pose helps to strengthen the sacroiliac joints and makes them less susceptible to pain. However, this pose involves twisting, so make sure to do this pose only when the joints are stable and pain-free.  
 

Before stretching and exercise

Before starting any stretching or exercise program, check with a doctor or chiropractor, if the joints are able then the stretching/exercise could begin right away. However, in most cases, a doctor will refer the patient to a physical therapist or chiropractor to create a customized exercise and stretching plan. The therapist will show exactly what activities will strengthen the joints and how to do them properly and safely. These movements can help condition the spinal and abdominal muscles. This can help prevent future episodes of back pain. If an individual just had surgery for sacroiliac joint pain, the surgeon more than likely prescribed a customized rehabilitation stretching/exercise program. Follow instructions, and get the surgeon�s approval before engaging in anything outside of the plan.

Staying fit safely

When dealing with sacroiliac joint dysfunction or sacroiliitis, physical activity may need to be redefined after treatment. As regular exercise could mean strenuous activity and could do more damage. Exercises like heavy weightlifting, contact sports, and intense biking could place excessive pressure on the joints. A doctor or chiropractor will offer the best stretching and exercises for every individual. Physical activity combined with gentle stretching and conditioning exercises can effectively reduce low back and hip pain. Talk to a doctor, chiropractor, or physical therapist about incorporating healthy exercise into a daily regimen. For some, the workout might not feel like there’s anything going on, but the effects on the pain will be.

Chiropractic Hip Pain Treatment

 
 

Dr. Alex Jimenez�s Blog Post Disclaimer

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, and sensitive health issues and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate and support directly or indirectly our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation as to how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900. The provider(s) Licensed in Texas& New Mexico*